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Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
Grafting budding
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Grafting budding

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Grafting Budding …

Grafting Budding
Fruit and Vegetable Science
K. Jerome

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
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Transcript

  • 1. Budding
  • 2.
    • T-bud graft most common budding method for fruits, ornamental plants
    • Single bud inserted into
    • T-shaped opening in bark of actively growing rootstock
  • 3.
    • T-budding fast by experienced propagators--2,000 to 3,000 roses in day
    • Because T-budding uses single bud, makes best use of propagation materials
  • 4.
    • Materials:
    • grafting knife
    • budsticks
    • grafting strips
  • 5. Budsticks
    • Source of buds that will be scions (shoot of new tree)
    • Branches that developed in last growing season
  • 6. Budsticks
    • should be healthy
    • diameter of pencil  
    • collected when fully dormant --no later than February in the Midwest.
  • 7. Rootstock
    • Root system of grafted tree
    • Rootstocks selected for traits such as dwarfing
    • Ideal rootstock –
    • stem diameter 1/2 to 3/4 inch
  • 8. Method- indoors
    • Rootstocks planted in pots
    • Watered, grown in greenhouse 4 to 6 weeks
  • 9.
    • At time of budding, rootstocks must be actively growing so bark “slips”
    • Slipping - rapidly dividing, thin walled cambium under bark easily separated from wood
  • 10.
    • To prepare rootstock for budding, remove side shoots in lower stem area
  • 11.
    • Holding grafting knife and budstick correctly takes practice
    • Goal: make smooth, clean cut
  • 12.
    • Cut should begin below bud to be removed
    • Bud should be in center of resulting "shield."
  • 13.  
  • 14.
    • Sharp knife
    • Smooth stroke
    • Budstick held close to body
    • Budstick between you and knife
  • 15.
    • Shield about 3/4 inch long
    • 1 to 2 mm thick
    • Bud in middle of shield
  • 16.
    • Bottom view of shield bud
    • Cambium layer greenish line between dark brown bark and the white wood
  • 17. Rootstock
    • On lower stem of rootstock choose smooth region free of axillary buds
    • Push knife into stem until resistance
    • Rock knife back and forth to cut line about 1/3 the way around stem
    • This is top or bottom of "T" cut
  • 18.
    • Cut straight downward from middle of cut about 1 inch to form "T“
    • Use grafting knife to open flaps created by cutting T in stem
  • 19.  
  • 20.
    • Slip lower, rounded end of shield bud into top of T.
    • Push in shield bud until top of shield is flush with top of T.  
    • Push shield firmly against rootstock, close flaps, wrap with grafting strip
  • 21.  
  • 22.
    • Start above bud and wrap grafting strip tightly around stem to cover all parts of shield except bud
    • Tie off strip with knot
    • Wrapping keeps bud in close contact with stock and prevents drying of exposed tissue
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26.
    • Return grafted tree to greenhouse bench
    • In 2 to 3 weeks graft union will form between scion and rootstock
    • When graft union is complete, scion will begin to produce new leaves and use rootstock's root system to obtain water and nutrients
  • 27.  
  • 28.
    • Once bud begins to grow, remove upper part of tree by cutting through the stem about 1/2 inch above scion
  • 29.  
  • 30.
    • Graft union on tree will be evident for several years as "dogleg"
  • 31.
    • Tree should flower and bear fruit in 3 to 4 years
  • 32. Chip budding
    • Used when bark is not slipping – any time
    • Gradually replacing T-bud – ornamentals, fruits
  • 33.
    • Better take, more uniform growth
    • Takes little scion wood – dormant or active
    • Water status not as big an issue
  • 34.
    • Small diameter stems
    • Plants with thin bark – doesn’t slip easily
    • Prepare rootstock same as for T-budding
  • 35.  
  • 36.
    • Usually take in 3-4 weeks
    • Remove tape and allow bud to swell
    • Winter – cut rootstock close to bud
  • 37. Patch budding
    • Rectangular patch of bark taken off rootstock and replaced with patch of same shape
    • Done on trees with thick bark that don't t-bud well - walnuts, pecans
    • Special knives with double blades so accurate with cuts
  • 38. Topworking
    • Several shoots are budded on same tree
    • Done in midsummer when everything active
  • 39. Microbudding
    • T-budding method - done on citrus
    • Everything cut away except bud and tiny bit of wood
    • T-budding done as usual.
  • 40. Aftercare of budded plants
    • Hot-pipe callusing system for bench grafting - graft inserted in pipe where warm water circulates around graft. Rest of plant kept cool and dormant.
    • May bury graft in slightly most peat moss or bark and bottom heat added
  • 41.
    • Planted out in nursery as soon as weather permits, before any growth starts
    • Usually established enough after first year to be transplanted or sold.
  • 42. Planting
    • Bud union just below soil for most ornamentals
    • If rootstock is for dwarfing or disease resistance, put union just above soil because want absolutely no roots from scion
  • 43. Timing for budding
    • Late summer or fall preferred in Wisconsin when done outdoors:
      • wood of good size
      • weather good
      • no storage needed
      • stock and scion not succulent
      • Scion – current season
      • Stock – current season

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