Roles of assistant language teachers and Japanese teachers of English for a successful team-teaching relationship: From a second language acquisition perspective.

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Plenary address at the Hokkaido 2012 ALT Skill Development Conference (Hotel Lifort Sapporo).

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Roles of assistant language teachers and Japanese teachers of English for a successful team-teaching relationship: From a second language acquisition perspective.

  1. 1. December 6, 2012 @ Hotel Lifort SapporoRoles of ALTs and JTEs for a successful team-teaching relationship—From a second language acquisition perspective—Ken Urano, Hokkai-Gakuen University 1
  2. 2. Before we begin...• Please consider this talk as a proposal, rather than a lecture.• Your questions and comments are welcome at any time. 2
  3. 3. About me...• I’m a teacher of English.• I’m a researcher in second language acquisition. 3
  4. 4. About me...• I’m a teacher of English.• I’m a researcher in second language acquisition. 4
  5. 5. Researchers’ roles, teachers’ roles• Researcher • Making guidelines• Teacher • Adapting the guidelines 5
  6. 6. What we knowfrom research 6
  7. 7. We know...• Importance of input • No input, no language learning 7
  8. 8. Importance of input• Limited input sources • Outside the classroom • Textbook• Teachers’ role as a main source of input 8
  9. 9. What about output?• Output is also important, but• Input is crucial. Input (Listening/Reading) Output (Speaking/Writing) 9
  10. 10. What about output?• Output is also important, but• Input is crucial. X Input (Listening/Reading) Output (Speaking/Writing) 10
  11. 11. But... 11
  12. 12. Not all input is good. 12
  13. 13. It’s Greek to me! http://www.flickr.com/photos/dnevill/2402430135/ 13
  14. 14. Comprehensible input 14
  15. 15. By the way... 15
  16. 16. I have two daughters. 16
  17. 17. My daughters’ conversation yesterdayMSR: こんどパフェ食べにいくって! We’re gonna eat some parfait!AKR: パフェ? Parfait?MSR: こんどアイス食べにいくって! We’re gonna eat some ice cream!AKR: アイス! Ice cream! 17
  18. 18. Even a 6-year-old knows how to adjust her talk 18
  19. 19. Speech adjustment• Caretaker speech • a.k.a. motherese, baby talk, etc.• Foreigner talk• Teacher talk 19
  20. 20. Question 20
  21. 21. QuestionHow do you adjust your speech? 21
  22. 22. We know...• Language learning takes place • When learners understand the meaning of the input, and • When they pay some attention to the form, • At the same time. 22
  23. 23. Form-meaning mapping 23
  24. 24. Gestures & visual aids 24
  25. 25. Gestures & visual aids Statue of Liberty 25
  26. 26. Gestures & visual aids http://www.flickr.com/photos/philofphotos/249220155/ 26
  27. 27. Gestures & visual aids• They are useful, but • They need to be used with caution • Because students may not pay attention to the form. 27
  28. 28. Gestures & visual aids Statue of Napoleon http://www.flickr.com/photos/zigazou76/3593523470/ 28
  29. 29. Gestures & visual aids Statue of King Kamehameha http://www.flickr.com/photos/irenetong/2570306240/ 29
  30. 30. Gestures & visual aids Statue of Liberty 30
  31. 31. Gestures & visual aids Statues 31
  32. 32. To simplify or not to simplify... 32
  33. 33. To simplify or not to simplify... • Everybody knows that Mike is diligent.Suppose your students don’t know this word. 33
  34. 34. To simplify or not to simplify...• Everybody knows that Mike is diligent. hard-working 34
  35. 35. Simplification• Replacing difficult items with easy ones. 35
  36. 36. Simplification• The girl who is wearing blue jeans is my sister. There is a girl over there. She is wearing blue jeans. That’s my sister. 36
  37. 37. Simplification• Generally improves comprehension, but• Takes away the chance to learn a new item. 37
  38. 38. Instead of simplifying... 38
  39. 39. Elaborate! 39
  40. 40. Elaboration• Giving additional information to improve comprehension without removing the difficult item. 40
  41. 41. Elaboration• Everybody knows that Mike is diligent, I mean, hard- working. 41
  42. 42. Or... 42
  43. 43. You can interact! 43
  44. 44. Interaction• Everybody knows that Mike is diligent. Do you know what diligent means? (No.) It means hard-working. So, everyone knows Mike is hard- working. 44
  45. 45. We know...• Simplification improves comprehension, but it does not help language learning.• Elaboration does both.• Interaction does both, too. 45
  46. 46. Feedback 46
  47. 47. We know...• Students need to pay some attention to form.• Providing corrective feedback helps increase their awareness. 47
  48. 48. Feedback options• +/- Explicit• +/- Correction 48
  49. 49. Feedback optionsFeedback type Explicit–Implicit CorrectionClarification request Implicit –Recast +Repetition –Elicitation –Metalinguistic clue –Explicit correction Explicit + 49
  50. 50. Clarification requestS: I go to the library yesterday.T: Pardon? 50
  51. 51. RecastS: I go to the library yesterday.T: Oh, you went to the library yesterday. Did you borrow any books? 51
  52. 52. RepetitionS: I go to the library yesterday.T: “I go to the library yesterday”?S: Oh, I went to the library yesterday. 52
  53. 53. ElicitationS: I go to the library yesterday.T: Yesterday, you ...S: ... went to the library. 53
  54. 54. Metalinguistic cluesS: I go to the library yesterday.T: It’s about yesterday, so what tense do you have to use?S: Past tense. I went to the library yesterday. 54
  55. 55. Explicit correctionS: I go to the library yesterday.T: It’s about yesterday, so you have to use the past tense went.S: OK. I went to the library yesterday. 55
  56. 56. Summary 56
  57. 57. Summary• Importance of comprehensible input• Elaboration and interaction to enhance form-meaning mapping• Corrective feedback to increase awareness 57
  58. 58. My last question 58
  59. 59. My last question• How will you incorporate today’s ideas into your teaching? 59

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