Chapter 12-economic-performance-and-diversity

360 views
262 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
360
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 12-economic-performance-and-diversity

  1. 1. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 407 Chapter 12: Economic Performance & Diversity 12.1 Introduction The economic performance & diversity criterion covers effects on the economic performance of the county and effects on the composition of the business base, and particularly the development and growth of new and emerging forms of economic activity. The criterion covers the topic of ‘material assets’ as required by the European Directive and UK Regulations on the environmental assessment of plans and programmes. 12.1.1 Receptor sensitivity to mineral working Mineral working has an important supporting part to play in the county’s economy, by providing the raw materials that are needed to construct and maintain key physical infrastructure including buildings, transport networks and utilities, which businesses and other economically active organisations require in order to undertake their work. The performance of the economy is constantly changing, and the activities of the minerals industry could give rise to temporary and reversible effects (in that shortages of local supply could have implications for the timing and cost of physical development, but would be unlikely to prevent it from going ahead altogether). Minerals resources can be obtained from a range of sources, not just those indigenous to Surrey, and consequently the county’s economy would be moderately sensitive to mineral working. 12.1.2 Relationship to the wider policy context for economic performance & diversity The relationship of the Surrey Minerals Plan to the wider policy context (i.e. other plans and programmes and environmental protection objectives) for the economic performance and diversity receptor is detailed in the first annex to this chapter (Annex 12A). The wider policy context covered in the review is composed of the following policies, plans, programmes and sources of environmental protection objectives listed in Table 12.1. Details have been compiled of the objectives, indicators and targets that have been set in policy, plans and programmes at international, European, national, regional and county levels for the performance and diversity of the economy. Table 12.1: Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity receptor International Report on the World Summit on Sustainable Development: Johannesburg, South Africa 2002 European Sixth Community Environment Action Programme Renewed EU Sustainable Development Strategy 2006. National Enterprise: Unlocking the UK’s Talent (The UK Government’s Enterprise Strategy 2008) Innovation Nation (The UK Government’s Innovation Strategy) 2008 Securing the Future: the UK Government Sustainable Development Strategy Quality of Life Counts – UK Government Sustainable Development Indicators Planning Policy Statement (PPS) 1: Delivering sustainable development Planning Policy Guidance (PPG) 4: Industrial, commercial development & small firms Draft Planning Policy Statement 4 – Planning for Prosperous Economies (2009) PPS 6: Planning for town centres PPS7: Sustainable Development in Rural Areas Minerals Policy Statement 1: Planning & Minerals
  2. 2. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 408 Regional South East Regional Sustainability Framework 2008 The South East Plan: Regional Spatial Strategy for the South East of England Regional Economic Strategy 2006-2016: A Framework for Sustainable Prosperity County Surrey Economic Partnership Economic Strategy 206-2011 (Draft Final Version) Surrey Hills AONB Management Plan 2009 12.2 The State of the County: Economic Performance & Diversity 12.2.1 Economic performance The contributions to the British economy made by individual producers, industries and sectors are measured in terms of their Gross Value Added. For Surrey, in 2002 that figure stood at £21,957 billion (1) . The county’s economy has exhibited a steady annual growth rate of 3.8% since 1982, exceeding the annual trend growth rate of the UK (at 2.5%). Growth was particularly strong and sustained between 1982 and 1988, and from 1992 to 1999. The output of the Surrey economy was forecast to continue growing above the UK trend growth rate during 2003 and beyond. In 2003, the single largest sector in output terms was business services, including activities such as professional services, information technology services, and consultancy. The sector contributed £400 million to the county’s output, almost twice that of the second largest producer in Surrey, the retail sector. The contributions of the manufacturing industries to the total output of Surrey were modest, the largest being the paper, printing and publishing sector which contributed £30 million or 1.5% of total output. The performance of the Surrey economy, relative to other sub-regions in the South East of England is highlighted when the levels of Gross Value Added per head of population are examined. In 2002 Surrey exhibited the third highest level of Gross Value Added per head of population in the South East, with a figure of £20,689. Only Berkshire, with a figure of £25,178 and Milton Keynes, with a figure of £22,139 performed better than Surrey. The average figures for Gross Value Added per head of population for the South East region and the UK for the same year were £17,565 and £15,980 respectively (2) . House prices can provide another useful guide as to the relative performance of the Surrey economy. Data from the Land Registry relating to property sales between April 2004 and June 2004 indicates that the average price of a house in Surrey was £300,647 compared to an average for the South East region of £213,828. 12.2.2 Economic diversity A structural analysis of the economy of Surrey undertaken in 2003 examined the potential of those sectors considered best able to sustain local competitive advantage in terms of both high value output and diverse and high quality employment opportunities (3) . That analysis noted that Surrey provided a particularly strong focus for the knowledge based sectors of the economy, which included the financial and professional services, and research and development. In terms of employment, the banking, financial and insurance services sector accounted for 29% of all employees working within Surrey in 2002, closely followed by the hotel, restaurant and distribution sector at 25% of all employees and the public administration, education and health service providers with 21% of all employees (4) . The future growth of the county’s economy is likely to be based on a continued increase in the demand for the services of the knowledge based and information intensive industries and those sectors that serve the market for ‘experience’ consumerism (e.g. tourism and recreation). 1 NUTS 3 Regional Gross Value Added (1995-2002), 2004, National Statistics: London 2 Region in Figures: South East, 2005, National Statistics: London. 3 Information drawn from a study by ECOTEC Research & Consulting, 2003. 4 The Surrey Economic Audit 2004, Surrey Economic Partnership.
  3. 3. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 409 The high value nature of the Surrey economy is reflected in the presence of a number of large multi- national companies within the county. Clusters and specialist sectors have also developed within the county that are competing effectively in the global market place and exhibit significant potential for future growth and development. Those sectors and clusters include: • Advanced electronics and engineering and air transport (Redhill & Reigate area) • Advanced electrical and electronic engineering research and development (Guildford) • Pharmaceuticals sector (Windlesham in the borough of Surrey Heath) • Biotechnology industry and food research centre of excellence (Leatherhead) Surrey is recognised as being a good place in which to do business, and performs well in respect of the formation and survival of new businesses. Levels of self-employment are relatively high, providing the foundations for the creation and further development of new micro and small businesses. The rates of survival exhibited by businesses that are based in Surrey are slightly higher than those observed across the South East region and the UK as a whole. In Surrey 69.9% of businesses that registered for VAT in 1999 were still trading in 2002 (3 years on), compared with 69.7% for the South East region and 66.5% for the UK (5) . 12.3 Key issues & future challenges for economic performance & diversity The Surrey economy is robust and growing at a rate in excess of that of the UK economy as a whole. The aggregates industry is important to the county’s economy because of its role, alongside the construction sector, in enabling the physical development that is vital for economic growth and development. Surrey’s economy is predicated on the knowledge based and service sector industries, with banking, financial and insurance services accounting for over a quarter of the people who work in the county, followed closely by the hospitality and catering industries. Demand for the services of those sectors, and their role in the county’s economy is expected to continue to grow into the future. The future implications for the minerals industry of continuing changes in the structure of Surrey’s economy include an ongoing need for physical infrastructure, and to safeguard the quality of the county’s environment in view of the growing importance of the tourism and leisure sectors. 12.4 Findings & conclusions for the assessment of the Submission Draft of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD and the Preferred Options Draft of the Restoration SPD The submission draft of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD is composed of six objectives and eighteen policies that set the strategic framework for the production of mineral resources in Surrey between 2009 and 2026. The preferred options draft of the Restoration SPD does not include any policies, but does set out preferred options for the restoration of the silica sand preferred area identified in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD. The working and processing of minerals is an activity that has the potential to give rise to direct and indirect impacts on the performance and diversity of the economy, primarily at the local level. The findings of the SEA and SA for the objectives and policies of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD with respect to the economic performance and diversity receptor are summarised in Table 12.2 5 The Surrey Economic Audit 2004, Surrey Economic Partnership.
  4. 4. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 410 Table 12.2 Assessment Summary for the Minerals Core Strategy DPD Strategically Significant Effects Adverse Beneficial High No objectives or policies No objectives or policies Medium No objectives or policies Objective 1, Objective 2, Objective 3, Policy MC1, Policy MC5, Policy MC6, Policy MC7, Policy MC8, Policy MC9, Policy MC12, Policy MC13 Low No objectives or policies Objective 5, Policy MC15, Policy MC16 Locally Significant Effects (may require EIA at planning application) No objectives or policies No objectives or policies No significant effects Objective 4, Objective 6, Policy MC2, Policy MC3, Policy MC4, Policy MC10, Policy MC11, Policy MC14, Policy MC17, Policy MC18 12.4.1 Summary of main opportunities for beneficial effects The implementation of the policies and delivery of the objectives of the Surrey Minerals Plan will result in the extraction and processing of mineral resources to provide the raw materials that are vital to the functioning of the local, regional and national economies, and particularly the activities of the construction sector. The Minerals Core Strategy DPD identifies sites at which silica sand would be produced (Policy MC8) and brick clay would be extracted and processed (Policy MC9), both of which activities would provide the raw materials required to manufacture a range of products that are important from an economic perspective. The Minerals Core Strategy DPD does not identify sites for the extraction of other non-aggregate minerals or mineral resources, but does identify the circumstances in which building stone might be exploited within the county, which would contribute to economic activity in the minerals and construction sectors at a very local level. 12.4.2 Summary of main enhancement measures The role of the Surrey Minerals Plan is to make provision for the allocation of sufficient areas of land from which mineral resources that are important to the functioning of the economy can be extracted. The demand for mineral resources will be determined by the action of the market and macro-economic forces that are beyond the remit of the MPA to influence. The most significant way in which the Minerals Plan can influence the economy is by ensuring that sufficient landbanks are allocated of the key mineral resources found within Surrey to meet anticipated demand for the lifetime of the Plan. The majority of the mineral resources found within Surrey are important to the economy at the local and regional levels, primarily as a result of their uses within the construction industry (e.g. sand and gravel for concrete and mortar, brick clay for bricks and tiles). The silica sand deposits in the north east of the county within the district of Tandridge are of national important, due to the scarcity in the UK of this important mineral resource, which is vital to the activities of the glass industry. 12.5 Findings & conclusions for the assessment of the Submission Draft of Primary Aggregates DPD & the Preferred Options Draft of the Restoration SPD The submission draft of the Primary Aggregates DPD is composed of three policies that identify the locations in Surrey at which primary aggregate resources, including concreting aggregate and soft sand, will be extracted between 2009 and 2026. The preferred options draft of the Restoration SPD
  5. 5. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 411 does not include any policies, but does set out preferred options for the restoration of the primary aggregate preferred areas identified in the Primary Aggregates DPD. The findings of the SEA and SA for the objectives and policies of the Primary Aggregates DPD with respect to the economic performance and diversity receptor are summarised in Table 12.3 Table 12.3 Assessment Summary for the Primary Aggregates DPD Strategically Significant Effects Adverse Beneficial High No objectives or policies No objectives or policies Medium No objectives or policies Policy MA1, Policy MA2, Policy MA3 Low No objectives or policies No objectives or policies Locally Significant Effects (may require EIA at planning application) No objectives or policies No objectives or policies No significant effects No objectives or policies 12.5.1 Summary of main opportunities for beneficial effects The implementation of the policies and delivery of the objectives of the Surrey Minerals Plan will result in the extraction and processing of mineral resources to provide the raw materials that are vital to the functioning of the local, regional and national economies, and particularly the activities of the construction sector. The Primary Aggregates DPD identifies sites at which concreting aggregate (Policy MA2) and soft sand (Policy MA3) would be produced and, in some cases, processed which would provide the raw materials required to manufacture a range of products that are important from an economic perspective as they meet the needs of the construction industry. 12.5.2 Summary of main enhancement measures The role of the Surrey Minerals Plan is to make provision for the allocation of sufficient areas of land from which mineral resources that are important to the functioning of the economy can be extracted. The demand for mineral resources will be determined by the action of the market and macro-economic forces that are beyond the remit of the MPA to influence. The most significant way in which the Minerals Plan can influence the economy is by ensuring that sufficient landbanks are allocated of the key mineral resources found within Surrey to meet anticipated demand for the lifetime of the Plan. The majority of the mineral resources found within Surrey are important to the economy at the local and regional levels, primarily as a result of their uses within the construction industry (e.g. sand and gravel for concrete and mortar, brick clay for bricks and tiles). The silica sand deposits in the north east of the county within the district of Tandridge are of national important, due to the scarcity in the UK of this important mineral resource, which is vital to the activities of the glass industry. 12.6 Findings & conclusions for the assessment of the Preferred Options Draft of the Aggregates Recycling DPD The preferred options draft of the Aggregates Recycling DPD is composed of three policies that identify the locations in Surrey at which construction, demolition and excavation wastes will be processed to produce recycled aggregates between 2009 and 2026.
  6. 6. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 412 The findings of the SEA and SA for the objectives and policies of the Aggregates Recycling DPD with respect to the economic performance and diversity receptor are summarised in Table 12.4 Table 12.4 Assessment Summary for the Aggregates Recycling DPD Strategically Significant Effects Adverse Beneficial High No objectives or policies No objectives or policies Medium No objectives or policies Policy AR1, Policy AR2, Policy AR3 Low No objectives or policies No objectives or policies Locally Significant Effects (may require EIA at planning application) No objectives or policies No objectives or policies No significant effects No objectives or policies 12.6.1 Summary of main opportunities for beneficial effects The implementation of the policies and delivery of the objectives of the Surrey Minerals Plan will result in the extraction and processing of mineral resources to provide the raw materials that are vital to the functioning of the local, regional and national economies, and particularly the activities of the construction sector. The Aggregates Recycling DPD identifies sites at which temporary and permanent aggregate recycling facilities (Policy AR1 and Policy AR2) would be developed, and requires that proposals for aggregate recycling (Policy AR3) have a demonstrable ability to deliver the maximum achievable range of recycled materials, which activities would provide the raw materials required to manufacture a range of products that are important from an economic perspective as they meet the needs of the construction industry. 12.6.2 Summary of main enhancement measures The role of the Surrey Minerals Plan is to make provision for the allocation of sufficient areas of land from which mineral resources that are important to the functioning of the economy can be extracted. The demand for mineral resources will be determined by the action of the market and macro-economic forces that are beyond the remit of the MPA to influence. The most significant way in which the Minerals Plan can influence the economy is by ensuring that sufficient landbanks are allocated of the key mineral resources found within Surrey to meet anticipated demand for the lifetime of the Plan. The majority of the recycled aggregate resources that would be produced at the allocated sites in Surrey would be important to the economy at the local and regional levels, primarily as a result of their uses within the construction industry (e.g. recycled materials can be used in foundations and as hardcore in place of virgin materials). 12.7 Review of findings & conclusions of previous phases of the SEA & SA of the Surrey Minerals Plan The main findings of the previous stages of the SEA and SA for the policy, objective, strategic and site options that have been considered during the preparation of the Surrey Minerals Plan are presented in the second annex to this chapter of the Environmental Report (Annex 12B). The Annex covers the findings for the policies and objectives included in the submission versions of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD and the Primary Aggregates DPD, and the preferred options version of the Aggregates Recycling DPD and indicates the relationship of those policies and objectives and the earlier versions of the Plan.
  7. 7. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 413 The findings of the SEA and SA for the objectives, core strategy options, policies and policy options and site selection options considered during the earlier stages (2005, 2006 and 2008) of the preparation of the Minerals Plan with respect to the economic performance and diversity receptor are summarised in Table 12.5 Table 12.5 Summary for previous SEA & SA phases for the Economic Performance & Diversity receptor Anticipated Effects Surrey Minerals Plan 2005 - 2006 - Adverse – High strategic significance 2008 - 2005 Policies MD3 & MD14 2006 - Adverse – Medium strategic significance 2008 Policy Option SS3 2005 Objectives 5 & 6, & Policies MC9 & MD15 2006 - Adverse – Low strategic significance 2008 - 2005 - 2006 -Beneficial – High strategic significance 2008 Policy SS1 Silica Sand Site Options 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a & 3b 2005 Objectives 1, 2 & 3, & Policies MD1, MD2, MC3, MC4, MC5, MC6 & MD5 Core Strategy Options 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d,1e, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b & 3c Site Option Scenarios 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7 2006 Objectives 1 & 2, & Policies MC3, MD1, MC4, MC5, MC6, MA1, MA2, MA3, MA4 & MA5Beneficial – Medium strategic significance 2008 Policies MC1, MC2, MC5, MCxx (Brick Clay), MCxx (Oil & gas), MCxx (Gas storage) & MCx (Rail aggregate depots) Policy Options RSA1, SS1, SS2, SS4, SS5, BC1, BC2, BC3, BC4, GS1, GS2, RA1, RA2 & RA3 Silica Sand Site Options 1c & 2b 2005 Objective 4 & Policies MD8, MC1, MC2, MD4, MC8 & MD12 2006 Objective 4 & Policies MC8 & MD4 Beneficial – Low strategic significance 2008 - 2005 Policies MD7, MD9, MD10, MD11, MC7, MD6 & MD13 2006 Objectives 3 & 5, & Policies MD5, MD6, MD7, MC1, MD2, MC2, MA6, MC7, MD3, MC9 & MD8No strategically significant effects 2008 Policy MCxx (Other non-aggregate minerals) Policy Options BS1, BS2, BS3, Ck1, Ck2, Ck3, Ck4, FE1, FE2, FE3, Pt1, Pt2 & OG1 The main conclusion that has been drawn over the course of the SEA and SA process for the Surrey Minerals Plan with respect to the economic performance and diversity receptor has been that the implementation of the Plan through the allocation and subsequent development of sites will provide the raw materials that are essential to the functioning of the economy, and in particular the construction sector. The demands of the economy that mineral working and associated activities must respond to have been addressed within the various iterations of the Minerals Plan through the inclusion of policies that provide for the allocation of sufficient land to provide landbanks of key mineral resources including primary aggregate, brick clay and silica sand.
  8. 8. Assessment for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor – Surrey Minerals Plan DPDs & SPD Key Adverse – low significance Adverse – medium significance Adverse – high significance Beneficial – low significance Beneficial – medium significance Beneficial – high significance Could implementation of the policy affect… Description of risks & opportunities Characterisation of unmitigated risks & opportunities Mitigation & Enhancement Residual (mitigated) risks & opportunities Receptor Economic performance & diversity (Moderate sensitivity) Objective 1: Reduce demand for minerals Growth in the county’s capacity for the recovery and recycling of construction and demolition waste could help to ensure that a level of self-sufficiency for minerals supply is retained over the longer term as indigenous stocks of primary aggregate diminish and the cost of extracting them becomes prohibitive. The scale of the benefits achieved is likely to be modest in the short term, as Surrey has sufficient primary mineral reserves to meet projected demand for the lifetime of the plan although if recycling rates achieve the target proposed for the county by the minerals policies in the regional spatial strategy of 0.8 million tonnes per year by 2016 the projected lifespan of the county’s primary aggregate reserves could be extended. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Objective 2: Safeguard the supply of minerals The commitment to safeguard the county’s reserves of mineral resources from sterilisation by other forms of development should help to ensure that sufficient material (up to 34.06 million tonnes of primary aggregate over the life of the plan and an unspecified volume of other types of mineral resources) is available to meet the needs of the local economy for physical development. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Objective 3: Meet the need for minerals The commitment to maintain landbanks for soft sand (7 years of supply at a production rate of 0.6 million tonnes per year), concreting aggregate (7 years of supply at a production rate of 0.9 million tonnes per year), silica sand (10 years of supply) and brick clay (25 years of supply) at the levels required by the minerals policies in the regional spatial strategy could ensure that supplies of key materials, including primary aggregates, clays and silica sands are maintained at levels adequate to meet the needs of the local and regional economies. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Objective 4: Address adverse impacts from minerals development on communities and the environment No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated during the lifetime of the plan – although the commitment to safeguard (where possible) the county’s environmental asset base (i.e. landscape, nature conservation interest, archaeological and historic interest, etc.) from the adverse impacts of mineral working may be of some benefit at the local level to the tourism, leisure and associated industries. No strategically significant impacts anticipated The MPA has given a commitment (paragraph 6.3 of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to require the screening of all planning applications for mineral developments to determine whether they need environmental impact assessment, which would include consideration of the risk of significant impacts on archaeology and the historic environment, the natural environment and biodiversity and the landscape. The MPA has identified archaeology and the historic environment, the natural environment and biodiversity and the landscape as a key considerations to be taken into account in proposals for mineral working and associated development (Policy MC14 the Minerals Core Strategy DPD). No strategically significant impacts anticipated Objective 5: Address adverse impacts from the transportation of minerals The commitment to minimise the risks of adverse impacts associated with the transportation of mineral and derivative products affords the MPA an opportunity to require operators to take steps that reduce their reliance on road transport as the principal means of getting goods to the market. A drop in the levels of minerals related traffic, and in particular heavy goods vehicles, could help to reduce the incidence of congestion on Surrey’s road network. Avoidable Indirect & Regional Beneficial & Low significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Minimal strategic beneficial effect Objective 6: Restore mineral workings to the highest standards No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated during the lifetime of the plan – although the requirement that areas affected by mineral working be restored would have cost implications, both in terms of the capital outlay associated with the implementation of the agreed restoration plans and the revenue costs associated with ongoing aftercare of the restored sites. No strategically significant impacts anticipated No mitigation or enhancement measures recommended No strategically significant impacts anticipated
  9. 9. Assessment for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor – Surrey Minerals Plan DPDs & SPD Key Adverse – low significance Adverse – medium significance Adverse – high significance Beneficial – low significance Beneficial – medium significance Beneficial – high significance Could implementation of the policy affect… Description of risks & opportunities Characterisation of unmitigated risks & opportunities Mitigation & Enhancement Residual (mitigated) risks & opportunities Receptor Economic performance & diversity (Moderate sensitivity) Core Strategy Policy MC1 – Spatial strategy for mineral development in Surrey The spatial strategy for the minerals plan sets the context for the continued working of primary aggregate, silica sand, and brick clay, the production of oil and gas, and the storage of gas within the county over the period up to 2026. All the minerals that would be produced within the county during the lifetime of the minerals plan have important roles to play in the performance of the local, regional and national economies. The production of sands, gravels and clays provides the raw materials that are required by a wide range of industries, but most particularly the construction industry. Silica sand is a nationally scarce mineral, occurring in very few areas of the country and being necessary for a number of high quality end uses, including the production of specialist medical and scientific equipment. The economy of the UK is still largely carbon based in terms of the types of energy sources that are utilised, and therefore the production of oil and gas and the provision of facilities for the underground storage of gas would make important contributions to the country’s security of energy supply, and consequently to the performance of the economy. Avoidable, Indirect & National & International Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – it would be inappropriate to suggest an increase in minerals extraction over that proposed by the plan, even though such an approach might be beneficial to the performance of the local, regional and national economies. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC2: Spatial Strategy – protection of key environmental interests in Surrey No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated within the lifetime of the plan – although the commitment to seek to avoid mineral working within or close to sites of national or higher level nature conservation or geological interest could help to safeguard the asset base (e.g. landscape, nature conservation interest, archaeological and historical sites and features, etc.) that is crucial to the activities of the tourism, leisure and associated sectors. No strategically significant impacts anticipated The MPA has given a commitment (paragraph 6.3 of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to require the screening of all planning applications for mineral developments to determine whether they need environmental impact assessment, which would include consideration of the risk of significant impacts on archaeology and the historic environment, nature conservation, and the landscape. The MPA has identified the landscape, the natural environment and archaeological and heritage assets as key considerations to be taken into account in proposals for mineral working and associated development (Policy MC14 (iii) Impacts on the…landscape…, Policy MC14 (iv) Impacts on the natural environment and biodiversity, and Policy MC14 (v) Impacts on historic landscapes, sites or structures and their settings and sites of existing or potential archaeological interest and their settings, in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD). No strategically significant impacts anticipated Core Strategy MC3: Spatial Strategy – mineral development in the Green Belt No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated within the lifetime of the plan – although the commitment to seek to avoid mineral working within the Green Belt could help to safeguard the asset base (e.g. landscape, nature conservation interest, archaeological and historical sites and features, etc.) that is crucial to the activities of the tourism, leisure and associated sectors. No strategically significant impacts anticipated The MPA has given a commitment (paragraph 6.3 of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to require the screening of all planning applications for mineral developments to determine whether they need environmental impact assessment, which would include consideration of the risk of significant impacts on archaeology and the historic environment, nature conservation, and the landscape. The MPA has identified the landscape, the natural environment and archaeological and heritage assets as key considerations to be taken into account in proposals for mineral working and associated development (Policy MC14 (iii) Impacts on the…landscape…, Policy MC14 (iv) Impacts on the natural environment and biodiversity, and Policy MC14 (v) Impacts on historic landscapes, sites or structures and their settings and sites of existing or potential archaeological interest and their settings, in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD). No strategically significant impacts anticipated Core Strategy MC4: Efficient use of mineral resources No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated during the lifetime of the plan – a drop in demand for minerals should not give rise to any major adverse effects in terms of economic performance so long as the change in the level of consumption is a consequence of a shift in the efficiency with which materials are used rather than an economic downturn. In the longer term growth in the use of materials efficient construction and manufacturing techniques could be beneficial to the diversity and continued development of the economy, as it could create demand for new knowledge, skills and services. Although the use of borrow pits would facilitate the delivery of major construction projects, it should be noted that those schemes would be likely to proceed even if the use of borrow pits were not feasible, as the necessary mineral resources would be sourced from elsewhere at, perhaps, slightly greater cost. No strategically significant impacts anticipated None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. No strategically significant impacts anticipated
  10. 10. Assessment for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor – Surrey Minerals Plan DPDs & SPD Key Adverse – low significance Adverse – medium significance Adverse – high significance Beneficial – low significance Beneficial – medium significance Beneficial – high significance Could implementation of the policy affect… Description of risks & opportunities Characterisation of unmitigated risks & opportunities Mitigation & Enhancement Residual (mitigated) risks & opportunities Receptor Economic performance & diversity (Moderate sensitivity) Core Strategy Policy MC5: Aggregates recycling The continued operation of existing facilities for the production of recycled and secondary aggregate, and the provision of new permanent and temporary facilities elsewhere in the county would help to maintain supplies of aggregate (providing at least 0.8 million tonnes of material per year) and meet the needs of the construction industry for materials, even in the event of a decline of local production of primary aggregate. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance There is limited scope in terms of the scale of the benefits that the MPA is in a position to deliver in respect of the goal of increasing the market share of recycled and secondary aggregates in construction. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC5 (Aggregates recycling) in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to make provision for the facilities and infrastructure necessary to the supply of secondary and recycled aggregate, but cannot require or enforce the use of such materials. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC4 (Efficient use of mineral resources), in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to work in partnership with the district and borough councils and the construction and development industries to promote and enable a rise in the use of secondary and recycled aggregates. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC6: Safeguarding The commitment to safeguard mineral resources that are currently being worked or that could be worked in the future from sterilisation by other forms of development could ensure the continuity of local supply of key construction materials in the short to medium term enabling the further development and maintenance of the physical infrastructure (e.g. workplaces, transportation networks, telecommunications networks, etc.) that is vital to the functioning of the local economy. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC7: Aggregate minerals supply The commitment to identify sufficient areas of extraction to produce up to 25 million tonnes of primary aggregate over the life of the Plan should ensure that supplies of soft sand and concreting aggregate are maintained at levels adequate to meet the needs of the local and regional economies. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC8: Silica sand The policy makes provision for the extraction of up to 6.2 million tonnes of silica sand from the preferred area at Pendell Farm near Bletchingley, which would support a range of industries. The British Geological Survey’s Minerals Planning Factsheet on Silica Sand advises that the value of UK silica sand sales in 2004 was £67 million and that the industry employed 550 people (in terms of employees subject to the provisions of the Mines & Quarries Act) in the same year. The glass industry is the biggest consumer of silica sand, and in 2004 produced 1.9 million tonnes of container glass with a value of £615 million, and 1 million tonnes of flat glass with a value of more than £265 million. In 2004 the special glass sector produced 200,000 tonnes of glass based products (e.g. lighting, television tubes, oven hobs, specialist medical and technical or scientific products) worth about £200 million, and the glass fibre industry produced an estimated 200,000 tonnes with a sales value of £315 million. Avoidable, Direct & National & International Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – it would be inappropriate to suggest any further increase in silica sand production over that proposed and demand for the resource will be determined by the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC9: Brick clay Provision for the maintenance of a 25 year landbank of brick clay would support the activities of a range of industries. The British Geological Survey’s Minerals Planning Factsheet on Brick Clay advises that the total value of sales of clay-based construction products in 2004 was £632 million, and that the brick clay industry supports the construction industry that in 2005 undertook £107 billion worth of work in the UK. It is not known what proportion of UK total production of bricks, and related products, are manufactured by the brickworks located in Surrey. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – it would be inappropriate to suggest any further increase in brick clay and brick production over that proposed and demand for the resource will be determined by the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect
  11. 11. Assessment for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor – Surrey Minerals Plan DPDs & SPD Key Adverse – low significance Adverse – medium significance Adverse – high significance Beneficial – low significance Beneficial – medium significance Beneficial – high significance Could implementation of the policy affect… Description of risks & opportunities Characterisation of unmitigated risks & opportunities Mitigation & Enhancement Residual (mitigated) risks & opportunities Receptor Economic performance & diversity (Moderate sensitivity) Core Strategy Policy MC10: Other non- aggregate minerals supply No strategically significant risks or opportunities are anticipated during the lifetime of the Minerals Plan – Provision for the future supply of building stone in Surrey would help support the activities of the construction industry, particularly those businesses specialising in the repair and restoration of historic buildings or those working with traditional methods and vernacular materials on new build schemes. It is anticipated that the scale of any economic benefits arising from the provision of local building stone would be modest when placed within the context of the County’s economic performance as a whole. The minerals plan indicates that it is not anticipated that chalk, fuller’s earth or peat would be worked over the plan period. No strategically significant impacts anticipated None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. No strategically significant impacts anticipated Core Strategy Policy MC11: Mineral extraction outside preferred areas No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated during the lifetime of the plan – the policy is unlikely to give rise to the production of substantial volumes of aggregate or other mineral resources and is not likely to be of major benefit to the economy. No strategically significant impacts anticipated None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. No strategically significant impacts anticipated Core Strategy Policy MC12: Oil and gas The development of exploration, appraisal or production facilities for oil and gas within Surrey could give rise to modest economic benefits, as the identification of resources that could be exploited in the longer term and that would contribute to the security of energy supplies would be beneficial to the economy. The scale of any benefit that would be delivered would depend on the extent of the county’s recoverable resources of oil and gas. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – it would be inappropriate for the MPA to set targets for the exploration, appraisal and potential extraction of the county’s oil and gas reserves as demand for the resource will be determined by the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC13: Underground gas storage Fossil fuels remain a mainstay of the global economy as the primary source of energy. The provision of underground storage capacity for natural gas is of considerable importance to the UK’s security of supply as reserves of North Sea gas are depleted. The British Geological Survey’s Mineral Planning Factsheet for Onshore Oil & Gas reports that the UK lags behind fellow members of the EU in terms of its existing capacity for gas storage (the UK has the equivalent of 12 days supply, compared with 91 days for France and 77 days for Germany). Any proposals that would increase domestic capacity for gas storage would have a beneficial effect on the economy. The estimated storage capacity for two potential sites in Surrey identified in the BGS Factsheet is equivalent to 1,775 million m 3 or 1.56% of the 114 billion m 3 consumed by the UK on an annual basis. Avoidable, Direct & National & International Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – it would be inappropriate for the MPA to set targets for the development of gas storage capacity within the county’s stocks of suitable geological structures as demand for such facilities will be determined by Government policy on gas storage capacity and the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy MC14: Reducing the adverse impacts of mineral working No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated during the lifetime of the plan – although the commitment to safeguard (where possible) the county’s environmental asset base (i.e. landscape, nature conservation interest, archaeological and historic interest, etc.) from the adverse impacts of mineral working may be of some benefit at the local level to the tourism, leisure and associated industries. No strategically significant impacts anticipated The MPA has given a commitment (paragraph 6.3 of the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to require the screening of all planning applications for mineral developments to determine whether they need environmental impact assessment, which would include consideration of the risk of significant impacts on archaeology and the historic environment, nature conservation, and the landscape. The MPA has identified the landscape, the natural environment and archaeological and heritage assets as key considerations to be taken into account in proposals for mineral working and associated development (Policy MC14 (iii) Impacts on the…landscape…, Policy MC14 (iv) Impacts on the natural environment and biodiversity, and Policy MC14 (v) Impacts on historic landscapes, sites or structures and their settings and sites of existing or potential archaeological interest and their settings, in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD). No strategically significant impacts anticipated
  12. 12. Assessment for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor – Surrey Minerals Plan DPDs & SPD Key Adverse – low significance Adverse – medium significance Adverse – high significance Beneficial – low significance Beneficial – medium significance Beneficial – high significance Could implementation of the policy affect… Description of risks & opportunities Characterisation of unmitigated risks & opportunities Mitigation & Enhancement Residual (mitigated) risks & opportunities Receptor Economic performance & diversity (Moderate sensitivity) Core Strategy Policy MC15: Transportation The commitment to minimise the risks of adverse impacts associated with the transportation of mineral and derivative products affords the MPA an opportunity to require operators to take steps that reduce their reliance on road transport as the principal means of getting goods to the market. A drop in the levels of minerals related traffic, and in particular heavy goods vehicles, could help to reduce the incidence of congestion on Surrey’s road network. Avoidable, Indirect & Regional Beneficial & Low significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Minimal strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC16: Rail aggregate depots The continued operation of the existing rail aggregate depot at Woking and the upgrading and bringing into operation of the site at Salfords (to the south of Reigate) and the potential for the provision of new facilities elsewhere in the county afforded by the adoption of a criteria based policy would enable the county to maintain sufficient supplies of aggregate (the proposed developments at the Salfords site alone would yield 200,000 to 300,000 tonnes of annual capacity for aggregate import) to meet the needs of the construction industry even in the event of a decline of local production capacity. Avoidable, Direct & Local Beneficial & Low significance No further mitigation or enhancement recommended, the need for further rail aggregate depot capacity will be determined by the demands of the market for mineral resources that cannot be locally won and that need to be imported from outside Surrey. Minimal strategic beneficial effect Core Strategy Policy MC17: Restoration of mineral workings No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated within the lifetime of the plan – although the restoration and ongoing management of former mineral sites would have cost implications in terms of both the initial capital outlay required to deliver the planned restoration scheme, and the revenue costs associated with the management and maintenance of the restored site. No strategically significant impacts anticipated No mitigation or enhancement measures recommended No strategically significant impacts anticipated Core Strategy Policy MC18: Restoration and enhancement No strategically significant risks or opportunities anticipated within the lifetime of the plan – although the restoration and ongoing management of former mineral sites would have cost implications in terms of both the initial capital outlay required to deliver the planned restoration scheme, and the revenue costs associated with the management and maintenance of the restored site. No strategically significant impacts anticipated No mitigation or enhancement measures recommended No strategically significant impacts anticipated Primary Aggregates Policy MA1: Aggregate requirements The commitment to supply up to 25 million tonnes of concreting aggregate and soft sand between 2009 and 2026 should ensure that the majority of the county economy’s needs for primary aggregate are met from local supplies thus enabling the continued physical development that is necessary for economic growth and safeguard the role of the minerals industry as an economic player. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Primary Aggregates Policy MA2: Preferred Areas for concreting aggregate The commitment to supply up to 15 million tonnes of concreting aggregate between 2009 and 2026 should ensure that the majority of the county economy’s needs for such materials are met from local supplies thus enabling the continued physical development that is necessary for economic growth and safeguard the role of the minerals industry as an economic player. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect
  13. 13. Assessment for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor – Surrey Minerals Plan DPDs & SPD Key Adverse – low significance Adverse – medium significance Adverse – high significance Beneficial – low significance Beneficial – medium significance Beneficial – high significance Could implementation of the policy affect… Description of risks & opportunities Characterisation of unmitigated risks & opportunities Mitigation & Enhancement Residual (mitigated) risks & opportunities Receptor Economic performance & diversity (Moderate sensitivity) Primary Aggregates Policy MA3: Preferred areas for soft sand The commitment to supply up to 10 million tonnes of soft sand between 2009 and 2026 should ensure that the majority of the county economy’s needs for such materials are met from local supplies thus enabling the continued physical development that is necessary for economic growth and safeguard the role of the minerals industry as an economic player. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance None recommended – the role of the minerals plan is to provide a framework within which planning permissions can be granted for sufficient mineral workings to meet the current and likely needs of the market for primary aggregates and non-aggregate mineral resources. Future demand can be projected (based on past use and changes in patterns and methods of usage) but cannot be accurately predicted which requires that the minerals plan is sufficiently flexible to respond to the needs of the market. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Aggregates Recycling Policy AR1: Aggregates recycling facilities The provision of new permanent and temporary aggregate recycling facilities at the twelve sites across the county identified in the Aggregates Recycling DPD would help to maintain supplies of aggregate (providing at least 0.8 million tonnes of material per year) and meet the needs of the construction industry for materials, even in the event of a decline of local production of primary aggregate. Avoidable, Direct & Regional Beneficial & Medium significance There is limited scope in terms of the scale of the benefits that the MPA is in a position to deliver in respect of the goal of increasing the market share of recycled and secondary aggregates in construction. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC5 (Aggregates recycling) in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to make provision for the facilities and infrastructure necessary to the supply of secondary and recycled aggregate, but cannot require or enforce the use of such materials. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC4 (Efficient use of mineral resources), in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to work in partnership with the district and borough councils and the construction and development industries to promote and enable a rise in the use of secondary and recycled aggregates. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Aggregates Recycling Policy AR2: Aggregates recycling at mineral sites The provision of new temporary aggregate recycling facilities at the seven primary aggregate preferred areas identified in the Aggregates Recycling DPD would help to maintain supplies of aggregate (providing at least 0.8 million tonnes of material per year) and meet the needs of the construction industry for materials, even in the event of a decline of local production of primary aggregate. Avoidable, Direct & Local Beneficial & Medium significance There is limited scope in terms of the scale of the benefits that the MPA is in a position to deliver in respect of the goal of increasing the market share of recycled and secondary aggregates in construction. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC5 (Aggregates recycling) in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to make provision for the facilities and infrastructure necessary to the supply of secondary and recycled aggregate, but cannot require or enforce the use of such materials. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC4 (Efficient use of mineral resources), in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to work in partnership with the district and borough councils and the construction and development industries to promote and enable a rise in the use of secondary and recycled aggregates. Moderate strategic beneficial effect Aggregates Recycling Policy AR3: Aggregates recycling – high value recovery The requirement that proposals for aggregate recycling demonstrate the capacity to maximise the range of recyclable materials that are recovered could have significant implications for the materials efficiency of the economy, by ensuring that the usefulness of construction, demolition and excavation wastes is optimised, the need for virgin materials in construction projects is reduced, and the maximum value is derived from materials. Avoidable, Direct & Local Beneficial & Medium significance There is limited scope in terms of the scale of the benefits that the MPA is in a position to deliver in respect of the goal of increasing the market share of recycled and secondary aggregates in construction. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC5 (Aggregates recycling) in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to make provision for the facilities and infrastructure necessary to the supply of secondary and recycled aggregate, but cannot require or enforce the use of such materials. The MPA has given a commitment (Policy MC4 (Efficient use of mineral resources), in the Minerals Core Strategy DPD) to work in partnership with the district and borough councils and the construction and development industries to promote and enable a rise in the use of secondary and recycled aggregates. Moderate strategic beneficial effect
  14. 14. Surrey Minerals Plan Environmental Report – November 2009 420 Annex 12A: Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant policies & strategies for the economic performance & diversity receptor The following policies, plans and programmes have been reviewed to establish the wider policy context for the economic performance and diversity receptor. Details have been compiled of the objectives, indicators and targets that have been set in policy, plans and programmes at international, European, national, regional and county levels for economic performance and diversity. Those objectives, indicators and targets that are relevant to the Surrey Minerals Plan are highlighted in blue in the following tables. International Policy Report on the World Summit on Sustainable Development: Johannesburg, South Africa 2002 European Policy Sixth Community Environment Action Programme (Decision No. 1600/2002/EC of the European Parliament & of the Council of 22 July 2002) Renewed EU Sustainable Development Strategy as adopted by the European Council on 15/16 June 2006. National Policy Enterprise: Unlocking the UK’s Talent (The UK Government’s Enterprise Strategy 2008) Innovation Nation (The UK Government’s Innovation Strategy) 2008 Securing the Future: the UK Government Sustainable Development Strategy Quality of Life Counts – UK Government Sustainable Development Indicators Planning Policy Statement (PPS) 1: Delivering sustainable development Planning Policy Guidance (PPG) 4: Industrial, commercial development & small firms Draft Planning Policy Statement 4 – Planning for Prosperous Economies (2009) PPS 6: Planning for town centres PPS7: Sustainable Development in Rural Areas Minerals Policy Statement (MPS) 1: Planning & Minerals Regional Policy South East Regional Sustainability Framework 2008 The South East Plan: Regional Spatial Strategy for the South East of England Regional Economic Strategy 2006-2016: A Framework for Sustainable Prosperity Surrey Strategies & Plans Surrey Economic Partnership Economic Strategy 2006-2011 (Draft Final Version) Surrey Hills AONB Management Plan 2009
  15. 15. Annex 12A Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant international, European, national, regional & local sustainable development objectives Actions, Indicators & Targets Report on the World Summit on Sustainable Development: Johannesburg, South Africa 2002 Provide assistance & mobilise resources to enhance industrial productivity & competitiveness as well as industrial development in developing countries, including the transfer of environmentally sound technologies on preferential terms, as mutually agreed. (Paragraph 10(a), page 12) Provide assistance to increase income-generating employment opportunities, taking into account the Declaration on Fundamental Principles & Rights at Work of the International Labour Organisation. (Paragraph 10(b), page 12) Promote the development of micro, small & medium-sized enterprises, including by means of training, education & skill enhancement, with a special focus on agro-industry as a provider of livelihoods for rural communities. (Paragraph 10(c), page 12) Provide financial & technological support, as appropriate, to rural communities of developing countries to enable them to benefit from safe & sustainable livelihood opportunities in small-scale mining ventures. (Paragraph 10(d), page 12) Provide support to developing countries for the development of safe low-cost technologies that provide or conserve fuel for cooking & water heating. (Paragraph 10(e), page 12) Strengthen the contribution of industrial development to poverty eradication & sustainable natural resource management. (Paragraph 10, page 12) Provide support for natural resources management for creating sustainable livelihoods for the poor. (Paragraph 10(f), page 12) Encourage industry to improve social & environmental performance through voluntary initiatives, including environmental management systems, codes of conduct, certification & public reporting on environmental & social issues, taking into account such initiatives as the International Organisation for Standardisation standards & Global Reporting Initiative guidelines on sustainability reporting, bearing in mind principle 11 of the Rio Declaration on Environment & Development. (Paragraph 18(a), page 15) Encourage dialogue between enterprises & the communities in which they operate & other stakeholders. (Paragraph 18(b), page 15) Encourage financial institutions to incorporate sustainable development considerations into their decision making processes. (Paragraph 18(c), page 15) Enhance corporate environmental & social responsibility & accountability. (Paragraph 18, page 15) Develop workplace-based partnerships & programmes, including training & education programmes. (Paragraph 18(d), page 15) Continue to promote open, equitable, rule-based, predictable & non-discriminatory multilateral trading & financial systems that benefit all countries in the pursuit of sustainable development. Support the successful completion of the work programmed contained in the Doha Ministerial Declaration & the implementation of the Monterrey Consensus. Welcome the decision contained in the Doha Ministerial Declaration to place the needs & interests of developing countries at the heart of the work programme of the Declaration, including through enhanced market access for products of interest to developing countries. (Para. 47(a), pp.37-38) Encourage ongoing efforts by international financial & trade institutions to ensure that decision-making processes & institutional structures are open & transparent. (Paragraph 47(b), page 38) Enhance the capacities of developing countries, including the least developed countries, landlocked developing countries & small island developing States, to benefit from liberalised trade opportunities through international cooperation & measures aimed at improving productivity, commodity diversification & competitiveness, community-based entrepreneurial capacity & transportation & communication infrastructure development. (Paragraph 47(c), page 38) Support the International Labour Organisation & encourage its ongoing work on the social dimension of globalisation, as stated in paragraph 64 of the Monterrey Consensus. (Paragraph 47(d), page 38) Globalisation offer opportunities & challenges for sustainable development. We recognise that globalisation & interdependence are offering new opportunities for trade, investment & capital flows & advances in technology, including information technology, for the growth of the world economy, development & the improvement of living standards around the world. At the same time, there remain serious challenges, including serious financial crises, insecurity, poverty, exclusion & inequality within & among societies. The developing countries & countries with economies in transition face special difficulties in responding to those challenges & opportunities. Globalisation should be fully inclusive & equitable, & there is a strong need for policies & measures at the national & international levels, formulated & implemented with the full & effective participation of developing countries & countries with economies in transition, to help them to respond effectively to those challenges & opportunities. (Paragraph 47, page 37) Enhance the delivery of coordinated, effective & targeted trade-related technical assistance & capacity-building programmes, including taking advantage of existing & future market access opportunities, & examining the relationship between trade, environment & development. (Paragraph 47(e), page 38)
  16. 16. Annex 12A Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant international, European, national, regional & local sustainable development objectives Actions, Indicators & Targets Report on the World Summit on Sustainable Development: Johannesburg, South Africa 2002 Implement the outcomes of the Doha Ministerial Conference by the members of the World Trade Organisation, further strengthen trade-related technical assistance & capacity-building & ensure the meaningful, effective & full participation of developing countries in multilateral trade negotiations by placing their needs & interests at the heart of the work programme of the WTO. (Paragraph 48, page 38) Actively promote corporate responsibility & accountability, based on the Rio principles, including through the full development & effective implementation of intergovernmental agreements & measures, international initiatives & public-private partnerships & appropriate national regulations, & support continuous improvement in corporate practices in all countries. (Paragraph 49, page 38) Strengthen the capacities of developing countries to encourage public-private initiatives that enhance the ease of access, accuracy, timeliness & coverage of information on countries & financial markets. Multilateral & regional financial institutions could provide further assistance for these purposes. (Paragraph 50, page 38) Strengthen regional trade & cooperation agreements, consistent with the multilateral trading system, among developed & developing countries & countries with economies in transition, as well as among developing countries, with the support of international finance institutions & regional development banks, as appropriate, with a view to achieving the objectives of sustainable development. (Paragraph 51, page 38) Sustainable development in a globalising world. (Section V, pages 37-39) Assist developing countries & countries with economies in transition in narrowing the digital divide, creating digital opportunities & harnessing the potential of information & communication technologies for development through technology transfer on mutually agreed terms & the provision of financial & technical support &, in this context, support the World Summit on the Information Society. (Paragraph 52, pages 38-39) European Union Sixth Community Environment Action Programme Encouraging reforms of subsidies that have considerable negative effects on the environment & are incompatible with sustainable development, inter alia by establishing, by the mid-term review, a list of criteria allowing such environmentally negative subsidies to be recorded, with a view to gradually eliminating. (Article 3, paragraph 4, page 5) Analysing the environmental efficiency of tradable environmental permits as a generic instrument & of emission trading with a view to promoting & implementing their use where feasible. (Article 3, paragraph 4, page 5) Promoting & encouraging the use of fiscal measures such as environmentally related taxes & incentives, at the appropriate national or Community level. (Article 3, paragraph 4, page 5) Promotion of sustainable production & consumption patterns by effective implementation of the principles set out in Article 2, to internalise the negative as well as the positive impacts on the environment through the use of a blend of instruments, including market based & economic instruments. (Article 3, paragraph 4, page 5) Promoting the integration of environmental protection requirements in standardisation activities. (Article 3, paragraph 4, page 5) Promoting an integrated product policy approach throughout the Programme that will encourage the taking into account of environmental requirements throughout the life-cycle of products, & more wide-spread application of environmentally friendly processes & products. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5) Encouraging wider uptake of the Community’s Eco-Management & Audit Scheme (EMAS) & developing initiatives to encourage companies to publish rigorous & independently verified environmental & sustainable development performance reports. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5) Establishing a compliance assistance programme, with specific help for small & medium enterprises. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5) Improving collaboration & partnership with enterprises & their representative bodies & involving the social partners, consumers & their organisations, as appropriate, with a view to improving the environmental performance of enterprises & aiming at sustainable production patterns. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5) Stimulating the introduction of company environmental performance award schemes. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5)
  17. 17. Annex 12A Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant international, European, national, regional & local sustainable development objectives Actions, Indicators & Targets European Union Sixth Community Environment Action Programme Stimulating product innovation with the aim of greening the market including through improved dissemination of results of the LIFE Programme. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5) Improving collaboration & partnership with enterprises & their representative bodies & involving the social partners, consumers & their organisations, as appropriate, with a view to improving the environmental performance of enterprises & aiming at sustainable production patterns. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5) Encouraging voluntary commitment or agreements to achieve clear environmental objectives, including setting out procedures in the event of non-compliance. (Article 3, paragraph 5, page 5) Encouraging the uptake of eco-labels & other forms of environmental information & labelling that allow consumers to compare environmental performance between products of same type. (Article 3, paragraph 6, page 5) Encouraging the use of reliable self-declared environmental claims & preventing misleading claims. (Article 3, paragraph 6, page 5) To help ensure that individual consumers, enterprises & public bodies in their roles as purchasers, are better informed about the processes & products in terms of their environmental impact with a view to achieving sustainable consumption patterns. (Article 3, paragraph 6, page 5) Promoting a green public procurement policy, allowing environmental characteristics to be taken into account & the possible integration of environmental life cycle, including the production phase, concerns in the procurement procedures while respecting Community competition rules & the internal market, with guidelines on best practice & starting a review of green procurement in Community Institutions. (Article 3, paragraph 6, page 5) Considering a voluntary initiative with the financial sector, covering guide-lines for the incorporation of data on environmental cost in company annual financial reports, & the exchange of best policy practices between Member States. (Article 3, paragraph 7, page 5) Calling on the European Investment Bank to strengthen the integration of environmental objectives & considerations into its lending activities in particular with a view to supporting a sustainable development of Candidate Countries. (Article 3, paragraph 7, page 5) To support environmental integration in the financial sector. (Article 3, paragraph 7, page 5) Promoting integration of environmental objectives & considerations into the activities of other financial institutions such as the European Bank for Reconstruction & Development. (Article 3, paragraph 7, page 5) European Union Renewed Sustainable Development Strategy Sustainable Consumption & Production Overall Objective: To promote sustainable consumption & production patterns. (Document 10917/06 Page 12) Operational objective & target – Promoting sustainable consumption & production by addressing social & economic development within the carrying capacity of ecosystems & decoupling economic growth from environmental degradation. (Document 10917/06 Page 12) Operational objective & target – Improving the environmental & social performance for products & processes & encouraging their uptake by business & consumers. (Document 10917/06 Page 12) Operational objective & target – Aiming to achieve by 2010 an EU average level of Green Public Procurement (GPP) equal to that currently achieved by the best performing Member States. (Document 10917/06 Page 12) Promote a prosperous, innovative, knowledge-rich, competitive & eco-efficient economy which provides high living standards & full & high-quality employment throughout the European Union. (Key Objective – Economic Prosperity, Document 10917/06 Page 4) Safeguard the earth’s capacity to support life in all its diversity, respect the limits of the planet’s natural resources & ensure a high level of protection & improvement of the quality of the environment. Prevent & reduce environmental pollution & promote sustainable consumption & production to break the link between economic growth & environmental degradation. (Key Objective – Environmental Protection, Document 10917/06 Page 3) Operational objective & target – The EU should seek to increase its global market share in the field of environmental technologies & eco-innovations. (Document 10917/06 Page 12)
  18. 18. Annex 12A Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant international, European, national, regional & local sustainable development objectives Actions, Indicators & Targets European Union Renewed Sustainable Development Strategy Global Poverty & Sustainable Development Challenges Overall Objective: To actively promote sustainable development worldwide & ensure that the European Union’s internal & external policies are consistent with global sustainable development & its international commitments. (Document 10917/06 Page 20) Operational objective & target – Make significant progress towards meeting the commitments of the EU with regard to internationally agreed goals & targets, in particular those contained in the Millennium Declaration & those deriving from the World Summit on Sustainable Development held in Johannesburg in 2002 & related processes such as the Monterrey Consensus on Financing for Development, the Doha Development Agenda & the Paris Declaration on Aid Harmonisation. (Document 10917/06 Page 20) Contribute to improving international environmental governance, in particular in the context of the follow-up to the 2005 World Summit outcome, & to strengthening multilateral environmental agreements. (Document 10917/06 Page 20) Raise the volume of aid to 0.7% of Gross National Income (GNI) by 2015 with an intermediate target of 0.56% in 2010. (Document 10917/06 Page 20) Promote sustainable development in the context of the WTO negotiations, in accordance with the preamble to the Marrakech Agreement establishing the WTO which sets sustainable development as one of its main objectives. (Document 10917/06 Page 20) Increase the effectiveness, coherence & quality of EU & Member States aid policies in the period 2005-2010. (Document 10917/06 Page 20) Promote a prosperous, innovative, knowledge-rich, competitive & eco-efficient economy which provides high living standards & full & high-quality employment throughout the European Union. (Key Objective – Economic Prosperity, Document 10917/06 Page 4) Include sustainable development concerns in all EU external policies, including the Common Foreign & Security Policy, inter alia by making it an objective of multilateral & bilateral development cooperation. (Document 10917/06 Page 20) Enterprise: Unlocking the UK’s Talent (The UK Government’s Enterprise Strategy 2008) Insolvency rules – the Government proposes to change the law by the end of 2009 so that insolvency officers have the discretion to decide whether or not to place an advertisement in the local press with the aim of reducing the embarrassment & risk of stigma in the local community & associated fear of failure. (Culture: key policy new proposals, page 32) Global Entrepreneurship Week – Building on the success of the UK’s Enterprise Week, run annually since 2004, 35 countries will now join in the first Global Entrepreneurship Week in 2008, involving 14-30 year olds, schools & universities, & a wide range of entrepreneurs, businesses, & non-profit organisations. (Culture: key policy new proposals, page 32) Erasmus for young entrepreneurs – Government will support the pan-European pilot programme (currently known as ‘Erasmus for young entrepreneurs’) to offer cross-border mentoring & work placements in SMEs. (Culture: key policy new proposals, page 32) Premier League – The Government will work with the English Premier League football clubs to promote enterprise & deliver enterprise education through the football clubs’ community programmes. This will include working with schools & wider members of the clubs’ local communities. (Culture: key policy new proposals, page 32) Women’s enterprise campaign – The Government will run a high level media campaign around women’s enterprise – ‘Spark an idea’, to be coordinated by Enterprise Insight. (Culture: key policy new proposals, page 32) Culture: Develop a culture, where talent can be unlocked & flourish, recognising differences in enterprise culture across different social groups, reducing fear of failure that prevents start-ups, & giving everyone the opportunity to be entrepreneurial. (Paragraph 1.10, page 10) Over 50s Campaign – The Government will work with Enterprise Insight, PRIME (the Prince’s Initiative for Mature Entrepreneurs) & South East of England Development Agency to develop a campaign to encourage older people to realise the benefits of unlocking their talent & exploiting their skills & knowledge to be active in enterprise. (Culture: key policy new proposals, page 32)
  19. 19. Annex 12A Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant international, European, national, regional & local sustainable development objectives Actions, Indicators & Targets Enterprise: Unlocking the UK’s Talent (The UK Government’s Enterprise Strategy 2008) Government has committed a further £30 million to extend enterprise education from secondary schools into primary & tertiary education. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Entrepreneur Peter Jones is working with the Government to launch a National Enterprise Academy (NEA). (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Government will work with the RDAs to pilot Women’s Business Centres (WBCs). (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Government will provide enterprise support focused on women through RDAs & Business Link. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) A national mentoring network for women in business will be coordinated to recognise & support the distinctive nature of women’s business start-ups & growth. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Government will work through Children’s Centres to make enterprise support & advice more women-friendly & more readily available. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Government will extend & improve the Train to Gain programme. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Government will increase its investment in the Leadership & Management Programme for small businesses. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Government will work with the RDAs, & the leading private sector agencies, to establish better links between existing mentoring programmes & the business support network overall. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Government will work with A4e over the next four years to develop a full understanding of good practice in corporate mentoring. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Knowledge & Skills: Ensure that individuals & businesses have access to & are able to develop the best possible knowledge & skills to support the growth of their businesses. (Paragraph 1.10, page 10) The Government has been working in partnership with the newly formed Institute of Business Consulting to create a new set of national standards for all organisations involved in the delivery of business support. (Knowledge & Skills: key policy new proposals, page 46) Extend the eligibility of Small Firms Loan Guarantee (SFLG) to businesses with growth ambitions that are more than five years old, including but not limited to those who have changed ownership. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) An additional £30 million capital commitment to stimulate the delivery of mezzanine finance through Enterprise Capital Funds commitment to stimulate delivery through SFLG. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) Commitment of £12.5 million for capital fund focused primarily on investing in women-led businesses. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) Launch of a third round of Enterprise Capital Funds, with around £50 million available to invest. Further £100 million available to commit in two subsequent rounds. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) Access to Finance: Enable new & growing businesses & those people seeking to exploit their ideas to have access to the appropriate level of finance & advice. (Paragraph 1.10, page 10) Commitment that businesses that use invoice/debt factoring are eligible to compete for public sector contracts. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60)
  20. 20. Annex 12A Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant international, European, national, regional & local sustainable development objectives Actions, Indicators & Targets Enterprise: Unlocking the UK’s Talent (The UK Government’s Enterprise Strategy 2008) Expansion of the Money Advice Trust’s Business Debtline service. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) Support & work with British Business Angel Association to develop & build capacity in UK’s Business Angel sector. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) Development of a national framework for the delivery of investment readiness support, including targeted support for under- represented groups such as women. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) Access to Finance: Enable new & growing businesses & those people seeking to exploit their ideas to have access to the appropriate level of finance & advice. (Paragraph 1.10, page 10) Commitment to explore further non-legislative approaches to tackling late payment. (Access to Finance: key policy new proposals, page 60) The Government will consult on the introduction of a new system of regulatory budgets for Departments that would set out the cost of new regulation that can be introduced within a given period – ‘regulatory budgets’ as suggested by the Better Regulation Taskforce (BRTF) report. (Regulatory Framework: key policy new proposals, page 73) The Government will introduce a new approach to regulating small firms in line with its ‘think small first’ policy. In the first instance, it will examine whether small firms can be fully exempted from new regulatory requirements or be subject to simplification of enforcement. Where this is not possible Departments will seek to work with small firms to design specific approaches for them. (Regulatory Framework: key policy new proposals, page 73) The Government will review existing legislation, ensuring the Hampton principles are embedded, introducing new, or amended, exemptions for small firms &, wherever possible, simplified inspection & enforcement. (Regulatory Framework: key policy new proposals, page 73) Regulatory Framework: Renew our focus on reducing regulatory burdens, recognising that unnecessary or overly complex regulation can stifle enterprise & have a disproportionate impact on small firms. (Paragraph 1.10, page 10) The Government will establish an independent review to make recommendations on ways of ensuring firms can place greater reliance on official guidance & thereby reduce the cost of compliance. (Regulatory Framework: key policy new proposals, page 73) Government to investigate the role that innovation vouchers can have in encouraging firms to innovate. (Business Innovation: key policy new proposals, page 85) Refocused Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI). (Business Innovation: key policy new proposals, page 85) Three month trial period for new firms registering on supply2gov.uk. Government will do more to encourage public sector buyers to register & post opportunities on the site. (Business Innovation: key policy new proposals, page 85) National Council for Graduate Entrepreneurship to establish university enterprise networks. (Business Innovation: key policy new proposals, page 85) Independent review of broadband led by Francesco Caio looking at the possible barriers to any new models for investment. (Business Innovation: key policy new proposals, page 85) Innovation in Services project to understand the barriers to innovation & determine how the Government can stimulate & support innovation. (Business Innovation: key policy new proposals, page 85) Business Innovation: Reinforce innovation’s role as a driver of enterprise itself & at the root of all entrepreneurial activity, complementing the Government’s new Innovation Strategy. (Paragraph 1.10, page 10) Intellectual property training programme for all Business Link & UKTI advisers. (Business Innovation: key policy new proposals, page 85)
  21. 21. Annex 12A Policy Context for the Economic Performance & Diversity Receptor Relevant international, European, national, regional & local sustainable development objectives Actions, Indicators & Targets Innovation Nation (The UK Government’s Innovation Strategy) 2008 Each Government Department will include an Innovation Procurement Plan as part of its commercial strategy, setting out how they will drive innovation through procurement & use innovative procurement practices. (Box, page 26) Department for Innovation, Universities & Skills (DIUS) will work with the Technology Strategy Board, Office of Government Commerce (OGC) & with Departments with experience in promoting innovation through procurement to support others to use their procurement power effectively in support of innovation. (Box, page 26) DIUS and the CBI will work together to facilitate the interchange of innovation expertise between the private sector & Government Departments, for example, through secondments & mentoring in innovative procurement & the design of services, products & processes. (Box, page 26) Demanding Innovation: Demand drives innovation by encouraging innovators to meet new, advanced needs. Early users, whether they be individuals, businesses or Government, shape innovations in their most important phase of development & provide critical early revenue. Regulation can help or hinder innovation by setting stretching standards for new technologies or constricting freedom to innovate. It the UK is to become an Innovation Nation, it must complement the supply-side innovation measures with demand-side policies. (Paragraph 3.1, page 23) DIUS will reform the SBRI, refocused on technology based research, prototyping this with the Ministry of Defence & the Department of Health & will extend the revised SBRI to all participating Departments by April 2009. BSI will undertake an analysis of the role of standards within the service sector & will publish a strategy. (Box, page 39) BSI will publish a revised standard on the management of innovation for April 2009. (Box, page 39) DIUS will produce technology roadmaps for the National Measurement System (NMS) Programmes & publish a new strategic plan to identify & address the metrology barriers to innovation. (Box, page 39) The UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO) will examine whether there is a role for Government in helping small firms obtain investment through better reporting of their intangible assets, by the end of 2008. (Box, page 39) Government’s main task is to maintain framework conditions in which business can innovate with confidence & to correct market failures. The UK is a strong performer on innovation & ranks in the leading group of EU economies; manufacturing, services & creative industries are all internationally competitive. The Technology Strategy Board is well placed to support UK business in retaining a technological & innovative advantage over competitors, notably through its innovation platforms. We also posses a world class innovation infrastructure. However, accessing finance & managing intellectual property can be a problem for some innovative companies, & there is scope for Government to create a more integrated escalator of financial support for business. (Paragraph 4.1, page 31) By the summer of 2009 all UKTI export & Business Link advisors will receive training from the UK-IPO in advising businesses on IP management. UK-IPO will provide online support to help small businesses exploit their IP through licensing & other means which are increasingly important to innovative businesses. This network will be used to promote an awareness-raising programme on the importance & changing nature of intellectual property. (Box, page 39) DIUS will maintain the growing investment in UK science & will broaden knowledge exchange between the research base & businesses into the arts & humanities & service sectors such as the creative industries. (Box, page 48) The UK-IPO will continue to develop the ‘Lambert’ online toolkit of model university-business licensing agreements which cuts the costs & complexity of IP transactions. (Box, page 48) World-class research in the UK is crucial to maintaining economic prosperity & responding to the challenges & opportunities of globalisation. Research in universities & Government research laboratories is not the only source of knowledge creation but it is an important part of our innovation ecosystem. (Paragraph 5.2, page 41) DIUS has commissioned a study to look at how universities should manage IP for their own benefit & for the benefit of the wider economy. (Box, page 48) DIUS will assume responsibility for leading & managing the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) Science & Innovation Network (SIN). In the future, DIUS & FCO will co-fund this network & DIUS will host a management team of DIUS & FCO staff to oversee the network’s operation. (Box, page 54) During 2008 DIUS will produce an international strategy which will draw together inter-related policies within DIUS’ remit, encompassing higher & further education, skills, research & innovation. (Box, page 55) Science & innovation are international endeavours. Businesses are internationalising their R&D, supply chains & customer bases & adopting ‘open innovation’ models of value creation. Scientists, engineers & entrepreneurs are increasingly mobile. (Paragraph 6.1, page 49) The Technology Strategy Board will develop, as part of its international strategy, a marketing plan to help deliver a step change in the ability of UK business to compete for grants in EU Framework Programme 7. (Box, page 55)

×