Teen addiction
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  • Now that we know the definitions of drinking, we will look at some statistics on teen drinking. The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth conducted an executive survey regarding teen alcohol use in the United States and issued a status report in 2004. Two national public health surveys tracked underage drinking. Monitoring the Future collected data in schools for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) through University of Michigan. They found that in the year 2004, nearly one in five 8 th graders, more than one in three 10 th graders, and nearly one in two 12 th graders had a drink in the month prior to the survey.
  • Statistics show that there is alcohol consumption among teens; therefore, they should be familiar with what alcohol can do to the body and behavior. As you move through each of these effects, take time to solicit examples from the students. An example of slower reaction time/reflexes might involve a person that has been drinking trying to catch a ball. Hand-eye coordination might not be as quick for someone who has been drinking. So someone who has been drinking might not catch the ball when it is thrown to them as easily as they would otherwise. Since alcohol irritates the lining of the stomach and intestinal lining, nausea and vomiting are common occurrences. There is a danger of choking on vomit, which could cause death by asphyxiation if the person is unconscious. Lowered reasoning ability might involve someone taking risks that they normally would not take. For example, they may leave a party with a stranger.
  • The characteristics of poor motor skills can be seen in a task as simple as walking. Alcohol will decrease the ability of a person to walk in a straight line and might even cause him/her to fall. Poor motor skills might also lead to driving accidents. Alcohol acts as a depressant and slows the heart rate. It also interferes with normal contraction and rhythm of the heartbeat. These effects are thought to be major reasons for sudden death among alcoholics. (6) Increased blood pressure, or hypertension, is associated with chronic drinking and usually goes away two to three weeks after drinking has stopped. Mood swings might be noticed, with anxiety and restlessness being at the top of the list. Lower inhibitions might lead a teen to do things he or she would not normally do, which could put them in a compromising or dangerous situation. Risky behavior,…. might result. They might also have poor judgment.
  • Chronic use of alcohol can lead to long term effects on the body. As synapses and transmitters are affected in the nervous system, loss of sensation in hands and feet occur. The muscles of the body become weak, and lungs have a greater chance for infection as the immune system becomes less responsive. The liver receives blood directly from the intestines, which is the major site for absorption of alcohol. The liver breaks down the alcohol; however, the products that are produced during this process are toxic to the liver. This can cause liver damage in the form of inflammation or cirrhosis (scarring of the liver).
  • Alcohol affects all parts of the brain and can result in brain cell damage. Loss of memory occurs with impairment of the hippocampus, which is the part of the brain responsible for storing new memories. Damage to the cerebral cortex will lead to lack of coordination while damage to the cerebellum will affect mood. Finally, damage to the brain stem may result in lack of normal body functions and regulations, such as breathing, heart rate and body temperature. Long term affects of heavy drinking may interfere with the mitochondria of the heart cells. These are the energy producing organelles and without proper energy, the heart does not function as normal. Hypertension is also a problem for the chronic drinker and could possibly lead to a stroke. The esophagus normally contracts and relaxes allowing food to move to the stomach. Alcohol inhibits this contraction which allows stomach acids to move into the esophagus causing irritation. It might also be a factor in gastritis. Scientist are currently undergoing studies to determine if alcohol or bacteria are the major cause of ulcers in alcoholics.
  • So drinking relates to various short term and long term effects on the body. It could also have a long term effect in the sense that it could affect your future by decreasing brain function during prime learning periods. A study was performed on teens and drinking. This slide shows brain activity of a 15 year old with an alcohol problem versus the brain activity of a non-drinking 15 year old. The pink shows brain activity. It is clear that the teen who does not drink has much more activity.
  • This is a continuation of the study on brain activity of teens drinking alcohol. Recall tests were done and the results were clear that alcohol does effect recall. School and life are based on recall.
  • Drinking may be a personal choice, but it affects more than just you. For example strangers may be affected through accidents. Statistics from the US Department of Transportation include: Alcohol was involved in 39% of fatal crashes in 1997. About 3 in every 10 Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash in their lifetime. In 1997, the highest rates for fatal crashes while intoxicated involved persons 21-24 years of age. One third of all pedestrians 16 years or older killed in traffic crashes in 1997 were intoxicated. Drinking lowers inhibitions and increases risky behavior. Teens might engage in unprotected sex while under the influence, which could lead to unplanned pregnancy. If a woman drinks while pregnant, it could lead to fetal alcohol syndrome.

Teen addiction Presentation Transcript

  • 1. TEEN ADDICTION
  • 2. • SMOKING ADDICTION• ALCOHOL ADDICTION• DRUG ADDICTION• GAMBLING ADDICTIONKINDS OF ADDICTION
  • 3. SMOKING ADDICTION
  • 4. Teen Tobacco Use is a BigProblem• Typically, tobacco usebegins beforeage 18 years .• Every day, 3,450people of age12 – 17 years initiatesmoking in the US .
  • 5. The Social Cycle of TobaccoUse InfluencesInfluencesto Startto StartSmoking: Media,Smoking: Media,Household Members,Household Members,PeersPeersAlienation from peersAlienation from peerswho don’t use tobaccowho don’t use tobaccoAdolescenceAdolescenceAdulthoodAdulthoodIn uteroIn uteroInfancyInfancyChildhoodChildhood
  • 6. •More likely to bepsychologically distressed,abuse other substances .•Less likely to be attachedto parents, do well inschool, participate inextracurricular activities,know the adverse effectsof smoking .SYMPTOMS OF A TEEN TOBACCO USER
  • 7. THE 5 A’SAskAsk about tobacco use and SHS exposureabout tobacco use and SHS exposureAdviseAdvise to quitto quitAssessAssess readiness to quitreadiness to quitAssistAssist in quit attemptin quit attemptArrangeArrange follow-upfollow-up
  • 8. Statistics on Teen Drinking Monitoring the Future (MTF)reportedthat in 2004, nearly one in five8thgraders, more than one in three10thgraders, and nearly one in two12thgraders had a drink in thepast month.
  • 9. Short-term Effects Slower reaction times/reflexes Heavy sweating Blurry vision Nausea and vomiting Lowered reasoning ability
  • 10. Short-term Effects Poor motor coordination Slower heart rate/breathing rate Increased blood pressure Anxiety/restlessness Lower inhibition
  • 11. Long-term Effects Nervous system Muscles Liver
  • 12. Long-term Effects Lungs Heart Esophagus/stomach The picture above shows the image of a pair of lungs of a person before the addiction of alcohol (left) n afterthe addiction of alcohol (right) .
  • 13. Studies on Teen Drinking
  • 14. Studies on Teen Drinking
  • 15. Drinking is a Personal Choice butWho Else is Affected? Friends and family Strangers
  • 16. DXM, ordextromethorphan,is acommoningredientin coughand coldmedicinesTeens,however,havefoundanotheruse forcoughmedicine--gettinghigh.
  • 17. ShockingFactsA 2008 study foundthat one in 10Americanteenagers hasabused productswith DXM togethigh, making itmore popular inthat age groupthan cocaine,ecstasy, LSD, andmeth.
  • 18. Dextromethorphan affects the brain,specifically the region that controlscoughing.However, at high doses – as much as 10 to50 times the suggested amount – DXMcan cause hallucinatory and dissociativeeffects similar to those of PCP orketamine (special K.)
  • 19.  DXM is easy toget. DXM is cheap DXM seems safer DXM is popular Hard for theparents to detect
  • 20.   Overdoses: High amounts can shut down thecentral nervous system. Toxins: Combination cold and flu drugs oftencontain cough suppressants, decongestants,antihistamines, and painkillers that can bequite toxic. Impairment. altered consciousness, impairedvision, and hallucinations can lead toirrational and dangerous behavior.
  • 21. •COCAINE•HEROIN•RX•MARIJUANAOTHER COMMON DRUGS :
  • 22.  Impaired vision Sweating and fever Rapid breathing Increased heart rateand blood pressure Nausea, vomiting,and diarrhea Slurred speech Impaired judgment andmental function Memory loss Rapid eye movements Hallucinations anddissociative effects Coma
  • 23. “The subject of gambling is allencompassing. It combines mansnatural play instinct with hisdesire to know about his fate andhis future.”~FranzRosenthal
  • 24. 27TYPES OF GAMBLING GAMES OF SKILL CARDS LOTTERY INSTANT SCRATCH TICKETS DAILY NUMBERS LOTTO QUICK DRAW
  • 25. 28TYPES OF GAMBLING SPORTS HORSE RACING AT TRACKS OTB OFFICE POOLS/BOXES FOOTBALL WORLD SERIES NCAA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS
  • 26. 29TYPES OF GAMBLING CASINOS LAND - BASED FLOATING CRUISES CRUISES TO NOWHERE SLOT MACHINES AND POKER MACHINES NOT AT A CASINO
  • 27. 30TYPES OF GAMBLING MISCELLANEOUS BINGO PULL TABS STOCK OR COMMODITIES MARKET DICE RAFFLES NUMBERS
  • 28. 31TYPES OF GAMBLING INTERNET CASINOS PLAY FOR MONEY PLAY FOR POINTSWITHNO MONETARY PAYOUTOR RISK CARDS STOCKS
  • 29. TYPES OF GAMBLING INTERNET EARLY STAGES OFDEVELOPMENTWITHLESSTHAN 1% OFTOTALGAMBLING ACTIVITY
  • 30. Societal Acceptance = MoreGamblers Industry perpetuates a vision of gambling as entertaining,glamorous and as a means of achieving financial freedom. Recent surge in realityTV gambling shows High use of internet gaming sites among those under 18
  • 31. Oregon Gambling:SummarizedOregon has more forms of legalized gamblingand offers easier access to gambling thanalmost any other state- AND -Oregon is a nationally recognized leader inprevention, harm reduction and treatment forgambling problemsSource: National Ctr for the Study of Gambling, 2006
  • 32. Why do they gamble? What are theperceived benefits? Money: the possibility of earning extra money isvery appealing Excitement: a major motivating factor Enjoyment: this was described as an“entertainment value” and was more oftenreported by the girls Social: Again, most often reported by girls.Gambling is viewed as a way to promoterelationships with friends and family
  • 33. Why do they gamble? What are theperceived benefits? Independence: Boys often reported gambling to assert their sense ofimportance and to feel older, since gambling is viewed as an “adultactivity Competition: Gambling presents as a challenge to compete with andwin against others. This was more true for the younger teens. Escape: This was not a common motivator listed by participants. Thefew who referred to it also reported recent problems with gamblingexperiences.
  • 34.  Prevention is key, as knowledge is power The education system is an ideal venue foradministration of prevention programs. In theprocess, teachers are sensitized as well. Prevention is a proactive and necessary approach
  • 35. •HELP THEM IN BREAKING THEIR OLDHABITS.• GIVE THEM LOVE , CARE AND ATTENTION.••MOTIVATE THEM . TAKE CARE OF THEIRINTERESTS.
  • 36. Young People who have addiction need help andcare. Firstly their family and people who are aroundthem should lend a hand to them for support.Persons who are addicted need love and interest. Ifyou have some addicted people around you, youshould take a step forward with a motive to helpthem.
  • 37. LETS MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTERPLACE TO LIVE FOR THEM TOO ...BECAUSE UNITED WE STANDDIVIDEDWE FALL!