IntroDUCKtion 2011 Parent Presentation
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IntroDUCKtion 2011 Parent Presentation

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Presentation to parents of admitted students who attend summer IntroDUCKtion at the University of Oregon

Presentation to parents of admitted students who attend summer IntroDUCKtion at the University of Oregon

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  • We introduce ourselves – Marilyn, Jennifer, & librarian. Introduce students. If it’s a transfer program: We ask how many in the audience are families of transfer students; welcome them and we point out usefulness of our comments to transfer students.
  • Marilyn describes what the two days look like for students. All students leave with a full schedule, registered in classes. Students meet with academic advisors without parent present. Further opportunities to ask questions today (lunch and 3:45) and tomorrow at 8:00 a.m.“See you in class” – some parents in “Insight Seminar”; can also participate in WOW
  • Slide 3: M Give insight into what happens during the first term. Read letters from students writing to their friends in h.s. then ask Rachel and Luke for their best advice to parents.
  • Strategic Learning – conceptual focus: behaviors (developed over time) that are necessary for success in college• Collect and analyze data precisely and accurately.• Interpret conflicting explanations of an event or phenomenon Evaluate the credibility of sources.Read with understanding a range of non-fiction publications, textbooks, and technical materials.College Knowledge – Grading, Pace Effort – does not play a large role in grading; grades are a specific assessment of a specific assignmentFewer assignments that carry a greater weight;percentages of overall grade are different (i.e., attendance and participation are a very small part of overall grade)Pace of the term is accelerated – learning is acceleratedTime management, self-awareness, study skills important Complete successfully an assignment that requires two weeks of independent work and extensive research.Attend every class and study groupCreate and maintain a personal schedule that includes a prioritized “to do” list.Roles and Resources: Faculty, students and offices play a different role than in high school – For example, resources are for all students – top students seek them out -- use the resources offered Coachparents on supporting students and how to respond to certain situations Utilize technological tools including appropriate online and desktop applications.Locate websites containing information on different majors, university rules, and financial aid.
  • M College education like a journey, with advisors and faculty as the tour guides; basic itinerary is set. Travel guide is the Student Handbook. Go over features: Academic dates, advising and academic information, freshman programs, course descriptions.Destination of the journey on this slide – what we want all our seniors to acquire. Integrative Learning – critical thinking, analytical thinking – the most consequential difference between high school and college is in the style of learning. Memorizing, etc. not sufficient. Students are expected to apply what they learn, draw comparisons and implications. Form reasoned opinions. Intel comments
  • We’ve discussed the groups – I would like to hear Rachel and Luke tell about their favorite classes in each category; M adds experience of business students with language
  • Composition is critical for entering students. These classes lay the groundwork for the scores of papers, lab reports, essays, and research papers to come. Students enroll in writing 121 based on an alpha table -- The UO thinks that these classes are important enough to save spaces in them year-round for students. LUKE – his experience in WR 121Transfer students may have satisfied both of these terms of writing; their degree audit and their advisor will answer any questions they have.
  • Good classes designed for first-year students. FIGs offered only in fall term, seminars each term. Students will find out what FIG they are in during this session. Opportunity to drop, add, change tomorrow. FIGs are a good way to start on gen ed and to begin exploring a possible major.
  • FIG guarantees a place in two high-demand classes with popular professors. FIG is only half a schedule, so there’s still choice to take language/math, etc. Strong message: if student has a FIG – stay in! Most FIGs work for most students.
  • Freshman seminars offer a small class (18-23) and an experience most students do not get until they are juniors or seniors and well established in their majors. For freshmen only. Describe the seminars. Available all three terms.
  • Highly encouraged.
  • Highly encouraged.
  • Highly encouraged.
  • Compatible with FIGs. Gen ed courses and colloquia are not linked, may take either or both. For more information go on line.
  • In their small group workshop, students are using their student handbook to jot down ideas for fall and their questions for their advisors. Advisors have information about their FIG assignments, their SAT and ACT scores; they are asking and questions about FL and mathematics; and advisors are encouraging students to think creatively about general education classes. If your student says, “I have homework tonight” they are referring to jotting down ideas on this form, noting questions, looking up classes in their student handbook, and thinking ahead to their appointment tomorrow with their advisor.
  • Our goal is that your student has ideas, thoughts, questions, “what ifs” for their appointment tomorrow with their advisor. As we mentioned earlier, the note-taking and problem-solving really mirrors everyday college life and we hope that your student is engaged with the course selection process. Now, our filled in example is way too small for mortals to decipher – here are our ideas for classes in the form of a list for us to look at…
  • Your student might have signed up for a FIG or be interested in a FIG experience, might have received an invitation to join the Society of College Scholars; they will have read or will read tonight about different Group and MC classes for fall and later!; they will have questions or things to think about with FL and mathematics; they might be interested in taking a course for their major if they are not already and they have heard information about different electives. Students will bring their list of ideas and possibilities and questions to their meeting tomorrow – and then make final decisions about courses after speaking with the faculty or professional advisors. They might decide on keeping their FIG, and taking math and a course in their major. Their advisor will make sure they know exactly what course for their major and math are appropriate. After their meeting, they’ll go to the computer lab to register for courses. Their final schedule will have times and section numbers and details that will help them get to the right place at the right time, come September.
  • This list represents many resources available to students. They are the first, most obvious resources that will help connect them to many other resources – peer advising, tutoring services… End with paragraph from student essay: “My first two months.”

IntroDUCKtion 2011 Parent Presentation IntroDUCKtion 2011 Parent Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Guide to Academics for UO Parents
  • IntroDUCKtion Schedule Today - Academics Revealed • Ask the experts • Lunch • Q & A panel at 3:45 Tomorrow • 8:30 – See you in class!
  • First-Year Student Wisdom• Manage schedule• Go to class• Get to know your faculty• Seek advice• Use campus resources• Be open to new experiences
  • Thriving at the UOHigh School College• Strategic learning• College knowledge• Roles and resources
  • Liberal Education for the 21st Century: Essential Outcomes Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World Intellectual and Practical Skills Personal and Social Responsibility Integrative Learning
  • General Education Arts & Letters General Social Science Major Education Science Writing Math Language Multicultural ElectivesUO Bachelor’s Degree
  • Is this image “real”?
  • Is this image “real”?ARH 206:History of Western Art IIIArts & Letters(top) Gustav Courbet - Stone Breakers, 1849(bottom) Jean-Francois Millet - The Gleaners, 1857.
  • Can a farm be economically viable and environmentally sustainable?
  • Can a farm be economically viable and environmentally sustainable? EC 333: Resource & Environmental Economic Issues Social Science
  • How do nutrients flow between the various components of this ecosystem?
  • How do nutrients flow between the various components of this ecosystem? BI 130 – Intro to Ecology Science
  • How does our built environment reinforce assumptions about culture & lifestyle?
  • How does our built environment reinforce assumptions about culture & lifestyle? INTL 250: Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective Multicultural
  • “The Groups”Explore both breadth and depth: ~4 courses in each Arts and Letters Social Science Science
  • WritingWR 121 & 122 or 123 Previous credit (AP) Priority registration Fall A-G Winter H-O Spring P-Z
  • Math Where to start? • Previous credit (AP) • SAT or ACT Scores • UO Math PlacementOne year of college-level math = Bachelor of Science (BS)
  • Language Where to start? • Begin a new language • Many languages offered • UO placement to continue from HS • Previous credit (AP)2 yrs equivalent of college-level language = Bachelor of Arts (BA)
  • Multicultural RequirementChoose 2 courses total, from different categories American Cultures Identity, Pluralism, & Tolerance International Cultures
  • First Year Programs Questions about FIGs orFIGs Freshman Seminars? General Visit us at lunch! Major Education Electives Freshman seminars
  • Freshman Interest Groups What is a FIG? Cohort of 25 students 2 courses in general-education and/or major Academic & Social Transition 1 faculty-led seminar Undergraduate FIG Assistant (FA)A complete fall term schedule = FIG + 2 courses
  • Popular Fall 2011 FIGs: …Choose from 68
  • Freshman Seminars Exclusively for First-Year Students Dedicated faculty teach topics of interest Offered each quarter Popular Fall 2011 Seminars: Writing for Art: Art of Writing Buddhism Through Art Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies Science Fiction: A New Mythology What’s New in the News You Are Here: How Mapping is Changing the Planet and Your Life Breaking Barriers An Exploration of Comedy in America From Gothic Script to Graphic Novel Russian Humor
  • After the 1st Year? Second Year SeminarsStudents talk to their adviser about these opportunities!
  • Second Year SeminarsFall Term Winter TermEC 399 From Asia to Wall Street ARH 399 Art and Politics From Michelangelo to YoutubeES 399 Race and Resistance in U.S. History ENG 399 Sex, Gender, and Science FictionPSY 399 Imaginative Minds HIST399 Language, Thought, and World History Talk to your adviser about these opportunities!
  • College Scholarsb • Colloquia • Small general education courses • By application http://scs.uoregon.edu/
  • How it Works• Quarter system – fall, winter, spring, summer• Average 4 courses per term• Total credits – 180 (about 45 courses) First-Year– Broad Exploration Sophomore – Choose a Major (Consider a Second Year Seminar) Junior – Study Abroad! 2nd major! Senior – Transition to Future
  • ARH 204 – History of Western Art DAN 251 – Looking at Dance AAD 250 – Art and Human Values EC 101 – Contemporary Economic Issues HIST 191 – China Past and Present INTL 250 – Values Systems MATH 243 – Intro to Statistics Yes, PS 205, PS 199 & PHYS 152 – Physics of Sound and Music Rel 101 GEOL 101- Earth’s Dynamic Interior ARH 207 – History of Indian Art No – take WR 121 in Winter MUJ 350 – History of Jazz J 201 – Media and Society ANTH 199 – Consuming Agendas Take SPAN placement? Or maybe start new language with Italian …then take 101Score puts me at MATH 095.Do I need to take this in fall? Is it too late to declare another major?Ask advisor. Do I need math for How will my community college credits count? Will they countenvironmental studies major? towards any general ed?
  • Schedule Possibilities for Fall• FIG (Freshman Interest Group) 9.0 cr• College Scholars• Group Requirements (AL, SS, SC)• Math and/or Language• Writing 121 (fall: last name A-G) 4.0 cr• Multicultural courses• Major coursework• Electives: Freshman Seminar 3.0 cr Any other course of interest
  • E-mail E-mail is the official form of communication at the UO.
  • Academic Resources• Academic Advising - Office of Academic Advising - Major advising in academic departments - Office of Multicultural Academic Success (OMAS) - Disability Services - Support Services for Student Athletes• University Teaching and Learning Center• UO Libraries
  • Fall isthe first step! Designed by Katie Schumm, OAA
  • IntroDUCKtion Parent Program Introduction to the UO LibrariesUniversity of Oregon | 1501 Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR 97403-1299 | T: (541) 346-3053 | F: (541) 346-3485
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR
  • library.uoregon.edu Images: UO Libraries, Digital Collections, UO Stock Photos. http://boundless.uoregon.edu/digcol/uostock/index.php. OIMB photo from http://www.uoregon.edu/~oimb/University of Oregon | 1501Kincaid Street | Eugene, OR