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Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy
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Teaser of the upcoming World Water Development Report 2014 on Water and Energy

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Presentation made by Lead Author Rick Connor at the World Water Week in Stockholm, September 2013

Presentation made by Lead Author Rick Connor at the World Water Week in Stockholm, September 2013

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • 1. Presentation from the 2013 World Water Week in Stockholm www.worldwaterweek.org ©The Author(s), all rights reserved www.siwi.org
  • 2. United Nations World Water Development Report 2014 Water and Energy Teaser Presentation Stockholm September 2013
  • 3. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Similarities, differences and divergences     Sustainable development Economic perspective Climate change Gender and equity Chapter 1
  • 4. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 2  Water: Demands, energy requirements and availability  External pressures  Current and projected water demand  Energy requirements for provision of water services  Water availability
  • 5. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 2 Figure 2.3 Water stress of aquifers important for farming (Nature 488, 197–200) Highlight: Resent evidence of increasing groundwater stress
  • 6. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 3  Energy’s thirst for water:  Global energy demand (present and future)  Primary energy (fossil fuels and biofuels) Current and projected water demand  Electrical power generation (thermal, nuclear, hydro, solar & wind, geothermal)  Water implications of energy policy
  • 7. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 3 Figure 3.2 World primary energy demand by fuel in the New Policies Scenario. Source: IEA (2012). Highlight: Demand for all types of primary fuels will increase over the next 20 years
  • 8. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 3 Figure 3.1 Water withdrawals and consumption vary for fuel production. Source: IEA (2012) Reality check: Water demand for energy depends not only on the type of fuel, but very much on the extraction process
  • 9. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 3 Figure 3.5 World electricity generation by source of energy in 2010 Reality check: 80% of the world’s electricity is provided by thermal power
  • 10. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 3 Figure 3.9 Water use for electricity generation by cooling technology. Source: IEA (2012) Reality check: By 2030, thermal power generation will continue to dominate the energy mix
  • 11. Part 1: Status, Trends and Challenges Chapter 4 The contents of the Data and Indicators Annex (DIA) of the WWDR‐2014 1. Population growth and urbanization 16. Water use for energy production 2. Total actual renewable water resources 3. Water withdrawal per sector 17. World primary energy demand: trends and projections  by WEO (Mtoe) 18. Trends in ISO 140001 certification 4. Water withdrawal per inhabitant 19. ISO 50001 certification 5. Annual average water scarcity in major river basins  (1996–2005) 20. Trends in geothermal electricity output 6. Access to improved drinking water 21. Total dam capacity (km3) 7. Electricity consumption (2000–2010)  22. Total dam capacity per capita (m3/inhab) 8. Electricity consumption per population 11. Electricity generation by energy source  23. Typical estimates of energy requirements for water and  wastewater treatment and distribution 24. Indicative energy use of municipal water and  wastewater services 25. Energy and cost implications of desalination by  technology utilized 26. Trends in desalination power consumption 12. Hydropower production 27. Desalination: global cumulative online capacity  13. Hydropower: economically feasible versus actually  developed  14. Use of dams by purpose 28. Water footprint of energy generation by fuel and cooling  technology 29. Water and energy in national policy 9. People without access to electricity 10. Total primary energy supply by source 15. Carbon intensity of electricity generation
  • 12. Part 2: Thematic Focus Infrastructure Chapter 5 (World Bank)  Financing infrastructure for development  Opportunities for synergies  Combined power and desalination plants  Alternative water resources for thermal power plant cooling  Combined heat and power plants  Sewerage water energy recovery
  • 13. Part 2: Thematic Focus Food and Agriculture Chapter 6 (FAO)  The water-energy-food nexus  Effects of increasing food demand on water and energy  Energy use in agrifood systems  Biofuel impacts on food security and water  Energy smart agriculture
  • 14. Part 2: Thematic Focus Cities Chapter 7 (UN Habitat)  Global urbanizing trends  Urban water and energy demands  The water-energy nexus in the urban context  Re-thinking urban development in terms of water and energy
  • 15. Part 2: Thematic Focus Industry Chapter 8 (UNIDO)  The relationship between water, energy and industry  The status of water and energy in industry (trends, water quality, low income countries, private enterprise)  Water and energy metrics  Externalities  Opportunities and trade-offs
  • 16. Part 2: Thematic Focus Ecosystems Chapter 9 (UNEP)  Ecosystems as the foundation of the water-energy nexus  Dependencies and impacts (hydropower, bioenergy, fossil fuels, thermal power)  An ecosystem approach to the waterenergy nexus
  • 17. Part 3: Regional Focus Chapters 10-14 Europe and North America (UNECE)  Hydropower  Conflicts  Coping with water scarcity  Climate change  Unconventional sources of oil and gas Asia and the Pacific  Hydropower  Coal  Biofuels (UNECAP)
  • 18. Part 3: Regional Focus Chapters 10-14 The Arab region (UNESCWA)  Knowledge and awareness raising for policy coherence  Technology choice and renewable energy options  Climate change and natural disasters Latin America and the Caribbean (UNECLAC)  Hydropower  Energy consumption in the provision of water services Africa (UNECA)  Energy use  Hydropower  Access to water and energy services
  • 19. Part 4: Response options (WWAP) Chapters 15-17 Fostering Synergies and Managing Trade-offs  Creating an enabling environment for change  Cultural barriers  Economic instruments  Responses in practice      Energy-smart and water-efficient agriculture Enhancing the role of industry Industry Ecosystems Power generation  Role of the United Nations and of the international community
  • 20. Current/emerging issues:  ‘Fracking’  Evolution of nuclear  Climate change
  • 21. United Nations World Water Development Report 2014 Water and Energy Thank you Teaser Presentation Stockholm September 2013

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