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  • USB stands for Universal Serial Bus , an industry standard for high-speed serial data communications between computers and peripheral devices. USB 2.0 a popular version of USB developed to improve on the performance and reliability of older versions of the standard called USB 1.0 and USB 1.1 (together often referred to as USB 1.x ) USB 2.0 is also known as USB Hi-Speed . USB 3.0 is a new and up and coming standard. Up to 127 different devices can function off of one USB host.
  • Definition: FireWire is a high performance networking standard based on a serial bus architecture similar to USB . FireWire is also known as the IEEE 1394 standard, created in 1995.People typically use FireWire to network their digital video cameras with their computers using special cables. However, FireWire theoretically supports direct networking of any two computers / computer peripherals that support the standard. The original FireWire technology provided 400 Mbps of network bandwidth, but the newer Firewire 800 (IEEE 1394b) implementations offer 800 Mbps. As those speeds far exceed typical Ethernet or WiFi connections, FireWire is therefore also well-suited for fast computer-to-computer large file transfers on home networks. Both Windows XP and Apple Mac OS support FireWire fire transfers over Internet Protocol (IP) . FireWire is fast -- the latest version achieves speeds up to 800 Mbps. At some time in the future, that number is expected to jump to an unbelievable 3.2 Gbps when manufacturers overhaul the current FireWire cables. First common in the computer world, this 4-or 6-pin connector is a link that carries compressed digital MPEG-2 video and digital audio for recording on a hard-disk or D-VHS digital videotape recorder. Found on some digital TV displays and set-top boxes, FireWire also carries an anti-copy code and can serve as a 2-way link between various devices in a network. Not found on most A/V receivers and DVD players.
  •   Read and write tests to the same IDE hard drive connected using FireWire and then Hi-Speed USB 2.0 show:      Read Test:  • 5000 files (300 MB total) FireWire was 33% faster than USB 2.0 • 160 files (650MB total) FireWire was 70% faster than USB 2.0       Write Test:  • 5000 files (300 MB total) FireWire was 16% faster than USB 2.0 • 160 files (650MB total) FireWire was 48% faster than USB 2.0   FireWire vs. USB 2.0 - Architecture  • FireWire, uses a "Peer-to-Peer" architecture in which the peripherals are intelligent and can negotiate bus conflicts to determine which device can best control a data transfer 
• Hi-Speed USB 2.0 uses a "Master-Slave" architecture in which the computer handles all arbitration functions and dictates data flow to, from and between the attached peripherals (adding additional system overhead and resulting in slower data flow control)
  •   Read and write tests to the same IDE hard drive connected using FireWire and then Hi-Speed USB 2.0 show:      Read Test:  • 5000 files (300 MB total) FireWire was 33% faster than USB 2.0 • 160 files (650MB total) FireWire was 70% faster than USB 2.0       Write Test:  • 5000 files (300 MB total) FireWire was 16% faster than USB 2.0 • 160 files (650MB total) FireWire was 48% faster than USB 2.0   FireWire vs. USB 2.0 - Architecture  • FireWire, uses a "Peer-to-Peer" architecture in which the peripherals are intelligent and can negotiate bus conflicts to determine which device can best control a data transfer 
• Hi-Speed USB 2.0 uses a "Master-Slave" architecture in which the computer handles all arbitration functions and dictates data flow to, from and between the attached peripherals (adding additional system overhead and resulting in slower data flow control)
  • Parallel ports were developed by IBM as a way to connect a printer peripheral to a computer. These ports can still be found on a majority of motherboards however they are beginning to be phased out as USB becomes more mainstream. Parallel wires are capable of sending data at a rate of “only” 50 to 100 kbps. It is called a Parallel wire because the data is transmitted parallel to each other through the wire, as opposed to being transmitted serially, or in a single row). Parallel wires can be used to connect a computer to: printers, scanners, external optical drives, and external storage devices.
  • This is considered to be one of the most basic wires/connections that you can use with a computer. It has been around for over 20 years. As with the parallel wires it is being phased out in favor of USB connections. It has mainly been used in order to connect to modems, as well as some PDA’s, and printers. Standard serial ports have a maximum data transfer rate of 115 kbps.
  • Definition: Ethernet is a physical and data link layer technology for local area networks (LANs) . Essentially Ethernet wires are used for networking applications. Ethernet was invented by engineer Robert Metcalfe. When first widely deployed in the 1980s, Ethernet supported a maximum theoretical data rate of 10 megabits per second (Mbps) . Later, so-called "Fast Ethernet" standards increased this maximum data rate to 100 Mbps. Today, Gigabit Ethernet technology further extends peak performance up to 1000 Mbps.
  • Phone lines are very versatile wires. They can be used for a variety of applications. Some of the most popular applications include being able to send faxes from computers, making phone calls from computers, and connecting to the Internet via a dial-up connection. As broadband connections become more and more affordable dial-up connections are being phased out, as they peak at a top speed of 56 kbps
  • All computers, and many peripherals need a separate power cord. However, some peripherals can be powered via USB. A common example would be an iPod which is recharge via the USB connection. Power cords are fairly uniform however proprietary power cords and power packs, especially for laptops, do exist.
  • Parallel ATA ( PATA ) is an interface standard for the connection of storage devices such as hard disks , solid-state drives , floppy drives , and CD-ROM drives in computers . The standard is maintained by X3/ INCITS committee [1] . It uses the underlying AT Attachment ( ATA ) and AT Attachment Packet Interface ( ATAPI ) standards.The current Parallel ATA standard is the result of a long history of incremental technical development, which began with the original AT Attachment interface, developed for use in early PC AT equipment. The ATA interface itself evolved in several stages from Western Digital 's original Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) interface. As a result, many near-synonyms for ATA/ATAPI and its previous incarnations exist, including abbreviations such as IDE which are still in common informal use. After the market introduction of Serial ATA in 2003, the original ATA was retroactively renamed Parallel ATA .Parallel ATA only allows cable lengths up to 18   in (457   mm). Because of this length limit the technology normally appears as an internal computer storage interface. For many years ATA provided the most common and the least expensive interface for this application. By the beginning of 2007, it had largely been replaced by Serial ATA (SATA) in new systems.

Wiring Presentation Wiring Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Glenn Hyman Gary Werner
    • Type the following URL into your web browser to take the 10 question preassessment.
      • http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JV2HYDQ
  •  
    • Stands for Universal Serial Bus
    • It is an industry standard to connect computers with many peripherals
    • Created in 1996
    • Multiple versions: 1.0 and 1.1 (referred to as 1.x), 2.0 (a.k.a. USB Hi-Speed), and most recently 3.0
    • Up to 127 different devices can function off of one USB host
  • USB Version Maximum Data Transfer Rate 1.X 12 Mbps 2.0 480 Mbps 3.0 4.8 Gbps
    • Firewire is similar to USB
    • A.K.A. IEEE 1394
    • Typically used to connect digital video cameras to computers
    • Original FireWire provided 400 Mbps data transfer rate
    • Newer FireWire provides 800 Mbps data transfer rate
    • Not as widely used, or as common, as USB
    Photo credit: http://gbennett.whsites.net/zencart/images/products/firewire400.jpg
    • Question: Which is faster Hi-Speed USB 2.0 or FireWire?
    • Answer: In sustained throughput FireWire is faster than USB 2.0.
    • Question: If Hi-Speed USB 2.0 is a 480 Mbps interface and FireWire is a 400 Mbps interface, how can FireWire be faster?
    • Answer: Differences in the architecture of the two interfaces have a huge impact on the sustained throughput.
    • FireWire vs. USB 2.0 Hard Drive Performance Comparison
    •   Read and write tests to the same IDE hard drive connected using FireWire and then Hi-Speed USB 2.0 show:     
    • Read Test:  
    • • 5000 files (300 MB total) FireWire was 33% faster than USB 2.0
    • • 160 files (650MB total) FireWire was 70% faster than USB 2.0       
    • Write Test:  
    • • 5000 files (300 MB total) FireWire was 16% faster than USB 2.0
    • • 160 files (650MB total) FireWire was 48% faster than USB 2.0
    • First developed by IBM to connect printers to computers
    • Still found on a majority of motherboards today
    • Being phased out in favor of USB connections
    • Data transfer rate of 50-100 Kbps
    • Called parallel wire because data is transmitted parallel to
    • each other through the
    • wire
    Photo credit: http://www.lps2u.com/shop/images/HighPerformanceParallelCableForPrinter.jpg
    • Considered one of the most basic wires/connections that you can use
    • Been around over 20 years
    • Is also being phased out in favor of USB
    • Mainly used to connect to
    • external modems, PDA’s
    • and printers
    • Have a maximum data
    • data transfer rate of
    • 115 Kbps
    Photo credit: http://www.shopit.ie/images/MXT100FF_Alarge.jpg
  • Wire Name Maximum Data Transfer Rate USB 2.0 480 Mbps FireWire 400 Mbps Serial 115 Kbps Parallel 100 Kbps
  •  
    • Ethernet is not synonymous with Internet
    • Ethernet wires are used in networking applications
    • Has been in use since the 1980’s
    • Initially supported a 10 Mbps data transfer speed
    • “ Fast Ethernet” increased the rate to 100 Mbps
    • Gigabit Ethernet currently peaks at 1000 Mbps
    Photo credit: http://kbserver.netgear.com/images/1561_straight_ethernet.jpg
    • Phone lines are very versatile
    • Most popular applications include:
      • Sending faxes from computers
      • Making phone calls from computers
      • Connecting to the Internet via dial-up connection
    • As broadband connections become more affordable dial-up will continue to be phased out
    • Dial-up connection peaks at a speed of 56 Kbps
    • 234,372,000 Internet users as of Nov 2009
      • 73,123,400 Internet broadband connections as of June 2009 (source http://www.internetworldstats.com/america.htm )
      • Leaving 160 million plus potentially still using dial-up
      • connections
    Photo credit: http://img.alibaba.com/photo/50638622/Telephone_Line_Cords_with_UK_Telephone_Plugs.jpg
  •  
    • No, not everything needs
    • a power cord!!
    • All computers, including laptops,
    • need their own power cord
    • Many peripherals need a separate power cord, however some may run off of USB supplied power
    • Power cords are fairly uniform but proprietary power cords and power packs, especially for laptops, do exist
    Photo credit: http://climate.sdstate.edu/howto/vrg101/black%20power%20cord.jpg
    • There are two main types
      • Molex
      • SATA
    • Molex was developed in the 1950s, first used in computers in the late 1970s
    • It is a 4 pin connector
    • Standard on all PATA drives, and most motherboards
    • SATA was developed in 2003 and is taking the place of Molex
    • SATA is more of a versatile power adapter, allowing for hot-swapping and it can only be inserted in one specific way
    Photo credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molex_connector
  •  
  • Photo credit: http://www.addictivetips.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/imageview.jpg http://www.microsoft.com/library/media/1033/windowsxp/images/using/mce/expert/sound_sound_card.jpg
    • Computer audio wires are essential for providing sound
    • Typically wires with green plugs are for speakers, wires with pink plugs are for microphones, and wires with blue plugs are for line-in
    • There are also wires that support 5.1, 6.1, and 7.1 surround sound
    • Newer audio wires include digital optical and coaxial cables, as well as HDMI which can transmit high definition video as well as
    • sound
  •  
  • Photo credit: http://en.dogeno.us/wp-content/uploads/vga2.jpg
    • Stands for “Video Graphics Array” or
    • “ Super Video Graphics Array”
    • Transmits an analog video signal
    • VGA maximum resolution is 800 x 600
    • VGA is considered the lowest common denominator that all PC graphics hardware support
    • SVGA improves on VGA, and covers a large range of display standards
    • SVGA maximum resolution is 1027 x 768
    • Still widely used for a large number of monitors, including flat screen monitors
    • Has been surpassed by DVI connections
    • S-Video stands for Separate Video
    • The wire transmits video data only , no sound
    • S-Video can transmit a slightly higher analog resolution picture than traditional composite video
    • Allows for a computer to be hooked up to a monitor/TV peripheral
    • Can not transmit high definition video signals
    • Has been replaced with DVI and HDMI
    • wires
    Photo credit: http://www.zpluscable.com/images/products/prem-svideo-end.jpg
    • Stands for Digital Visual Interface
    • Transmits a digital video signal
    • First produced in 1999
    • Direct replacement of VGA/SVGA connections
    • Supports a maximum resolution of 3840 × 2400
    • Already starting to be replaced by such connections as HDMI and DisplayPort
    Photo credit: http://www.cablek.com/client_file/upload/image/dvi-cable-pic.jpg
  •  
    • Originally designed in 1986
    • Superseded by SATA in 2003
    • Is an internal connection standard for hard drives, floppy drives, and optical drives
    • Maximum data transfer rate is 133 Mbps
    • Looks like a ribbon cable
    • Was commonly called ATA or IDE cables until approximately 2003 when SATA was released and it was retroactively called PATA to
    • differentiate between the two cables
    Photo credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ata_20070127_002.jpg
    • SATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment) was created in 2003
    • Reduces amount of cables from 80 in PATA to just seven
    • Is used for:
      • Internal computer parts connection
      • External computer peripherals connection (eSATA)
      • Power supply connection
    • SATA has a maximum data transfer rate of 1.5 Gbps, SATA II is 3 Gbps, SATA III is 6 Gbps
    • Another plus is that SATA connections are
    • hot-swappable
    Photo credit: http://www.sierra-cables.com/Cables/Images/SATA-Signal-Cable-1.jpg
  • Photo credit: http://gallery.techarena.in/data/513/sata-ide_lg.jpg
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus
    • http://www.usb-ware.com/firewire-vs-usb.htm
    • http://blog.makeitwork.com/audio-video-cables-explained/
    • http://computer.howstuffworks.com/parallel-port1.htm
    • http://www.howstuffworks.com/serial-port.htm
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S-Video
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_Graphics_Array
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Video_Graphics_Array
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Visual_Interface
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_ATA
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA
    • http://computer.howstuffworks.com/ethernet.htm
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molex_connector