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The impact of affect in serious games
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The impact of affect in serious games

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  • \n
  • Affective computing is a fairly new field. But compared to it Affective serious games is a baby.\n\nSo before I talk about what it is, I am going to speak a little about my background and how I ended up working on affect.\n
  • I had a very short lived commercial game experience that started with this game that some friends and I made for a competition in 2005. \n\nIt was one of the first ever cross platform multiplayer games. You could switch between PC and Moblie depending on what suited you at the time.\n\nOur game ended up winning the competition and from that we got some money that we used to start a business making games for high schools in Scotland.\n\n
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  • \nBut when you think about what is exciting about games based learning -the REASON we are excited about using games is that we FEEL there must be some potential there. \n\nWe play commercial games and feel that we’re learning - we might just be learning the rules of the game - but we are learning - and it doesn’t feel as cheap as CCB\n
  • These guys were pioneering the idea of teaching through game mechanics. And it was this approach that I used for e-Bug.\n
  • what is e-Bug...\n\n
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  • When e-Bug started, I believe it was innovative.\n\nEven in 2009, there weren’t many games that were teaching well THROUGH the mechanics.\n
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  • \nCurfew explores the UK's growing atmosphere of social anxiety and authoritarianism by portraying an Orwellian dystopia.\n
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  • what is fun?\nis it important?Serious Games\n
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  • I started thinking about the emotional envelope.\nThis could be math - a game woudl have lots of peaks.\nEmotional roller coaster.\n
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  • We are not robots. We are all aware of experiencing emotion.\nBut we rarely EXPLICITELY address how emotion / affect influences teaching and learning.\n
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  • Idea of computers HAVING emotions.\nIdea of computers CONVEYING emotions.\nIdea of computers RECOGNISING emotions\n
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  • People without emotions can’t function. They test identically on IQ tests. \nThey are able to reason out a problem - even a moral problem perfectly in the lab.\n\nBut in the real world, they don’t learn from their actions and they can’t manipulate situations correctly. \n
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  • Bullying simulator\n\n\n
  • I haven’t explored this very deeply\n\nbut think how much communication is lost when we are not in the room with each other.\n\nA face-2-face beats a phone call.\nA phone call beats an email.\nA text or tweet needs to be DESIGNED to not cause problems!\n
  • Scenario Date:\n sweaty palms\n heart palpitating\n pupils dilated\n\n
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  • Rom’s study.\n\nPhD Student - people express more emotion as they move towards being in a room together opposite a table\n* so playing solo \n* playing multiplayer over net\n* playing multiplayer in same room\n
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  • You can tell if people notice a thing \nYou can go back and watch video of the user interacting with your system to see if you can figure out why\n
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  • Describe the study with the robot\n\nMobile phone example\n\ngame examples - idea of detecting frustration - or detecting and maintaining flow\n
  • That may look like 2/4 bullet points there - but that’s some amazing stuff if we can do it.\n\nOf course the tech is very intrusive and expensive. And it’s a nightmare to analyse. But it can be done. \n\n\n
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  • What I’m looking at myself is the idea that we adopt a state of mind - similar to what Carol Dweck calls a mindset when we play games.\n\nWe don’t mind failing - it adds content!\nWe don’t mind asking for help.\nWe don’t mind difficulty.\n\nMy hunch is that PLAY matters more than GAME and that by trying to make learnign PLAYFUL we will help learners be more effective.\n