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Vikings Lecture 5

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Lecture 5 from The Vikings, a class from Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

Lecture 5 from The Vikings, a class from Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

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  • 1. Maps: left—map of Viking routes throughout Europe; right—map of earlyKievan Russia. Left map from Vikings: the North Atlantic Saga, edited by Wardand Fitzhugh. Right map from Ferguson, The Vikings: a History.
  • 2. Maps of the Byzantine Empire (600-1000 AD) and Abbasid Empire(left-c. 650-750, right-c. 950-1050). From Lynn Hunt, The Making ofthe West, Volume 1, 3rdedition.
  • 3. Map of Russian river trade with the Middle East.From Gwyn Jones, A History of the Vikings.
  • 4. Early Rus burial mounds at Staraja Ladoga.Image from Wikipedia.
  • 5. Images from Olaus Magnus, Historia de Gentibus Septentrionalibus,1555. Left—hunting of martens and sables; right—hunting of squirrels.In Gwyn Jones, A History of the Vikings.
  • 6. Images of portage on Russian rivers from Olaus Magnus,Historia de Gentibus Septentrionalibus, 1555. In GwynJones, A History of the Vikings.
  • 7. Items from early Russia burials: left top—bear tooth amulets; bottomleft—bear or beaver paw amulets; right—folding scales. Images fromVikings: the North Atlantic Saga, edited by Fitzhugh and Ward.
  • 8. Early Russian rulers: left—a gold coin of Vladimir I; right—a facialreconstruction of Iaroslave I, the Wise, by Mikhail Gerasimov, 1939.Images from Wikipedia.
  • 9. Model of the original St. Sophia, Kiev. Image fromWikipedia, model housed in St. Sophia, Kiev.
  • 10. Trade between Scandinavia, Russia, and the East:left—an 8thcentury bronze Buddha statue found in Helgö;right top—obverse and reverse sides of an Abbasid dirham, dated to 786 andfound in Staraja Ladoga; right bottom—8thcentury quartz beads from theCaucasus found in Birka. Images from Vikings: the North Atlantic Saga.

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