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Vikings Lecture 2
 

Vikings Lecture 2

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Lecture 2 from The Vikings, a class from Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

Lecture 2 from The Vikings, a class from Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

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    Vikings Lecture 2 Vikings Lecture 2 Presentation Transcript

    • Symbols of Viking gods: left—a figurine of Odin with two ravens abovehis head and a sword and spears in hand, from Uppland, Sweden; right—a hammer amulet representing Thor, from Bornholm, Denmark.Images from Vikings: the North American Saga, edited by Fitzhughand Ward.
    • Symbols of Viking gods: left—a figurine of Freyr, god of fertility, witherect penis, from Södermanland, Sweden; right—amulets representingValkyries, the furthest right carrying a horn of drink to welcome theheroes to Valhalla, from various sites in Sweden. Images from Vikings:the North American Saga, edited by Fitzhugh and Ward.
    • Viking religious beliefs: a depiction of Yggrasil, the World Tree, in theÖverhogdal Tapestry. The threat dates from the Viking Age. Ondisplay at Jämtlands Läns Museum, Östersund, Sweden. Image fromVikings: the North American Saga, edited by Fitzhugh and Ward.
    • Viking religious beliefs: left—a stone depicting a Viking ship (below)and an image of the afterlife (above) with Odin riding Sleipnir, fromTjängvide, Gotland, Sweden, 9thcentury; right—Thorvald’s cross slab,depicting Odin (right bottom side) with ravens on his shoulders andbeing devoured by Fenrir, Isle of Man, 10thcentury. Images fromVikings: the North American Saga, edited by Fitzhugh and Ward.
    • Left—the Viking lands in relation to Europe circa 813.Right—growth of power of Danish kings circa 800. Mapsfrom Robert Ferguson, The Vikings: a History.
    • Contact between Scandinavia and Western Europe:left—Ranvaig’s casket, Irish in origin but owned by a Scandinavian womannamed Ranvaig who carved her name into the casket; center—replica of a 9thcentury Irish penannular brooch from a Viking cemetery in Kilmainham, Ireland;right—the Helgö Crosier, also Irish in origin, but found in Helgö, Sweden.Images from Vikings: the North American Saga, edited by Fitzhugh and Ward.
    • Contact between Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East:left—8thcentury bronze Buddha statue found in Helgö, Sweden; topright—late 8thcentury quartz beads from the Caucasus found in Birka, Sweden;bottom right—an Abbasid dirham of 786 found in Staraja Ladoga, northernRussia. Images from Vikings: the North American Saga, edited by Fitzhughand Ward.
    • The Oseberg Ship, built c. 820, buried c. 825,excavated 1904.The Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway• 72 ft long• 16 ½ ft broad• Crew of 30 men• Used to bury twowomen, one possiblya queen, the otherher slave.• Buried with a horse-drawn cart, buckets,barrels, and atapestry depicting thefuneral procession.
    • Viking ships: left—a close up of the Oseberg ship prow, with oar hole(used in preference to oar locks); right—a modern replica ship, SagaSiglar. Images from Vikings: the North American Saga, edited byFitzhugh and Ward.
    • The Gokstad ship, built c. 870-890, buried c. 900,excavated 1880.The Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway• 76 ½ ft long• 17 ft broad• Crew of 32-35 men• Used to bury one man,over 6 ft tall and bearingmultiple injuries, includinga stab wound close to thefemoral artery.• Buried with shields, dogs,horses, and a peacock,among other objects.
    • 11thcentury Viking-style ships depicted in the BayeuxTapestry, on display in Bayeux, Normandy, France. Thetapestry records the events leading up to the Normanconquest of England in 1066 at the battle of Hastings.
    • Illustration of a Viking bearing-dial, based on a bearing dialrecovered in Iceland. Illustration from Gwyn Jones, AHistory of the Vikings.