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Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
Vikings Lecture 1
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Vikings Lecture 1

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Lecture 5 from The Vikings, a class from Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

Lecture 5 from The Vikings, a class from Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

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  • 1. The Gundestrup Cauldron, 2nd-1stcentury BC, in the National Museumof Denmark: The cauldron shows evidence of Celtic workmanship, butwas recovered in a bog in Gundestrup, Denmark. This is evidence oftrade between Celtic society and Scandinvia.
  • 2. Ptolemy’s world map, c. 200 AD. The map demonstrates Romanknowledge of the world, and includes a rather inaccurate depiction ofScandinavia.
  • 3. Map of Europe at the height of the Roman Empire,circa 117 AD.Map from Lynn Hunt, The Making of the West, Volume 1.
  • 4. Maps of Scandinavia: left—map of important areas and sites; right—environmental map of Scandinavia. Left map from Henry Loyn, TheVikings in Britain; right map from Vikings: the North American Saga,edited by William Fitzhugh and Elisabeth Ward.
  • 5. Reconstruction of an early medieval Viking house, Stöng, Iceland:stone base with timber and turf walls. Image from MedievalScandinavia: From Conversion to Reformation, circa 800-1500, byBirgit and Peter Sawyer.
  • 6. A nobleman’s outfit and jewelry worn by men: left-reconstruction of anoutfit found in the Mammen grave, Jutland, Denmark; right-ringbrooches worn by Scandinavian noblemen. Images from Vikings: TheNorth American Saga, edited by William Fitzhugh and Elisabeth Ward.
  • 7. Weapons used by Viking Age warriors: left top-arrow heads; bottomcenter-a striking sword (2 ft long) and a “weapon knife” (1 ft long); righttop-axe head from Mammen grave. Images from Vikings: The NorthAmerican Saga, edited by William Fitzhugh and Elisabeth Ward.
  • 8. Evidence of women’s role in society. Left—keys carried by the wife ofa householder; center—an amulet whose hairstyle indicates a highstatus woman; right—a reconstruction of a Finnish noblewoman’sdress. Images from Vikings: The North American Saga, edited byWilliam Fitzhugh and Elisabeth Ward.
  • 9. Jewelry worn by women: left-oval brooches; center-beaded necklaceof glass, crystal, and carnelian; right-box brooch from Gotland. Imagesfrom Vikings: The North American Saga, edited by William Fitzhughand Elisabeth Ward.
  • 10. A chieftain’s settlement at Borg, Norway, inhabited from the 6th-10thcenturies. Images from Vikings: The North American Saga, edited byWilliam Fitzhugh and Elisabeth Ward.
  • 11. Evidence of daily life in Viking communities: left—carving of a smith atwork, Hylestad Church, Setesdal, Norway; right top—ice skates madefrom bone; right bottom—soapstone bowls. Images from Vikings: TheNorth American Saga, edited by William Fitzhugh and Elisabeth Ward.
  • 12. The Runic alphabet. Image from Robert Ferguson, The Vikings: aHistory.
  • 13. The Gokstad Ship, built c. 870-890, buried c. 900, and excavated in thelate 1800s. Now housed in the Viking Ship Museum, Oslo, Norway.
  • 14. The Oseberg Ship and headpost, built c. 820, buried c. 825, andexcavated in the early 1900s. Now housed in the Viking Ship Museum,Oslo, Norway.
  • 15. Objects from the Oseberg ship burial: left top-horses and cart buriedwith the Oseberg woman; bottom-embroidered textile that may depictthe procession to the Oseberg woman’s burial; right top-bucketsdecorated with brass and enamel. Images from Vikings: the NorthAmerican Saga, edited by William Fitzhugh and Elisabeth Ward.

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