Cariño Early Childhood Classes 2014 3rd Quarter Newsletter
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    Cariño Early Childhood Classes 2014 3rd Quarter Newsletter Cariño Early Childhood Classes 2014 3rd Quarter Newsletter Document Transcript

    • Volume 3, Issue 19 3rd Quarter 2013-2014 Cariño Early Childhood News 3-STAR and 4-STAR Programs: Time is running out! AIM HIGH is being phased out and FOCUS is being phased in. You have until January 1, 2018 to transition to FOCUS. Snow provokes responses that reach right back to childhood. Andy Goldsworthy UNM Cariño Early Childhood Training & Technical Assistance Program Early Childhood Services Center UNM Continuing Education 1634 University Blvd MSC07 4030 Albuquerque, NM 87131 505-277-1371 Office 505-277-8975 Fax Cariño Program Director Malisa Kasparian 277-0954 Training & Development Consultants Inclusion Specialists Sheryl Faulconer 277-1260 Linda Littlewolf 277-6031 Training & Development Consultants Janet Gagliano 277-1039 Luisa Chavez-Scott 277-1000 Amanda Williams 277-1348 Vacant (Bilingual) 277-1590 Verification Manager Amy Bazan 277-1469 Training Coordinator Dawn Gibson 277-0593 Enrollment Services Rep Marlene Lopez-Rodriguez 277-1592 General Information & Training Registration 277-1371 If you have any questions or comments regarding the UNM Cariño EC TTAP Newsletter contact Malisa Kasparian. Apply today to participate in FOCUS. The sooner you apply to FOCUS the more time your program will have to work on the new criteria and successfully demonstrate that you are meeting your program’s current STAR level. 5-STAR Accredited Programs: Time is running out! Your accrediting agency may no longer be recognized for 5-STAR on January 1, 2018. You may: Transition to a state-recognized early childhood accreditation (NAEYC, COA, or ACSI) or Apply to participate in the state’s new FOCUS TQRIS (this will allow your program time to meet the new 5-STAR criteria by January 1, 2018). For more information about FOCUS and to download the application please visit www.NewMexicoKids.org or call (505) 827-7623 Inside this issue: Strengthening the Quality of Early Care Programs Wondering with Children: The Importance of Observation in Early Education Early Childhood Course Descriptions UNM Cariño EC TTAP Child Care Provider and Parent Training Calendar Other Training Opportunities (45 Hour & 6 Hour Courses), Training Policies Early Childhood Trauma - Part 1 Wondering with Children: continued from page 3 Monitorización y evaluación del desarollo Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Pages 5-7 Pages 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11
    • Strengthening the Quality of Early Care Programs Adapted from The Power of Observation for Birth through Eight, by Judy R. Jablon, Amy Laura Dombro & Margo Dichtelmiller “All of us share the common goal of strengthening the quality of early care programs. Teaching strategies focuses on developing curriculum, assessment, and professional development resources, so we know that support and training are essential if teachers are to understand and use a curriculum to guide their everyday decision making. Effective curriculum implementation requires a good understanding of child development and of each child's unique abilities, interests, and needs. When teachers and family care providers observe children systematically, they have a wealth of information for implementing curriculum and individualizing instruction.” Diane Trister Dodge President, Teaching Strategies We define observation as watching to learn. Observing provides the information you need to build relationships with individual children and enable them to be successful learners. We learn about children by watching them, listening to them, and studying their work. Watching and listening to children helps us understand what they are feeling, learning, and thinking. Why does this gap exist? The answer lies in how one has been taught to think about observing. Many were taught a “set of skills” - looking at a child’s behavior, objectively recording what we see, and then analyzing our notes. Observing IS all these things, but it IS also so much more! This subtle shift from seeing observation as a skill to seeing it as an opportunity to wonder and learn makes an enormous difference. When it happens, observation is no longer something “out there” that you have to find time to do. Instead, it becomes part of your everyday work. Wondering and asking; watching, listening, and taking notes; and reflecting and responding are as important as anything else you do during the day. Fostering Children’s Competence and Success You can use the information you learn from observing to create the classroom’s physical and social environment and to plan daily routines and activities. The environment you create leads children to certain kinds of discoveries and thinking. Your role is to Getting to know children as people and as learners gives you the facilitate this process as they discover their own meaning of their experiences. information you need to be an effective-decision maker in the classroom. With the information you learn from observing, you Too often teachers intervene in ways that are oriented toward can select the right materials, plan appropriate activities, and an activity, not toward children and their learning. As you get to ask questions that guide children in learning to understand the know children, and your respect and appreciation for them world around them. grows, your decisions about how and when to intervene will more likely be based on children’s interest and needs. This is The relationship that develops as you get to know and interact the essence of individualizing. with children affects everything that happens in the child care setting. When children are respected, they feel good about Ask yourself three basic questions before intervening: themselves. When they feel a connection with you, they feel safe to explore, experiment, question, and test new limits —all 1. Should I step back and give children the space and prerequisites for learning. For teachers, the key to effectiveness time they need to make a discovery or solve a problem is trusting and responsive relationships. Observation is key to independently? building these relationships. 2. Does the child need me to step in and help? 3. If I step in, what should I say or do? Beyond a Set of Skills: Observing is an Attitude of Openness If we all agree that observing is important, why is it so often a hit-or-miss affair and a source of great frustration? “I can go for months without giving observation a thought,” one teacher said. “I set out with good intentions, “ explains another. “Then at the end of the year, I find a pile of index cards in a drawer that I never looked at. It’s frustrating.” A clear pattern has emerged: Teachers know observing is important. But most don't see themselves as effective observers and, thus, feel unable to reap the full benefits of observing. Page 2 Sometimes the best thing you can do to support a child’s learning is to step back and let the child experience something. Taking a few moments to observe a child at play or work may be just what you need to figure out if you should stay out of the action. When you do step in, rely on your observations to ask the right questions to stimulate and stretch the child’s thinking. In turn, taking a step back also allows you to enjoy the children. Your work will be so much more satisfying, your relationships with parents enriched by the stories your share with them, and the children will thrive! Cariño Early Childhood News
    • Wondering with Children: The Importance of Observation in Early Education George Forman & Ellen Hall Videatives, Inc. Amherst, Massachusetts Children are sometimes spontaneous, sometimes reserved; joyful now, sad later; friendly and reserved; competent and naïve; talkative and quiet. To be childlike is to experience an almost unpredictable array of discoveries, emotions, and levels of energy. Children are unique and complex and thus often difficult to comprehend. They do not readily engage us in dialogue in order to explain the reasons for their caprice as they explore the world that surrounds them. Yet, as teachers, it is important for us to know our children deeply, to flow with their currents, and to extend their budding theories about how the world works. We want to use these reasons again, so we will provide an example that illustrates the general meaning of each:  Interests—He loves to play with trucks.  Developmental level—She throws the ball either very hard or not at all.  Strategies—He keeps all the crayons to himself and only shares when another child plays with him.  Skills—He has trouble stringing beads onto a knotted string.  Personality—She is quiet and reserved, likes to observe others before engaging in activity. Given the delightful yet often enigmatic characteristics of young children, we learned decades ago that in order to comprehend In essence, we can learn at least five attributes of our children children we must begin by observing them as they play. But what when we observe them closely: do we see as we observe, and how do we use our observations  Their interests and preferences to enhance our effectiveness as teachers?  Their levels of cognitive and social development  Their strategies for creating desired effects Here are some of the reasons that teachers offer when asked  Their skills and accomplishments about the value of watching and listening to children:  Their personalities and temperaments  If I watch the children play, I can discover their interests.  By observing children, I can assess their developmental levels. Each of the preceding objectives for observing is relevant if we  I look to see what strategies children use to attain their goals. desire to learn about children and thus improve the quality of our teaching. We think that one of these objectives is best suited  Observing children helps me know what skills the children for gathering information in order to engage in high-level converneed to practice. sations with young children about their theories and attitudes,  When I observe children at play, I learn a lot about their conversations that can support and extend their learning in both personalities. depth and breadth. Continued on page 10 More Resources for Observation & Documentation Information  Wondering with Children: The Importance of Observation in Early Education - The above article was adapted from the abstract paper written by George Forman and Ellen Hall. To view the paper in its entirety with video clips visit http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v7n2.  Young Children - July 2013, Vol. 68, No. 3 - Using Documentation and Assessment to Support Young Children’s Learning. http://www.naeyc.org/yc/pastissues/2013/july.  The Power of Observation for Birth Through Eight by Judy R. Jablon, Amy Laura Dombro, & Margo L. Dichtelmiller. Another great resource for all information related to early childhood in the state of New Mexico is the newmexicokids.org website - resources for caregivers and educators. Cariño Early Childhood News Page 3
    • The New Mexico Training & Technical Assistance Programs (TTAPs) will be supporting the New Mexico FOCUS quality improvement initiative by offering trainings in our community that are OPEN TO EVERYONE! Below you will find detailed descriptions for each FOCUS training. These trainings will be offered all throughout the calendar year and they will specifically be designated as “FOCUS” related. NEW MEXICO EARLY LEARNING GUIDELINES What Are the New Mexico Early Learning Guidelines? An Awareness Session (2 Hour Series) In this 2-hour training you will be introduced to the ELG’s, what age groups and domains they address, who can use the ELG’s, and how they can be used. Introducing the New Mexico Early Learning Guidelines: Introduction (8 Hour Series) Part 1 - In this 2-hour training you will learn about the background and overview of the NMELG’s. You will receive a copy of the document so that you can get familiar with the general content and sections and the specific parts of each section. Part 2 - In this 2-hour training you will bring your copy of the NMELG’s to become acquainted with the purposes, recommended uses and guiding principles. You will be introduced to the Individualizing and Curriculum Planning Process using the ELG’s and learn about the ELG Family Engagement Materials. Part 3 - In this 2-hour session you will bring your copy of the NMELG’s and learn more about authentic, observational assessment using the guidelines. The foundations for observing children will be shared along with ways to document (or write down) your observations. Some strategies for good documentation will be introduced. Part 4 - In this 2-hour session you will bring your copy of the NMELG’s and learn more about portfolio documentation as a way to organize your observational notes and relate them to the NMELG’s. You will become acquainted with the portfolio formats for the NMELG’s and learn strategies for communicating effectively with families through portfolio documentation. EARLY CHILDHOOD ENVIRONMENT RATING SCALES - REVISED (ECERS-R) Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale - Revised for Classroom Self-Assessment (6 Hour Series) In this 6-hour training series, the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale - Revised and teaching practices that are linked to positive child outcomes, ELG’s, and continuous program improvement for your program/classroom will be explored. Part 1 - Key elements of program structure Part 2 - Powerful interactions with children, your curriculum Part 3 - Self-Assessment and Continuous Program Improvement Plan Please note: Cariño will also be offering the Infant Toddler Environment Rating Scale (ITERS), the Family Child Care Home Environment Rating Scale (FCCERS), and the School-Age Childhood Environment Rating Scale (SACERS) training series throughout the year. See ECERS-R description above. POWERFUL INTERACTIONS Powerful Interactions (4 Hour Series) Powerful Interactions, the book written by A. Dombro, J. Jablon, & C. Stetson, provides the foundation for this 4-hour training about practical and influential ways to interact with young children. Join us as we explore a number of practical insights and strategies that can help to increase our effectiveness as educators of young children. AUTHENTIC OBSERVATION DOCUMENTATION CURRICULUM PLANNING PROCESS (AODCP) AODCP (6 Hour Series) Join us in this 6-hour training as we explore the process of observing and documenting how young children grow and develop. Based on the AODCP process, this training includes elements about what “getting the why” means, the NM Early Learning Guidelines (ELG’s), Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP), and the inclusion of families. AODCP also provides practical ideas and activities to support participants in their process of curriculum planning. See pages 5-7 for specific dates, times and registration information! Page 4 Cariño Early Childhood News
    • UNM Cariño Early Childhood TTAP Training Calendar  Please call 277-1371 (277-1590 en Español) to sign up. Each individual participant must pre-register themself.  Please see legend below for corresponding competency areas.  Please arrive early/on time. Only a short 5 minute grace period is allowed, after which latecomers will not be admitted. No children at UNM Cariño trainings, please.  Trainings with (5) Pre-Registered Participants or less may be cancelled.  Arrangements for needed accommodations may be made 1 week prior to class  Inclement Weather/Training Cancellation Line 277-1371 Evenings & Saturdays JANUARY 2014 - SIGN-UPS BEGIN DECEMBER 16th (You MUST attend all parts in a training series to receive a certificate) BERNALILLO COUNTY: 1/4 9:00-11:00am FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 1 1/4 11:30-1:30pm FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 2 1/4 2:00-4:00pm FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-1hr, 5-2hrs, 6-2hrs, 7-1hr) 1/6 1/13 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Powerful Interactions Part 1 FOCUS - Powerful Interactions Part 2 (4 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-1hr, 5-3hrs) 1/6 1/13 1/27 9:00-11:00am 9:00-11:00am 9:00-11:00am The Effects of Childhood Trauma: Intro Part 1 The Effects of Childhood Trauma: Brain Development Part 2 The Effects of Childhood Trauma: Strategies Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-2hrs, 4-2hrs, 7-2hrs) 1/8 1/15 1/22 9:00-11:00am 9:00-11:00am 9:00-11:00am FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 1 FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 2 FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-1hr, 5-2hrs, 6-2hrs, 7-1hr) 1/8 1/15 1/22 1/29 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 1 FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 2 FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 3 FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 4 (8 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-2hrs, 3-.5hr, 4-2hrs, 5-1.5hrs, 6-1.5hrs, 7-.5hr) 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 SANDOVAL COUNTY: No Training Scheduled this Month VALENCIA COUNTY: No Training Scheduled this Month SOCORRO COUNTY: No Training Scheduled this Month FOCUS trainings are open to everyone! For a more detailed description of these trainings see Page 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. Child Growth Development & Learning Health Safety & Nutrition Family Community Collaboration Developmentally Appropriate Content Cariño Early Childhood News EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COMPETENCY AREAS 5. Learning Environment & Curriculum Implementation 6. Assessment for Children & Programs 7. Professionalism Page 5
    • UNM Cariño Early Childhood TTAP Training Calendar  Please call 277-1371 (277-1590 en Español) to sign up. Each individual participant must pre-register themself.  Please see legend below for corresponding competency areas.  Please arrive early/on time. Only a short 5 minute grace period is allowed, after which latecomers will not be admitted. No children at UNM Cariño trainings, please.  Trainings with (5) Pre-Registered Participants or less may be cancelled.  Arrangements for needed accommodations may be made 1 week prior to class  Inclement Weather/Training Cancellation Line 277-1371 Evenings & Saturdays FEBRUARY 2014 - SIGN-UPS BEGIN JANUARY 20th (You MUST attend all parts in a training series to receive a certificate) BERNALILLO COUNTY: 2/3 10:00am-Noon DIRECTORS SERIES: Positive Communication Part 1 2/10 10:00am-Noon DIRECTORS SERIES: Positive Communication Part 2 2/17 10:00am-Noon DIRECTORS SERIES: Positive Communication Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 3-2hrs, 4-2hrs, 6-2hrs) 277-1371 2/3 2/10 2/17 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 1 FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 2 FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-1hr, 5-2hrs, 6-2hrs, 7-1hr) 277-1371 2/4 2/11 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm Science in the Classroom Part 1 Science in the Classroom Part 2 (4 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-2hrs, 5-2hrs) 2/5 2/12 2/19 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 1 FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 2 FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-1hr, 5-2hrs, 6-2hrs, 7-1hr) 2/6 2/13 2/20 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 1 FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 2 FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 3-.5hr, 4-2hrs, 5-1hr, 6-1hr, 7-1.5hrs) 2/24 6:30-8:30pm Quality Care Series - Intro to the NM Quality Rating System Part 1 (Please Note: Must also attend Part 2 on 3/3 and Part 3 on 3/10) 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 SANDOVAL COUNTY: 2/22 9:00-11:00am FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 1 2/22 11:30-1:30pm FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 2 2/22 2:00-4:00pm FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 3-.5hr, 4-2hrs, 5-1hr, 6-1hr, 7-1.5hrs) VALENCIA COUNTY: 2/22 9:00-11:00am Nurturing a Child’s Intelligence Part 1 2/22 11:30-1:30pm Nurturing a Child’s Intelligence Part 2 (4 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-2hrs, 5-2hrs) SOCORRO COUNTY: 2/22 9:00-11:00am FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 1 2/22 11:30-1:30pm FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 2 2/22 2:00-4:00pm FOCUS - Early Childhood Environment Rating Scales - ECERS-R Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-1hr, 5-2hrs, 6-2hrs, 7-1hr) 277-1371 277-1371 277-137 FOCUS trainings are open to everyone! For a more detailed description of these trainings see Page 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. Child Growth Development & Learning Health Safety & Nutrition Family Community Collaboration Developmentally Appropriate Content Page 6 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COMPETENCY AREAS 5. Learning Environment & Curriculum Implementation 6. Assessment for Children & Programs 7. Professionalism Cariño Early Childhood News
    • UNM Cariño Early Childhood TTAP Training Calendar  Please call 277-1371 (277-1590 en Español) to sign up. Each individual participant must pre-register themself.  Please see legend below for corresponding competency areas.  Please arrive early/on time. Only a short 5 minute grace period is allowed, after which latecomers will not be admitted. No children at UNM Cariño trainings, please.  Trainings with (5) Pre-Registered Participants or less may be cancelled.  Arrangements for needed accommodations may be made 1 week prior to class  Inclement Weather/Training Cancellation Line 277-1371 Evenings & Saturdays MARCH 2014 - SIGN-UPS BEGIN FEBRUARY 17th (You MUST attend all parts in a training series to receive a certificate) BERNALILLO COUNTY: 3/3 6:30-8:30pm Quality Care Series: Happy & Healthy Learning Environments Part 2 (Must have also attended Part 1 on 2/24) 3/10 6:30-8:30pm Quality Care Series: Watch, Listen & Learn - Observation/Assessment Part 3 277-1371 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-1hr, 4-2hrs, 5-1hr, 6-1hr, 7-1hr) 3/3 3/10 3/17 9:00-11:00am 9:00-11:00am 9:00-11:00am DIRECTOR’S SERIES: Self Care: What is Burnout? Part 1 DIRECTOR’S SERIES: Self Care: Avoiding Burnout Part 2 DIRECTOR’S SERIES: Self Care: Finding a Happy Balance Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competency 7-6hrs) 3/4 3/11 3:00-5:00pm 3:00-5:00pm FOCUS - Powerful Interactions Part 1 FOCUS - Powerful Interactions Part 2 (4 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-1hr, 5-3hrs) 277-1371 3/4 3/11 3/18 3/25 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 1 FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 2 FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 3 FOCUS - Early Learning Guidelines Introduction Part 4 (8 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-2hrs, 3-.5hr, 4-2hrs, 5-1.5hrs, 6-1.5hrs, 7-.5hr) 277-1371 3/5 3/12 3/19 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 1 FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 2 FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-1hr, 5-2hrs, 6-2hrs, 7-1hr) 3/6 3/13 3/20 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm Theme Curriculum Part 1 Theme Curriculum Part 2 Theme Curriculum Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 1-2hrs, 4-2hrs, 5-2hrs) 3/17 3/24 3/31 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm 6:30-8:30pm FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 1 FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 2 FOCUS - Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scales - ITERS Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 4-1hr, 5-2hrs, 6-2hrs, 7-1hr) 3/22 3/22 3/22 9:00-11:00am 11:30-1:30pm 2:00-4:00pm FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 1 FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 2 FOCUS - Authentic Observation Documentation Curriculum Planning Process (AODCP) Part 3 (6 Hour Certificate - Competencies 3-.5hr, 4-2hrs, 5-1hr, 6-1hr, 7-1.5hrs) 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 277-1371 SANDOVAL COUNTY: No Training Scheduled this Month VALENCIA COUNTY: No Training Scheduled this Month SOCORRO COUNTY: No Training Scheduled this Month FOCUS trainings are open to everyone! For a more detailed description of these trainings see Page 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. Child Growth Development & Learning Health Safety & Nutrition Family Community Collaboration Developmentally Appropriate Content Cariño Early Childhood News EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COMPETENCY AREAS 5. Learning Environment & Curriculum Implementation 6. Assessment for Children & Programs 7. Professionalism Page 7
    • Other Cariño EC TTAP Learning Opportunities 45 HOUR EARLY CHILDHOOD ENTRY LEVEL COURSE Call for January—March 45 HOUR Schedule. $40 Money order or company check required to register (No Cash). Must register with Cariño 277-1371. 6 HOUR QUALITY EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS FOR ALL COURSE Directors of 3 and 4 STAR programs can contact one of the Cariño Child Care Inclusion Specialists (Sheryl Faulconer 277-1260 or Linda Littlewolf 277-6031) to register for the training. GETTING READY FOR YOUR LICENSING VISIT The Getting Ready for Your Licensing Visit training continues to be offered. Please contact Cariño at 277-1371 for more information or to register for the training. CARIÑO EC TTAP ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER REQUESTS Would you prefer to receive the Cariño newsletter via email? If yes, please send your request to mkaspari@unm.edu. Indicate in the subject line “Electronic Newsletter Request” and you will be added to our email distribution list. Other Community Learning Opportunities CNM Workforce 45 Hour Courses & Early Childhood Credit Courses: Please call Alicia West at 224-5204 for 45-Hour course info or CNM Registration at 224-3214 for courses offered. New Mexico Child Care & Education Association: NMCCEA Professional Development Training on-line www.NMCCEA.org, 239-0660. UNM Cariño Early Childhood TTAP Training Guidelines! UNM Cariño EC trainings fill up fast! Be sure to read, understand & follow these guidelines: 1. Please sign up (277-1371) before the training so we will be expecting you and have a chair reserved. 2. Please leave a DETAILED voicemail message with your name, child care program name and day time phone number and your call will be returned in the order it was received. Cariño’s registration system ensures that spaces are filled on a first come first served basis. 3. You will receive registration confirmation via phone with training details, location, etc. 4. Please note that you may no longer call to pre-register for other participants. Each individual must pre-register herself/himself. 5. You may sign up for more than 1 training at a time (maximum 3 per month), but PLEASE show up if you sign up. If you “no show” without cancellation ahead of time, you may automatically lose any future reservations you may have had. 6. Each child care center is respectfully asked to not sign up more than three participants per training, so as to allow more centers and family child care home providers to participate. 7. Certificates are issued at the end of each training and will not be issued early under any circumstances. 8. Plan to arrive on time. Only a short “grace period” of 5 minutes is allowed, after which latecomers will not be admitted. 9. No children are allowed; this is because we as early childhood professionals, believe that this is not an appropriate setting for children and we are not able to accommodate them with toys or room to play. In addition, children can be a distraction to the presenter as well as to other training participants. 10. Any disruptive or inappropriate behavior will NOT be tolerated and at the discretion of the trainer you may be asked to leave 11. Cell phone calls are not permitted during the training. Please turn your cell phone to silent or off. 12. Trainings with (5) Pre-Registered Participants or less may be cancelled. 13. Inclement Weather/Training Cancellation Line 277-1371 Evenings & Saturdays. 14. No food or drink is allowed in the Cariño EC TTAP classroom so please plan accordingly. Page 8 Cariño Early Childhood News
    • EARLY CHILDHOOD TRAUMA (adapted from Zero to Six Collaborative Group, National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010, Los Angeles, CA and Durham, NC: National Center for Child Traumatic Stress) Many adults assume that young age protects children from being impacted by traumatic experiences. This is partly due to the fact that young children, ages 0-6, may react differently to trauma than older children. Also, young children may not be able to verbalize their reactions and tell you what is bothering them. Young children are affected by traumatic events even though they may not understand what happened. A growing body of research has established that even infants may be affected by these events. Trauma can be a result of intentional violence such as physical or sexual abuse to the child, experiencing or witnessing domestic violence, a natural disaster, accidents, or war. Young children can also experience traumatic stress because of painful medical procedures or the sudden loss of a parent or caregiver. In one study of children aged 2-5, more than half (52.5%) had experienced a severe stressor in their lifetime. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network conducted a survey among children who were receiving assessment or intervention services for trauma. Seventy-eight percent of these children had experienced more than one trauma type and the average initial exposure occurred at age five. Other data is showing that one-fifth of children receiving trauma-focused services are between the ages of zero to six years. The traumas these children most often received services for were: exposure to domestic violence, sexual abuse, neglect, and traumatic loss or bereavement. Traumatic events have a profound impact on the sensory development of young children. Their sense of safety may be changed by sounds, movements, and other sensations of a frightening event. These images tend to reoccur as nightmares, fears, or reenacting the event. Because young children lack the ability to accurately understand the event, they may believe that their fears have the power to become real. They are less able to anticipate danger or keep themselves safe. They often interpret a traumatic event differently than their older siblings or friends. They may blame themselves or their parents for not preventing the event. Young children do experience both behavioral and physiological symptoms after exposure to trauma as do older children. However, unlike older children, young children cannot express their feelings in words. This also makes the effects of trauma on younger children unique. Young children are especially vulnerable to trauma because of their rapidly-developing brains. Early childhood trauma has been associated with reduced size of the brain cortex, the area that is responsible for memory, attention, awareness, thinking, language, and consciousness. These changes can affect IQ, ability to regulate emotions, fearfulness, and the feeling of not being safe. Without the support of a parent/caregiver, children who are impacted by trauma may experience overwhelming stress. They often develop symptoms that are difficult for adults to understand and to know how to respond to. In our next issue, we will discuss how to recognize common symptoms of early childhood trauma. READ MORE ABOUT IT: For more information about the impact of trauma on brain development, see Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain, available at http://developingchild. harvard.edu/library/reports and working papers/wp3/. CHECK OUT THESE RESOURCES:  Stressful Life Events and PTSD in Preschool Children by H. Egger and A. Angold (2004)  The Future of Children, vol. 10, p. 4-22, by D.C. Grossman (2000)  Preschool Children’s Exposure to Violence: Relation of Behavior Problems to Parent and Child Reports by A. Shahinfar, N.A. Fox, and L.A. Leavitt (2000)  Witnessing Violence by Young Children and Their Mothers by L. Taylor, B. Zuckerman, and B.M. Groves (1994) Cariño Early Childhood News SITUATIONS THAT CAN BE TRAUMATIC:  Physical or sexual abuse  Abandonment, betrayal of trust, or neglect  The death or loss of a loved one  Life-threatening illness in a caregiver  Witnessing domestic violence  Automobile accidents or other serious accidents  Bullying  Life-threatening health situations and/or painful medical procedures  Witnessing or experiencing community violence  Witnessing police activity  Having a close relative incarcerated  Life-threatening natural disasters  Acts or threats of terrorism Page 9
    • Wondering with Children: The Importance of Observation in Early Education Continued from page 3 If we truly want to have high-level conversations with children about their beliefs, expectations, and assumptions about how something works or why something occurs, what do we need to know about the children? Quite simply, we need to know their beliefs, assumptions, and expectations so that we might enter the conversation with a paraphrase or counterpoint:  Knowing children’s interests might help us prepare the environment, but it does not help us have better conversations.  Knowing children’s skills might help us think about games to play that might encourage them to practice their skills, but it does not help us have better conversations.  Knowing children’s developmental level might help us predict what questions the children can answer, but it does not help us enter into a meaningful conversation with the children.  Knowing something about a child’s personality might help us be sensitive about our tone of voice or help us know what topics to avoid, but it does not help us have better conversations. In order to have a meaningful conversation with a child, we need to know what the child thinks can be done in real situations (possible goals), and we need to know the procedures that the child believes will make things happen (possible strategies). If we have watched and listened long enough to determine the child’s goals and his strategies for attaining those goals, then we have both a resource for understanding the child and an interesting basis for a high-level conversation. We might say, “It seems like you think the ball will roll faster if you make the incline steeper.” Or we might say, “Do you think you will have more friends if you have crayons?” But then in revisiting an experience with a child, putting that experience into words, we need to go beyond the observed strategies and consider the theories that make those strategies reasonable. Considering children’s theories requires more than a careful transcription of what they say and do. We have to dig. We have to abstract the meaning of elliptical sentences, aborted movements, or a confusing explanation, request, or description. Children are competent learners, but as teachers, we have to slow down, carefully observe, and study our documented observations in order to understand the ideas that they are attempting to convey. In addition to slowing down, observing, and studying children’s actions and narration, understanding children’s theories requires a general knowledge of child development and a willingness to speculate. Wondering with Children: The Importance of Observation in Early Education - The above article was adapted from the abstract paper written by George Forman and Ellen Hall. To view the paper in its entirety with video clips visit http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v7n2/forman.html. Page 10 Cariño Early Childhood News
    • Cariño EC TTAP Clases en Español Cariño no ofrecerá ninguna clase en Español este trimestre (Enero, Febrero y Marzo). Por favor, sea paciente con nosotros mientras nuestro nuevo personal bilingue están en formación y desarollo de nuevas talleras para ofrecer en el 4to trimestre (Abril, Mayo y Junio). Si tiene alguna pregunta, puede ponerse en contacto con Marlene al 277-1371. Monitorización y evaluación del desarrollo Vigilancia del desarrollo El crecimiento y desarrollo de su bebé deben ser objeto de un seguimiento conjunto por parte de usted y su profesional de la salud. En cada consulta de rutina, el médico verifica que no haya retrasos o problemas del desarrollo y responde a las inquietudes que los padres puedan tener. Esto se conoce como vigilancia o monitorización del desarrollo . Se le debe dar seguimiento a cualquier problema que se observe durante la monitorización mediante una evaluación del desarrollo. A los niños con necesidades de atención médica especial se les debe hacer una monitorización y evaluación al igual que a los niños que no tienen estas necesidades. Vigilar un desarrollo saludable significa no solo prestar atención a los signos y síntomas relacionados con la afección del niño sino también estar pendiente de su bienestar físico, mental, social y emocional. Evaluación del desarrollo Las consultas pediátricas de rutina hacen posible que los médicos y enfermeras tengan contacto regular con los niños con lo cual llevan un registro y monitorizan su salud y desarrollo a través de evaluaciones periódicas del desarrollo. La evaluación del desarrollo es una prueba corta para saber si un niño está aprendiendo las destrezas básicas a su debido tiempo o si presenta retrasos. La evaluación del desarrollo también la pueden realizar otros profesionales en entornos médicos, comunitarios y escolares. Puede que sea necesario realizar evaluaciones complementarias si el niño tiene un riesgo alto de presentar problemas del desarrollo debido a que fue prematuro, nació con bajo peso o por otros motivos. Si en los chequeos de rutina el médico de su niño no realiza este tipo de evaluaciones del desarrollo, pídale que las haga. Servicios de intervención temprana Los estudios muestran que los servicios de intervención temprana pueden mejorar significativamente el desarrollo del niño. Los servicios de intervención temprana ayudan a los niños desde que nacen hasta los 3 años de edad (36 meses) a aprender destrezas importantes. Estos servicios incluyen terapia para ayudar a los niños a que hablen, caminen e interaccionen con otros. La Ley sobre Personas con Discapacidades (IDEA, por sus siglas en inglés) establece que los niños menores de 3 años de edad (36 meses) que tienen riesgo de presentar retrasos del desarrollo pueden reunir los requisitos para recibir servicios de intervención temprana aun cuando no se les haya hecho un diagnóstico formal. Estos servicios los proporciona cada estado por medio de un sistema de intervención temprana. Además, para los tratamientos de síntomas específicos, Durante este examen, el médico puede hacerle preguntas como terapia para casos de retraso en el lenguaje, por lo a los padres o hablar y jugar con el niño para ver cómo se general no se requiere tener un diagnóstico formal. comporta, aprende, juega, habla y se mueve. Un retraso en Aunque la intervención a una edad temprana es extremacualquiera de estas áreas podría ser signo de un problema. damente importante, la intervención puede ser útil a cualquier edad. La Academia Americana de Pediatría recomienda que www.cdc.gov todos los niños sean examinados para detectar retrasos del desarrollo y discapacidades durante las visitas regulares al pediatra a los:  9 meses
  18 meses
  24 o 30 meses Cariño Early Childhood News Page 11
    • Cariño Early Childhood News Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage University of New Mexico Cariño Early Childhood Training & Technical Assistance Program Early Childhood Services Center Division of Continuing Education 1634 University Blvd MSC07 4030 Albuquerque, NM 87131 505-277-1371 Office 505-277-8975 Fax PAID Albuquerque, NM Permit No. 39 UNM Cariño Early Childhood News is published on a quarterly basis. Inside this issue you will find the Cariño Training Calendars for January, February & March 2014 The UNM Cariño Early Childhood TTAP is funded by the Children, Youth & Families Department Office of Child Development UNM New Mexico Kids Child Care Resource & Referral Services New Mexico Kids Child Care Resource and Referral maintains a statewide database of child care providers that are licensed or registered by recognized regulatory agencies in the state of New Mexico and continue to maintain their status with their respective agencies. This database is used to provide courtesy referrals to anyone who requests them at no cost to families or child care providers. Child care providers share the information that is included in the database and that information is used to help refer families to providers that might meet the needs of their children. Child care providers and their information appear on this list on a voluntary basis. Referrals are available online or by phone. If you are interested in referrals or joining the Child Care Referral database call 277-7900.