Joy Bossi Edible Landscape Mon Jan 25 At 9

  • 345 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
345
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Would you like to cash in on the fastest growing, most politically correct trend in gardening? Welcome to the edible landscape! The down side to an introduction of a fruit-producing plant is, of course, the possible mess when the fruit ripens. With a little explanation to a homeowner beforehand, acceptable choices can still be made. The great surge in the desire for home food production overshadows the potential downside if a little ‘counseling’ is done before planting. Because all plants create a mess of some size during a growing season, sliding into something that can be eaten, dried, or preserved in some other way, will fill a niche that is rapidly expanding. We know that vegetables play well with ornamental flowers and shrubs, so an integrated planting can fill the need for “pretty” and still be “edible.” Since you already ask preference questions before designing/installing a landscape plan, just add “What do you like to eat?” to your usual list. Don’t ask “What do you want to grow?” or you will get caught in the “Well, what is easiest to grow?” trap. Even if radishes and onions are near foolproof, it won’t make your client happy when they have a bountiful harvest and THEN remember that only one member of the family likes radishes and onions aren’t anybody’s favorite. Brush up on the pollination requirements before creating your recommended variety list. For instance, Bartlett Pears will produce with only one tree planted, but a second tree will boost the harvest. Apple varieties can be very finicky about what pollen will be accepted to produce fruit. Remember, very few sweet cherries are self-fertile – which brings me to an opinion statement: Because of the Western Cherry Fruit Fly, I believe a Sweet Cherry tree to be useful only as 1. A shade tree or 2. A Robin Feeding Station. Consider Rhubarb for an impressive addition to a lush landscape design. An artichoke plant, while usually only an annual, will still make an incredible focal point in a mostly ornamental garden. And a couple of purple cabbage plants will absolutely shine as they begin to mature amongst the marigolds. There will always be a call for the stand-apart vegetable garden, but when space is a major factor in the design process, integration will be a great help. Herbs, too, are often considered only for an official, organized ‘Herb Garden.’ Help your clients visualize the beauty of a border of Purple Ruffle Basil; a tasty ground cover of Golden Creeping Thyme; or a sparkling addition of Tri-Color Sage in the front planting beds. You can add substantially to your versatility in our business by taking advantage of the exploding growth in the request for edible landscaping. Whether it comes from planting seeds or nursery stock, shrubs or trees, annuals or perennials, folks want to ‘graze’ in their own little garden spot. They may be concerned about the safety of grocery store produce and know (or are learning) that you can control exactly what is sprayed on your own garden. Maybe they want to reduce the miles traveled by their peppers or potatoes. Whatever the motivation, you can be the solution they are looking for! Happy Growing! Joy in the Garden
  • 2. Try substituting these into any regular landscape plan: TREES – FOR - Almond trees ………………………………………………….. Flowering Cherries 2 varieties of Filbert ………………………………………… Clump River Birch Sour Cherry trees ……………………………………………. Lilac, Forsythia Dwarf Peach tree (except in deep shade)………….. Japanese Maple SHRUBS – Gooseberry …………………………………………………….. Pyracantha, Barberry Raspberry (especially along an east facing fence) Privet, Juniper Grape vine ……………………………………………………… Virginia Creeper Dwarf peach, plum, or apple ….………………………… Mugho pine ANNUALS – Opal basil. ……………………………………………………. Ageratum, Lobelia Eggplant ………………………………………………………. Tall Zinnia
  • 3. Bright Lights Chard ………………………………………. Medium Marigold Sun Sugar tomato …………………………………………. Black-eyed Susan vine PERENNIALS – Asparagus ……………………………………………………. Ornamental Grass Golden Sage …………………………………………………. Moonbeam Coreopsis Chives …………………………………………………………. Blue Fescue Grass Oregano ………………………………………………………. Ajuga