University of Sussex postgraduate prospectus section 7: Subjects
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Section 7 of the University of Sussex postgraduate prospectus 2009. Visit www.sussex.ac.uk to view online or order a printed copy of the 2010 prospectus.

Section 7 of the University of Sussex postgraduate prospectus 2009. Visit www.sussex.ac.uk to view online or order a printed copy of the 2010 prospectus.

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University of Sussex postgraduate prospectus section 7: Subjects University of Sussex postgraduate prospectus section 7: Subjects Document Transcript

  • 042 American studies Subjects Subjects 044 Anthropology 047 Archaeology 048 Art history 050 Astronomy and cosmology 052 Biochemistry 056 Biology 059 Chemistry 062 Computing, artificial intelligence and IT 069 Contemporary European studies 072 Creative writing 074 Development studies 083 Economics 086 Education and teaching 091 Engineering and design 128 English language (see Linguistics and English language) 098 English language teaching 099 English literature 103 Environmental science 104 Finance 099 French (see English literature) 106 Gender studies 109 Geography 099 German (see English literature) 114 Globalisation, ethnicity and culture 115 History 048 History of art (see Art history) 121 Human rights 122 International relations 125 Law 128 Linguistics and English language 130 Management 132 Mathematics 134 Media and film studies 138 Medicine and health studies 140 Migration studies 142 Music 144 Neuroscience 146 Philosophy 148 Physics 158 Policy studies (see Science and technology policy and management) 151 Politics 153 Psychology 099 Renaissance studies (see English literature) 158 Science and technology policy and management 162 Social and political thought 164 Social work and social care 167 Sociology 086, 098 Teaching (see Education and teaching, and English language teaching) 169 Visual arts and conservation studies 41
  • American studies American studies Essentials Programme structure • Our faculty research achieved grade 5 Autumn and spring terms: all students take Taught programme (recognising research of national and Theory in Practice: Readings in Contemporary MA American Literature: Critical Reading international excellence) in the most recent Theory and Literature, plus three of the following Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) and Research programmes options: Anglo-American Modernism: Poetry our publications have attracted a number of MPhil, DPhil American History and Literature and Poetics; American Poetry after Modernism: prestigious prizes and nominations for both Retreat? Redirection? Rediscovery?; Admissions requirements British and American awards. Fictions of Capital: Case Studies in American For information on overseas qualifications that • American studies at Sussex offers flexibility Narrative; Representing the Great Depression; meet the admissions requirements, see pages and choice. For postgraduate students, we ImagiNation: Fiction and American History. 172-175 offer a taught MA in American Literature: MA Up to two options may be taken from related MA Critical Reading, an MPhil in American History A literature-based upper second-class programmes. and Literature, and a wide range of expertise undergraduate honours degree for the supervision of doctoral research in Summer term and vacation: you undertake MPhil supervised work on the MA dissertation. all aspects of the subject: literary, cultural, A first- or upper second-class undergraduate political and historical. MA students may also Assessment honours degree in history, literature or take courses from MA programmes in English. You are assessed by four 5,000-word term American studies DPhil • We have an active and friendly research papers and a dissertation of 20,000 words, for A Masters degree in a subject relevant to culture at all levels, including regular open which you will receive one-to-one supervision. your chosen area of research. For advice seminars with guest speakers, and frequent on research supervision, prospective DPhil symposia and academic conferences. applicants are encouraged to look at the Research programmes • Particular strengths include race and research areas and faculty interests listed on the ethnic relations, labour history and MPhil in American History and Literature right, and to contact Doug Haynes at the address slavery, discourses of migration, aesthetic 1-2 years full-time/up to 4 years part-time listed below modernism, modern poetry, popular culture An MPhil is a Masters-level research degree English language requirements and 20th-century writing. on a topic of your choice, achieved through IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and personal research and the close guidance of an • American Studies houses the Cunliffe Centre 6.0 in the other sections. For more information academic supervisor with relevant expertise. A for the Study of the American South and and alternative English language requirements, highly flexible qualification, your MPhil can either has close associations with the Centre for see page 174 be ‘stand-alone’ or, via an upgrade examination, Modernist Studies, based here at Sussex. Fees We also have close associations with the can form part of doctoral-level work, extending See pages 176-181 for information on fees leading literary journal Textual Practice. your thesis further and leading to a DPhil. Further information • All degrees may be undertaken on a part- or To facilitate greater autonomy and develop a Dr Doug Haynes, full-time basis. range of appropriate skills, all MPhil students are American Studies, normally required to take one or more research University of Sussex, Falmer, training courses during the first year of their Brighton BN1 9QN, UK Taught programme study. T +44 (0)1273 877304 Titles of recently completed theses include: F +44 (0)1273 625972 MA in American Literature: Critical Reading Selective Amnesia: Truth and Reconciliation E d.e.haynes@sussex.ac.uk 1 year full-time/2 years part-time in the American South and Savage Desert, www.sussex.ac.uk/americanstudies Designed for those with a critical interest in or American Garden: Popular Imagery in the Selling informed curiosity about modern American of California, 1876-1929. literature, this programme explores key topics in primarily 20th-century fiction and poetry. Assessment You are assessed by a 40,000-word thesis. Beginning with questioning how contemporary literary theory might inform all our readings, DPhil you will go on to investigate subjects such as Research applications are actively sought in modernism and its legacy in Anglo-American the following areas: 20th-century American writing, the relation between economic poetry and fiction; literature and migration; structures and narrative form, literary and autobiographical studies; popular culture; filmic representations of nationhood, or the African-American history; Southern history; relationship between culture, language and and Atlantic world topics. Proposals on other or politics during the Great Depression. related topics are welcome. This MA is associated with the Centre for Funding Modernist Studies (www.sussex.ac.uk/ EU applicants may apply to the AHRC (see Fees modernist). and funding on pages 176-186). Funding There are opportunities for research students to EU applicants may apply to the AHRC. For teach undergraduate courses. information on AHRC funding, see Fees and funding on pages 176-186. 42
  • Recent thesis titles Faculty research interests Technology, the public sphere and American American studies writing since 1960 Stephen Burman International political economy; class and race in the US; international Colonialism 1590-1730: the racialisation foreign policy. Author of The Black Progress of space Question: Explaining the African-American Selective amnesia: truth and reconciliation in the Predicament (1995). Currently working on a American South book on US foreign policy in the 1990s. Myth and sites of resistance: the structuring of Professor Robert Cook Political and social identity in contemporary US counter-discourse of history; the American Civil War; civil rights. Author race and gender of Troubled Commemoration: The American Civil War Centennial, 1961-1965 (2007) and ‘Slavish pleasures and mechanical leisures’: the Baptism of Fire: The Republican Party in Iowa, problem of leisure in America during the 1930s 1838-1878 (1993). Blank fiction: culture, consumption and the Sue Currell American literature and culture contemporary American novel 1890-1940; the emergence and production Do you see what I mean? An ‘inner law of form’ in of 20th-century mass culture; the thirties; Susan Howe’s historicism Taylorism/Fordism in relation to identity, language and the self; eugenics and popular culture; self- ‘City of refuge’: Harlem and the urban aesthetic help literature of the inter-war era. Author of The in 20th-century American literature March of Spare Time: The Problem and Promise of Leisure in the 1930s (2005). Specialist facilities Richard Follett 19th-century US social and economic history; slavery; antebellum American subjects have formed an important southern history; comparative slavery and race part of the humanities at Sussex since the relations; demography; agricultural and rural University was founded. Consequently, the history. Author of Louisiana’s Sugar Country University’s Library has large holdings of serials (2005). Currently working on slave demography and printed books relating to the US, plus and fertility patterns. electronic resources such as ECHO, and Early American Imprints. Doug Haynes European and American modernism, postmodernism and avant-garde Manuscript collections include: the Harvey writing and culture, particularly as these intersect Matusow Papers, covering the McCarthy Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is an icon both with critical theory. Publications on Thomas of the endurance of Depression Americans and of hearings in the 1950s; the Kenneth Allsop Pynchon, William Burroughs, surrealism, and the documentary mode itself, subjects covered in Papers, reflecting that author’s interest in Nathanael West. the courses Representing the Great Depression, American society, literature and popular culture; and Fictions of Capital: Case Studies in American and a series of letters from Margaret Mead to Daniel Kane 20th-century American literature; Narrative Geoffrey Gorer, exploring aspects of their shared the avant-garde; the beats; poetry since the interest in American national identity. 1960s. Author of All Poets Welcome: The Lower East Side Poetry Scene in the 1960s (2003) and For the more advanced or specialised graduate What Is Poetry: Conversations with the American student, the incomparable American holdings of Avant-Garde (2003). the British Library and the Institute of Historical Studies – as well as London’s other repositories Maria Lauret American feminist fiction and of books, serials, manuscripts, films and the theory; the American 1960s; gender, language fine arts – are all within easy commuting distance and migration; race and ethnicity; women’s of the University. autobiography. Author of Liberating Literature: Feminist Fiction in America (1994), and Alice Walker (2000). Working on race and ethnicity in Academic activities women’s writing; narratives of migration. Open seminars in subjects related to the various Professor Peter Nicholls International Americanist disciplines – history, critical theory, modernism; literary radicalism of the 1930s English literature, lesbian and gay studies, and 1960s; contemporary American poetry and international relations, post-colonialism – are poetics. Author of Modernisms: A Literary Guide scheduled in addition to the regular American (1995). Currently working on contemporary studies seminar. experimental poetry in America. Website information Jarod Roll Race, work and protest in the political The American studies web pages are regularly economy of rural America, especially in the updated and are the most reliable source of 20th century. Publications on African-American information for faculty research interests, grassroots radicalism, American farmers and as well as programme changes. Visit labour relations in the New Cotton South, 1890- www.sussex.ac.uk/americanstudies 1945. Clive Webb Race and ethnic relations in the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly in the southern states; racial and religious prejudice, racial violence, and the civil rights movement. Author of Fight Against Fear: Southern Jews and Black Civil Rights (2001); (ed) Massive Resistance: Southern Opposition to the Second Reconstruction (2005). 43 View slide
  • MA in Anthropology (Africa) Anthropology 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Anthropology Funding MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages 176-186). Programme structure Autumn term: you are provided with a foundation in the discipline, taking Anthropology and Ethnography; and Understanding Processes of Social Change. Spring term: you take Culture and Society in Africa and an option from the other MA Essentials • Anthropology at Sussex received a grade 5 anthropology programmes. Taught programmes (recognising research of national and international excellence) in the most recent Summer term and vacation: you undertake MA degrees supervised work on your dissertation. Anthropology Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). Anthropology (Africa) • Anthropology was also awarded a grade of See below for assessment methods. Anthropology (Europe) ‘excellent’ in an earlier assessment of teaching Contact the programme convenor Jon Mitchell Anthropology (South Asia) quality. (j.p.mitchell@sussex.ac.uk) for further Anthropology of Conflict, Violence information and Conciliation • We maintain a concern with the traditional Anthropology of Development and categories of British social anthropology MA in Anthropology (Europe) Social Transformation (political and economic anthropology, kinship, 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Medical Anthropology religion and ritual), while developing research Funding that focuses on contemporary global society. MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa MSc degree Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research • We have a long-standing involvement in the issues surrounding policy-making and applied 176-186). Methods (Anthropology) anthropology, and in the anthropological critique Programme structure Research programmes of development. Autumn term: you are provided with a foundation MPhil, DPhil Social Anthropology • Faculty have undertaken consultancy and in the discipline, taking Anthropology and New Route DPhil Social Anthropology commissioned work, and many of our graduates Ethnography; and Understanding Processes of Admissions requirements have found employment in these fields. Social Change. For information on overseas qualifications that We also have a significant commitment to the meet the admissions requirements, see pages Spring term: you take European Transformations ethnographic exploration of cultural phenomena and an option from the other MA anthropology 172-175 such as religious ritual, music, dance MA programmes. performance, heritage and film. An upper second-class undergraduate Summer term and vacation: you undertake honours degree in anthropology or any other supervised work on your dissertation. relevant subject area Taught programmes MSc, MPhil and New Route DPhil See below for assessment methods. An upper second-class undergraduate honours These programmes combine a thorough Contact the programme convenor Jon Mitchell degree in anthropology or a related discipline, grounding in the history, theory and methodology (j.p.mitchell@sussex.ac.uk) for further but applicants from other backgrounds may be of anthropology. They permit you to specialise in information considered. Applicants should submit an outline a region or specific focus if you wish, or to (two to three pages) of their research interests MA in Anthropology (South Asia) maintain a more general interest in the DPhil 1 year full-time/2 years part-time discipline. A Masters degree in anthropology, although Funding those with a degree in a closely related MA in Anthropology MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa discipline may also be considered. Applicants 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages should submit an outline research proposal Funding 176-186). indicating the nature, ambitions and primary MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa Programme structure questions of the research project Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages Autumn term: you are provided with a foundation 176-186). English language requirements in the discipline, taking Anthropology and IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and Programme structure Ethnography; and Understanding Processes of 6.0 in the other sections. For more information Autumn term: you are provided with a foundation Social Change. and alternative English language requirements, in the discipline, taking Anthropology and Spring term: you take Society and Economy in see page 174 Ethnography; and Understanding Processes of South Asia and an option from the other MA Social Change. Fees anthropology programmes. See pages 176-181 for information on fees Spring term: you are given the chance to adapt Summer term and vacation: you undertake the programme more to your interests. You take Further information supervised work on your dissertation. one of Culture and Society in Africa; European Contact the degree convenors indicated for each Transformations; and Society and Economy in See below for assessment methods. taught programme, or for general inquiries: South Asia, plus one course from another of the Professor Simon Coleman, Contact the programme convenor Jon Mitchell MA programmes. Department of Anthropology, University of (j.p.mitchell@sussex.ac.uk) for further Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SJ, UK Summer term and vacation: you undertake information. E s.m.coleman@sussex.ac.uk supervised work on your dissertation. Assessment for the four programmes above www.sussex.ac.uk/anthropology/postgrad Courses are assessed by a 5,000-word term See below right for assessment methods. paper, except for Anthropology and Ethnography, Contact the programme convenor Jon Mitchell which is assessed through two 2,000-word book (j.p.mitchell@sussex.ac.uk) for further reviews. The dissertation is 10,000 words. information. 44 View slide
  • MA in Anthropology of Conflict, MA in Medical Anthropology Violence and Conciliation 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Anthropology 1 year full-time/2 years part-time This MA is concerned with cross-cultural This MA is concerned with modern conflicts understandings of medicine, health and and violence, ranging from war to domestic healing, with the experience of pain and illness, violence, and with conciliation, whether local and with the political economy of health. It will or international. It will be of interest to those be of interest to both anthropologists and those concerned with research into these fields as well with experience, or considering a career, in the as those with experience, or considering a career, medical or health professions, social services, or in conflict prevention, relief and conciliation. development. Contact the programme convenor Contact the programme convenor Mark Leopold Maya Unnithan (m.unnithan@sussex.ac.uk) for (m.a.leopold@sussex.ac.uk) for further more information. information. Funding Funding MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages 176-186). 176-186). Programme structure Programme structure Autumn term: you take Medical Anthropology Autumn term: you take Researching and and one of Anthropologists and Development; Reporting Conflict: Anthropological Perspectives; Researching and Reporting Conflict: and Understanding Processes of Social Change. Anthropological Perspectives; and Understanding Spring term: you take Embodiment and Processes of Social Change. Institutionalisation of Violence, Conflict and Spring term: you take Cultural Understandings of Conciliation and an option from another MA Health and Healing and one of Anthropology of programme. Childbirth and Reproductive Health; Embodiment Summer term and vacation: you take and Institutionalisation of Violence, Conflict Anthropology of Reconciliation and and Conciliation; Households, Rural Livelihoods Reconstruction and undertake supervised work and Development Intervention; and Knowledge, on your dissertation. Power and Resistance. Assessment Summer term and vacation: you either take Each course is assessed by a 5,000-word term Evaluation and Appraisal or Anthropology of paper. The dissertation is 10,000 words. Reconciliation and Reconstruction, and write a Performance of a young men’s masquerade cult in MA in Anthropology of Development short dissertation; or you undertake supervised south-eastern Nigeria and Social Transformation work on a longer dissertation. Autumn term: you take a research elective, 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Assessment Philosophy of Science and Social Science Concerned with the anthropological study of Each course in the autumn and spring terms is Research Practice, and Research Design in a the complex economic, political and cultural assessed by a 5,000-word term paper. Cross-Cultural Context. processes of social transformation in the Where appropriate, you may also either write developing world, this MA provides an entry into a 5,000-word term paper on your optional Spring term: you take courses in quantitative and the anthropology of development and will be of summer-term course followed by a 10,000- qualitative data collection and analysis. interest to those with experience, or considering word dissertation, or write a 20,000-word Summer term: you choose from a selection of a career, in the development field. For further dissertation. courses in cross-cultural and comparative data information, contact Katy Gardner MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural collection and analysis. The research elective (k.gardner@sussex.ac.uk). Research Methods (Anthropology) continues across all terms, culminating in the Funding 1 year full-time/2 years part-time writing of a dissertation. MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa A Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate are also Assessment Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages available. See Routes to postgraduate study at Taught courses are variously assessed by term 176-186). Sussex on pages 14-15. papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent Programme structure This MSc provides an alternative route for coursework portfolios, depending on the courses Autumn term: you take Understanding Processes doctoral candidates who require more focused chosen. The research elective is assessed by a of Social Change; and Anthropologists and research skills training. 10,000-word dissertation that incorporates a Development. research report and fieldwork proposal. For further information, contact the MSc Spring term: you take Households, Livelihoods Anthropology convenor Professor Simon and Development Intervention; and Knowledge, Coleman (s.m.coleman@sussex.ac.uk). Specialist facilities Power and Resistance. Funding Extensive computing facilities are available, and Summer term and vacation: you either take This programme qualifies for ESRC support Evaluation and Appraisal and write a short office space is usually given to students taking under its 1+3 system of doctoral support. For research degrees. Students have full access to dissertation; or you undertake supervised work information on ESRC and other funding, see Fees on a longer dissertation. the University’s main Library, and to the British and funding on pages 176-186. Library of Development Studies at the Institute of If available, an option from another MA can be Development Studies (IDS), which is located on Programme structure substituted for one of the spring- or summer- the Sussex campus. There are three main elements to the MSc term courses. programme that run concurrently through the There is close academic collaboration between Assessment academic year: a research elective involving social anthropology faculty and other Each course in the autumn and spring terms is supervised reading in your individual research departments and interdisciplinary research assessed by a 5,000-word term paper. area and the writing of a dissertation; credited centres, notably history, migration studies, Where appropriate, you may also either write courses in the philosophy and methodology of geography and gender studies. Particularly a 5,000-word term paper on your summer- research; and training in both quantitative and important links have been developed with IDS term option course followed by a 10,000- qualitative research skills. and the Sussex Law School. word dissertation, or write a 20,000-word dissertation. 45
  • Research programmes Paul Basu Scotland, India, Sierra Leone, visual Pam Kea Gambia, West Africa: gender relations, anthropology, globalisation, transnationalism, migrant farm labour, politics of difference, social Anthropology We welcome students wishing to undertake migration, politics of identity, anthropology, relations of agrarian production; globalisation, research in the main areas of faculty interests. memory and history. Author of Highland processes of accumulation, child labour and Funding Homecomings: Genealogy and Heritage-Tourism education. Author of The Politics of Difference: Anthropology has full 1+3 and +3 recognition in the Scottish Diaspora (2007). Female Farmers and Agrarian Transformation from the ESRC. This includes access to five in a Gambian Political and Cultural Economy Professor Simon Coleman Sweden, UK interdisciplinary research studentships in (2007). and US; religion and pilgrimage, identity, 2009. For further information on ESRC and human rights, globalisation, modernity; Mark Leopold Violence, peacemaking and other funding, see Fees and funding on pages space, movement and health. Author of The memory, Uganda, Sudan, history, conflict, 176-186. For further advice on funding, contact Globalisation of Charismatic Christianity (2000), political culture and public morality. Author Professor Simon Coleman at the address listed and editor of (with M Crang) Tourism: Between of Inside West Nile: Violence, History and in Essentials. Place and Performance (2003). Representation on an African Frontier (2005). Coursework There are three modes of entry for research Professor Jane Cowan Greece; southern Peter Luetchford Costa Rica, Spain; students. First is traditional entry to an MPhil or Balkans; nationalism, memory and identity; cooperatives, alternative trade organisations, DPhil. Second is the MSc plus DPhil pathway, conceptualising and administering ‘difference’ alternative food provision. Author of Fair Trade which is the 1+3 route required by the ESRC in Balkan contexts; culture and rights; minority and a Global Commodity: Coffee in Costa Rica for their studentship support. Third is the New politics; gender relations; music and dance (2007). Route DPhil offering an integrated four-year performance, embodiment and experience. Jon P Mitchell Malta: history, memory, politics programme of taught coursework in research Editor of (with M Dembour and R Wilson), and national identity; religion and belief. Author methods and professional skills together with Culture and Rights: Anthropological of Ambivalent Europeans: Ritual, Memory and supervised doctoral research. Perspectives (2001). the Public Sphere in Malta (2001) and (with R For those studying for an MPhil or DPhil, during Geert de Neve India; Tamilnadu; informal labour; Wilson) Rights, Claims and Entitlements (2002). the autumn and spring terms of the initial training power; caste and kinship; industrialisation; social Co-editor of, with P Clough, Powers of Good and year you normally take a social anthropology change; globalisation. Publications include The Evil (2001). course, working closely with a designated Everyday Politics of Labour: Working Lives in Filippo Osella Kerala, South India: social supervisor. Where appropriate, you may take India’s Informal Economy (2005), and (with reproduction and stratification; migration courses from other specialist MA options as part Maya Unnithan-Kumar) Critical Journeys: The and globalisation; masculinity; consumption. of your research training. If you already have Making of Anthropologists (2006). Author of, with C Osella, Social Mobility in an MA degree, you are not necessarily required Professor Marie-Bénédicte Dembour Central Kerala (2000), and (with C Osella) Men and to take courses as part of your pre-fieldwork Africa; Europe; colonialism; memory, life stories; Masculinities in South India (2007). training. New research students will normally law and human rights; (based in the Sussex be required to take two or three courses in Jeffrey Pratt Italy, Europe: political movements Law School). Author of Who Believes in Human research methods from those offered within and ideologies; religious practice; rural Rights? Reflections on the European Convention the MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural transformations. Author of The Politics of (2006). Research Methods (Anthropology). Each course Recognition (2001) and Class and Nationalist is assessed, but assessment does not contribute Nigel Eltringham Human rights, conflict, Movements in Europe (2002). to the award of the degree. genocide and the Great Lakes region of Africa. Dinah Rajak South Africa, UK: intersection Author of The Ethics of Anthropology Debates and Fieldwork of the anthropology of development and Dilemmas (2003), and Accounting for Horror: Research degrees usually involve fieldwork. globalisation; and in the relationship between the Post-Genocide Debates in Rwanda (2004). After the first year, you usually spend the second state, business and civil society in the process year in the field and return to Sussex to write Professor James Fairhead Africa south of of development. Author of ‘Uplift and Empower: up your thesis in the third year. Those on a 1+3 the Sahara; UK: agriculture and ecology; health The Market, The Gift and Corporate Social programme can usually go to the field by the and fertility; colonialism; science and medicine. Responsibility on South Africa’s Platinum Belt’, in middle of their second year. Author of Science, Society and Power (2003), Research in Economic Anthropology (2008). and (with M Leach, T Geysbeek and S Holsoe) Recent thesis titles Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner China, Japan: African-American Exploration Inland from Liberia On the Perama waterfront: the social, economic genomics, biobanking practices, genetic (forthcoming). and cultural aspects of employment structure in testing and population policy-making, stem-cell a suburb of Piraeus, Athens Anne-Meike Fechter Indonesia, South-East research in Asian societies. Author of Academic Asia: corporate expatriates, transnationalism, Nations in China and Japan: Framed by Concepts Transnational lives, plurinational subjects: development practitioners. Author of Transnational of Nature, Culture and the Universal (2004). identity, migration and difference amongst Lives: Expatriates in Indonesia (2007). Moroccan women in Italy Professor Jock Stirrat Sri Lanka: aid and Katy Gardner Bangladesh, Islam, migration, development; economic anthropology; Asian Knowledge, risk and power: agriculture and diaspora, development, Asians in the UK. Author religions, Catholicism. Author of (with R Grillo) development discourse in a coastal village in of (with D Lewis) Development, Anthropology Discourses of Development: Anthropological Bangladesh and the Postmodern Challenge (1996), and Age, Perspectives (1997). The politics of identity in left-wing Bologna Narrative and Migration: The Life Course and Maya Unnithan-Kumar India, Rajasthan: Life Histories Amongst Bengali Elders in London Senegalese transmigrants and the construction kinship, caste and gender; development, popular (2002). of immigration in Emilia Romagna religion, fertility and reproductive health; medical Elizabeth Harrison Zambia, Malawi, Kenya: anthropology. Author of (with V Damodaran) If you won’t do these things for me, I won’t technology transfer, discourse of development, Postcolonial India (2000), and (with G de Neve) do these things for you: local and regional gender relations. Editor of (with A Cornwall Critical Journeys: The Making of Anthropologists constructions of seclusion ideologies and and A Whitehead) Feminisms in Development: (2006). Editor of Desire and Ambivalence in practices in Kano, Northern Nigeria Contradictions, Contestation and Challenges Human Reproduction (forthcoming). Abortion discourses: an exploration of the social, (2006). Professor Ann Whitehead Africa south of the cultural and organisational context of abortion Raminder Kaur India and UK; politics and Sahara; western Europe: gender relations and decision-making in contemporary Britain popular culture, festivals, Indian cinema, social transformation; economic anthropology; censorship, nationalism, diaspora, nuclear family, kinship and marriage; epistemology and Faculty research interests issues. Author of Performative Politics and the methodology; race, gender and difference. Cultures of Hinduism (2003); and Co-author of, Author of ‘Continuities and discontinuities in Research interests are briefly described below. Liquid Notions: Critical Reflections on Diaspora political constructions of the working man in For more detailed information, see and Hybridity (2004). rural sub-Saharan Africa: the lazy man in African www.sussex.ac.uk/anthropology/people agriculture’ in European Journal of Development Research (2000). 46
  • Archaeology Archaeology Essentials Taught programme Taught programme MA in Field Archaeology MA Field Archaeology (full-time and part-time) 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Research programmes Our archaeological heritage is a valuable, MPhil, DPhil Archaeology finite and vulnerable resource, which requires investigation, recording and analysis to very Admissions requirements high professional standards. This MA has been For information on overseas qualifications that developed to provide you with the practical meet the admissions requirements, see pages knowledge and skills, underpinned by theory, that 172-175 will enable you to make a positive contribution to MA field archaeology. An upper second-class undergraduate honours degree in archaeology (including You may already work for an archaeological joint degrees), or an undergraduate diploma organisation or you may want to gain skills in archaeology with level 2 passes averaging and a qualification to enable you to enter 60 per cent or higher. Consideration will also the profession of field archaeology. Or, as an be given to others who can demonstrate amateur archaeologist, you may wish to enhance extensive and relevant experience (including your skills to a high professional standard. individual research) Funding MPhil and DPhil Successful applicants are advised to check the Students on the MA in Field Archaeology Normally a Masters degree in archaeology Fees and funding information on pages 176- excavating at Barcombe Roman Villa, Sussex English language requirements 186. If you are considering taking this degree IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and programme for professional development, your Most projects are within the Ouse Valley Research 6.0 in the other sections. For more information employer may be able to help with the payment Project (East Sussex), although it is also possible and alternative English language requirements, of fees. to work on approved personal projects. For see page 174 current field research projects, see Programme structure www.sussex.ac.uk/cce/archaeology Fees This MA consists of five core courses, taken See pages 176-181 for information on fees full-time in one year or part-time over two years. Year 2 These courses are taught as a series of day Autumn term: you take Archaeological Further information Reporting. This course looks at the theory and schools to facilitate access for students living David Rudling, practice of archaeological reporting, including at a distance or undertaking the programme as Archaeology, Centre for Continuing Education, traditional journal, client and synthetic reports, continuing professional development. Teaching Sussex Institute, University of Sussex, together with associated archives and wider includes lectures, seminars, group fieldwork, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QQ, UK dissemination. excavations and independent work towards a T + 44 (0) 01273 873527 dissertation. Spring and summer terms: you take Independent E d.r.rudling@sussex.ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/cce/archaeology The programme structure of the part-time MA Study: Field Archaeology. You will undertake an can be found below: approved extended piece of supervised research related to the aims of the programme. It will be • Highly dedicated faculty offer a range of Year 1 based on an original archaeological project (field- expertise, and specialise in field archaeology, Autumn term: you take Field Archaeology, or artefact-based) within its wider geographical British prehistory, Romano-British archaeology, covering methods and techniques used to and/or theoretical context. environmental archaeology and cultural locate, excavate and record field data. Following a consideration of theoretical aspects of field Assessment resource management. A wide variety of modes of assessment are used archaeology, sampling and site formation, part • Students receive a thorough knowledge and one covers how archaeological sites are located. within the programme. These include essays, practical experience of modern approaches to Part two covers the full process of archaeological projects, practical reports, research plans and field archaeology. excavation including logistics, health and safety, poster presentations. The final dissertation is up and excavation methods. to 15,000 words. • Each programme of study is designed to cater for an individual’s background experience and Spring term: you take Artefact Studies, looking aims within practical archaeology. at the archaeological analysis of material culture Faculty research interests recovered by archaeologists. The emphasis is • Archaeology students are based in the on the identification and analysis of ceramics, Research interests are briefly described below. Centre for Continuing Education (CCE), which lithics and metals, together with the technology Richard Carter Stone Age hunter-gatherers, provides an academic community that fosters of manufacture and the social context of such archaeology of animals, environmental intellectual and social links with students and processes. The course includes hands-on archaeology. faculty in other disciplines. analysis of artefact groups, archaeological illustration and finds reports. David Rudling Field archaeology, landscape archaeology, Romano-British archaeology, Summer term: you take Archaeological Field numismatics. Practice, which is a practical course based on a sample excavation of an archaeological site. Each student is allocated a site or part of a site, for which they design an excavation and sampling strategy and undertake the excavation. 47
  • Art history Art history Essentials • The Art History Department received a grade 5 Research programmes Taught programme (recognising research of national and We offer research supervision in the history MA Art History international excellence) in the most recent of art and architecture. Special areas of Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). interest include the history of the visual Research programmes MPhil, DPhil Art History • The skills of the faculty represent a unique arts and architecture of western Europe array across European and American art and in the early modern and modern periods, Admissions requirements culture, and include the study of methodology Byzantine art, Renaissance art, 18th-century For information on overseas qualifications that and critical theory. art, North American art of the 20th century, meet the admissions requirements, see pages and contemporary visual culture, especially 172-175 • Art history at Sussex has strong links with photography. Shared concerns across period MA museums and galleries, both locally and interests include issues of methodology, An upper second-class undergraduate honours nationally. historiography and critical theory, as well as degree in art history or another arts or social • For MA and research students alike, art material and visual culture. sciences discipline history at Sussex provides a friendly and MPhil and DPhil Funding stimulating environment for the exchange of A Masters degree in art history or a related The Department has a strong track record in ideas, in which intellectual life and scholarly discipline such as history, architecture, obtaining studentships from the AHRC, the Royal endeavour thrive. English, archaeology, anthropology or cultural Historical Society, the Social Sciences Research studies, and proof of engagement with art • Sussex graduate students have gone on Council of Canada and the Green Foundation. history at an advanced level. Training in to find employment in higher education, A limited amount of funding may be available research skills and methodologies is provided publishing, the art market, conservation and for outstanding research students, which may museum management. involve some teaching. English language requirements IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing Recent thesis titles and 6.0 in the other sections. For more Narrative and figurative imagery in the English Taught programme information and alternative English language domestic interior c1558-c1640 requirements, see page 174 MA in Art History The fashions of the Florentine court: wearing, 1 year full-time/2 years part-time buying and making clothing, 1560-1620 Fees This MA is associated with the Centre for Visual See pages 176-181 for information on fees On relocating contemporary Chinese art Fields (www.sussex.ac.uk/cvf). Further information Light in early Byzantium. The Church of Funding Hagia Sophia in Constantinople Sarah Maddox, UK applicants for the full-time MA are eligible School of Humanities, Arts A, Studies in the symbolism and spirituality to apply for AHRC studentships (see Fees and University of Sussex, Falmer, of the Arts and Crafts Movement funding on pages 176-186). Brighton, BN1 9SH, UK Representing rebellion: visual aspects of E s.maddox@sussex.ac.uk Programme structure counter-insurgency in colonial India www.sussex.ac.uk/arthistory The MA programme looks at global perspectives in the history of art, concentrating on the From mimesis to metaphor: images of the art object, its appearance, reception and Holocaust in contemporary photographic and manufacture. In the core course, you share a installation art common taught experience, examining methods Commemoration and academic ‘self-fashioning’: and theories relating to themes such as material funerary monuments to professors c1700 culture, globalisation, space, historiography and museology. The core course, Objects and Methods, is complemented by three options selected from those on offer in any one year, which may include: Postcolonialism and Visual Culture; Photography and 20th-Century Visual Culture; Modernity in Europe and America; Body and Society; Creating the Court; Power of Images in Byzantium; Art and Text in Byzantium; and 18th-Century British Art and Italy. You may, with the agreement of the programme director, take an option from other humanities postgraduate programmes. The dissertation is undertaken by full-time students in the third term, and by part-time students in the third and sixth terms. Assessment You are assessed by term papers and a dissertation of 20,000 words. The early 19th-century Egyptian House at Penzance epitomises the influence of other civilisations on European art and architecture 48
  • Specialist facilities Art history Facilities include a well-equipped slide library containing over 100,000 colour transparencies, the Bridson Collection of photographs, access to computing and word-processing training, and a library well stocked with secondary literature in the discipline and with online access to the British Library and other repositories. You are encouraged, where appropriate, to take advantage of local sites of art-historical interest: the Barlow Collection of Chinese art situated on campus; extensive collections in the Royal Pavilion and the museums of Brighton & Hove; and local country houses such as Petworth, Firle and Charleston. Academic activities A regular research seminar, to which outside speakers are invited, provides a major focus of debate. You are also able and encouraged to attend seminars in other disciplines such as history, English, philosophy and anthropology. The Department of Art History is linked to the Victoria and Albert Museum in London through an exchange programme that extends and enhances the research and teaching expertise of both institutions. Each year a member of staff from the museum teaches at Sussex, while a member of the University faculty undertakes research based on the museum collections. Researchers in the Sussex Centre for Byzantine Cultural History are working with international The Department of Art History plays a part in colleagues on an interdisciplinary project investigating how, when and where glass tesserae, the the Sussex Centre for Research in Visual and building blocks of mosaics, were made. As well as providing insights into artistic practices of the Material Culture, the Sussex Centre for Early Byzantium era, this will contribute to wider debates about the nature of trade and exchange within the Mediterranean during this period and into our understanding of political and social changes within the Modern Studies and the Sussex Centre for Mediterranean world Byzantine Cultural History. These form foci for a range of lectures, conferences and funded research projects. Faculty research interests Professor David Alan Mellor 20th-century painting, film and photography; all aspects of These cover a broad chronological spread from cultural history and visual representation c1900 Byzantium to the present and a wide range of to the present; photography in Europe and the interests, from 20th-century photography to US, 1920 to the present. Author of Works on women art critics, Tudor architecture, art and Paper Attributed to Francis Bacon: the Barry travel. Joule Archive (2000), Tracing Light (2001), and Research interests are briefly described below. Liliane Lijn: Works, 1959-1980 (2005). For more detailed information, see Michelle O’Malley Italian Renaissance painting, The 18th-century hall ceiling of Clandon Park, www.sussex.ac.uk/arthistory by an Italian plasterer, demonstrates the cross- commissioning, consumption and production. fertilisation of European expertise during this Meaghan Clarke 19th-century art; women and Author of The Business of Art: Contracts and period writing. Author of Critical Voices in British Art: Commissioning in Renaissance Italy (2004), Women Writing 1880-1905 (2004). and The Material Renaissance: Cost and Consumption in Italy 1400-1650 (2005). Flora Dennis Renaissance art and music. Author of At Home in Renaissance Italy (2006). Geoffrey Quilley 18th-century art, travel and empire. Author of Conflicting Visions: War and Professor Maurice Howard Tudor art and Visual Culture in Britain and France, c1700- architecture; French architecture 1500-1600; 1830 (2005), and Art and the British Empire issues in Dutch and Netherlandish painting; the (2007). history of ornament. Author of The Tudor Image (1995), Ornament: A Social History since 1450 Associated faculty (1996), and The Building of Elizabethan and Vibhuti Sachdev Associate Fellow: architectural Jacobean England (2008). theory, contemporary architectural practice and urban design in India. Author of Indian Professor Liz James Classical and Byzantine Architectural Theory: Contemporary Uses of art, light and colour, gender. Author of Light and Vastu Vidya (1998), and Building Jaipur: The Colour in Byzantine Art (1996), Women, Men Making of an Indian City (2002). and Eunuchs in Byzantium (1996), Desire and Denial in Byzantium (ed) (1999), Empresses and Power in Early Byzantium (2001), and editor of Art and Text in Byzantine Culture (2007). 49
  • Astronomy and Astronomy and cosmology cosmology Essentials Programme structure (full-time) • The Department of Physics and Astronomy Your time is split equally between taught Taught programmes received a grade 5 (recognising research courses and a research project. You have a MSc degrees of national and international excellence) supervisor who oversees your work in general Astronomy in the most recent Research Assessment and is responsible for supervision of your Cosmology Exercise (RAE). Sussex also tops the latest UK project. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in rankings for having the highest citation rate Research programmes consultation with you, early in the autumn term. in astronomy and space science (Thomson MPhil, DPhil Astronomy Projects may be theoretical, or involve simulation Scientific, 2001-05). or data reduction. In many cases the projects Admissions requirements • The Department is one of six in the South form the basis of research papers later published For information on overseas qualifications that East of England to receive a joint award in scientific journals. meet the admissions requirements, see pages of £12.5 million, for the academic years 172-175 Autumn and spring terms: you take four 2008-13, to enhance collaboration in MSc compulsory courses: Cosmology; Stellar graduate teaching and learning in physics and A first- or second-class undergraduate Structure; Galactic Structure (all comprising 20 astronomy. honours degree in a physics-, mathematics- or lectures and 10 problem classes); and Research astronomy-based programme. Other degrees • Students are based in the Astronomy Centre, Skills. You also choose two options from a range will be considered on an individual basis which is part of the Department of Physics and of courses available. These are taught on topics MPhil and DPhil Astronomy. The Centre was founded in 1965 relating to research interests within the group, A first- or an upper second-class honours and over 250 MSc and 100 DPhil students and vary from year to year, but generally cover degree in a relevant subject: physics, have graduated from it. a wide range of topics. Options might include: astronomy or mathematics • The Astronomy Centre carries out world- Astronomical Detectors; Computer Simulations leading research in many branches of in Physics; Data Analysis Techniques; Galaxy English language requirements theoretical and observational astrophysics, Formation; Introduction to C; and General IELTS 6.0, with not less than 6.0 in each with current emphasis on the early universe, Relativity. You start work on your project and give section. For more information and alternative large-scale structure, the high-redshift an assessed talk on this towards the end of the English language requirements, see page 174 universe, and galaxy formation and clustering. spring term. Fees • There are close links with other groups Summer term: after examinations, the final three See pages 176-181 for information on fees in physics, especially those working on months are devoted to project work, including Admissions and further information preparation of a poster display. theoretical particle physics. Postgraduate Coordinator, School of Science and Technology, • At any one time there are about 20 to 30 Programme structure (part-time) University of Sussex, graduate students, of whom about one-third You take the four compulsory courses in the Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ, UK are from overseas. Together with permanent autumn and spring terms of year 1. After the T +44 (0)1273 678940 faculty, postdoctoral fellows and visitors, there examinations in the summer term, you will begin F +44 (0)1273 877873 is a community of about 50 astronomers in work on your project. Project work continues E physpgadmiss@sussex.ac.uk total. during year 2 when you will also take two options www.sussex.ac.uk/physics from the above list. Assessment Taught programmes Assessment for the taught courses is by MSc in Astronomy coursework and unseen examination. 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Assessment for the project is by seminar, poster The MSc programme is intended for honours presentation and a dissertation of not more than 20,000 words. The exams are normally taken graduates with an applied mathematics or in May and the project dissertation must be physics-based degree who wish to learn how submitted by the end of August. to apply their knowledge to astronomy. It is one of only three full-time, broad-based astronomy A distinction is awarded on the basis of MSc degrees in the UK. It covers the major fields excellence in both the lecture courses and of astronomy and astrophysics at an advanced the project. level, with an emphasis in the lecture courses on MSc in Cosmology theoretical astronomy. 1 year full-time/2 years part-time The programme has a high reputation, both The MSc programme is intended for honours nationally and internationally, and there are graduates from an applied mathematics or MSc graduates from the Sussex Astronomy physics-based degree who wish to learn how to Centre all over the world. Many of our graduates apply their knowledge to cosmology. It is one of go on to take a research degree and often find only two MScs in this subject area in the UK. The a permanent job in astronomy. Others have emphasis is on observational and theoretical become science journalists and writers. cosmology in the pre- and post-recombination universe. Instruction is by lectures, exercise classes, seminars and personal supervision. Instruction is by lectures, exercise classes, seminars and personal supervision. 50
  • Programme structure (full-time) Your time is split equally between taught Astronomy and cosmology courses and a research project. You have a supervisor who oversees your work in general and is responsible for supervision of your project. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, early in the autumn term. Most projects are theoretical, but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members. Autumn and spring terms: you take two compulsory courses: Cosmology and Relativistic Quantum Fields I. You also choose four options from a range of courses available. These are taught on topics relating to research interests within the group, and vary from year to year, but generally cover a wide range of topics. Options might include: Early Universe; General Relativity; Distant Universe; Galaxy Formation; and Further Quantum Mechanics. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. Summer term: examinations, then the final three months are devoted to project work, including Map of the cosmic background radiation, a relict of the big bang preparation of a poster display. Programme structure (part-time) Specialist facilities large-scale structure, and weak lensing You take the two compulsory courses and two with statistical methods including Bayesian options in the autumn and spring terms of year 1. Theoretical astronomers have access to approaches and non-Gaussianity. The aim is to After the examinations in the summer term, massively parallel supercomputers in the UK reveal more about the properties of the universe, you will begin work on your project. Project work (Durham and Cambridge) and overseas. We also especially the dark energy, topological defects, continues during year 2 when you will also take have our own network of high-performance UNIX inflation, and theories of gravity. two more options. workstations and servers and a departmental computer cluster. Andrew Liddle works on a range of topics in Assessment theoretical cosmology, including physics of Assessment for the taught courses is by The Centre has an excellent record for obtaining the very early universe, the cosmic microwave coursework and unseen examination. observing time on STFC and other overseas background, and dark energy. He is involved in a Assessment for the project is by seminar, poster telescopes, such as the Anglo-Australian number of major international projects including presentation, and a dissertation of not more Telescope and the telescopes on La Palma in the Planck Satellite and the Dark Energy Survey. than 20,000 words. The exams are normally the Canaries and on Hawaii. We have extensive taken in May and the project dissertation must involvement in satellite projects, especially in Jon Loveday is an astronomer with research be submitted by the end of August. infrared and x-ray. The Centre is also involved interests in observational cosmology and with the 4m Visible and Infrared Survey galaxy formation and evolution. He is an active A distinction is awarded on the basis of participant in several current optical and near- excellence in both the lecture courses and Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) in Chile. infrared galaxy surveys, including GAMA, SDSS, the project. UKIDSS and VISTA. Academic activities Seb Oliver is an astronomer researching the Research programmes Both MSc and DPhil students are expected to evolution of galaxies since the big bang. He contribute to the weekly informal seminars, and undertakes surveys of the universe to determine Funding the statistical properties and large-scale Research Council studentships are available are encouraged to attend research seminars. structure of galaxies at early times. He is a world for the DPhil programme. In addition, the DPhil students have an opportunity to attend expert in far-infrared observations with space Department of Physics and Astronomy offers and give a paper on their specialist subject at an telescopes including NASA’s Spitzer and ESA’s graduate teaching assistantships each year. international conference. Observational students Herschel. Financial support is not available for the normally make at least one observing trip to an overseas telescope each year. Most DPhil Kathy Romer leads the XMM Cluster Survey, is MPhil degree, and applications to study for an graduates acquire considerable computing the only UK member of the ACBAR CMB project, MPhil are considered only from well-qualified skills, which they find an asset in obtaining and is a member of both the XEUS Astrophysics candidates with their own finances who cannot employment. and the Dark Energy Survey Cluster working obtain financial support for a long enough period groups. Her research involves the use of multi- to study for a DPhil. wavelength observations of clusters of galaxies Coursework Faculty research interests as cosmological probes. You are expected to study a selection of graduate courses to ensure that you receive a broad Research interests are briefly described below. Peter Thomas uses supercomputer simulations education in modern astronomy, as well as For more detailed information, see to investigate the physics of galaxies and training in research skills. www.sussex.ac.uk/physics clusters of galaxies. Although star formation and associated feedback processes can only Observational projects for DPhil students are Our research is organised into several areas of be treated phenomenologically, the use of likely to involve the use of overseas telescopes; activity, all focusing on extragalactic astrophysics numerical simulations allows us to study the theoretical projects may involve the use of and cosmology. We offer research opportunities in physics of the early universe, constraining effects of galactic winds and metal enrichment national supercomputers. on the properties of the inter-galactic medium. cosmological models, numerical simulations of structure formation, extragalactic survey science, Parts of our cosmology research are carried out and galaxy formation and evolution. within the theoretical particle physics research Faculty interests are listed below: group, whose faculty interests can be found under the physics subject entry on pages Martin Kunz, a theoretical cosmologist, 148-150. combines observational probes such as the cosmic microwave background, supernovae, 51
  • Biochemistry Biochemistry Essentials • Biochemistry and biomedical sciences at Taught programmes Sussex received a grade 5 (recognising MSc degrees research of national and international Bioinformatics excellence) in the most recent Research Genetic Manipulation and Molecular Cell Biology Assessment Exercise (RAE), reflecting our Postgraduate diplomas excellent research environment. Our research Bioinformatics grant income regularly puts us among the Genetic Manipulation and Molecular Cell Biology top 5 of all biochemistry divisions in the UK. Research programmes • We were rated 3rd in the 2006-07 National MPhil, DPhil Biochemistry Student Survey (NSS), which measured the quality of our provision directly from Admissions requirements student feedback. We also offer formal For information on overseas qualifications that taught research and study skills training to all meet the admissions requirements, see pages postgraduates. 172-175 MSc and postgraduate diploma • Our collaborative links with the Genome Motor neurons in culture A second-class undergraduate honours Damage and Stability Centre, the Centre for degree in a relevant subject such as biology, Chemical Biology, the Biomedical Science Taught programmes biochemistry, genetics, bioscience, chemistry, Research Centre, the Trafford Centre for physics, molecular biology, computer science, Graduate Medical Education, and the MSc in Bioinformatics medicine or mathematics Brighton and Sussex Medical School, offer 1 year full-time MPhil and DPhil exciting opportunities for our research and The huge increase in biological data has made A first- or upper second-class undergraduate Masters students to experience cutting-edge bioinformatics one of the fastest growing areas in honours degree in a relevant subject research projects across a broad range of biology. This MSc offers comprehensive training interdisciplinary areas. in the theory and practical skills essential to English language requirements bioinformatics. The programme is divided into IELTS 6.5 overall. For more information and • We have excellent facilities for proteomics, two main strands: biocomputing and bioscience. alternative English language requirements, see genetics, microarrays and robotics, These combine lectures in aspects of molecular page 174 biophysics, protein molecular graphics and biology, biochemistry, statistics and computer Fees bioinformatics, atomic force microscopy, x-ray science, enabling you to gain the relevant skills to See pages 176-181 for information on fees crystallography, FACS analysis, mammalian become trained bioinformaticists. The programme cell culture, confocal, 2-photon, and time- accepts students from both bioscience and Admissions lapse video microscopy, cryo- and scanning computing backgrounds and provides tailor-made Karen White, Graduate Centre Coordinator, electron-microscopy, mass spectroscopy ‘catch up’ courses for both. School of Life Sciences, John Maynard Smith and NMR. Building, University of Sussex, Falmer, Additional admissions requirements Brighton BN1 9QG, UK You must have evidence of some mathematical T +44 (0)1273 872774 background such as undergraduate elementary E pglifesci@sussex.ac.uk mathematics courses or an A level (or equivalent) in mathematics. Programme structure Autumn term: you take Biocomputing I (Unix, Perl); Genomics; Statistical and Numerical Methods; and Introduction to Genes and Biochemistry, or Computer Science for Bioinformatics. Spring term: you take Biocomputing II (Java, MySQL); Protein Form and Function. Summer term: examinations are followed by a research project, including preparation of a thesis dissertation and an oral presentation. A limited number of places are available to allow the research project to be done on placement or at leading research institutes. Postgraduate Diploma in Bioinformatics 2 terms full-time The structure of the Postgraduate Diploma is the same as the MSc degree programme of the same name, but Diploma students do not take the research project. The Postgraduate Diploma is taken over the autumn and spring terms only. Laser scanning confocal micrograph of synchronised HeLa cells undergoing mitosis. Green: tubulin, red: eIF4A, blue: DNA 52
  • MSc in Genetic Manipulation and Research programmes Interdisciplinary research centres Molecular Cell Biology Centre for Chemical Biology (CCB) Biochemistry 1 year full-time Around 15 DPhil/MPhil positions are offered The CCB was set up to house an interdisciplinary Most biological disciplines now rely on analyses annually in the overlapping areas of cellular grouping of chemists and biochemists in new at the molecular level, and the use of molecular recognition and signalling; molecular cell state-of-the-art laboratories, with the aim of biology to manipulate genes and proteins. This biology and cancer; molecular biology and gene fostering interactions at the interface between popular MSc provides detailed training in current expression; and structural biology. Projects chemistry and biology. Research interests approaches to molecular biology, including fields falling within the faculty research interests in include studies of small molecule-protein such as proteomics and functional genomics that any of these areas (see pages 54-55) can be interactions, protein-structure function and have arisen as a result of genome sequencing considered. Graduate students are allocated mechanism and protein engineering and design, projects. a supervisor and a co-supervisor, and special drug development (bio-organic chemistry) and courses are provided covering basic topics glycobiology. For more information, contact The programme concentrates on experimental ranging from transferable skills, safety, career Professor Andy Smith (a.t.smith@sussex.ac.uk). techniques and their applications, not only in management and experimental techniques to pure scientific research, but also in medicine, Biomedical Science Research Centre recent developments in fast-moving areas of agriculture and other biotechnology industries. The Centre represents research groups within the molecular research. University of Sussex with diverse methodological A significant part of the programme is an Funding disciplines programmes but linked by common extended research project undertaken in an For DPhil research degrees, studentships are interests in identifying the molecular basis of active research lab. For nine or ten months you awarded by the Research Councils (eg BBSRC, disease and the development of diagnostic will become part of a research group, and the MRC and NERC). EU and UK students are eligible tools (biomarkers), and therapies to identify and results from these projects are often published for these. Additional studentships may also be combat disease. in scientific journals. available from some charities (eg Wellcome Disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, Programme structure Trust and Leukaemia Research Fund). Graduate proteomics, bioinformatics, structural biology The programme comprises a combination of four teaching assistantships may be available. and molecular biophysics are brought together to MSc courses together with a choice of several Recent thesis titles foster an interdisciplinary environment to tackle final-year undergraduate courses. Involvement of toll-like receptor 4 and serum medically relevant questions in infection and Autumn and spring terms: you take the four proteins in the recognition of Gram-negative immunity, neurodegenerative diseases, oncology compulsory courses: Advanced Methods in bacterial products and cancer research. Members of the University Molecular Research; Practicals in Molecular of Sussex Biomedical Science Research Centre Characterisation of a novel caspase-like activity Biology; Skills for Research Bioscientists; and have strong research collaborations with the present in proliferating lymphoid cells Topics in Genetic Manipulation and Molecular University of Sussex Proteomics Centre, the Cell Biology. Additionally you choose one or two Studies on the localisation of eukaryotic initiation Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy, the courses from a list of options including Molecular factors in Xenopus kidney B3.2 cells Genome Damage and Stability Centre, the Genetics; Biochemistry of Gene Expression; Brighton and Sussex Medical School, the Biochemical characterisation of a novel DNA Molecular Biology of Cancer; Genes and University of Sussex Centre for Neuroscience, single-strand break repair process and its defect Development; Molecular Evolution and Ecology; the Centre for Chemical Biology, and the in a neurodegenerative disease and Protein Form and Function. You also start Brighton and Sussex Cancer Research Group. work on your research project. N-terminal proteolytic processing of the Bacillus For more information, contact Alison Sinclair thuringiensis Cry1delta-endotoxins (a.j.sinclair@sussex.ac.uk). Summer term: examination and then continuation of your project work, including Understanding and overcoming the resistance Genome Damage and Stability Centre preparation of a thesis dissertation and an of Plutella xylostella to the Cry1Ac Bacillus This Centre has been established, in a oral presentation. thuringiensis toxin purpose-built laboratory, as a partnership Assessment Overexpression and purification of a pea between the Medical Research Council and the The main assessment for this programme is mitochondrial heat shock protein University. Its aim is to understand how cells based on the research project. and organisms respond to DNA damage and Hyphal growth in the fission yeast maintain the stability of their genomes. Defects You are also assessed by short term papers and Schizosaccharomyces pombe in cellular responses to DNA damage result in one or two examinations for the options. cancer and a variety of genetic disorders. The Postgraduate Diploma in Genetic scientists in the Centre are at the forefront of Manipulation and Molecular Cell Biology international research in this area. They exploit 2 terms full-time a multiorganism approach to understanding The structure of the Postgraduate Diploma is the responses to DNA damage. For more the same as the MSc degree programme of the information, contact Professor Alan Lehmann same name, but Diploma students do not take or Professor Tony Carr (pglifesci@sussex.ac.uk), the research project. The Postgraduate Diploma or see www.sussex.ac.uk/gdsc is taken over the autumn and spring terms only. Trafford Centre for Graduate Medical Education and Research This Centre provides a focus for health-related research drawing on a variety of science disciplines. Central to its philosophy is the encouragement of close integration between scientists and clinicians in practice. Strong links have been forged with the Faculty of Health at the University of Brighton and the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Proteomic analysis: 2D protein analysis of the patterns of protein expression in human cells. Proteomics, functional genomics and transcriptome analysis are important tools in modern molecular cell biology and form an essential element of the MSc in Genetic Manipulation and Molecular Cell Biology 53
  • Faculty research interests Biochemistry The research interests of the biochemistry faculty can be broadly divided into three main areas: structural biology; gene expression and cell signalling; and genomics, genome stability and cancer. However, there is considerable overlap in research interests between these areas and with other areas within the University, such as the Genome Damage and Stability Centre and the Centre for Chemical Biology. Structural biology This is an expanding area at Sussex and has recently been strengthened by the inclusion of bioinformatics and x-ray crystallography within biochemistry and within the Centre for Chemical Biology. It is very active in a range of fundamental and applied research into the structure and Graduate student using the new microscope facilities in the Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy functions of proteins and enzymes, using a wide Andrew T Smith Protein engineering and Melanie Newport Genetic susceptibility to variety of genetic, biochemical and biophysical molecular enzymology. We study structure/ infectious diseases. Infectious diseases are a approaches as outlined below: function relationships of metalloenzymes, major cause of mortality globally, yet the majority Neil Crickmore Biochemical and genetic particularly enzymes that activate oxygen. Our of individuals exposed to infectious agents do analysis of host-pathogen interactions. We main model systems are the haem peroxidases not develop clinical disease. Understanding this use a variety of biological disciplines including and molybdenum enzymes. Projects cover: could lead to new vaccines. My research focuses molecular biology, immunology, protein heterologous expression/folding and production on host genetic factors, aiming to identify biochemistry and biophysics to study the of enzyme variants; analysis of their mode of specific genes involved. More information about interaction between a pore-forming protein action; and their structural analysis by x-ray my work can be found at www.bsms.ac.uk toxin and its insect host. We are using protein crystallography. We are particularly interested Keith Caldecott DNA repair and replication. engineering methods to create improved in transferring functionalities from one enzyme Single-strand breaks are a frequently biopesticides. to another as a route to understanding encountered type of DNA damage. Central fundamental structure/function and mechanistic to repair of this type of damage is the XRCC1 Aidan Doherty Molecular mechanisms of DNA relationships. protein, which interacts with several other repair. Inaccurate repair of DNA breaks has the potential to contribute to cancer formation. Darren Thompson X-ray crystallography interesting proteins with links to human Using a variety of biochemical, cellular and of proteins. We use x-ray crystallography to disorders. We are trying to understand the role structural techniques, we are studying protein determine the 3D structures of proteins. These of these proteins in the repair of DNA damage. repair complexes that mediate the recognition structures also give us insights into the nature Antony Carr Interplay between replication, of, and cellular response to, DNA damage. of interactions between ligands and their recombination and checkpoints in fission yeast. This research will improve our understanding, biological targets. We are currently working on Multiple DNA repair and signalling pathways at the molecular level, of the biochemical and several proteins including components of the prevent DNA mutation and chromosomal structural basis for the repair of breaks in DNA. complement cascade. instability – important to avoid cancer. We investigate how damage response pathways Sue Jones Bioinformatics. We are applying Genomics, genome stability and cancer Much of the work in this area is carried out in control DNA repair and interact with DNA bioinformatics methods to the study of molecular the Genome Damage and Stability Centre. In replication. We use yeast models coupled to interactions using both protein sequence and some work in higher eukaryotes. structure information. Specifically, we are addition to the overall interest in DNA repair focusing on new tools to recognise and and cancer, a centre for functional genomics Jessica Downs The role of chromatin in DNA characterise protein nucleic acid interactions. of fission yeast, including microarray analysis, damage responses. We are interested in Other research interests include protein function has been established within this group. Current understanding how the structure, organisation prediction and the recognition of functional research areas include the following: and modulation of chromatin structure transcription factor binding sites. contribute to DNA damage responses and, in John Armstrong Functional genomics, particular, to the repair of double-strand breaks. Anthony Moore Structure and function of molecular biology and development of fission We use a combination of molecular biology, alternative oxidases. Research is focused on the yeast. We study eukaryotic cell and molecular genetics, and biochemistry to address this structure and function of alternative oxidases biology using a simple eukaryote; and fission question using budding yeast as a model system. from plants, fungi and human parasites studied yeast, using molecular genetics, advanced by site-directed mutagenesis, overexpression microscopy and proteomics. We are studying Majid Hafezparast Molecular basis of motor and purification in yeast and E coli and kinetic differentiation of fission yeast into invasive neuron disease. Dynein is a molecular motor analysis of the purified enzyme. Protein mycelia, a model for pathogenic fungi that are involved in axonal transport. We have identified a structure is studied using spectrophotometry, harder to study. mutation in dynein, which causes motor neuron electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray death. Our research is focused on the links Trevor Beebee Molecular population genetics. between mutations in dynein and motor neuron crystallography. We analyse microsatellites in conjunction with death in motor neuron disease. Louise Serpell Structure of amyloid fibrils. estimators of individual fitness, to investigate Amyloid fibrils are deposited in a number of animal (amphibian, reptile, insect) populations. Helfrid Hochegger Cell cycle control and diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. The Microsatellite loci are amplified by PCR and genome maintenance. Cyclin-dependent kinases fibrils are formed from normally soluble proteins allele patterns are identified by electrophoresis. (Cdks) are key players in the orchestration of that undergo a conformational change to a Fitness is quantified by rearing individuals under genome maintenance in the context of the cell predominantly beta-sheet structure. We are standardised conditions and measuring growth cycle. We are using a chemical genetic approach using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to rates, survival and fecundity. in vertebrate cell lines to analyse Cdk function examine the structure of the amyloid fibril. in DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Lucas Bowler Molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis. Our work centres on the complex Eva Hoffmann Meiotic recombination and interactions that occur between parasite and chromosome segregation. My laboratory is host in order to understand the molecular basis interested in how the repair of double-strand breaks is coupled to accurate chromosome of bacterial pathogenesis. Current projects focus segregation, mainly during meiosis but also during on the pathogenic streptococci. Techniques mitosis. We use a wide variety of molecular, include a wide range of DNA- and RNA-based genetic and cytological tools to study these methodologies, real-time PCR, proteomics and processes in the model organism Saccharomyces microarray analysis. cerevisiae. 54
  • Penny Jeggo Response to DNA double breaks Lynne Mayne Molecular medicine. Molecular in mammalian cells. We study responses to approaches to understanding cardiovascular Biochemistry DNA damage and their contribution to human disease including the use of new differential disease. One focus is the mechanism of DNA screening techniques to identify genes involved non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) – a major in ischaemic preconditioning. A second major process that repairs DNA double-strand breaks focus is on Alzheimer’s disease and on the in mammalian cells. NHEJ also functions during normal cellular mechanisms that maintain the immune development and defective NHEJ can integrity of the nervous system during ageing. cause immunodeficiency. Simon Morley Regulation of translation in Alan Lehmann DNA repair and human eukaryotic cells. Protein synthesis is fundamental disorders. DNA repair is essential to maintain to cell growth and survival but the regulation genome stability and protection against cancer. of this process is poorly understood. We are Our interests are: DNA polymerases that can investigating the signalling pathways that replicate past damaged DNA; the Smc5-6 modulate translation rates in cells and how the protein complex involved in DNA repair and phosphorylation and integrity of initiation factors replication; and the molecular basis of DNA- influences mRNA selection for translation. repair defects in human genetic disorders. Mark Paget Stress responses in Streptomyces. Johanne Murray DNA repair and replication. The Streptomyces bacteria produce a huge range We are interested in how cells coordinate repair of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds in with replication and use fission yeast to study response to stress. We investigate mechanisms how recombination is regulated in S phase with of sensing stress inputs (eg oxidative stress) a particular focus on the roles of RecQ helicases and how these signals are transduced into (defective in cancer-prone genetic diseases) regulatory outputs at the level of transcription and SMC complexes, required for higher order and translation. chromosome structure. Alison Sinclair Cancer biology and human Matt Neale Repair of protein-linked DNA breaks viruses. Our aim is to define the molecular in meiosis and mitosis. Chromosome breaks with mechanisms that disrupt normal processes protein attached to the DNA ends are formed following infection with the tumour-associated during meiotic recombination, and when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the Kaposi’s topoisomerases are poisoned by chemo- sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) during therapeutic drugs. Removal of the bound protein the development of cancer. We are particularly is essential for DNA repair to occur, and its interested in how the virus reprogrammes host failure leads to genome instability. To better gene expression. understand this, we use various techniques in the Michael Titheradge Regulation of metabolism model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. in sepsis and vascular disease. Our research Mark O’Driscoll Human DNA damage response is investigating the control of carbohydrate defective disorders. Defects in the ATR signal metabolism by bacterial lipopolysaccharides transduction pathway or mutations in ATR itself and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, cause Seckel syndrome. We have shown that TNF-α and IFN-γ) during sepsis. We are also several other human disorders, often cancer investigating the role of asymmetric dimethyl prone, are also associated with compromised arginine, in the development of vascular and ATR-pathway function. We are interested in renal disease. determining how defects in this pathway result Kathy Triantafilou Infection and immunity. in these specific clinical features and in defining Our focus is host-pathogen interactions and, how ATR functions to maintain genomic stability. in particular, the innate recognition of bacteria Felicity Watts Regulation of DNA repair and and viruses by the immune system. Recently cell cycle events. We are interested in how DNA our group has focused on identifying cellular damage responses are coordinated with the cell receptors that recognise bacterial cell wall cycle and, in particular, the role of SUMO (small components such as lipopolysaccharide and ubiquitin-like modifier) modification. SUMO lipoteichoic acid, as well as receptors for is covalently attached to proteins. We have enteroviruses. identified SUMO-modified proteins and our aim Martha Triantafilou Molecular basis of host- is to determine how SUMO modification of these pathogen interactions. Our focus is on identifying proteins affects their activity. and characterising receptor molecules for Sally Wheatley Regulation of cell division. enteroviruses, in particular Coxsackieviruses Cell division is the most fundamental process (A and B groups), as well as human of life. My lab focuses on how it is regulated parechoviruses and echoviruses. These viruses have been associated with many diseases, Top: genes in somatic vertebrate cells and, specifically, Middle: proteins how mitosis and cytokinesis are coordinated. including aseptic meningitis, pneumonitis of Bottom: computers Currently we focus on the role of survivin, infants, hepatitis, viral myocarditis, and insulin- a protein that is essential for these events, dependent diabetes mellitus. MSc in Bioinformatics. This new and exciting field is a fusion of biology and computer science which is upregulated in cancer and, intriguingly, Michelle West Regulation of transcription by that enables scientists to understand biological also inhibits programmed cell death. viral and cellular factors. Our research involves data such as the sequence of the human Gene expression and cell signalling investigations into the structure, function and genome. There are three main strands to the This is a vibrant area of research involving a mechanism of action of the latent transcriptional programme – bioscience, biocomputing and regulatory proteins encoded by the cancer- statistics – taught by faculty from disciplines number of researchers working on the molecular such as biochemistry, biology, informatics and mechanisms regulating gene expression at the associated Epstein-Barr virus. We are particularly mathematics, plus an extended research module level of both transcription and translation. Much interested in investigating how different stages of this research is directed at understanding the of the transcription process are regulated by mechanisms involved in infection and immunity. these proteins. 55
  • Biology Biology Essentials There is a strong emphasis on laboratory-backed • Biology at Sussex offers excellent facilities field experience in the taxonomic parts of the Taught programmes supporting a wide range of interrelated programme, supervised by experienced field MSc degrees research areas. ecologists. A distinctive feature of the MSc is Biodiversity Survey • There are three overlapping research sub- the requirement that all students develop a Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience groups: evolution, the Environmental Systems specialism in a particular taxonomic group and (see page 144) Processing Research Group (ESPRG), and a particular habitat. This will equip you with an Developmental Cell Biology genetics. additional highly marketable skill. Theoretical Plant Conservation elements are delivered by specialist topic-based Postgraduate diplomas • The research environment is enhanced lectures and seminars with additional input Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience by activities associated with a number of from professional bodies, such as the Sussex (see page 144) interdisciplinary research centres across Biodiversity Record Centre. Developmental Cell Biology campus, including the Genome Damage and Plant Conservation Stability Centre and the Trafford Centre for Graduates of this programme have first-class Graduate Medical Education. career prospects in a related profession. Research programmes MPhil, DPhil Biology • New opportunities for collaboration are Programme structure provided by the expanding research activities You take courses in Biodiversity Theory and Admissions requirements Practice, Habitat Ecology, and Identification in the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. For information on overseas qualifications that and Survey Skills. Weekly field- and laboratory- meet the admissions requirements, see pages • You can expect an extensive programme of based practical classes run throughout the 172-175 generic skill-enhancing instruction in your first degree programme, and there are two one-week MSc and postgraduate diploma year and supervision from two academics. residential field classes in different parts of A second-class undergraduate honours degree the country to provide a wide range of habitat • For students wishing to obtain taught in a relevant subject such as biology, chemistry experience. postgraduate degrees we currently run or medicine four MSc programmes in Biodiversity Assessment MPhil and DPhil Survey, Developmental Cell Biology, Plant You are assessed through a combination A first- or upper second-class undergraduate Conservation, and Cellular and Molecular of course essays, practical tests, field and honours degree in a subject relevant to your Neuroscience. laboratory notebooks, and unseen examinations. chosen area of research You also submit a full professional biodiversity English language requirements survey and assessment, together with an oral IELTS 6.5 overall. For more information Taught programmes presentation. and alternative English language requirements, MSc in Biodiversity Survey MSc in Developmental Cell Biology see page 174 1 year full-time 1 year full-time Fees The degree provides postgraduate training in Developmental cell biology lies at the core of See pages 176-181 for information on fees biodiversity survey and specifically aims to equip our understanding of how organisms develop Admissions you with the identification and practical skills from stem cells through to adults. This MSc Karen White, Graduate Centre Coordinator, necessary to carry out field surveys and produce programme comprises five key courses, teaching School of Life Sciences, John Maynard Smith high-quality professional biodiversity assessments, both practical techniques and the experimental Building, University of Sussex, Falmer, both needed by conservation bodies. approaches to aspects of cell and molecular Brighton BN1 9QG, UK It has two main elements: the acquisition biology required to understand development, T +44 (0)1273 872774 of identification skills and competence in as well as the theoretical background to these E pglifesci@sussex.ac.uk the organisational and legislative structure processes. A large part of the degree is devoted of conservation. to a research project, undertaken in the genetics and development, neuroscience or oncology research groups. The UK’s only Professor of Apiculture, Francis Ratnieks (see page 58 for his research interests), teaches and researches at Sussex 56
  • Programme structure Research programmes Autumn term: you take Techniques in Cell and Biology Developmental Biology, and Topics in Cell and Research projects are available in ecology and Developmental Biology. behaviour, evolution, genetics and development, plant sciences and systems biology (see Faculty Spring term and vacation: you take Genes and research interests for further details). Development, Developmental Neurobiology, and Topics in Genetic Manipulation and Molecular Funding Cell Biology, and start your research project. For DPhil research degrees, studentships are awarded by the Research Councils, as well Summer term and vacation: you continue your as strategic studentships earmarked for research project. specific projects. EU and UK students are Assessment eligible for these. Additional studentships You are assessed by essays, poster from the Wellcome Trust, the John Maynard presentations, examinations and a project Smith studentship and Graduate Teaching dissertation (including an oral exam). Assistantship bursaries may be available for DPhil research students. Postgraduate Diploma in Developmental Cell Biology As part of a structured postgraduate training 2 terms full-time programme, opportunities to demonstrate to and The structure of the Postgraduate Diploma is the tutor undergraduates are available to suitably same as the MSc of the same name but Diploma qualified graduate students. students do not take the research project. The Recent thesis titles Postgraduate Diploma is therefore taken over the ‘Bypass flow’ and the distribution of sodium ions autumn and spring terms only. in rice Oryza sativa L MSc in Plant Conservation Interactions between rabbits, plants and soil, 1 year full-time and their consequences for chalk grassland and This MSc offers theoretical and practical chalk heath vegetation communities training at postgraduate level in a broad range of aspects of plant conservation, including pure Evolution and maintenance of the isochore and applied ecology, biodiversity and habitat structure in vertebrate genomes ecology, restoration ecology, seed banking, Rates of adaptation in complex genetic systems seed physiology, plant genetics and molecular biology, and plant tissue culture. These fields Effective population size and its effects on will be comprehensively reviewed to survey the molecular evolution Top: in addition to excellent laboratory facilities, Sussex students have access to a wide range of strategies available for conserving plant species, Carbohydrate analysis of the resurrection plant high-quality field sites their habitats and genetic resources, and for Craterostigma plantagineum analysing plant diversity. Bottom: developmental cell biology: unlocking Fuelling ecology and migratory strategies: nature’s biological secrets. Which genes turn The degree is taught primarily by faculty in the a study of two Acrocephalus warblers off and on and why? How does this relate to our University, members of the Seed Conservation understanding of cancer and the cell cycle? Department, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, at Interdisciplinary research centres Wakehurst Place, and by guest lecturers from Centre for the Study of Evolution (CSE) Kew and other institutions. This cross-disciplinary research group aims to Faculty research interests develop and utilise evolutionary ideas. Members The aim of the MSc is to spread knowledge include biologists, biochemists, mathematicians Environmental Systems and Processes about the technologies used in all areas of plant and computer scientists. CSE builds upon the Research Group conservation and seed banking across the globe. ethos and distinguished contributions of the late This group is made up of people interested in The degree is suitable for both UK-based and Professor John Maynard Smith, who founded the interactions of animals and plants with their international students. the biology school at the University of Sussex in environments. For example, we carry out research Contact Professor Mike Hutchings 1961. CSE runs weekly seminars and a journal on genetic variation in populations of wild animals (m.j.hutchings@sussex.ac.uk) for further club – all are welcome. See and plants and on how pollution of land and water information. www.lifesci.sussex.ac.uk/CSE by metals and organic chemicals affects these organisms. The fusion of ecology, plant science Programme structure Genome Damage and Stability and environmental science in a single research The programme starts in October and runs to Centre (GDSC) group provides a breadth of expertise, which September. You take courses in Ecological The GDSC is a research centre investigating allows us to explore a wide range of exciting Aspects of Plant Rarity, Habitat Ecology, the responses of cells to genome damage, and new interdisciplinary topics such as biosphere- Biodiversity Theory and Practice, Biotechnology their relationship to cancer and other aspects of geosphere interactions (eg plant-soil interactions and Plant Conservation, and Techniques in Plant human disease. The purpose-built laboratories – or animal-plant-soil interactions) together with Conservation. You also carry out an extended funded by the Joint Infrastructure Fund (JIF), the how environmental changes (eg increased salinity research project. Wolfson Foundation and the University – provide or contamination) affect these relationships. a dynamic and collaborative environment for Assessment We are well placed to explore new ideas and carrying out cutting-edge research. You are assessed through term exam papers, initiatives in understanding the responses essays, lab notebook and report, and a written Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy of organisms to their environment from the project dissertation. The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy molecular to the ecosystem level (metabolomics provides state-of-the-art facilities for confocal, through to biodiversity). Faculty members of Postgraduate Diploma in Plant Conservation 2-photon, and time-lapse video microscopy and this group are split into three research areas: 2 terms full-time cryo- and scanning-electron microscopy. See ecology and behaviour, plant science and The Postgraduate Diploma comprises the taught www.lifesci.sussex.ac.uk/scam/index.php environmental science. elements of the MSc in Plant Conservation but does not include a research project component. Larissa Conradt Metapopulation ecology. The Postgraduate Diploma is therefore taken I test important assumptions and predictions of over the autumn and spring terms only. existing metapopulation models, and develop new models, by closely integrating experimental Contact Professor Mike Hutchings and modelling work at the individual and the (m.j.hutchings@sussex.ac.uk) for further population level. The aim is to make realistic information. predictions about metapopulation dynamics that are applicable to conservation problems. 57
  • Jeremy Field Social evolution. Evolutionary Timothy Roper The behavioural ecology of Genetics and development ecology of social systems, using wasps and bees mammals, especially badgers. Special interests We are concerned with understanding the Biology as models. We are interested in the fundamental include behavioural aspects of the transmission integration of control processes in development, question of how helping behaviour evolves, as of bovine tuberculosis from badgers to cattle; from the level of molecular recognition to that well as social plasticity, conflict resolution, and behavioural ecology of urban mammals; using of the formation of the nervous system. This parental care strategies. Work involves large- remotely collected DNA to investigate broad goal links a range of specific approaches scale field experiments in natural environments, mammalian social structure; and group decision- including enzyme biochemistry, molecular modelling, and use of genetic markers. making in animals. genetics, cell culture, spatial patterning in animal tissues, and both genetic and neurobiological Tim Flowers Salt tolerance in higher plants. Peter Scott Plant adaptation to drought stress. analyses of segmentation. The group is My research interests centre on the effects of Using plant genetic modification as a tool I have well equipped for research on mammalian, salinity on plants, both truly salt-tolerant plants been investigating how metabolism in specific amphibian and insect species, and has facilities (halophytes) and more sensitive crop plants. plant species (resurrection and CAM plants) is for vertebrate and invertebrate tissue culture, A major part of my research has concerned adapted to drought stress. I am investigating the as well as a wide range of instrumentation for increasing salt-resistance in rice. My current partitioning of fixed carbon into storage organs cell and molecular biology. It can provide broadly research focuses on halophytes, on creating a in terrestrial orchids in order to unravel the based research training in both fundamental comprehensive database of salt tolerant plants complexities of their life cycle. and applied aspects of eukaryote genetics and that can be used to study their evolution and on Alan Stewart Insect population and community developmental biology. how halophytes transport and store sodium. ecology. How ecological principles can best Juan Pablo Couso Molecular and David Harper Behavioural ecology. I study be applied to: conservation ecology of rare developmental genetics. We study limb evolution of animal signals; mass regulation by species; restoration of species-rich communities; development by analysing the molecular basis birds especially during migration; risk-taking biological control of pest species. Current projects of proximal-distal (PD) pattern formation in behaviour; bird ectosymbionts, especially feather include: restoration ecology of grassland the legs of the fruit fly, Drosophila. From this mites; declining farmland birds, especially Corn invertebrate assemblages; diversity patterns in starting point, our research branches into Buntings; and osmotic loads of birds feeding in tropical rainforest; and conservation ecology of cell biology, genomics, evo-devo and human saline habitats. selected insect groups. disease, thus remaining at the cutting edge Susan Hartley Community ecology, plant- Evolution of developmental biology. animal interactions. I look at ultitrophic The research at Sussex includes evolutionary Jane Davies Cell communication and interactions (how plants mediate interactions theory, where mathematical techniques are used development in Drosophila. We are using between insect herbivores and other organisms); to solve challenging problems within evolutionary the sophisticated genetics of Drosophila to plant defence (how environmental factors alter genetics; bioinformatics and population investigate the role of gap junction-mediated allocation of physical and chemical defences); genetics, where information technology is used intercellular communication during development and herbivory and plant communities (how to analyse the avalanche of data being produced and in the nervous system; and examining the herbivory and resource availability interact to by genome sequencing; and molecular evolution, change in gene expression after exposure affect competition between plants). where DNA data is statistically analysed to to alcohol. answer biological questions. Topics currently David Hill Behaviour, ecology and conservation under investigation include: evolution of altruistic Mark Maconochie See Neuroscience (pages of bats. I look at species differences in behaviour, evolutionary adaptation, adaptive 144-145) for research interests. response to woodland management and other evolution in humans and major transitions in Roger Phillips Molecular interactions by disturbance; development of new techniques evolutionary history. microscopy. We are studying control of growth for surveying bats in woodlands; comparative patterns of habitat use in sympatric bat species; Adam Eyre-Walker Molecular evolution. I am and differentiation by intercellular signalling and the function of social calls in woodland bats interested in the rates and effects of new genetic during development. We analyse molecular in the UK and Japan. mutations, the evolution of genome structure interactions in living tissue using fluorescence and recombination in mitochondrial DNA. microscopy and genetic techniques in the fruit Michael Hutchings Plant ecology. The The work involves the bioinformatics and fly, Drosophila. effects of patchiness in resource supply on statistical analysis of DNA sequences. Robert Ray Evolution of gene networks plant performance; ecology of clonal plants; interactions between roots; conservation of rare Joel Peck Evolution of sex and social behaviour. controlling wing patterning in insects. We study and endangered species, especially orchids; Understanding how social behaviour evolves, Diptera (flies) and, in particular, Drosophila, plant community restoration; and consequences including the evolution of ‘altruism’; the ‘major to characterise the developmental networks of habitat fragmentation; and species dispersal transitions in evolution’, whereby the interests controlling patterning and morphogenesis in the for plant biodiversity. Collaborations involve of a group of independent replicators become developing wing to understand how, over the colleagues in several European countries, united; and the impact of different modes of course of evolution, this network is altered to give Mexico, New Zealand and Canada. reproduction on the response to selection. rise to new morphological forms. Libby John Plant community ecology. The Francis Ratnieks Honey bees, social insects, Ian Roberts Molecular cell biology of factors that control the diversity and species social evolution and behaviour. Applied: Drosophila. We use the fruit fly, Drosophila, composition of plant communities. These apiculture (beekeeping, breeding, diseases), to study signal transduction pathways involved factors include the quality and spatial distribution conservation; basic: colony organisation, in cell signalling and cell division. Using of plant nutrient supply, herbivores and other conflicts and conflict resolution, recognition. Drosophila it is possible to ‘genetically dissect’ animals, and competition between plant species. Study taxa: honey bees, stingless bees, Vespinae the molecular signalling pathways that are The interactions between these factors are also wasps, ants (Atta, Monomorium, Lasius, common to all animals. of great importance. Formica, etc). Methods: theory and modelling, genetics, behavioural studies in lab, apiary and Stephen Pearce Plant retrotransposons. field. Retrotransposons are similar to retroviruses and are found in all eukaryotes. In plants they David Waxman Evolutionary population genetics are particularly numerous and produce new and theoretical biology. I use mathematical insertions at distant sites in the genome. We are models and computer simulations to explain using mobile genetic elements to determine the complex phenomena exhibited by populations genetic diversity of rare wild plant populations, of organisms. Current research: evolutionary and also using them in plant breeding. dynamics of populations characterised by continuously varying traits such as height; theory of genetic drift; statistical analysis and modelling of the behaviour of social insects. 58
  • Funding Chemistry Research Council studentships (including Chemistry CASE awards) are available (see Fees and funding on pages 176-186). Graduate teaching assistantships may also be available for outstanding research students. For further details, please contact Karen White at the address listed in Essentials. Research council students may also be able to supplement their income with a limited amount of paid demonstrating work. Recent thesis titles Theory of diffusion and plasticity in layered Essentials Taught programmes carbon materials Taught programme MSc in Chemical Biology Application of palladium N-heterocyclic carbene MSc degree 1 year full-time complexes in catalysis Chemical Biology Programme structure This programme is aimed at candidates with an Synthesis, characterisation and applications of Research programmes novel nanomaterials undergraduate honours degree in chemistry, MPhil, DPhil Chemistry wishing to acquire chemical biology research Multidentate amide and cyclopentadienyl Admissions requirements training through a substantive two-term uranium and thorium complexes and For information on overseas qualifications that chemical biology project. This is in conjunction related studies meet admissions requirements, see pages with taught courses such as Basic Introduction A bicyclic guanidine and its silyl- and methyl- 172-175 to Biochemistry, Practical Molecular Biology, derivatives: ligands in transition metal complexes MSc Advanced Organic Synthetic Chemistry, and and their potential in polymerisation catalysis A second-class undergraduate honours degree Chemical Biology. in chemistry New methodology for the synthesis of MPhil and DPhil You attend chemistry and biochemistry seminars enantiopure [2.2] paracyclophane derivatives A first- or upper second-class undergraduate held throughout the degree programme, as well as lectures and practical courses during A photochemical approach towards the synthesis honours degree in chemistry or a related of gelsemine discipline the autumn and spring terms, including: Introduction to Genes and Biochemistry, Synthesis and reactivity of some chelating English language requirements Practicals in Molecular Biology, Advanced amido complexes of magnesium, vanadium and IELTS 6.5 overall. For more information Methods in Molecular Research, Advanced chromium and applications to catalysis and alternative English language requirements, Organic Chemistry, Protein Form and Function, see page 174 A novel approach to iminosugars of and Chemical Biology. The latter comprises biological interest Fees modules in protein engineering and design, molecular modelling and molecular recognition, Boron-alkoxides as electron deficient ligands: See pages 176-181 for information on fees synthesis of molecules for chemical intervention applications in catalysis Admissions in biological systems, medicinal chemistry and Karen White, Graduate Centre Coordinator, drug design. School of Life Sciences, John Maynard Specialist facilities Smith Building, University of Sussex, Falmer, You also undertake a 10-month chemical biology research project with two supervisors, one The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Brighton BN1 9QG, UK biological and one chemical, working on a joint provides a first-class environment for research T +44 (0)1273 872774 collaborative project, with research time being and is superbly equipped. There are outstanding E pglifesci@sussex.ac.uk spent in both labs. facilities for synthetic and preparative chemistry, bio-organic chemistry, structure determination, • Chemistry at Sussex has been at the top of Assessment spectroscopic analysis, separation and elemental UK chemistry league tables for the last two Assessment is based on essays, written (unseen) analysis. State-of-the-art equipment has been years (top in the Guardian 2008, top 10 in examinations, a dissertation and short oral obtained using research council special the Times 2008). Internationally, the Centre presentation based on the research project. You research grants and funding council funds. This for Higher Education Development rates have to satisfy the examiners on all of the above. would have been difficult to achieve without Sussex among the best in Europe for budding a wholehearted commitment to research. researchers (2007). Research programmes Three new, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers have been • Chemistry and Biochemistry has been a Many different research projects are available in installed in 2008. highly rated research department since inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, and chemical Chemistry has modern apparatus for elemental the beginning of the research assessment biology, all areas in which the Department has analysis, and other analytical services including scheme. We achieved a grade 5 (recognising a high international profile. Areas of particular mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic research of national and international resonance spectroscopy, and both gas and interest include: excellence) in 1996 and 2001. liquid chromatography. High-resolution mass • Biological chemistry: small molecule-protein • Recognition for past and present Sussex interactions, protein-structure function, protein spectrometers (Bruker FTMS, VG-AUTO SPEC) faculty has been outstanding. Two faculty engineering, drug development, glycobiology, provide state-of-the-art facilities. The FTMS is have won the Nobel prize – John Cornforth in and biomimetics. equipped with HPLC, electrospray, MALDI, EI, CI, 1975 and Harry Kroto in 1996 – and eight and MSMS facilities. Fast atom bombardment • Inorganic chemistry: organometallic synthesis is available and the service includes a gas faculty, of whom five are still active within the and homogeneous catalysis, main group rings Department, have been elected Fellows of the chromatography/mass spectrometry facility, and cages, f-element chemistry, oxide super- Royal Society. also equipped with EI and CI modes. New conductors, solid-state and multinuclear NMR. GC-MS, HPLC-MS, MALDI and laser ablation-MS • Chemistry has excellent facilities for synthesis • Materials chemistry: carbon science, facilities have recently been installed in a new and characterisation: advanced NMR suite, nanomaterials, polymers, advanced diffraction Mass Spectrometry Centre serving chemistry, single and powder x-ray diffraction, advanced and spectroscopic methods. biochemistry and biology, along with a large mass spectrometry, single molecule • Organic chemistry: natural product synthesis, investment in protein separation and mass fluorescence spectroscopy, together with bio-organic chemistry, drug design and spectroscopic analysis for proteomics research. access to national and international facilities mechanism, development of new reagents and reactions for organic synthesis. An ICP spectrometer also provides analysis for for high-performance computing and neutron all elements at extremely low levels of detection. diffraction. • Theoretical chemistry: computational modelling of solids, surfaces and organometallics. 59
  • Additional themes include fullerene science and degradation of polymers. Chemistry Recent highlights include: • identification of the key defect involved in stored energy in graphite (Wigner energy); • discovery of a low energy route for the Stone- Wales transformation in fullerenes; • first calculation of the properties of the basal dislocation in graphite, demonstrating the mechanism of graphite lubrication; and • design and folding of novel protein structures. Main tools for MAT comprise high performance computing, diffraction techniques, and mass spectrometry. Organic Synthetic Chemistry (ORG) The strong Sussex presence in organic chemistry has resulted in the discovery and control of reactive organic intermediates that produce new and incisive synthetic techniques. These are applied to a variety of goals, with a principal aim being the control of stereochemistry in organic synthesis. Biologically important natural molecules and their medicinally significant synthetic analogues are also an important target, State-of-the-art FT-ICR mass spectrometer in the supporting the activity in biological chemistry. Faculty research interests The development of exciting methodology for the new Mass Spectrometry Centre. The Department has excellent facilities for a wide range of Cutting across the traditional chemical divisions synthesis of highly complex organic molecules analytical and spectroscopic techniques of inorganic, organic and physical, faculty attracts worldwide interest. operate within the following groupings: Organometallic and Inorganic Materials Chemistry (OM) • Centre for Chemical Biology (CCB) (including There is a recently installed HR GCMS (PRO- Bioorganic and Biological Chemistry, The University of Sussex is an internationally SPEC) facility. Biomimetics and Metalloenzymology and recognised centre of excellence in inorganic Physical Biological Chemistry) chemistry. Our long-standing reputation Three Varian NMR spectrometers (400, 500 and in synthetic organometallic chemistry is 600 MHz) and a Bruker 400 MHz spectrometer • Materials Chemistry: Carbon, Polymers and complemented by strengths in bioinorganic, are currently available. All have multinuclear Solutions (MAT) polymerisation catalysis and physical inorganic capability. Several of the NMR spectrometers are • Organic Synthetic Chemistry (ORG) chemistry. Studies encompass most of the main on open access to research students. • Organometallic and Inorganic Materials group elements, transition metals, and f-block There is a Nonius Kappa CCD diffractometer with Chemistry (OM) metals (lanthanides, Th, and U). Organometallic an area detector for the accurate determination research is directed towards the synthesis of crystal structures. The protein crystallography • Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (TC). and structural characterisation of highly novel laboratory is fully equipped for all aspects of Centre for Chemical Biology (CCB) compounds, the development of new ligands protein crystallography from protein purification The Centre for Chemical Biology is the latest and preparative methods, the activation of small and crystallisation through data collection and initiative, housing an interdisciplinary grouping molecules (especially ‘greenhouse gases’), processing to model building and analysis, of chemists and biochemists in new state-of- and homogeneous catalysis. Research in the including a Rigaku RU-H3RHB rotating anode the-art laboratories, with the aim of fostering inorganic materials area focuses on precursors X-ray generator with Osmic Max-Flux optics, interactions at the interface between chemistry to quantum dot materials, low-dimensional an RAXIS-IV++ image plate area detector and biology. Research interests include studies magnets and conductors, and extended 1- and MSC X-Stream cryo system. Our facilities of small molecule-protein interactions, protein- and 2-dimensional arrays of metal containing include a Stereoscan 420 scanning electron structure function and mechanism and protein polymers. Bioinorganic research encompasses: microscope with analytical x-ray capability and engineering and design, drug development water-soluble metallo-drugs, novel sensors, the (bioorganic chemistry) and glycobiology. The and fluorimetry. development of new biomimetic catalysts, and main members of the Centre are Professor Andy Smith, Professor Phil Parsons, Hans Streicher, studies on electron transfer in Fe enzymes. Theoretical and computational work is supported by a 64 processor farm with a mixture of Ewan Main, Peter Varnai, Iain Day and Robin Recent highlights include: 32 and 64 bit single and dual processors. Fulton. • reductive coupling of CO and activation of CO2 Comprehensive storage and back up facilities are Materials Chemistry: Carbon, Polymers by U(III) mixed sandwich complexes; available for work with large data sets. and Solutions (MAT) • synthesis and structures of dense phase The Polymer Science laboratory is equipped Sussex is a major centre for carbon research, magnetic fluorides that are archetypes for low with facilities for thermogravimetric analysis, particularly graphite, graphene, fullerenes and dimensional magnets and superconductors; differential scanning calorimetry, gel permeation nanotubes, which originated in the work of Sussex Nobel Laureate, Sir Harry Kroto. • synthesis of rare 3-coordinate group 14 chromatography, highly sensitive chemi- complexes that are capable of facile activation luminescence equipment, an ICP atomic Continuing carbon research is fundamental in nature, using first principles methods to explore of carbon dioxide; emission analyser and optical microscopy with digital image analysis. In the laser spectroscopy new carbon structures, their synthesis and • a new class of cationic phosphines laboratory there is a multi-frequency ion gas treatment, including graphene, nanotubes, incorporating bicyclic guanidine substituents, laser facility, and several diode pump solid-state fullerenes and activated carbons. Modelling the and their application in coordination chemistry lasers are available. evolving structure of graphite moderators for and catalysis; and nuclear reactors is a key activity, underpinning Technical support for research is available in all safety research for both operational, Generation • the first stable titanocene. main areas. In addition, there are well-staffed IV, fusion and decommissioned reactors. Research in these areas is heavily supported mechanical, electrical and electronic workshops Structure-property relationships are also by state-of-the-art NMR techniques (including and an excellent glass-blowing service. Access to strong themes within MAT, including folding multinuclear, high field, solid state NMR), all relevant journals is available, either online or of synthetic biological polymers, graphene diffraction methods (X-ray and neutron) and through the Department or the University Library. layers, dislocations in semiconductors, and the computational studies with the TC Group. structure-property relationships in hydrogen bonded liquids from neutron diffraction. 60
  • Theoretical and Computational Metalloenzymes for new biomimetic catalysts, Chemistry (TC) eg copper-containing galactose oxidase (GAO), Chemistry Interests span the development of time- copper amine oxidase (CAO) and non-heme iron dependent density functional theory methods, centre (NHIC) of photosystem II. Synthesis of chiral the analytical solution of the three body problem polymers. and modelling radiation damage in graphite to the Professor Malcolm Heggie (TC/MAT) Computer interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. modelling of condensed matter and large Current research interests of supervising faculty molecules: ab initio and other calculations on are listed below with their primary research group archetypal solids, such as ice, quartz, silicon, allegiances in parentheses. diamond, graphite, nanotubes and fullerenes. Alaa Abdul-Sada (MAT) Mass spectrometry Mechanochemistry. Layered materials: radiation and its application in chemistry of fullerenes. damage, buckling, folding and intercalation for Analytical application of different mass energy applications. The Matter Compiler Project: spectrometry, including trace analysis of molecular synthesis in the Scanning Probe some markers for medical digenesis by liquid Microscope. chromatography, and gas chromatography mass Gerry Lawless (OM) Metallocene complexes of spectrometry. the main group, transition metals, lanthanides Professor Norman Billingham (MAT) and actinides. The structural investigation of such Migration and solubility of small molecules in metallocenes, employing solid- and solution-state polymers – applications to stabilisers, surface multinuclear NMR spectroscopic techniques. modifiers and controlled release. Applications of Synthesis of low valent and/or multiply bonded optical microscopy to polymer degradation and derivatives of Main Group elements. stabilisation. Chemiluminescence as a probe Ewan Main (CCB) In the post-genomic era two of polymer oxidation. Synthesis of polymers for fundamental questions continue to challenge speciality applications. protein scientists: how do amino-acid sequences Qiao Chen (CCB/MAT) Advanced materials of proteins determine their three-dimensional technology. Sub-molecular imaging of molecular structure? How do properties of proteins relate recognition events and chemical reactions. to their biological function? I investigate each of Stimulation of individual molecules via injection these questions using interdisciplinary approaches of energy or charge. Metal oxide, semiconductor that combine protein engineering with many and metal substrates. Nanoparticle/nanowire biophysical/structural techniques. synthesis producing electrode contacts of Mark Osborne (CCB) Development of ultra- separation less than 1nm. Nanometre electronic Professor Andrew T Smith (CCB) For research sensitive laser spectroscopic techniques to interests, refer to Biochemistry research devices (ie transistors and quantum devices) detect, image and manipulate single molecules. from molecules. information on pages 52-55. Application of single molecule technologies to Professor Geoff Cloke (OM) Synthesis of the study of the photophysics of molecules at Hans Streicher (CCB) Carbohydrate (bio)- novel, highly reactive organo-transition metal interfaces, the structure and dynamics of proteins, chemistry and synthesis of carbohydrate mimetics. and f-element complexes via classical and metal lipids and DNA, and the development of novel Carbohydrates and sialic acids in molecular vapour syntheses. Small molecule activation biosensors. recognition processes and related diseases. (CO,CO2) by uranium(III) complexes. Lanthanide Human and microbial sialic acid metabolism Professor Philip Parsons (ORG) The studied by synthesis of sialic acid derivatives and pentalene complexes – towards molecular wires development of new strategies and methods for and nanomagnets. Palladium N-heterocyclic sialylmimetics. Parasitic trans-sialidases, viral the synthesis of biologically important molecules receptor-destroying enzymes and enzymes of the carbene complexes for catalytic organic involving cascade reactions, organometallic transformations and coupling reactions. Cleavage human acetylsialate turnover (synthesis, inhibitor reagents and cycloadditions. The synthesis of analysis, binding and inhibition assays). of dinitrogen. Magnetism of organo f-element galbonolide B (antifungal), lactonamycin (anti complexes. MRSA), herbimycin (anticancer) and the excitatory Darren Thompson (CCB) For research interests, Martyn Coles (OM) Synthesis/coordination amino acids is currently under investigation. refer to Biochemistry research information on chemistry of cationic phosphorus compounds. Interests include novel immuno-suppressants and pages 52-55. Bulky alkyl ligands to stabilise reactive main group memory enhancing agents. John Turner (MAT) Reactivity in TM and main complexes. Design of ligands for the synthesis Clive Penkett (ORG) Combined photochemical group molecules. Small targets (CnHm, H2, O2, N2) of heterobimetallic compounds. Main group with TM systems containing electronically non- and organometallic techniques for the atom- compounds for catalysis. Ferrocene derivatives innocent amides. Novel dense phase fluorides with efficient assembly complex organic compounds. as sensors for organic and inorganic anions. low-D magnetism. Microporous materials from Formation of advanced intermediates for the Synthesis of biodegradable polymers with medical adamantane-based blocks with acidic functions total synthesis of natural products, eg gelsemine. applications. (-PO3H, -CO2H). Diffraction (neutron/x-ray) on Formation of unique excitatory amino acids Hazel Cox (TC/OM) Theory of the chemical and derivatives and the use of novel desymmetrisation local/national facilities for structures of liquids physical properties of gas-phase TM complexes techniques involving π-allyl palladium species (H2O, HF, FSO3H, BF3,AsF5). (geometries, spin states, potential energy surfaces for complex enantiomerically enriched polycyclic Peter Varnai (CCB/TC) Computational studies of to locate surface crossings). Implementation and compounds. the structure, dynamics and function of biological use of time-dependent density functional theory molecules in collaboration with experiments such Gianluca Savini (CCB) Computational (TD-DFT) for spectroscopy. DFT for organometallic as NMR and single-molecule FRET spectroscopy. biochemistry, mechanical properties of layered bonding and mechanism in metal-based catalysis. Riboswitches, quadruplex forming nucleic acid and biologically important materials, eg graphite The quantum mechanical three body problem by sequences, protein-DNA recognition, enzymatic and proteins. Semiconductor science, dislocations analytical methods. reactions. Novel methods to understand the in group IV and compound semiconductors, IV-IV Iain Day (CCB) Hyperpolarised methods in NMR functioning principles of biomolecules and exploit an III-V. spectroscopy. Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation to the understanding to design new molecules. improve the sensitivity of heteronuclear NMR. Louise Serpell (CCB) Structure of amyloid Eddie Viseux (ORG) Novel multidisciplinary Rapid methods to determine heteronuclear spin- fibrils. Amyloid fibrils are deposited in a number methodologies for synthethis. Novel chiral gold lattice relaxation times. Development of carbon- of diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. The catalysts to assemble key fragments of biologically carbon and carbon-nitrogen correlation methods. fibrils are formed from normally soluble proteins important targets. Methodologies for chiral that undergo a conformational change to a Robin Fulton (CCB/OM) Lead (and group alcohols and amines from enantio-enriched predominantly beta-sheet structure. We are 14 analogue) alkoxides/hydroxides and their sulfoxides. Natural product synthesis, including using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to viability as nucloeophile or base. Lead-induced monensin and phorboxazole. Novel manganate examine the structure of the amyloid fibril. RNA cleavage from aqueous-stable lead- reagents to oxidise allylic and propargylic alcohols. macrocyclic complexes to RNA model systems. Green chemistry: enzymes for Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions (DKR). 61
  • Computing, artificial Taught programmes Computing, artificial intelligence and IT Part-time programmes The part-time structure for each programme is intelligence and IT as follows: Year 1 In each of the autumn and spring terms you take two courses. In the summer term you undertake work on the dissertation. Year 2 You take two courses in the autumn term. In the spring and summer terms you complete work on the dissertation. MSc in Creative Systems Essentials • The Department of Informatics at Sussex is 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Taught programmes a leading centre for teaching and research in Able to deal with an increasingly wide range MSc degrees computing. It is internationally respected for of media, the computer is now viewed by Creative Systems its interdisciplinary approach and innovative many artists as a key tool for creative work. Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems research, and offers a diverse range of Its ability to provide convenient substitutes Human-Centred Computer Systems stimulating topics for postgraduate study and for traditional tools and methods (software Information Technology for E-Commerce research. paintboxes, synthesised instruments, etc) is Intelligent Systems • We achieved a grade 5 (recognising research widely appreciated. Beyond this, there is growing Multimedia Applications and Virtual of national and international excellence) in the awareness that the computer can serve as the Environments most recent Research Assessment Exercise basis for entirely new methods of creativity. Scientific Computation (see page 132) (RAE). As a dynamic, configurable and interactive MA degree device, it can play an active and contributory Philosophy of Cognitive Science • As a consequence of our internationally renowned research, our taught programmes role in the creative process. A more cooperative Postgraduate certificates style of work is then enabled with the promise of E-Learning Design continuously evolve to take in the most recent results that may be hard to achieve any E-Learning Design (Professional Practice) advances made in the subject. other way. Postgraduate diplomas • The Department has modern, well-equipped Creative Systems The field of interactive digital arts has now general and specialist computer laboratories, Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems reached a stage of maturity where we can powerful computer servers, and a wide range Human-Centred Computer Systems identify a broad range of novel methodologies of software. Information Technology for E-Commerce and approaches. To make full use of these, Intelligent Systems • We have many links with industry, as well as practitioners need to be at ease with modern Multimedia Applications and Virtual a number of CASE studentships. We have an methods of computation. Environments Industrial Board that advises on our Masters The principal aim of the programme is to provide Philosophy of Cognitive Science programmes, and is involved in setting up the knowledge and technical skills required and advising on dissertation projects, guest for use of these new technologies and to give Research programmes lectures and recruitment events. MPhil, DPhil Informatics students the background they need to gain MPhil, DPhil Cognitive Science • The diversity of our research and teaching employment in the digital arts and creative New Route DPhil Cognitive Science interests mean that we attract students from industries. a wide range of backgrounds and interests. Delivered in an interdisciplinary academic Admissions requirements For information on overseas qualifications that • We provide an intellectually stimulating environment long associated with ground- meet the admissions requirements, see pages environment, with research in areas including breaking research in creativity, artificial life, 172-175 pervasive computing technology, multimedia human-centred computing and media and film MSc, postgraduate certificates and and graphics, human-centred computing, studies, the programme also benefits from close postgraduate diplomas genetic algorithms and artificial life, computer ties with the Brighton-based Blip forum A first- or upper second-class undergraduate vision, natural language processing, and (www.blip.me.uk) for creative arts, science and honours degree artistic and creative systems. The major technology. See Applicant profiles under each current research groups in informatics programme entry for information on the are described on pages 66-68. For more types of undergraduate study undertaken by information, see successful applicants. Mature applicants with www.sussex.ac.uk/informatics relevant experience will also be considered on an individual basis Robots in the Autonomous Systems Laboratory MPhil, DPhil and New Route DPhil A first- or upper second-class undergraduate honours degree in a subject relevant to your chosen area of research English language requirements IELTS 6.0, with not less than 6.0 in each section. For more information and alternative English language requirements, see page 174 Fees See pages 176-181 for information on fees Admissions and further information Postgraduate Admissions, Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH, UK T +44 (0)1273 678940 F +44 (0)1273 877873 E infopgadmiss@sussex.ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/informatics 62
  • Applicant profiles MSc in Human-Centred Applicants have a broad range of backgrounds Computer Systems Computing, artificial intelligence and IT from system developers working on advanced 1 year full-time/2 years part-time music/video technology, via creative artists This programme explores how to apply techniques aiming to extend their skills in the use of creative from cognitive science, psychology and software systems, to psychologists and biologists aiming engineering to the design, implementation and to expand their understanding of the creative evaluation of computing systems from a human- process. centred perspective. Funding The University of Sussex and American Express The University of Sussex and American Express Some Advanced Course Studentships, supplied have joined forces to offer an exciting new way to have joined forces to offer the opportunity to by the EPSRC, are available. Other scholarships study and gain work experience. You will work for study for the MSc part time while working for may also be available. See Fees and funding on two years part time in the Technologies Division American Express for two years part time. This pages 176-186. of American Express, based in the Sussex opportunity is available to EU students only, and Innovation Centre on the University of Sussex you must fulfil certain criteria (see box on the left). Programme structure campus, while also studying for an MSc in Autumn term: you take the compulsory courses Applicant profiles either Information Technology for E-Commerce Academic Development; Object-Oriented Applicants will have an interest in computing or Human-Centred Computer Systems in the Programming; Interactive Media Theory; and systems from a human perspective and will have Department of Informatics.* Models of Creativity. You also take one of the an undergraduate background in computing and/ following options: Artificial Life; Computer Your tuition fees for the course will be paid or psychology. Graphics Modelling and Rendering; HCCS by American Express and you will receive a Programme structure Advanced Topics; and Interactive Media Practice. competitive salary based on a working week Autumn term: you take the compulsory courses: of 30 hours. At the end of the two years, the Spring term: you take the compulsory course Academic Development; Human-Computer highest-performing students will have an Generative Creativity. You also take options as Interaction; Object-Oriented Programming; opportunity to gain a full-time job with American follows: and HCCS Advanced Topics. You also take one Express. option (depending on previous experience) either Media, Technology and Everyday Life and This opportunity is available to EU students only from: Programming Techniques; Introduction to one 15-credit option; or Science, Technology and you must be entitled to study part time and Cognitive Ergonomics; Multimedia Design and and Culture and one 15-credit option; or work 30 hours per week in the UK to be eligible Applications; and Models of Discovery, Invention three 15-credit options from the following list: for consideration. and Design. Computational Music; Multimedia Design and For more information, contact: Spring term: you take the three compulsory Applications; Data Mining; Music Technology; pg.admissions@sussex.ac.uk courses Software Design and Evaluation; Adaptive Systems; Model-Based Animation; * Please note that it is possible to study Psychological Methods for Systems Evaluation; Web-Based Commerce; Neural Networks; and for the MSc in Information Technology for and Interdisciplinarity and Group Processes. Software Design and Evaluation. You also take one option from: E-Business; E-Commerce and the MSc in Human-Centred Summer term: you undertake supervised work Computer Systems full time or part time, without Interactive Learning Environments; and for the MSc dissertation, which should be undertaking the work experience component Multimedia Design and Applications. Not all substantially based on a working creative system. with American Express. options are available every year; additional options may be available. Assessment You are assessed by coursework, unseen Summer term: you undertake supervised work for Applicant profiles examinations, essays, programming projects, the MSc dissertation, a project that either designs Undergraduate studies need to have been and evaluates a human-centred computer and a 12,000-word dissertation. in disciplines requiring both numeracy and system or investigates an aspect of interactivity. MSc in Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems computer literacy. 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Assessment Funding You are assessed by coursework, examinations, The study of natural and artificial evolutionary Some Advanced Course Studentships, supplied and adaptive systems is at the heart of important essays, programming projects, group projects, by the EPSRC, are available. Other scholarships presentations and a 12,000-word dissertation. emerging approaches to artificial intelligence, may also be available. See Fees and funding on cognitive science, computational biology and pages 176-186. MSc in Information Technology related areas. for E-Commerce Programme structure 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Sussex is internationally renowned for its Autumn term: you take the compulsory courses The University of Sussex and American Express research in these interdisciplinary areas and has Artificial Life; Programming Techniques; Formal have joined forces to offer the opportunity to one of the largest groups in this field. Computational Skills; Intelligence in Animals and study for the MSc part time while working for This programme provides a solid grounding in the Machines; and Academic Development. American Express for two years part time. This major themes of the area, including: artificial life, Spring term: you take the two compulsory courses opportunity is available to EU students only, and adaptive systems, biologically inspired robotics, Adaptive Systems; and Neural Networks. You also you must fulfil certain criteria (see box above left). complex adaptive systems, dynamical systems take two of the following options: Computational You can choose to organise your studies into approaches to cognition, evolutionary systems Neuroscience; E-Business; Issues in Philosophy pathways: Programming; Technology Innovation; and evolutionary computing, as well as natural of Cognitive Science II; Simulation of Adaptive Managing Innovation; E-Business/E-Commerce; and artificial neural systems. Behaviour; Advanced Computer Vision; From Human Systems including Software Design; This well-established programme is taught by Signal to Behaviour; Dynamics of Development; or you can mix and match according to your leading experts and there are many opportunities Issues in Emotion and Consciousness; and personal interests. to interact with the thriving local community of Sensory and Motor Functions of the Nervous Applicant profiles researchers in this field. Students have access to System. Not all options are available every year; Applicants need a good background in specialist facilities including robotics labs. additional options may be available. computing, information technology or During the summer term a dissertation project is Summer term: you undertake supervised work engineering with a reasonable programming undertaken under the supervision of a member for the MSc dissertation, which should usually be content. Applicants with relevant industrial of faculty; this gives students the opportunity based on a programming project. experience have also been successful. to develop further what they have learnt in Assessment the context of a piece of research. It is not You are assessed by coursework, unseen unusual for work from dissertation projects to be examinations, essays, programming projects published in conference proceedings or journals. and a 12,000-word dissertation. 63
  • Programme structure Autumn term: you take the compulsory courses Computing, artificial intelligence and IT Academic Development; Object-Oriented Programming; and Internet Technologies. You also take two options such as: Human-Centred Computer Systems Advanced Topics; Human- Computer Interaction; Models of Discovery, Invention and Design; Information Technology Systems; and Managing Innovation. Other options may be available. Spring term: you take the compulsory course Information and Communication Technology Policy and Strategy. You also take two options from: Managing Innovation in Complex Product Systems; Web-Based Commerce; Data Mining; Multimedia Design and Applications; Software Design and Evaluation; and Data Mining. Summer term: you undertake supervised work for the MSc dissertation, which is based on a substantial research project or thesis. Assessment Taught courses are assessed by a variety of methods including coursework, presentation, literature review, programming projects, unseen examinations and term papers. The MSc project Photorealistic computer-generated model of a living room. The model was built by Ben Jackson (a DPhil is assessed by a 12,000-word dissertation. student in the Centre for VLSI and Computer Graphics), using state-of-the-art gaming techniques to enable real-time interaction MSc in Intelligent Systems 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Summer term: you undertake a dissertation MA in Philosophy of Cognitive Science This MSc prepares graduates for research and project under faculty supervision. There are 1 year full-time/2 years part-time development in intelligent systems, covering occasionally opportunities to collaborate in The rapidly developing sciences of the mind theoretical issues and practical techniques for this with an industrial partner. The dissertation are confronting us with fascinating questions their design and implementation. Programming offers scope to specialise through research in concerning representation, meaning, skills are developed through introductory courses a chosen topic, and the work of some projects consciousness, subjectivity and the scientific in Prolog and Java, enabling students from both has led to publication in journals and conference process itself – questions that require computing and non-computing backgrounds proceedings. philosophical insight and skill to answer. This MA access to a wide range of optional specialist courses commensurate with their experience. Assessment gives you a unique opportunity to explore these You are assessed by coursework, unseen fundamental issues, and acquire skills necessary You can choose to organise your studies into for advancing our understanding of ourselves. examinations, essays, programming projects, pathways: Artificial Intelligence; Creative group projects, presentations and a 12,000-word This MA has strong connections with the Systems; Computational Neuroscience; dissertation. world-famous Centre for Research in Cognitive Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems; Software Design; and Philosophy of Cognitive Science; MSc in Multimedia Applications Science (COGS), which provides a highly active or you can mix and match according to your and Virtual Environments and interdisciplinary environment involving personal interests. 1 year full-time/2 years part-time linguists, cognitive psychologists, philosophers, Applicant profiles neuroscientists and AI (artificial life) researchers. Applicant profiles Philosophers in COGS interact regularly with This programme is for applicants intending While applicants will often have a background in these other researchers, whose work includes the to deepen their understanding of multimedia computing or cognitive subjects (like psychology areas of sumbolic AI, connectionism, evolutionary applications and virtual environments. It is suited or philosophy), the programme is for anyone robotics, dynamic systems explanations of interested in research or development work in to those with a previous degree in computer science, mathematics, the natural sciences or cognition, and AI. Interdisciplinary dialogue intelligent systems. is encouraged by weekly research seminars, practical media. Programme structure including the popular Philosophy Society Autumn term: you take the compulsory Programme structure meetings. Weekly E-Intentionality work-in- courses Academic Development; Knowledge Autumn term: you take the compulsory courses progress seminars teach both general research Representation; and Object-Oriented Object-Oriented Programming; Computer skills and those specific to the Philosophy of Programming. You also take two options from: Graphics Modelling and Rendering; Academic Cognitive Science, and acquaint you with the Intelligence in Animals and Machines; Artificial Development; and Human-Computer Interaction. research philosophers in COGS. The career Life; Computer Vision; Formal Computational You also take one option from: 3D Animation; and development of students on this programme Skills; Internet Technologies; Human-Computer Music Technology. has shown it to be an excellent preparation for Interaction; Introduction to Cognitive Ergonomics; Spring term: you take the four compulsory doctoral-level research. Issues in Philosophy of Cognitive Science I; Models courses: Software Design and Evaluation; Applicant profiles of Creativity; and Natural Language Processing. Distributed Systems; Internet-Based Virtual Applicants come from both an arts and a science Spring term: you take the two compulsory Environments; and Multimedia Design and background, with undergraduate studies in courses Advanced Technical Communications; Applications. philosophy or a subject related to cognitive and Artificial Intelligence Programming. You Summer term: you undertake supervised work science, such as psychology, linguistics, also take two options from: Adaptive Systems; for the MSc dissertation, which should usually be neuroscience or computing. Computational Neuroscience; Data Mining; based on a multimedia programming project. Funding Dynamics of Development; E-Business; From Signal to Behaviour; Advanced Computer Vision; Assessment EU applicants can apply for an AHRC studentship. Generative Creativity; Interactive Learning You are assessed by coursework, group projects, See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Environments; Neural Networks; Simulation essays, software projects, programming projects of Adaptive Behaviour; Sensory and Motor and a 12,000-word dissertation. Functions of the Nervous System; Software Design and Evaluation; Computer-Supported Cooperative Work; and Issues in Emotion and Consciousness. Not all options are available every year. Additional options may be available. 64
  • Programme structure Applicant profiles Students admitted to research degrees will Autumn term: you take the compulsory courses This programme is intended for both current normally be required to do some coursework in Computing, artificial intelligence and IT Philosophy of Cognitive Science I: Concepts practising e-learning designers looking for their first two terms, although an appropriate and Cognitive Science; and Academic accreditation for their skills and those who want MSc often provides an alternative way of gaining Development. You also take one option to gain a comprehensive range of new skills and the necessary training. Additional short courses from the list of autumn term courses from become qualified in e-learning design. Applicants for the development of generic skills are available the MA in Philosophy (see page 146), or come from a range of backgrounds (computing, from a wide selection provided by the Sussex two options from: Intelligence in Animals education, and creative writing). Postgraduate Skills Programme, and Machines; Introduction to Cognitive (www.sussex.ac.uk/sp2). Linguistics; Conceptual Projection in Thought Programme structure and Language; Formal Computational The Certificate is run jointly with the University Funding Skills; Introduction to Cognitive Ergonomics; of Brighton. The first two courses take place A limited amount of funding from the EPSRC Computer Vision; Natural Language at Sussex, while the second two take place at and the University is available for outstanding Processing; and Programming Techniques. Brighton. applicants. See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Spring term: you take the compulsory course Autumn term (October-November) – you take Philosophy of Cognitive Science II: Mind Embodied one compulsory course – E-Learning: Theory and Recent thesis titles and Embedded. You also take either Emotion and Practice. To err is human: a discussion of intentionality, Consciousness, or Language in Human error and misrepresentation Autumn-spring term (November-January)– you Psychology, and one option from the list of take one compulsory course – Technology for Evolutionary search of fitness landscapes with spring term courses from the MA in Philosophy E-Learning Designers. neutral networks (see page 146); or two options from: Language Unsupervised language acquisition: theory and Space; Cognitive Approaches to Grammar; Spring term (February-April) – you take one and practice Cognitive Linguistic Typology; Adaptive compulsory course – Design and Content Systems; AI Programming; Interactive Learning Development. Active group communication Environments; Neural Networks; Simulation of Hardware evolution: on the nature of artificially Summer term (May-June) – you take one Adaptive Behaviour; From Signal to Behaviour; evolved electronic circuits compulsory course – Project Process. and Dynamics of Development. Not all options Proxy compilation of dynamically loaded are available every year. Additional options may be For the 90-credit version: Java classes available. Summer term (June-September): you take one compulsory course – Professional Placement. Interactivity in graphical representations: Summer term: you undertake supervised work on assessing its benefits for learning the MA dissertation. Assessment Categorical and graphical models of Assessment You are assessed by coursework, which includes programming languages You are assessed by unseen examinations, presentations, and the submission of portfolios essays, programming projects, group projects and design projects. On the relations between behaviour, mechanism and a 20,000-word dissertation. and environment: explorations in artificial evolution Postgraduate diplomas Postgraduate Certificate in E-Learning Funding Reverse engineering an active eye Design/E-Learning Design (Professional See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Implementation of an optimising object- Practice) oriented programming language compiler Programme structure 1 year part-time for embedded applications The full-time structure is identical to that of the The PGCert in E-Learning Design is a part- 3D graphics hardware prototyping and autumn and spring terms of the corresponding time programme aimed at those working in or implementation Masters programme. intending to work in the e-learning industry. Two potential awards are available: a 60-credit and a The part-time structure is identical to that of the A multimedia CAL system for object- 90-credit version. autumn and spring terms of year 1 and year 2 of oriented methodology the part-time Masters programme. Algorithm design for 3D computer The 60-credit PGCert in E-Learning Design is suitable for students with a background in graphics rendering education, multimedia or computing. This Research programmes Computer graphics hardware using ASICs, programme provides a means of augmenting FPGAs and embedded logic their skillsets to fit the needs of the e-learning Research students studying for MPhil or DPhil Texture mapping acceleration using cache industry. degrees are associated with one or more research memories groups in the Department and are housed in well- For those already working in the industry, Academic activities equipped shared offices. They have full access the 90-credit PGCert in E-Learning Design Research students make a substantial contribution to their research group’s specialist facilities and (Professional Practice) offers opportunities to the research output of the Department of laboratories. to strengthen and expand existing knowledge Informatics, and frequently present their work at and skills, and to demonstrate proficiency in a The Department of Informatics is engaged in a conferences and in journals. professional setting. wide range of highly rated research covering many areas of artificial intelligence, computer science Graduate students are also encouraged to attend The Postgraduate Certificate in E-Learning and give talks in the various specialised seminar and cognitive science. We can supervise research Design is the result of a SEEDA-funded series in the Department: students in all areas in which departmental collaboration between the University of Sussex, faculty specialise. • Artificial Life Reading Group the University of Brighton and e-learning companies in Brighton from BeLA (the Brighton Applicants wishing to pursue interdisciplinary • Bioinformatics and Vision E-Learning Alliance). It was driven by a demand research involving artificial intelligence (including • Computer Science seminars for education, training and certification from computational philosophy of mind or of biology) the e-learning companies, both to support their • COGS seminars may apply to do research degrees in cognitive existing staff and to help fuel further growth when science. It is also possible to undertake a • Human-Centred Technology Group recruiting new staff. research degree in cognitive science via the New • Informatics departmental seminars Areas covered by the programme include Route DPhil (see Routes to postgraduate study at • E-Intentionality seminars e-learning design, learning technologies, project Sussex on pages 14-15), offering an integrated • Natural Language and Computational Linguistics management, and theories of learning (60- and four-year programme of taught coursework in • Software Systems Group 90-credit versions). The full 90-credit PGCert research methods and professional skills, and supervised doctoral research. • Theoretical Computer Science Study Group. in E-Learning Design (Professional Practice) provides an opportunity to develop effective The regular seminars held in life sciences and by reflective practice in the workplace. the Philosophy Society may also be of relevance to graduate studies. Successful graduates from either version may choose to use credits gained in this course towards an MSc in Learning Technologies offered by the University of Brighton. 65
  • Research groups Computer vision and medical imaging lab Ezequiel Di Paolo Evolutionary robotics, This group uses a wide variety of methods and evolutionary biology and embodied cognitive Computing, artificial intelligence and IT Research is organised around well-defined approaches from computer science, cognitive science; computational models of the evolution groups of international standing. Some of our and biological sciences to research into a variety of social behaviour, altruism and coordination research is highly interdisciplinary, involving of areas including: dynamic aspects of visual through acoustic interactions. collaborations between these groups as well as perception, low-level vision, spiking neural nets, with other departments at Sussex. All groups Inman Harvey Artificial evolution as applied data mining, and machine learning. are well funded from a variety of sources, to design: theoretical (error thresholds, neutral including research council grants and support Faculty involved include: David Young, Des networks, optimising speed of search) and from industry, and all have specialist facilities Watson, Professor Phil Husbands, and Andy applications (evolutionary robotics, evolvable and laboratories. The research groups are briefly Philippides. hardware, combinatorial chemistry). described below (for more details see Creative Systems Lab Professor Phil Husbands Evolutionary and www.sussex.ac.uk/informatics). The research of this group lies at the intersection adaptive robotics; evolutionary computation Centre for Research in Cognitive Science of arts, science and technology. Members of the and optimisation; artificial life; computational (COGS) group work on theories of the creative process neuroscience; adaptive systems; neuro- This is an interdisciplinary Research Centre, and their implementation in computer models modulation; history of AI and cybernetics; and which aims to champion and support research and artistic productions; they also initiate and creative systems. and teaching in cognitive science at Sussex. facilitate collaborations between scientists, Thomas Nowotny Use of dynamical systems artists, musicians, industry and the general A world-renowned, pioneering institution in theory, statistics and hybrid systems experiments public. In addition to those listed below, faculty cognitive science, COGS continues to conduct in a comprehensive approach to understand involved include: Professor Margaret Boden, first-class research in such topics as computer information processing in nervous systems, Ron Chrisley, Professor Phil Husbands, and Andy particularly olfactory systems and applications to vision, mental representation, cognitive Philippides. linguistics, conscious experience, computational electronic noses; sequence learning in neuronal architectures for emotion, machine learning Faculty research interests include: systems; accurate conductance-based neuron and neural networks, pattern recognition, models; and hybrid systems. Nick Collins Live electronic music and cognitive modelling, implicit learning, reasoning, audiovisuals; interactive music systems; Andy Philippides Computational neuroscience mechanisms of creativity, philosophical issues in music understanding by computer; algorithmic and neuroetholgy; evolutionary robotics; artificial life, and temporal cognition in language. composition and sound synthesis; mathematics; insect visual homing strategies; and gaseous The Centre acts as a focus for research in and psychology of music. neuromodulators in real and artificial neural cognitive science by running interdepartmental networks. Chris Thornton Computational learning seminars and research meetings. For more using symbolic algorithms and connectionist Anil Seth Theoretical neuroscience and information, contact the Centre’s director, Ron mechanisms; and theories of creativity. evolutionary and adaptive systems; time-series Chrisley (r.l.chrisley@sussex.ac.uk). analysis of neural dynamics, causality in neural Evolutionary and adaptive systems systems, neurorobotics, neural mechanisms Centre for Computational Neuroscience and This group is concerned with the interface Robotics (CCNR) of consciousness, and network-theoretic between the biological and computational approaches to the analysis of complex systems; This thriving interdisciplinary centre is jointly run sciences and applications of new technologies by the Department of Informatics and the and evolutionary theory and ecological modelling. resulting from work in this area. Research neuroscience group. It has its own well-resourced focuses on a wide range of topics including: Adrian Thompson The application of artificial laboratories, and focuses on work at the interface the development of biologically inspired evolution to engineering design, principally between computing structures and biological adaptive algorithms, adaptive and evolutionary electronics; custom/reconfigurable computing; systems – an area that has been recognised by robotics, artificial life, computational biology, fault-tolerance; and evolutionary theory. government funding agencies and the EU as an computational neuroscience, dynamical systems David Young Computational and biological emerging area of considerable importance. approaches to cognition and development, aspects of vision, including theoretical and The symbiosis between computer science and evolutionary electronics and evolutionary experimental research on optic flow and image neuroscience in particular holds the key to computation, evolutionary theory, and representation, and practical applications such future developments in robotics and artificial applications of adaptive systems in the as traffic monitoring. intelligence. It will lead to a better understanding creative arts. of how the brain works and promises biomedical Foundations of computation advances of enormous benefit. There is also a strong line of work in This group focuses on the foundational aspects Artificial intelligence and neuroscience are bioinformatics and machine learning. In machine of computer science, particularly the semantics areas in which Sussex is exceptionally strong. learning, research involves the development of computation. They have developed behavioural Combined with a tradition for interdisciplinary of novel and efficient algorithms, building on theories for a range of process languages, links between the informatics research groups statistical theory as well as borrowing ideas including features such as higher-order and the neuroscience groups (IRC, EP and MRC from neuroscience. Research in bioinformatics abstractions and distributed resources. laboratory), this places Sussex at the forefront of includes microarray data processing, MD and Research interests in this thriving group include: this emerging field. protein structures. Ian Mackie Foundations of programming Work in the Centre mainly falls under the following This well-resourced group overlaps with CCNR languages and models of computation. Applying headings: natural and artificial neural systems; and, together, they make up one of the largest techniques from mathematical logic and evolutionary and adaptive robotics; evolutionary and best-known research groups in the world quantum mechanics to programming language electronics; dynamics, development and working in this area. The group collaborates implementation. cognition; insect and robot navigation; complex widely with other centres in the University and adaptive systems; and computational creativity. elsewhere, has a number of well-equipped Bernhard Reus Mathematical semantics of This last area uses adaptive technology in the laboratories, machine shop facilities and runs programming languages; their foundations, creative arts and involves various collaborations several lively seminar series, as well as smaller ie Domain Theory and Type Theory; Synthetic with local and international artists and performers. specialist discussion groups. Domain Theory as the natural synthesis of both; constructive (categorical) logic; programming The CCNR overlaps with the Evolutionary and Faculty research interests include: logics; formal proof; and formal techniques Adaptive Systems group, described on the right. Luc Berthouze Motor development in infants and tools supporting (object-oriented) program For more information, contact the directors: and in machines; clinical applications of analysis, design and verification. Professor Phil Husbands (p.husbands@sussex.ac.uk) or Professor Michael dynamical system approach to characterising O’Shea (m.o-shea@sussex.ac.uk). infant movements (particularly cerebral palsy); EEG-based brain-machine interfaces, intelligent neuroprostheses; epigenetic or developmental robotics; and modelling cognitive development with robotic systems. 66
  • Human-centred technology (HCT) Natural language processing Representation and cognition The HCT group is an internationally renowned This group comprises one of the largest teams of Group members are interested in the Computing, artificial intelligence and IT research centre in human-computer interaction researchers in the UK focusing on statistical and development and application of cognitive (HCI), interaction design and interactive learning corpus-based approaches to natural language theories. They study the higher forms of cognition environments. Its focus is on understanding how processing. Their research covers probabilistic including reasoning, problem solving and learning. people interact with and communicate through processing techniques, linguistic theory and The group has a particular focus on the role(s) technology, with particular interests in more automatic acquisition of grammatical knowledge of representation, emphasising cognitive and cutting-edge tangible and pervasive technologies. from corpus data, with application to practical semantic dimensions. Favoured methodologies The group is made up of two research labs: the natural language parsing and generation. include rich data capture, protocol analysis, INTERACT lab and the IDEAS lab. One of the main The group currently consists of about 15 experimental designs, the use and design of strengths of the HCT group is its interdisciplinary faculty, doctoral and postdoctoral researchers. technology to test theory, and modelling. heritage, with faculty, research fellows and DPhil It has a long and distinguished track record at Faculty research interests include: students coming from a variety of backgrounds, international level, with many achievements in including computer science, psychology, artificial basic and applied research. Current work covers six Professor Peter Cheng The nature of intelligence, engineering, art, design and related areas of research: probabilistic and robust representational systems, both external in the philosophy. parsing, annotation of text and transcribed speech, world and internal to the mind. A particular automatic acquisition of lexical information interest is diagrams that support advanced forms A common theme to all HCT research is putting from corpora, computational formalisms for of cognition, such as complex problem solving, people at the centre of the design process. representing information about language, discovery and conceptual learning. Key strands of research include: interactive learning environments and technology-enhanced empirical foundations of language processing, and Richard Cox Human reasoning, especially with learning, tangible embodied interaction, practical applications of language processing. external representations such as diagrams; pervasive technologies in the home and non- Faculty research interests include: representational systems; vicarious learning; work environments, pervasive care/telehealth, artificial intelligence and educational systems; psychology of programming, accessibility and Professor John Carroll Hybrid linguistic/ and interactive learning environments. game design. statistical approaches to disambiguation of text, efficient parsing, evaluation of parser Sharon Wood Multi-agent systems, especially Faculty research interests include: accuracy, tools for large-scale natural language anticipating agent behaviour through situational grammar and lexicon development, and linguistic cuing and intention recognition. Situational Professor Ben du Boulay Application of AI modelling, in particular, the acquisition of techniques to education, particularly modelling approaches to the generation of text from representations of its meaning. information through cognitively plausible visual motivation and metacognition in intelligent attention processes, and the acquisition of learning environments. Bill Keller Applying machine learning techniques situational understanding through cognitively Geraldine Fitzpatrick People-centred design to problems in language learning/grammatical plausible epigenetic processes, and cognitive and methods and conceptual frameworks, especially inference. epigenetic robotics. for emerging technologies such as mobile, Rudi Lutz Machine learning, especially of Software systems tangible and ubiquitous computing and their language models (eg grammars, or Hidden Staff and postgraduate students within this applications to everyday contexts; special Markov Models) using various techniques (ie group have research interests covering a wide interests in social interaction and collaboration, evolutionary, expectation maximisation). range of topics including programming language creativity/play, domestic environments, older design and implementation, object-oriented people, disability, and healthcare/telecare. Professor Geoffrey Sampson Corpus-based natural language processing using statistical programming and design, software development Judith Good Constructivist learning stochastic optimisation techniques; and environments, debugging tools, networking, environments; educational games and standards definition for natural language communication, operating system design, simulations; technology toolkits for learning; computing. compiler design, parallelism, code optimisation, visual programming languages; and embodied automated code generator construction and and tangible interfaces for learning. David Weir Controlling non-determinism in software development for embedded systems. natural language generation, using language Many of the current projects have commercial Graham McAllister Accessibility and usability in pervasive computing environments, efficient involvement, and we are keen to develop further of video games and interactive systems. In parsing with large grammars, probabilistic parse links with industry. particular, how the user experience of video ranking, and inferring knowledge about words games can be evaluated and how games can be Particular research strands include the from raw text. designed for people with special needs. development of compiler technology for Philosophy of artificial intelligence and embedded systems, and user-centred Pablo Romero Exploring the support that cognitive science networking, where the needs and constraints collaboration and external representations can This group considers the conceptual issues that of the users drive the engineering of networked offer to students learning programming; exploring arise when trying to explain natural intelligence systems. These two areas are coming together in the potential that new forms of interaction systems, or create artificial ones. the development of programming languages for (tangible interfaces, embodied interaction) have pervasive computing. This well-funded group has for learning in general and specifically as a way Faculty research interests include: its own specialist facilities and laboratories. to approach engagement and motivation; as a Professor Margaret Boden Computational way to foster collaboration; and for specifying Faculty research interests include: approaches in the philosophy of mind and concrete and abstract behaviours (programming, theoretical psychology: special interest in Dan Chalmers Context awareness and the way scripting). purpose, intention, motivation and creativity; in which system behaviour impacts the user philosophy of AI and ALife; and social implications experience in ubiquitous/pervasive computing Blay Whitby Social and ethical implications of of AI. scenarios; how knowledge of context (including AI and ALife; philosophical foundations of AI resource limits, location, and other physical and and ALife; professionalism in computing; and Ron Chrisley Non-conceptual representations social aspects of context) can be used to modify multimedia and decision support systems. and human cognition; computational behaviour, affect data display and configuration architectures for psychological theories of pre- of systems. objective mind, consciousness, philosophy of computation, and computational architectures Ian Wakeman Communications and distributed for affect and emotion. systems, distributed multimedia and collaborative working. Other faculty, who have primary affiliations within disciplines such as linguistics, philosophy, Des Watson High-level language compilers; neuroscience and psychology, play an active role code generator design and implementation; in this group. sensor networks; medical computing, particularly computer support for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. 67
  • The Centre is also exploring the idea of ‘fidelity’ of simulations in relation to their real-world Computing, artificial intelligence and IT counterparts. A central issue is the investigation of perceptual sensitivity measures of simulation engineering limitations, such as latency and rendering quality. Functional fidelity metrics that are based on spatial cognition aspects such as memory awareness states and schemas have been established and incorporated into perceptually based real-time rendering engines. Through this work, the Centre has established an international reputation working with collaborators such as HP Labs and NASA Ames Research Centre, USA. Faculty research interests include: Katerina Mania Fidelity metrics for computer graphics simulations; perceptually based computer graphics rendering; display technologies; 3D user interfaces; human factors issues for virtual environments (task performance after-effects); presence; vection and latency for immersive simulations; and visualisation. Paul Newbury Multimedia systems, in particular virtual prototyping and MPEG2/MPEG4 streaming data. Image processing, image compression, lossy compression of multivariate scientific data sets; and analysis and manipulation and compression of deep multispectral electron microscope images. Adrian Thomas Non-invasive techniques for shape capture to digitise surface structure of faces, feet etc; and real-time extensions for gait Space science Centre for VLSI and Computer Graphics capture and movement analysis. The University of Sussex Space Science Centre is The Centre’s research focus has moved from one Phil Watten Software development; virtual an interdisciplinary cross-departmental research of developing innovative graphics accelerator prototyping; high-level design; system modelling; centre. technologies at the low hardware and software display systems; interface design; and all aspects algorithm level – we designed one of the first of media production including new media and The Space Science Centre is led by Professor graphics accelerators leading towards the birth web broadcasting. Paul Gough and conducts both general and of the PC graphics card industry – to taking a mission-oriented space research in close Martin White 3D graphics; virtual, augmented high-level design and simulation approach that collaboration with other space research institutes and mixed reality applied to digital heritage also encompasses the environment as part of in Europe, the US, and the former Soviet Bloc systems; digital libraries; semantic-based the simulation. The Centre has now established countries. The Centre designs and constructs knowledge and content systems; technology- a research theme focused on ‘modern living instruments, and continues to monitor their enhanced learning; access to and preservation extensions’, based on developing pervasive operation once launched into space with of cultural and scientific resources; virtual simulation environments that allow real-world subsequent scientific data analysis. archaeology; virtual reconstruction. Metadata environments, such as InQbate – The Centre for The Centre has probably placed more computers Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Creativity, standards for digital heritage, interoperable in space than any other UK university space to be simulated, created, technologically systems; e-learning and information technology; group. It has led with on-board intelligence enhanced and evaluated. Simulation of knowledge GRID applied to digital libraries; within space instruments, and claims the first pervasive computing environments represents an e-Government, information visualisation applied discovery of a geophysical phenomenon by a interesting and challenging research area for our to independent living and inclusion; and digital neural network ‘Expert Data Analyst’ flown within postgraduate students. content creation. a space instrument. The Centre is also engaged in research focused The Space Science Centre attracts a lot on the design and development of innovative of external funding and the research interests ‘digital heritage systems’, where we explore of the faculty involved, Professor Paul Gough, the use of ICTs including virtual and augmented Natalia Beloff and Andrew Buckley reality, and interaction technologies to the (Department of Engineering and Design), include cultural heritage domain. Here we seek to the following areas: space instrumentation, understand how people could appreciate their space plasma diagnostics and scientific heritage through the pioneering design of interpretation, particle correlation technique, heritage systems. intelligent instruments, smart autonomous In this respect the Centre has developed instruments, real-time data analysis in space two innovative digital heritage systems: the instruments, embedded systems, data ARCO Virtual Exhibition System, which is now compression, parallel processing and fault- being licensed and commercially exploited by tolerance versus artificial neural networks for museums, and the EPOCH Multimodal Interface data classification and analysis, associative list that allows users to interact with a physical memory for data classification, fuzzy logic in museum artefact through the medium of a virtual control of instruments, evolutionary instruments replica or simulation environment. This research to adapt to unforeseen environments, graphical is underpinned by detailed usability trials and display and dissemination of complex data sets evaluations in actual museums in order to assess for rapid man-machine interaction, knowledge the efficacy of these digital heritage systems. accumulation from databases, remote data gathering and processing for unmanned instruments in inhospitable locations, and satellite communication systems. 68
  • Contemporary Taught programmes Contemporary European studies Students taking taught programmes are based at the Sussex European Institute. European studies MA in Contemporary European Studies 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Funding British, Mexican and East European MA students are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages 176-186). EU students are eligible for a Lady Monica Cockfield Memorial Trust award (Home/EU fees only). SEI has two of these awards for MA Essentials students, awarded annually. There are six OSI/ • The Sussex European Institute (SEI), a Jean FCO Chevening/Sussex scholarships (fees and Taught programmes Monnet Centre of Excellence for the study maintenance) for suitably qualified applicants MA degrees of European integration, consolidated the from Albania, Belarus and Kosovo. Applications Contemporary European Studies University’s position among the leading for these awards should be made via the local European Politics (see page 151) international centres of graduate training and Open Society Institute representation in the MSc degree research in European studies. respective countries before February 2009. Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research • SEI comprises a vibrant community of Programme structure Methods (Contemporary European Studies) scholars, visiting practitioners and academic The MA has pan-European coverage, with a Research programmes fellows. wide-ranging core course and a variety of MPhil, DPhil Contemporary European Studies • Research in the Institute focuses on three specialised options. New Route DPhil Contemporary European themes: The programme is aimed at graduates in social Studies - European integration with a focus on the sciences or other appropriate disciplines who Admissions requirements political economy of European integration wish to add a European dimension to their For information on overseas qualifications that including the single market, agriculture, knowledge, and at graduates in subjects such meet the admissions requirements, see pages structural funds and the EU budget, as French or history who wish to gain a social 172-175 monetary and financial integration, the science background. You may select for yourself MA economics of accession and trade policy; a general approach to European studies, or you An upper second-class undergraduate - representative politics in Europe focusing on may specialise by area according to your choice honours degree in an arts or social sciences political parties, democracy and electoral of options. subject politics, and including the Centre for Parties Autumn term: you take the core course MSc, MPhil, New Route DPhil and Democracy and Europe; and The Making of Contemporary Europe. An upper second-class undergraduate - internal external security challenges to the honours degree in any relevant social science, EU covering justice and home affairs, and Spring term: you choose from: Comparative but applicants with other backgrounds may European security policy and defence. Politics of Western Europe; Domestic Politics be considered. Applicants should submit an • The Sussex European Institute provides an of European Integration; EC Single Market outline (two to three pages) of their research excellent location for research students with Law; European Convention on Human Rights; interests its Research in Progress seminar series, European Media in Transition; European DPhil as well as its own tailored Professional Political Integration; Human Rights in Europe; A Masters degree in any relevant social Development Workshop series. Industrial Change and Regional Development; science but applicants with other backgrounds International Relations of the EU; Idea of Europe; may be considered. Applicants should submit • SEI is home to the Journal of Common Market Migration under the EHCR; Political Economy an outline research proposal indicating the Studies (JCMS), the primary interdisciplinary of EU Integration; Political Economy of EU nature, ambition and primary questions of the journal on European integration; the Enlargement and Accession; Political Parties research project European Foreign Affairs Review; the Centre and Party System in Comparative Perspective; on European Political Economy; and the Politics of Citizenship and Immigration; Politics English language requirements European Parties Elections and Referendums of Eastern Europe in Transition; and Post War IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and Network (EPERN). Germany. 6.0 in the other sections. For more information and alternative English language requirements, Summer term and vacation: you undertake see page 174 supervised work on the MA dissertation. Fees Assessment See pages 176- 181 for information on fees You are assessed by one unseen examination, two 5,000-word term papers (on two of Further information the options), plus a dissertation of up to Sussex European Institute, University of Sussex, 20,000 words. Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SH, UK T +44 (0)1273 678578 F+44 (0)1273 678571 E sei@sussex.ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/sei Garments of would-be immigrants are hooked on a razor wire fence that separates Spain’s North African enclave of Melilla from Morocco. There have been many mass attempts to enter Spain’s North African enclaves as hundreds of African migrants try to enter Europe. The Politics of Citizenship and Immigration is just one of the option courses you can choose as part of the MA in Contemporary European Studies 69
  • Research programmes Contemporary European studies Research students are based at the Sussex European Institute. Degrees may be awarded either in contemporary European studies or in a particular discipline, eg anthropology, geography, economics, international relations or politics, while focused on a European topic. SEI also hosts visiting researchers. Funding The Sussex European Institute has full 1+3 and +3 recognition for the ESRC. This includes access to five interdisciplinary Quota studentships in 2009. EU students are eligible for a Lady Monica Cockfield Memorial Trust award (Home/EU fees only). See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. A limited amount of funding from Sussex may be available for outstanding research students, and may include some teaching. For further details, contact the Sussex European Institute at the address listed in Essentials. Coursework There are three modes of entry for research students. First is traditional entry to an MPhil or DPhil. Second is the MSc plus DPhil pathway, which is the 1+3 route required by the ESRC for their studentship support. Third is the New Route DPhil offering an integrated four-year programme of taught coursework in research The European Court of Human Rights, Strasbourg; a bulwark of European values methods and professional skills and supervised doctoral research. All new research students MA in European Politics Programme structure will be required to participate in the programme 1 year full-time/2 years part-time There are three main elements to the MSc The MA in European Politics offers the of research training courses and to take other programme that run concurrently through the opportunity to examine recent dramatic changes courses that may be recommended by the academic year: a research elective involving in the political systems of western and eastern supervisor of their research. (Exemption from supervised reading in your individual research Europe. For full details, see page 151. research training courses can be granted to area and the writing of a dissertation; credited those who have already taken such courses at MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural courses in the philosophy and methodology of postgraduate level; students can also qualify Research Methods research; and training in both quantitative and for interim awards, such as the Postgraduate (Contemporary European Studies) qualitative research skills. Diploma or Certificate in Comparative and Cross- 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Autumn term: you take a research elective, Cultural Research Methods, for any research A Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate are Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific training courses taken concurrently with their also available. See Routes to postgraduate study Research Practice; and Research Design in a research. See Routes to postgraduate study at at Sussex on pages 14-15. Cross-Cultural Context. Sussex on pages 14-15.) The MSc is designed to meet the most recent ESRC requirements for social science research Spring term: you take courses in quantitative Recent thesis titles training. The programme provides a rigorous and qualitative data collection and analysis. Change and Continuity in British Post-Cold War training in social research methods, an Summer term: you choose from a selection of Foreign Policy towards European Security and opportunity to develop a full doctoral research courses in cross-cultural and comparative data Defence Cooperation, 1989-2000 proposal and to write a supervised dissertation collection and analysis. The research elective Foreign Policy and Public Opinion in the Polish- (the research elective), as well as exposure to continues across all terms, culminating in the Ukrainian Borderlands debates and theories within the broad field of writing of a dissertation. contemporary European studies. It involves a The Voter-Party Relationship in France: Patterns mixture of supervised reading and attendance at Assessment of Partisanship since the 1981 alternance formal courses, and aims to equip you with the Taught course units are variously assessed by Enlarging the area of freedom, security and necessary skills to pursue research for a DPhil term papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent justice: Poland’s accession to the European in the field. coursework portfolios. The research elective is Union in the field of external border controls assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words. Funding Economic integration and production structures: This programme qualifies for ESRC support the case of the EU-15 and the Central and under its 1+3 system of doctoral support. For Eastern European Countries information on ESRC and other funding, see Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Policy evolution and change: the Spanish and Finnish accessions to the European Union Political participation and role of migrant organisations in Sweden and the Netherlands 70
  • Contemporary European studies Specialist facilities Professor Mick Dunford Urban and regional Signing the treaty of Rome 27 March 1957. development in Britain and western Europe. Six countries start a process of European political The University Library is a European and economic integration that has led to a Documentation Centre, and Library holdings in David Dyker Science policy and economic European Union of 27 by 2008, with the prospect the fields of European institutions, economics transformation in eastern Europe. of a Union of more than 30 by 2020 and politics are particularly strong. There is an Peter Holmes Economics of European excellent Language Institute on campus, which integration, and trade and competition policy. provides taught courses and self-study facilities Professor Jim Rollo Co-Director of SEI. for a wide range of European languages, both Daniel Hough Comparative politics, German Economics of EU integration; and EU external east and west. politics, former GDR, party politics, and political economic policy. Editor, Journal of Common corruption. Market Studies. Zdenek Kavan Politics in eastern Europe; Professor Malcolm Ross EU Law; competition Academic activities central and eastern Europe since 1945; human law; and law and citizenship. The Sussex European Institute organises a rights in Europe; and international relations. Professor Aleks Szczerbiak Co-Director of research-in-progress seminar that runs for most Professor Russell King Migration studies; SEI. Comparative politics of central eastern of the year. Here faculty members and visitors tourism; and regional specialism in Europe and Europe; political parties; lustration and introduce work related to current research Ireland. de-communisation; and contemporary Poland. projects in the field of contemporary European studies. A study visit to Brussels is offered to MA Kate Lacey Gender, media and technology; and Professor Paul Taggart Political parties in students in the summer term. history of the media in Germany. western Europe; Euroscepticism; populism; and Francis McGowan Policy-making in the EU; and European Parliament. European government/industry relations. Adrian Treacher International relations of the Faculty research interests EU; European security; and French foreign policy. Professor Alan Mayhew Transition and Research interests are briefly described below. integration in central and eastern Europe; Professor Paul Webb Parties and electoral For more detailed information, see political economy of transition processes; and processes, both in the UK and comparatively: www.sussex.ac.uk/sei institutional economics and integration. more specifically, this takes in party organisation, Sabina Avdagic Comparative political economy Professor Susan Millns Law of the EU Single professionalisation and regulation; party including the politics of market reforms, as Market. competition, campaigning and electoral well as causes and consequences of national behaviour; party system change; and the effects variation in politico-economic institutions. Professor Jörg Monar Justice and home affairs of electoral systems. in the European Union. Tim Bale Comparative and British party politics, Europeanisation, and voting and citizenship. Lucia Quaglia European monetary integration; central banking governance in the EU; financial Professor Gerard Delanty Social theory service regulation and supervision in the EU; and political sociology; modernity in global Euroscepticism, Europeanisation, and perspective; social identity, nationalism EU Presidency. and citizenship; European societies in transformation; and cosmopolitanism. Editor of European Journal of Social Theory. Professor Marie-Bénédicte Dembour International law including European law; and international criminal law and public international law. 71
  • Creative writing Creative writing Essentials Pioneering study of creative writing at Sussex Taught programmes includes programmes offered by both the MA degrees Centre for Continuing Education (CCE) and the Creative and Critical Writing (see page 99) Department of English. Creative Writing and Authorship • MA, MPhil and DPhil programmes are Creative Writing and Personal Development available. Research programmes • All our programmes provide the opportunity to MPhil, DPhil Creative and Critical Writing develop your own creative writing with taught (see pages 101-102) courses, independent study and tutorial MPhil, DPhil Creative Writing advice. MPhil, DPhil Creative Writing and Personal Development • You benefit from contact with a variety of writing professionals. Admissions requirements For information on overseas qualifications that • Faculty include published writers and meet the admissions requirements, see pages researchers of international standing. 172-175 • Tutors include practising novelists, poets and MA dramatists. Students will normally have an upper second- class undergraduate honours degree or be able to provide evidence of equivalent professional or Taught programmes artistic experience MPhil and DPhil MA in Creative and Critical Writing Students will normally have a Masters degree 1 year full-time/2 years part-time in a relevant subject This MA is taught in the Department of English English language requirements and is designed to enable you to combine an IELTS 7.0, with not less than 6.5 in each section. interest in critical and theoretical ideas with For more information and alternative English an enthusiasm for creative writing. For more language requirements, see page 174 information, see page 99. Fees MA in Creative Writing and Authorship See pages 176-181 for information on fees 1 year full-time/2 years part-time This unique programme offers you an opportunity Further information to develop your own writing practice in the Programme structure Centre for Continuing Education, context of the study of cultural and textual issues Autumn term: you take Authorship: Historical The Sussex Institute, Essex House, of authorship. You consider how the writers of Studies; and Creative Practice: Writing University of Sussex, Falmer, the past emerged as writers, and reflect on the Workshops. Brighton BN1 9QQ, UK concerns of authors today. T +44 (0)1273 877888 Spring term: you take Creative Practice: F +44 (0)1273 877534 The programme is aimed at graduate students Masterclasses; and Authorship: Contemporary E si-admissions@sussex.ac.uk with an ongoing interest in creative writing Contexts. www.sussex.ac.uk/cce practice, and combines workshops and tutorials with masterclasses. Summer term: you take Authorship: Project MA in Creative Writing and Authorship Dissertation – creative writing portfolio (20,000 Dr Sue Roe Incorporating an opportunity to attend an Agents’ words, of which 5,000 must comprise a critical T +44 (0)1273 873211 and Publishers’ Day, the programme also includes introduction). E s.m.roe@sussex.ac.uk advice on pitching work to prospective agents MA in Creative Writing and Personal and publishers. Full-time students take two courses per term. Development Part-time students take one course per term Dr Celia Hunt Additional admission requirements (researching and preparing the creative writing T +44 (0)1273 606755 ext 2154 Applications must be accompanied by a short portfolio in the summer term of year 1, for E c.m.hunt@sussex.ac.uk sample of recent, unpublished writing. completion in the summer term of year 2). Research programmes Assessment Dr Celia Hunt You are assessed by term papers and a portfolio T +44 (0)1273 606755 ext 2154 of creative writing. E c.m.hunt@sussex.ac.uk 72
  • MA in Creative Writing and Personal Development Creative writing 1 year full-time/2 years part-time The MA is a unique creative writing programme. It has two main strands: 1) Creative Writing/ Personal Development – allowing you to develop your creative writing through an exploration of the relationship between self and creativity; and 2) Creative Writing/Professional Development – allowing you, in addition to the above, to develop the skills of facilitating therapeutic writing groups in healthcare, therapy and education. All students take the three core courses, then there are various option courses that allow you to follow one of the two strands, or to mix and match as you wish. There are opportunities for undertaking practical or theoretical research and for producing an extended portfolio of creative writing in a genre of your choice. Programme structure Autumn and spring terms: you take two core courses from Writing for Personal Development; Creative Writing and the Self; or Life Writing: Theory and Practice. You also take two option courses chosen from: Contexts for Practice: Healthcare, Therapy and Education; Writing Practice; Writing and Groups; Projects: Practical and Theoretical; or Life Writing: Theory and Practice. Summer term: you either write a portfolio of creative writing with critical introduction or undertake a research project (20,000 words). Both options are supervised. Faculty research interests The creative writing programmes at Sussex offer students unique opportunities to gain professional Assessment Research interests are briefly described below. expertise You are assessed by a mixture of creative writing, For more detailed information, see term papers, a reflective learning diary, and www.sussex.ac.uk/cce/academic_faculty dissertations or portfolios of creative writing with critical introductions. Celia Hunt Convenor: Creative Writing and Personal Development and its associated research programmes since 1996. Her Research programmes DPhil research was published as Therapeutic Dimensions of Autobiography in Creative Writing Supervision is available for practice-based (2000) and her most recent publication (with research in creative writing in a variety of genres, Fiona Sampson) is Writing: Self and Reflexivity theory-based research into the writing process, (2006). She was a founder member and first and qualitative research into the developmental Chair of Lapidus: The Association for the Literary or therapeutic uses of creative writing with Arts in Personal Development. She was awarded individuals and groups in healthcare, therapy and a National Teaching fellowship by the Higher education. For advice on research supervision Education Academy in 2004. within the creative writing programmes, we encourage prospective MPhil and DPhil Sue Roe Convenor: Creative Writing and applicants to discuss their ideas with relevant Authorship. Biographer, poet, novelist and critic, faculty in the first instance. and author of Gwen John: A Life (2002). Her other books include The Spitfire Factory (poetry), Estella, Her Expectations (novel), and a Penguin edition of Virginia Woolf’s Jacob’s Room. She is co-author of The Cambridge Companion to Virginia Woolf, and her biography, The Private Lives of the Impressionists, appeared in 2006. Martin Ryle teaches literary and cultural studies for CCE and the Department of English. His special interests include modernist and late 19th-century fiction, Irish literature in English, and questions of literary authorship and cultural authority. As well as critical books, including To Relish or Sublime?, with Kate Soper (2002) and George Gissing: Voices of the Unclassed, edited with Jenny Bourne Taylor (2005), he has published books about politics, nature and cycling. Mark Slater is currently researching for a DPhil thesis titled Plagiarism, Originality and the Writing Subject. He co-convenes CCE’s Certificate in Creative Writing and is a trustee of the Asham Trust, which supports new writing. He is a published short-story writer and has written librettos, plays and educational matter for radio. 73
  • Development studies Development studies (in CDE) (in CDE) Essentials Assessment Sussex has a worldwide reputation for You are assessed on each autumn course Taught programmes excellence in the field of development studies. through one 2,000-word essay and one 3,000- MA degrees Faculty teaching on our programmes come word term paper. In the spring term you are Environment, Development and Policy from a broad range of disciplines and many examined through two 5,000-word term papers. Gender and Development (see also p78) members of staff have extensive experience The Development Skills and Practice Workshop International Education and Development in international development. In the Centre is examined through a learning diary, while the (see p87) for Culture Development and the Environment summer course is examined by a 2,500-word Rural Development (CDE) we offer a series of postgraduate essay or review. You also write a 10,000-word Social Development programmes characterised by: dissertation. MSc degree • a strong emphasis on interdisciplinarity; Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research Postgraduate Diploma in Environment, Methods (Development Studies) • a critical approach to the process of Development and Policy Postgraduate diploma development and the role of development 6 months full-time Environment, Development and Policy agencies; and Funding See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Research programmes • the combination of academic analysis and MPhil, DPhil African Studies policy issues. Programme structure MPhil, DPhil Development Studies In the autumn and spring term you take a MPhil, DPhil South Asian Studies number of courses from the range available New Route DPhil Development Studies Taught programmes to the MA students (see above), totalling 120 credits. You do not take the Development Skills Admissions requirements Taught degrees are built around a number of and Practice Workshop and the dissertation is For information on overseas qualifications that core courses, plus a series of options for each not required. meet the admissions requirements, see pages programme. However, it is also possible for you 172-175 to choose an option from other programmes, MA in Gender and Development MA and postgraduate diploma or from programmes in the Institute of This MA is taught jointly with the Institute of An upper second-class undergraduate honours Development Studies (see pages 77-82), Development Studies. For full details, see degree in the social or natural sciences. subject to the fulfilment of any prerequisites and Development studies (in IDS) on page 78. Applicants with relevant practical work the availability of places. MA in Rural Development experience will also be considered 1 year full-time/2 years part-time MSc, MPhil and New Route DPhil MA in Environment, Development and Policy This programme provides a systematic A first- or upper second-class undergraduate introduction to the problems of rural honours degree in any relevant social science 1 year full-time/2 years part-time The focus of this degree is the analysis of development in poor countries, which aims but applicants with other backgrounds may be to promote a critical and reflective approach considered. Applicants should submit an outline environmental change and natural resource management mainly, but not exclusively, in to development theory and practice, and (two to three pages) of their research interests prepare students for careers in rural DPhil developing countries. It is intended for students interested in researching or working in the field development worldwide. A Masters degree in any relevant social science but candidates with other of environmental management in developing Funding backgrounds may be considered. Applicants countries and for those hoping to embark on See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. should submit an outline research proposal related careers. Programme structure indicating the nature, ambition and primary Funding Autumn term: you take Sustainable questions of the research project You can apply for a Sasakawa Scholarship (see Development; and Theories of Development and English language requirements Fees and funding on pages 176-186). Underdevelopment. IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and Programme structure Spring term: you take one course from Critical 6.0 in the other sections. For more information Autumn term: you take Theories of Development Debates in Environment and Development; and alternative English language requirements, and Underdevelopment; and Political Economy Environmental Policy and Industrial Technology; see page 174 of the Environment. Migration, Inequality and Social Change; and Fees Spring term: you take one of the Architecture of Refugees and Development; and you take one See pages 176-181 for information on fees Aid; Globalisation and Rural Change; Migration, of The Architecture of Aid; Globalisation and Inequality and Social Change; Topics in Social Rural Change; International Relations of Global Further information Development; and one of Critical Debates in Environmental Change; and Topics in Social Director, CDE, University of Sussex, Environment and Development; Environmental Development Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SJ, UK E cde@sussex.ac.uk Policy and Industrial Technology; and In the autumn and spring terms you also take the www.sussex.ac.uk/development International Relations of Global Environmental Development Skills and Practice Workshop. Change. Summer term: you take one of Geographical In the autumn and spring terms you also take the Information Systems; Participatory Research In Development Skills and Practice Workshop. Cross-Cultural Contexts; Rural Research and Summer term: you take one of Geographical Appraisal; and you work on your dissertation. Information Systems; Participatory Research in Cross-Cultural Contexts; Rural Research and Appraisal; and you work on your dissertation. Please note, not all options run in any one year. 74
  • Assessment You are assessed on each autumn course Development studies (in CDE) through one 2,000-word essay and one 3,000-word term paper. In the spring term you are examined through two 5,000-word term papers. The Development Skills and Practice Workshop is examined through a learning diary, while the summer course is examined by a 2,500-word essay or review. You also write a 10,000-word dissertation. MA in Social Development 1 year full-time/2 years part-time This programme provides an intellectual understanding of the major issues in social development and an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary for social development practitioners. Taught by active practitioners in the field of social development, the programme provides opportunities for those already involved in social development to reflect on their activities in this field, while enabling those who have no experience of social development to develop the appropriate skills and knowledge. It is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops, and stress is placed not only on academic and analytical skills but also on improving students’ presentation skills. Programme structure Autumn term: you take Concepts of Social Development; and Theories of Development and Underdevelopment. Extracting juice from sugar cane, India Research programmes Spring term: you take one from Critical Debates in Environment and Development; Culture, Funding CDE offers MPhil, DPhil and New Route DPhil Development and Policy; Environmental Policy This programme qualifies for ESRC support programmes in Development Studies, as well and Industrial Technology; Globalisation and under its 1+3 system of doctoral support. For as area studies in Africa and Asia. Prospective Rural Change; International Relations of Global information on ESRC and other funding, see applicants are strongly encouraged to contact Environment Change; Migration, Inequality and Fees and funding on pages 176-186. members of faculty whose interests most Social Change; and either The Architecture of Aid Programme structure closely coincide with their own, as places are or Topics in Social Development. There are three main elements to the MSc strictly limited (see Faculty research interests on programme that run concurrently through the page 76). Summer term: you take Methods in Social Development and you work on your dissertation. academic year: a research elective involving Funding supervised reading in your individual research CDE has full 1+3 and +3 recognition from the Assessment area and the writing of a dissertation; credited ESRC. For more information on ESRC and You are assessed on each autumn course courses in the philosophy and methodology of other funding, see Fees and funding on pages through one 2,000-word essay and one 3,000- research; and training in both quantitative and 176-186. word term paper. In the spring term you are qualitative research skills. examined through two 5,000-word term papers. Coursework The summer course is examined by a 5,000- Autumn term: you take a research elective; There are three modes of entry for research word term paper. You also write a 10,000-word Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific students. There are three modes of entry for dissertation. Research Practice; and Research Design in a research students. First is traditional entry to Cross-Cultural Context. an MPhil or DPhil. Second is the MSc plus DPhil MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural pathway, which is the 1+3 route required by the Research Methods (Development Studies) Spring term: you take courses in quantitative ESRC for their studentship support. Third is the 1 year full-time/2 years part-time and qualitative data collection and analysis. New Route DPhil offering an integrated four-year A Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate are Summer term: you choose from a selection of programme of taught coursework in research also available. See Routes to Postgraduate study courses in cross-cultural and comparative data methods and professional skills together with at Sussex on pages 14-15. collection and analysis. The research elective supervised doctoral research. All new research continues across all terms, culminating in the students will be required to participate in a The MSc is designed to meet the most recent programme of research training courses offered ESRC requirements for social science research writing of a dissertation. within the MSc in Comparative and Cross- training. The programme provides a rigorous Assessment Cultural Research Methods (Development training in social research methods, an Taught course units are variously assessed by Studies), and to take other courses that may be opportunity to develop a full doctoral research term papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent recommended by the supervisor of their research proposal and to write a supervised dissertation coursework portfolios. The research elective is (exemption from research training courses can (the research elective), as well as exposure assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words. be granted to those who have already taken to debates and theories within the broad field such courses at postgraduate level; students of development studies. It involves a mixture can also qualify for interim awards, such as of supervised reading and attendance at the Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate in formal courses, and aims to equip you with the Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research necessary skills to pursue research for a DPhil Methods, for any research training courses taken in the field. This programme is taught jointly concurrently with their research. See Routes to with IDS. postgraduate study at Sussex on pages 14-15). 75
  • Faculty research interests Professor Russell King International migration and development in the Mediterranean. Development studies (in CDE) Research interests are briefly described below. Publications include The Mediterranean For more detailed information, see Passage: Migration and New Cultural Encounters www.sussex.ac.uk/development in Southern Europe (ed) (2001) and (with Andreas Antoniades International relations; S Schwanders-Sievers) The New Albanian globalisation. Publications include Producing Migration (2005). Globalisation: The Politics of Discourse and Professor Alan Lester Historical geography of Institutions in Greece and Ireland (2008). Empire. Publications include Imperial Networks: Professor Richard Black Migration and Creating Identities in 19th-Century South Africa refugee studies in Africa and Europe; natural and Britain (2001), and Colonial Lives Across the resource management in West and southern British Empire: Imperial Careering in the Long Africa. Publications include Targeting 19th Century (2006). Development (2004). Julie Litchfield Poverty and development. Grace Carswell Rural livelihoods in eastern Kamran Matin Processes of modern socio- Africa, population-environment interactions; political transformation in the Middle East. agricultural change under the influence of colonialism. Publications include Cultivating Filippo Osella Kerala, South India: social Success: Kigezi Farmers and Colonial Policies reproduction and stratification; migration (2007), and (with Samantha Jones) The and globalisation; masculinity; consumption. Earthscan Reader in Environment, Development Publications include (with Caroline Osella) Men and Rural Livelihoods (2004). and Masculinities in South India (2007). Vinita Damodaran State, nationalism and Fabio Petito International politics of the popular resistance in India; environmental Mediterranean. Publications include The change and popular protest. Publications include International Political Thought of Carl Schmitt: Postcolonial India (2000). Terror, Liberal War and the Crisis of Global Order (2007). Geert de Neve South India labour relations and organisation; industrialisation. Publications Dinah Rajak Corporate social responsibility; include The Everyday Politics of Labour: Working and philanthropy. Lives in India’s Informal Economy (2005), and David Robinson Ecology and environmental (with Maya Unnithan-Kumar) Critical Journeys: aspects of agricultural systems in Africa. Community meeting in India. Photo taken on a The Making of Anthropologists (2006). recent field trip Ben Rogaly ‘Race’, immigration and class Professor Saul Dubow Race, colonialism relations in the UK; temporary migration for work Fieldwork and the history of modern Africa; South African in rural areas in the UK and India; agricultural It is normally expected that you will undertake racism and apartheid. Publications include workers; employment relations; migration, fieldwork for projects leading to a DPhil. A Commonwealth of Knowledge. Science, inequality and social change. Permission to proceed to fieldwork is not Sensibility and White South Africa, 1820-2000 normally given before completion of the first (2006). Professor Ronald Skeldon Professorial Fellow. year of research. Population migration in the developing world, Professor Mick Dunford Comparative regional especially Asia. Publications include Migration Recent thesis titles and urban economic performance; inequality and Development (1997). Small farmers and the political economy of and social cohesion; and theories of regulation. pesticide use in banana production in St Lucia Publications include (with Lidia Greco) After the Maya Unnithan-Kumar India, Rajasthan: Three Italies: Wealth, Inequality and Industrial kinship, family and gender relations; economic Aboriginal property rights and biodiversity within anthropology; popular religion; reproductive the globalised political economy Change (2006). health. Publications include Reproductive Explaining rural poverty in Mozambique: Rob Eastwood Open-economy macro- Change, Medicine and the State: Ethnographic a realist approach economics; monetary economics. Explorations of Agency in Childbearing (2004). Legitimacy of local institutions for natural Nigel Eltringham Human rights. Publications resource management in Manica, Mozambique include Accounting for Horror: Post-Genocide Debates in Rwanda (2004). Environmental degradation and sustainable livelihoods following the return of Mozambican Professor James Fairhead Africa south of refugees from Dedza and Ntcheu Districts, the Sahara; UK agriculture and ecology; Malawi health and fertility; colonialism; science and medicine. Publications include (with M Leach) The role of urban market women in local Vaccine Anxieties: Global Science, Child Health development processes and its implications and Society (2007), and (with M Leach) Science, for policy: a case study of Kumasi Central Society and Power: Environmental Knowledge Market, Ghana and Policy in West Africa and the Caribbean (2003). Specialist facilities Katy Gardner Bangladesh: Islam, migration, diaspora, development. Publications include All CDE students have full access to computing Age, Narrative and Migration: The Life Course facilities, the University’s main Library, the and Life Histories Amongst Bengali Elders in British Library of Development Studies at IDS, London (2002). which includes a wide range of online databases and CD-ROMs, and the Eldis development Elizabeth Harrison Zambia, Malawi, Kenya: information gateway and id21 research technology transfer, discourse of development, reporting service. All research students are gender relations. Publications include (with offered office space. Andrea Cornwall and Ann Whitehead) Gender Myths and Feminist Fables and The Struggle for Interpretive Power in Gender and Development (2007). 76
  • Development studies Taught programmes Development studies (in IDS) Programme structure (for all MA programmes except the MA in Participation, Power and (in IDS) Social Change) Autumn term: you take the core course Ideas in Development and Policy, Evidence and Practice; and one additional core course (see individual programme descriptions below for details). Spring term: you take two core courses. Summer term: you may pursue your special interests by choosing two half-course units from a range of options and begin work on a Essentials • The learning and teaching programme of supervised dissertation. The courses vary from Taught programmes the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) year to year, but may include: MA degrees is known for its academic excellence. It is • Aid and Poverty: the Political Economy of Development Studies strongly research led, drawing the ongoing International Development Assistance Gender and Development work of researchers into the classroom, and Globalisation and Development also significantly enhanced by the experience • Analysing Poverty and Vulnerability Governance and Development that each graduate student brings to the • Climate Change and Disasters International Education and Development Institute. (see page 87) • Decentralisation and Local Government • We offer integrated ways of working, Participation, Power and Social Change combining research, teaching and • Doing Gender and Development Poverty and Development communications work. IDS is one of the only Science, Society and Development • Governance of Violent Conflict and (In)Security development organisations that is a world MSc degree leader in all three spheres. • Management of Public Finance Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research Methods (Development Studies) (see • Our postgraduate degrees attract students • Politics of Pro-Poor Policies page 75) from all over the world. We welcome • Post-Conflict and Very Poor Countries the diversity of academic, cultural and Research programme professional backgrounds that our students • Rethinking Health Systems DPhil Development Studies bring to IDS. • Reflective Practice and Social Change Admissions requirements • IDS was founded in 1966 and has a For information on overseas qualifications that • China in Development tradition of learning, teaching and training meet the admissions requirements, see pages with a distinctive emphasis on plurality and • Competing in the Global Economy 172-175 multidisciplinary study. MA • Mobilising Knowledge for Development. An upper second-class undergraduate • IDS aims to challenge convention and Professional Skills for Development workshops honours degree in the social sciences or a to generate fresh ideas that foster new will run throughout the year and include study related discipline, and substantial professional approaches to development policy and skills. work experience in a developing country or in practice. development-related work, which is a factor in Assessment (for all MA programmes except • The Institute’s research is organised in five selection (one year for Development Studies; the MA in Participation, Power and Social closely linked multidisciplinary teams, and two years for Gender and Development, Change) a growing number of international, multi- Globalisation and Development, Poverty and Assessment is primarily through 3,000-5,000- partner research projects are hosted at the Development, and Science, Society and word term papers, coursework assignments, Institute. Development; three years for Governance and practical exercises and, on some occasions, • We use a diverse range of teaching examinations, as well as a final 10,000-word Development; and five years for Participation, approaches and methodologies that reflect dissertation. Power and Social Change). Applications must the complexity of development studies. be accompanied by a detailed, two-page MA in Development Studies personal statement • IDS hosts research consortia, postgraduate 1 year full-time DPhil programmes and a range of world-class This programme provides a solid grounding in A Masters degree in a subject relevant to knowledge facilitites (see Specialist facilities international development concepts, theories your chosen area of research and substantial on page 80). and approaches, allowing you to develop the professional work experience in a developing analytical and practical skills you need to engage country or in development-related work in development work from a cross-disciplinary perspective. English language requirements IELTS 7.0, with not less than 6.5 in each section. It is designed to enhance career opportunities For more information and alternative English in international development by helping you language requirements, see page 174 gain the professional skills you will need to work across the intersections of policy, research and Fees practice. You will also be able to understand See pages 176-181 for information on fees the main theories, concepts and debates of Further information development and be able to draw upon this Dr Andy Sumner, IDS, University of Sussex, knowledge in your professional work, engage in Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RE, UK an informed and critical way with professionals T +44 (0)1273 91590 from diverse backgrounds and perspectives; and F +44 (0)1273 621202/691647 approach development problems with creativity, E teaching@ids.ac.uk confidence and the ability to work collaboratively www.ids.ac.uk/ids/teach with others to identify and contribute to meaningful solutions. This programme is structured to allow strong coherence and some integration with the other specialised MA programmes offered at IDS. A participatory exercise in Brazil 77
  • Programme structure Autumn term: the second core course is Development studies (in IDS) Managing Globalisation (see page 77 for details on the first core course). Spring term: you take the core course Globalisation and Inequalities; and an option from: Poverty and Inequality; Vulnerability and Social Protection; Empowering Society; Public Management and Organisational Development; Global Governance; Science, Knowledge and the Politics of Development; Science and Policy Processes: Issues in Health, Environment and Agriculture; The Politics of Implementing Gender and Development; Key Issues in Gender and Development. Summer term: you take two half-term options: Competing in the Global Economy, plus one from a range of options, and begin work on a 10,000- word dissertation. In addition, you participate in a two-week field trip to China. MA in Governance and Development 1 year full-time This programme will provide you with a theoretically informed understanding of governance and development debates, covering both the ‘state-centric’ and ‘societal’ aspects of governance. The main objectives are to equip you with the ability to: critically assess competing theories of the role of the public sector and public finance in social and economic development; understand Making hats in Thua Thien Hue province, Vietnam the significance of current globalisation processes for international and national Programme structure Funding institutions; and develop and implement policies Autumn term: the second core course is either You are eligible to apply for a Sasakawa for improving the effectiveness, accountability Introduction to Economics, or Sociology, Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages and legitimacy of governance in specific settings. Anthropology and the Development Conundrum 176-186). (see page 77 for details on the first core course). Programme structure Programme structure Autumn term: the second core course is Spring term: you take two core courses from: Autumn term: the second core course is Gender Governance, Politics and Development (see page Economics for Development; Poverty and Analysis and Theoretical Perspectives (see page 77 for details on the first core course). Inequality; Vulnerability and Social Protection; 77 for details on the first core course). Empowering Society; Public Management Spring term: you take two core courses from: and Organisational Development; Global Spring term: you take Key Issues in Gender and Empowering Society; Public Management Governance; Managing Globalisation; Science, Development; and Politics of Implementing and Organisational Development; Global Knowledge and the Politics of Development; Gender and Development. Governance; and Democracy and Development. Science and Policy Processes: Issues in Health, Summer term: you take Key Issues in Gender Summer term: you take two half-term options Environment and Agriculture; The Politics of and Development; and Politics of Implementing and begin work on a 10,000-word dissertation. Implementing Gender and Development; Key Gender and Development. Issues in Gender and Development. MA in Participation, Power and Summer term: you take two half-term options Social Change Summer term: you take two half-term options 18 months (full-time) and begin work on a 10,000-word dissertation. and begin work on a 10,000-word dissertation. This programme aims to deepen knowledge, MA in Globalisation and Development MA in Gender and Development innovation and practice of participatory 1 year full-time 1 year full-time approaches for engaging people in decision- This programme offers a fresh perspective on making and citizenship in diverse contexts. This programme situates the study of gender globalisation issues with emphasis on the shift of Designed for experienced practitioners, the and development in the context of the social sciences, while addressing the challenges power from West to East, and thus with a focus programme combines intensive coursework of policy-making and implementation. To do on the new drivers of the world economy such with work-based learning, action research and this it brings together experts from a range of as China. It provides students with the analytical processes of critical reflection and analysis. academic disciplines and policy experiences. The and practical skills needed to understand globalisation processes and their main drivers, The programme will provide you with an programme is taught jointly by IDS and CDE. and to participate in the formulation of policies understanding of conceptual, theoretical and The programme will provide you with the for a sustainable development. Our programme methodological approaches to participation as analytical and conceptual skills needed to is based upon the view that the impact of trade applied to practical challenges in development understand gender issues in the context of and financial market policies on countries, and governance; practical skills in participatory social and economic development; an in-depth producers and workers is influenced by how they processes and action research, including design, knowledge and capacity for gender analysis of are integrated into the global system, and that management, facilitation, communication, specific development sectors or themes, such there is scope for the many actors involved to networking, evaluation and teamwork; and as reproductive health and rights, identity, influence change. abilities of critical thinking, analysis and reflective environment or social protection; and the tools practice, as well as personal development required to participate effectively in gender and A trip to China, to include meetings with public of values and attitudes useful in pursuing development-related research, policy-making, officials, representatives from the private participatory approaches. and implementation. sector, trade unions, academics and other organisations, is planned in the second part of Note: applicants are responsible for arranging The programme provides a thorough grounding in the summer term. their own placements for work-based learning. policy and planning skills. Applications must be accompanied by an initial letter of support from the host organisation. 78
  • Programme structure Programme structure Research programme This programme is a combination of two 10-week Autumn term: the second core course is Poverty Development studies (in IDS) full-time blocks of study based at IDS (parts 1 and Development: Disciplinary (see page 77 for Research students are based in the Institute of and 3), and 12 months of part-time work-based details on the first core course). Development Studies. learning (part 2). IDS runs a small DPhil programme for research Spring term: you take Poverty and Inequality; and Part 1 (October to December) Vulnerability and Social Protection. in areas of strong current interest to fellows. Autumn term, year 1 Prospective applicants, and those applying for Summer term: you take two half-term options the MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural Foundations of Participation; Policy, Evidence and begin work on a 10,000-word dissertation. Research Methods (Development Studies) (see and Practice; and Ideas in Development – a 10-week intensive study at IDS used to explore MA in Science, Society and Development page 75) with a view to subsequently enrolling concepts and approaches and to design an 1 year full-time for a doctorate, are strongly advised to familiarise individual learning plan. This programme is designed for people interested themselves with the research priorities of fellows, in the intersection between science, policy and and to enter into dialogue prior to application Part 2 (January to December) with fellows working in the relevant area. development. The degree is appropriate for both Work-based learning. Information on fellows’ research priorities can be natural and social science graduates wishing to Part 3 (January to March) enhance their interdisciplinary understanding obtained at www.ids.ac.uk/ids/teach Spring term, year 2 and policy-related skills. It will provide you Alternatively, a current annual report can be Critical Reflection and Analysis: integrating with a theoretically informed understanding of obtained from the IDS teaching area: theory and practice, a final 10-week period at debates in development, sociological studies of T +44 (0)1273 606261 IDS to undertake further course work, reflect science and technology, governance and policy F +44 (0)1273 621202/691647 on work experience and write a synthesis paper processes, while promoting a people-orientated E teaching@ids.ac.uk linking concepts and practice. approach. It will equip you with the ability to: critically examine and reflect on the role of Registration You also take a second core course from: science in environmental, health and agricultural Students are required to register (and pay full- Economics for Development; Poverty and issues within development, using a cross- time fees) for a minimum of three years. Inequality; Vulnerability and Social Protection; disciplinary perspective; engage in an informed Funding Empowering Society; Public Management and critical way with other professionals; apply For information on ESRC funding, see Fees and and Organisational Development; Global practical methods and frameworks to research funding on pages 176-186. Governance; Managing Globalisation; Science, problems; and advance policy debates on Knowledge and the Politics of Development; Coursework key issues relating to food and agriculture, Science and Policy Processes: Issues in Health, Research training needs will be assessed at health and disease, water and sanitation, and Environment and Agriculture; The Politics of the time of application and admission. You agricultural research problems. Implementing Gender and Development; Key may be required to undertake coursework on Issues in Gender and Development. Programme structure research skills. Autumn term: the second core course Professional skills training will run throughout the Fieldwork is Sociological Perspectives on Science, year and includes study skills. Research degrees normally require fieldwork. Technology and Sustainability (see page 77 for Assessment details on the first core course). Recent thesis titles The assessment strategy develops your capacity Gender sensitive accountability of service Spring term: you take Science, Knowledge and to reflect, self-evaluate, and monitor your own the Politics of Development; and Science and delivery NGOs: BRAC and PRIOSHIKA in learning in consultation with your supervisor. Policy Processes: Issues in Health, Environment Bangladesh Methods will include written assignments, a and Agriculture. Locating citizenship in everyday life: perceptions learning plan, course participation, progress reports, portfolio items and presentations Summer term: you take two half-term options and experiences from Kwoi, northern Nigeria generated through field work, individual and and begin work on a 10,000-word dissertation. Opportunities and obstacles for industrial peer review sessions, as well as a 10,000-word upgrading of Brazilian foot wear and furniture synthesis paper. firms: a comparison of global and national value MA in Poverty and Development Cows who choose domestication. Generation 1 year full-time and management of domestic animal diversity by This programme aims to provide you with a WoDaaBe pastoralists (Niger) solid grounding in the concepts and theories and analytical and practical skills needed The role of the private sector in modern to engage critically in current debates on Philander Beukes, asbestos-related disease biotechnology and rural development: the case poverty and development issues from a cross- sufferer, South Africa of the Monsanto smallholder programme disciplinary perspective. Upon completion you will understand the main theories, concepts and debates of development in their historical and contemporary context, with specialised knowledge of the treatment of poverty reduction within the development discourse. You will approach issues in poverty reduction and development with confidence and knowledge through a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and inquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge. You will engage in an informed and critical way with other professionals from diverse social science backgrounds concerned with poverty reduction and development issues. You will also understand and use commonly applied research methods and skills, drawing on both qualitative and quantitative methods. 79
  • Xavier Cirera Economist with a particular interest in the impact of trade reform and Development studies (in IDS) regional integration. Recent research focuses on the impact of different regional and preferential trade agreements. Other interests also include the analysis of spatial price variations and the functioning of markets. Research experience in southern Africa. Sarah Cook Economist/social scientist focusing on the social impact of economic reform and transition; employment and human resources and their interaction with poverty and income distribution; special emphasis on gender, household economics and intra-household resource allocation. Research focus on China and South East Asia. Professor Andrea Cornwall Social anthropologist. Interest in gender, sexuality, rights and democracy. Focus on participatory governance in the health sector, sexual rights and women’s empowerment. Field-work experience in Brazil, southern and West Africa and the UK. Director of the Research Programme Consortium, Pathways of Women’s Empowerment (www.pathways-of-empowerment.org). Stephen Devereux Economist working on food security, rural livelihoods, social protection and poverty reduction. Research experience mainly in Africa, especially Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi and Namibia. Jerker Edstrom A development social scientist In a rapidly changing world, studying at IDS will equip you with knowledge of a broad range and worker. Formerly a Director at the of development issues International HIV/AIDS Alliance. Interests include gender and masculinities, the informal economy Specialist facilities IDS faculty and research interests of sex, HIV-related citizenship and policy, The information resources at IDS are a major The range of faculty research activities is intergenerational transmission of vulnerability, asset. Known for the strength of its library – the illustrated below. More information is available at and children affected by HIV and AIDS. British Library for Development Studies (BLDS) www.ids.ac.uk Rosalind Eyben Feminist social anthropologist is Europe’s most comprehensive research with a career in international development policy IDS fellows collection on economic and social change in and practice. Long-term experience of working Niagale Bagayoko Political scientist. She has developing countries – IDS is now a world leader and living in anglophone and francophone Africa, done field research in francophone countries in in online information services. It hosts the Eldis India and, most recently, in Latin America. Africa and now concentrates on the interface development information gateway, the id21 Research and teaching interests concern power between security and development. Her thematic research dissemination service and the gender relations and theories of change, particularly in expertise includes French and American security advisory and information service, BRIDGE as well the field of international aid. policies in West Africa. as other specialist thematic services such as the Governance and Social Development Resource Marc P Berenson Political scientist. His work Marzia Fontana Economist with particular Centre, and Livelihoods Connect. IDS students focuses on public policy in Eastern Europe and interest in social and economic dimensions of have access to a wide range of online databases, the former Soviet Union, with particular attention inequality. Recent research focuses on gender CD-ROMs, and a fully computerised library to the comparative analysis of post-communist inequalities, employment, unpaid work and catalogue. governing institutions. He has also worked as a international trade. Field experience in South research analyst for a number of NGOs, as well Asia, Fiji and North Africa. as founding a rule-of-law project for Freedom Professor John Gaventa Political sociologist House in Ukraine. working on citizen participation, power, participatory Gerald Bloom Physician and social scientist with research and education methodologies, and an interest in the adaptation of health systems participatory governance. Interest in linking to rapid economic and social change. Focuses participation to policies and programmes of on finance, performance of markets for health- larger institutions, and in training and capacity related goods and services, and the changing building for strengthening civil society. role of government. Experience in China, South Professor Anne-Marie Goetz Political scientist East Asia and a number of African countries. specialising in the politics of pro-poor and Eun Kyong Choi Political scientist. Research gender-equitable development. Research areas: interests in the sociopolitical impact of economic gender and the state, accountability and good transformation; state capacity in developing governance. Studying grassroots anti-corruption countries focusing on tax collection; social struggles in India, judicial activism, women’s welfare, particularly social health insurance; political leadership, and gender and corruption. decentralisation, accountability and capability of local governments; state-business relations. Ricardo Gottschalk Economist with research Research focus on China and East Asia. interest in the developmental impact of capital flows to emerging economies. Other interests include the empirics of economic growth, macro- economics of developing countries, economic reforms and sustainability in Latin America, and issues concerning exchange-rate-based stabilisation programmes. Long-term work and Marching for women’s rights, Brazil research experience in Brazil. 80
  • Martin Greeley Development economist. Professor Naila Kabeer Economist working Lyla Mehta Sociologist working on forced Main areas of interest: aid and public policy, on the social and economic interactions migration, environment/development linkages Development studies (in IDS) agricultural development, programme and between households, communities and the and science/society relations. Research: the project impact evaluation, poverty measurement wider economy. Specialisms: poverty, social politics of water and scarcity; linkages between and assessment, and microfinance. He has exclusion and gender in relation to labour gender, displacement and resistance; rights researched and published extensively on poverty markets and livelihood strategies in the context and access to resources; ‘public’ and ‘private’ and public policy in Africa and Asia. of globalisation. Engaged in research on social aspects of water; and community-led total protection strategies and struggles for citizenship sanitation. Jing Gu Political economist with a background among workers in the informal economy. in law and finance. Research interests: issues Andrés Mejía Acosta Political scientist studying of governance and accountability, international Professor Melissa Leach Social anthropologist the impact of natural resource revenues on trade disputes settlement, institutional, political and director of the ESRC STEPS (Social, budgetary politics and state capacities in Latin and legal aspects of trade policy-making. Technological and Environmental Pathways America. Publications include journal articles Concerned with the role of the private sector in to Sustainability) Centre. Interests: social and and book chapters on electoral systems, political the Chinese economy. Focus on the implications institutional dimensions of environment and parties, legislative politics, budget governance, of China’s economic growth for developing health; knowledge, power and policy processes; the policy-making process, informal institutions, countries from political economy perspectives. and citizenship and participation. She works in and democratic governance in the Andean region West Africa, the Caribbean and the UK. and the Caribbean. Professor Lawrence Haddad Director of IDS; his main research interests have been at Professor David K Leonard Political scientist Tom Mitchell Geographer working on climate the intersection of poverty, food insecurity and specialising in governance and organisation change, disaster management, participatory malnutrition – including poverty dynamics, social theory, particularly the delivery of agricultural, processes and governance. Practical experience: capital, HIV/AIDS, social protection, agriculture development, education, human health, and conducting deliberative processes for improving and poverty, and women’s empowerment. An veterinary services in rural areas. Also works disaster resilience and working with small island economist, he was selected for the latest Who’s on conflict and governance in Africa. Formerly developing states to assess disaster policy. Other Who in Economics (Elgar). served at the Universities of Nairobi, Dar es interests: volcanoes, livelihoods, education and Salaam and California, Berkeley (Dean of social vulnerability. Experience in the Caribbean Naomi Hossain Research includes the political International and Area Studies). and shorter assignments in the Indian Ocean. effects of discourses of poverty and governance; social change in gender and childhood; political Henry Lucas Information and research Joy Moncrieffe Political /social scientist culture among poor and marginal people; methodology and M&E (monitoring and working on citizenship and power, particularly people’s experiences of governance with respect evaluation) specialist with an interest in among children growing up in violent contexts; to social protection, crime and violence; peace- the health sector. Long-term research and democratisation and accountability; ethnicity building and human security; and identities and consultancy experience in Africa, China, South and identities; politics and inequalities; and rights, poverty, marginality and governance. East Asia and the Pacific. Current activities religion and development. Research experience focus on social protection and health, PRSP in Africa and the Caribbean. Peter Houtzager Political scientist with broad monitoring and the impact of new information training in comparative politics and historical- Professor Mick Moore Political economist and communications technologies on the health institutional analysis. Areas of specialisation: working on political and institutional aspects of sector. analysis of political empowerment strategies and ‘good government’, especially the international democratisation processes; research on state- Hayley MacGregor Social anthropologist with a dimensions; taxation and accountability; service society relations; institutional roots of collective background in clinical medicine. Specialisation in delivery; and government-business relations. action; social movement theory; democratisation medical anthropology, with interest in psychiatry Zander Navarro Sociologist working on and political development in Latin America. and mental health services in post-conflict theories of development and related topics on and low-income settings. Research concerns: Professor John Humphrey Sociologist working collective action and social movements, with a human rights discourses and citizen mobilisation on global value chains and their impact on specialisation in agrarian studies. He also works in the context of health provisioning, and the employment and trade in developing countries. on theories of democracy and processes of ethnography of biomedical research and health Interests in the automotive and horticulture democratisation and participatory experiments, technologies. industries, global concentration in retail and its as well as having an interest in the sociological impact on developing country manufacturers and Neil McCulloch Economist with a focus on the theory proposed by Pierre Bourdieu. how e-commerce is being used to link firms in quantitative analysis of poverty dynamics using Celestine Nyamu Lawyer with training in legal developed and developing countries. large household survey data sets. Interests: anthropology. Interests: overlap between formal the relationship between poverty, growth and Anuradha Joshi Urban planner with a focus and informal legal regulation of land relations, inequality and the impact of trade liberalisation on public policy and extensive experience access to justice at the local level; gender upon poverty. Research experience in Africa and in institutional analysis of development equity in resource control; local implementation Asia especially Pakistan, China and Zambia. programmes. Has worked in a variety of sectors of international human rights standards; including poverty, low-income housing, urban Rosemary McGee Development social scientist. rights-based approaches to development; and public services, taxation of the informal sector Participation and policy change; qualitative and integrating participatory approaches into rights and environmental policy. Convenor of the quantitative poverty research and epistemology; advocacy. research theme on Collective Action and civil society participation in local and national Professor Sherman Robinson Professor of Service Delivery as a part of the DFID-funded governance. Interests: institutional trans- Economics at Sussex. Interests: international Development Research Centre for the Future formation; southern ownership and partnership trade, macroeconomic policy, income distribution, State at IDS. in development cooperation. Ethnographic and poverty, and policy-oriented general equilibrium RRA experience in Colombia; field research in Patricia Justino Economist specialising in modelling. Has held appointments at the US Honduras; policy research and PPA experience Department of Agriculture; the US Congressional quantitative development economics. Interests: in Uganda. Budget Office; and the President’s Council of the micro-level causes and effects of violent conflict, the measurement of inequality and Merylyn McKenzie Hedger Social scientist. Economic Advisers (Clinton administration). poverty, and the role of social security and Research in international governance of climate Rachel Sabates-Wheeler Development redistribution on economic growth. She is the change; the science-policy interface of climate economist with training in agricultural Director of MICROCON (www.microconflict.eu) change; the interface between climate change economics, econometrics and survey design. and co-directs the Households in Conflict adaptation and development; and the integration Specialisms: comparative law; post-socialist Network (www.hicn.org). of climate change into sectoral planning such transition; the gendered implications of newly as water. Long-term experience in Ecuador and acquired land; and land reform implementation Papua New Guinea. Worked in government on and the policy implications of land reform. UK and European climate-change policy-making. 81
  • Anna Schmidt Political scientist with an interest John Thompson Resource geographer in humanitarian aid evaluation and effectiveness, specialising in understanding the dynamics Development studies (in IDS) humanitarian emergencies and forced migration, of nature-society interactions and power, conflict analysis and post-conflict reconstruction, knowledge and sustainability issues. Research: as well as human rights and security matters, the political ecology and governance of agri-food and social network analysis. Field experience systems, community-based natural resource across sub-Saharan Africa. management, water-environment-health Professor Hubert Schmitz Political interactions, deliberative policy processes, economist specialising in: industrialisation and citizen action and social change. employment; industrial clusters and collective Linda Waldman Social anthropologist with efficiency; governance and upgrading in global research experience in racial classification, value chains; value chain analysis for policy- ethnicity, identity, ritual and gender in South makers. Projects: implications of China’s Africa. Previous research focused on indigenous economic rise; the changing knowledge divide identity and nationalism among the Griqua of in the global economy; the politics of investment South Africa. Recent research interests: a study and growth. of asbestos environmental pollution, together Professor Ian Scoones Natural resource with its socio-cultural ramifications in South ecologist interested in exploring the links Africa and the UK; citizen mobilisation and between ecological dynamics and local resource international litigation. management with a focus on dry-land areas in Dirk Willenbockel Economist with research Africa. Interdisciplinary research has involved interests in international economic integration, examining issues of rangeland and pastoral trade, growth and development. Experience development, soil and water conservation, and and publications in quantitative economic forestry and woodland management, as well as policy modelling, with particular expertise in biodiversity and protected area issues. computable general equilibrium analysis under Esha Shah Main areas of work involve imperfect competition. anthropology and history of science and Professor Fiona Wilson Research interests: technology. Other research interests: risk, understanding dynamics of provincial societies, uncertainty, regulation of emerging technologies, seen in relation to the state and global relations; and social context of collective participation in changing economies; discrimination rooted in natural resource management. Her main research ‘race’ and political violence in Andean Peru; experience is in India and South Asia. social/political position of new professionals; Hilary Standing Social scientist/social public authority, citizenship, and ‘doing politics’ anthropologist specialising in health and in the context of decentralisation policy in development. Interests: household-level and Andean Peru. gender aspects of health, formal and informal care Farhana Yamin International lawyer with a systems, gender and equity in health reforms, the background in politics and philosophy. Working management of organisational change in health- on global environmental issues. The boundaries sector restructuring and improving accountability between law, ethics and politics informs her within health systems. Has worked extensively in work, which has focused on legal, institutional South Asia. and procedural aspects of environmental policy- Andy Sumner Economist doing cross-disciplinary making, including international issues relating to research. Working on childhood poverty, policy- participation and justice. making processes, and knowledge generation. Research associates Previously he has worked on various aspects of Professor Robert Chambers Knowledge in multidimensional poverty. His work has focused development, including perceptions, concepts on East Africa and South and East Asia. Interest and realities of poverty and wellbeing; the in the relationship with growth and international development and dissemination of participatory trade and investment policy. He has worked at methodologies for workshops and training, SOAS, LSHTM, LSBU and UEL. and for the empowerment of poor people; Mariz Tadros Research and teaching interests and relationships in development, including in gender empowerment; advocacy, participation procedural, institutional and personal change. and development; state-society relations and citizenship; and moderate Islamist political parties Professor Sir Richard Jolly Development and the politics of inclusion. economist. Currently working on long-run trends in global inequality and the history Thomas Tanner Social scientist specialising in of UN contributions to economic and social the policy and practice of adaptation to climate development. Before this, he worked for two change, particularly in linking approaches to decades as Deputy Executive Director of UNICEF development, disasters and climate change. and as Principal Coordinator of UNDP’s Human Research interests include climate risk Development Report. management, child-centred approaches, social protection, organisational change, and adaptation Robin Luckham Sociologist/political scientist policy processes. working on legal systems and the legal profession; Third World and African military Peter Taylor Interests in participatory and institutions, disarmament and development; contextualised approaches in teaching democratisation in Africa and the Third World; and learning, curriculum development and and relationships between strategic culture and evaluation, and teacher/trainer training at various popular culture. levels of education. Research and advisory work in education for agriculture, forestry and rural development. Top: traditional junk boat in a commercial setting Middle: Asian welder working on the street Bottom: shipping containers, Hong Kong 82
  • Economics Economics Essentials • Economics at Sussex offers teaching MSc in Development Economics and research at graduate level in applied 1 year full-time Taught programmes Funding MSc degrees economics. You may be eligible to apply for a Sasakawa Development Economics • Our faculty are engaged in research across a Scholarship to cover fees and maintenance. See Economics range of applied areas, including international Fees and funding on pages 176-186. International Economics economics, development, labour, macro- Programme structure International Finance (see page 105) economics, social policy and the public sector. Graduate diploma The degree comprises three two-term Economics • While much of the research is policy oriented, courses – Development Economics; Economic and therefore responsive to external events Analysis; and Econometric Methods – and a Research programmes (such as European economic integration and dissertation. For descriptions of the courses, see MPhil, DPhil Economics reform of the former socialist economies), the MSc course outlines section over the page. New Route DPhil Economics the highest importance is attached to Assessment Admissions requirements basing applied work on sound theoretical You are assessed by unseen written For information on overseas qualifications that foundations, as well as utilising best-practice examinations and a dissertation of 20,000 meet the admissions requirements, see pages quantitative techniques in estimating and words. 172-175 testing models. MSc and New Route DPhil MSc in Economics • Our focus on applied economics should 1 year full-time An upper second-class undergraduate honours therefore be interpreted broadly, to include degree in economics Funding work on developing the applicability of You may be eligible to apply for a Sasakawa MPhil and DPhil theory and computable general equilibrium Scholarship to cover fees and maintenance. See A Masters degree in economics modelling, as well as the analysis of empirical Fees and funding on pages 176-186. English language requirements questions. IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and Programme structure • Members of faculty have attracted project The degree comprises two compulsory two-term 6.0 in the other sections. For more information funding from the Ford Foundation, the ESRC, courses – Economic Analysis, and Econometric and alternative English language requirements, the Nuffield Foundation, the Department for Methods – plus one course in each term that see page 174 International Development, the Department of may be freely chosen from a range of options, Fees Trade and Industry, the European Commission, and a dissertation. The options will include See pages 176-181 for information on fees and the Commonwealth Secretariat. both parts of Development Economics and Further information International Economics, as well as other Taught programmes courses, the availability of which may vary from Professor Andrew McKay, Economics, Taught programmes year to year. University of Sussex, Falmer, All Economics MSc students may be required to Assessment Brighton, BN1 9SN, UK take a pre-sessional course in Mathematics and You are assessed by unseen written E a.mckay@sussex.ac.uk Statistics in the September before beginning examinations and a dissertation of 20,000 Research programmes the main programme. An exemption may be words. Professor Richard Dickens, given if you have recently obtained an equivalent MSc in International Economics (contact details as above) qualification. An additional fee (£250 in the 1 year full-time T +44 (0)1273 678889 academic year 2009-2010) is charged for Funding F +44 (0)1273 673563 this course. You may be eligible to apply for a Sasakawa E r.f.dickens@sussex.ac.uk All of our MSc programmes are recognised by Scholarship to cover fees and maintenance. See www.sussex.ac.uk/economics Fees and funding on pages 176-186. the ESRC under its 1+3 scheme (see Routes to postgraduate study at Sussex on pages 14-15). Programme structure Courses taken from these programmes make The degree comprises three two-term courses – up the coursework component of the New Route International Economics; Economic Analysis; DPhil in Economics (see Routes to postgraduate and Econometric Methods – and a dissertation. study at Sussex on pages 14-15). For descriptions of the courses, see the MSc All our MSc programmes have ‘internship’ course outlines section below. variants. These allow you to take a three-month Assessment ‘internship break’ from May onwards for an You are assessed by unseen written examinations approved purpose such as a placement in an and a dissertation of 20,000 words. international organisation or a research assistant post in a university. The registration period for the MSc is then lengthened by three months. If you are interested in the MSc with an internship, you should apply for the standard MSc as described below, and will be transferred to the MSc with an internship after starting the standard MSc. See www.sussex.ac.uk/economics for more details. 83
  • MSc course outlines Development Economics Economics The first part of this course focuses on three linked topics: the measurement, profile and reduction of poverty; the institutional and technical bases for economic development in agriculture and the rural sector; and the role and workings of factor markets. The second part concerns growth, trade and macroeconomic issues for developing countries, including financial repression, foreign exchange controls, dual labour markets, structural adjustment, stabilisation and external debt, and the growth and equity impact of macroeconomic adjustment programmes and trade policy options. Econometric Methods The first half of this course covers the basic techniques of modern econometrics, making use of applied studies to illustrate the material, particularly from the fields of development and international economics. You are also introduced to the analysis of data sets using the STATA software package, as well as the interpretation of the resulting output. The emphasis is upon the appropriate application of econometrics to practical problems arising in economics. The second half of the course is devoted in part to further topics in econometrics, including maximum likelihood techniques, qualitative response models, models with limited dependent variables, and panel-data estimation. Economic Analysis Is international trade good for development? The microeconomics part of this course covers the theory underlying a variety of topics, European Economic Integration The second part addresses macroeconomic and together with its application in policy analysis This is a policy-oriented course, which covers monetary issues, including theory and evidence and empirical work. Topics covered include: theoretical issues such as customs union on the performance of flexible exchange rate decision-making under uncertainty; asymmetric information; oligopoly; efficiency and productivity theory, regional convergence and divergence, regimes; alternative policies for the international measurement; externalities and public goods. and Keynesian and Monetarist approaches coordination of macroeconomic policies in the to monetary union, as well as the basic light of historical experience; issues raised by the The macroeconomics part of the course is institutional and legal aspects of the EU relevant prospect of monetary union in the EU; and the oriented towards the design of macroeconomic to economists (including the EU treaties operations of international institutions such as policy in open economies in the short and and decision-making processes with special the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund medium term. Among the topics covered are: reference to trade competition and industrial and the World Trade Organization. concepts of equilibrium unemployment; causes policy). and consequences of real and nominal wage Dissertation rigidity; rational expectations in models with and Although this is a policy-oriented course, The dissertation involves individually supervised without market clearing; and nominal income economics students are encouraged to use the research on a particular aspect of your special versus inflation targeting. opportunity to explore the quantitative aspects of subject. It is undertaken in the second half of the Economics of the Labour Market the material. academic year and counts for one-third of your This course aims to make you familiar with final mark. Financial and Time-Series Econometrics the theoretical and empirical methods of This course aims to make you familiar with Graduate Diploma in Economics contemporary research in labour economics. a variety of applied time-series econometric This programme is designed both for graduates It is especially suitable for students who wish techniques, enabling the confident and of other disciplines who wish to change their to conduct empirical research into labour independent use of these techniques. An academic direction, and for Economics and household issues, as well as those who important emphasis of the course is to provide graduates whose training is insufficient to enable might wish to specialise in labour issues as a you with hands-on experience of econometric them to enter an MSc programme immediately. government economist. Topics will include: analysis through using a variety of economic data the economics of non-wage labour costs; the Students with no previous training in the subject sets. The course emphasises the importance of demand for skills; the design and impact of attend an intensive three-week pre-sessional the time-series properties of economic data and performance-related pay schemes; the supply Primer in Economics to equip them with the outlines econometric procedures appropriate to of hours and the time allocation of households; basic knowledge required to undertake the modelling these series. The course covers topics education, wages and work; the economics of remainder of the programme. An additional fee on unit root testing, cointegration and dynamic migration; and job search and unemployment. (£250 in the academic year 2009-2010) is modelling within an error correction mechanism (ECM) framework. The course also explores ARCH charged for this course. All students then study and GARCH modelling, with particular reference macro- and microeconomic principles, statistics, to their use in the context of financial markets’ introductory mathematics for economists, data. computer literacy and The Economics of Development. The courses are assessed by a International Economics combination of examinations, and (for statistics) The first part of this course covers the theory a project report. of international trade, including comparative Successful completion of the Diploma with advantage, gains from trade, and trade under an average mark of at least 60 per cent imperfect competition; trade policy, including (excluding computer literacy) is a qualification for tariffs and other trade restrictions; effective admission to an MSc programme in the following protection theory and the political economy of academic year. trade policy. 84
  • Research programmes Economics Coursework There are three modes of entry for research students. First is traditional entry to an MPhil or DPhil. Second is the MSc plus DPhil pathway, which is the 1+3 route required by the ESRC for its studentship support (see Routes to postgraduate study at Sussex on pages 14-15). Third is the New Route DPhil (see Routes to postgraduate study at Sussex on pages 14-15) offering an integrated four-year programme of taught coursework in research methods and professional skills together with supervised doctoral research. All new research students will be required to participate in the programme of research training courses and to take other courses that may be recommended by the supervisor of their research (exemption from research training courses can be granted to those who have already taken such courses at postgraduate level). Funding For information on ESRC funding, see Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Limited funding from Sussex, which may involve some teaching, may be available for outstanding research students. Please contact Professor Richard Dickens at the address listed in Essentials. You may be offered tutorial teaching in the undergraduate economics programme, and sometimes research assistantship work is Stock prices on tickers streaming by available. In neither case are the sums involved of a sufficient scale to provide full support. Academic activities Peter Holmes International economics; indicative planning; French industrial policy; the Recent thesis titles The Economics faculty organise regular seminars interaction of trade, competition and technology A study of the regional distribution of at which external speakers present papers, policy in the EU. Author of ‘Competition policy unemployment in Poland’s economic transition faculty report on current activities, and research and the future of the multilateral trading system’ students present their thesis proposals in order (with Dumont) in Journal of International Four essays on economic growth in Venezuela: to obtain advice on the preparation of their Economic Law (2002). 1950-99 formal research outlines. They also provide a Julie Litchfield Poverty, inequality and income Impact of changes in the unemployment forum for discussing substantive results when a distribution. Author of ‘Agricultural trade insurance programme on the duration of thesis is close to completion. liberalization and poverty dynamics in three insured unemployment in Atlantic Canada developing countries’ (with N McCulloch and Exchange-rate and output dynamics in Mexico: A Winters) in American Journal of Agricultural Faculty research interests an econometric study Economics (2003). The range of faculty research activities is Professor Andy McKay Chronic poverty in Essays on Bangladesh’s exports illustrated below. More information, including developing countries, trade and poverty, pro-poor Factor proportions, market size and the location links to our recent discussion papers, is available growth. Author of ‘Combining quantitative and of economic activity at www.sussex.ac.uk/economics qualitative methods in assessing chronic poverty: Mike Barrow Public-sector economics; housing the case of Rwanda’ (with G Howe) in World Essays on the causes and effects of fiscal and local government. Author of ‘An Economic Development (2007). decentralisation Analysis of the UK Landfill Permits Scheme’ in Andrew Newell Labour economics; in particular Productivity growth, imitation and product variety Fiscal Studies (2003). unemployment in OECD and transition countries. The economic effects of Mercosur: an Professor Richard Dickens Economic impact Author of ‘The Polish Wage Inequality Explosion’ empirical analysis of minimum wages; earnings and income in Economics of Transition (2007). mobility. Author of ‘Spikes and spillovers: the Four essays on trade and labour standards Barry Reilly Applied econometrics, especially impact of the national minimum wage on the with reference to the microeconomics of An empirical analysis of the formal and informal wage distribution in a low-wage sector’ (with A labour markets; economics of crime and labour markets in FR Yugoslavia Manning) in Economic Journal (2004). unemployment. Author of ‘Education, Rob Eastwood Demographic change, poverty employment and earnings of secondary school- and inequality in developing countries. Author leavers in Tanzania: evidence from a tracer study’ Specialist facilities of ‘Premature de-agriculturalisation and its (with S Al-Samarrai) in Journal of Development consequences: rural dependency among African Studies (2008). The University has an excellent library and households in Limpopo province, South Africa’ widely available computing facilities. In addition, Professor Sherman Robinson International (with J Kirsten and M Lipton) in Journal of graduate students have access to specialist economics, development economics. Author Development Studies (2006). software such as Stata, Microfit and GAMS. of ‘Structural change and economic growth in Michael Gasiorek International economics; China’ (with S Fan and Z Xiaoko) in Review of Interdisciplinary research conducted at Sussex economics of integration; 20th-century is often of particular significance to economics Development Economics (2003). economic history. Author of ‘The impact of rules students. There is close academic collaboration of origin on trade flows’ (with P Augier and C Lai- Professor Alan Winters International trade, between specialist centres and the relevant Tong) in Economic Policy (2005). regional integration, effects of trade on poverty. departments at Sussex. Author of ‘How regional blocs affect excluded countries: the price effects of MERCOSUR’ in American Economic Review (2002). 85
  • Education and teaching • Education at Sussex received a grade 5 Education and teaching (recognising research of national and international excellence) in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), and was awarded a very high grade in the latest QAA Review of Education. • Education hosts three international research centres. • Our high-quality Initial Teacher Education has been established over 40 years. • Experienced social science researchers are involved in teaching core programmes. Essentials English language requirements IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and • We offer innovative interdisciplinary teaching Taught programmes 6.0 in the other sections. For more information and research with social work, law and MA degrees and alternative English language requirements, continuing education. Education Studies see page 174 • There are exciting teaching and research English Language Teaching (see page 98) Fees opportunities for mid-career and senior International Education and Development See pages 176-181 for information on fees professionals. International English Language Teaching (see page 98) Further information and admissions Teacher training Lifelong Learning For all programmes except the MA in We provide teacher training via our PGCE and MSc degree Lifelong Learning and the Postgraduate Graduate Teacher Programmes. We have Social Research Methods (Education) Certificate in Education (PGCE) always prided ourselves on our partnerships with Postgraduate diplomas We consider applications from September schools, with local education authorities and Education Studies in the year before the one in which the with our sister universities. We strengthen the English Language Teaching (see page 98) programme begins, and try to offer places practice of school-based teacher training, which Postgraduate certificates as early as possible. Please apply early, even has existed in Sussex for over 40 years, through Education Studies though places on part-time programmes may a consortium of partnership schools and the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) be available until the summer preceding the University of Sussex. Research programmes programme. EdD, MPhil and DPhil Education Contact the Sussex School of Education at: MPhil and DPhil Continuing Education and Taught programmes The Sussex Institute, Lifelong Learning University of Sussex, Masters-level programmes in education and New Route DPhil Education Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QQ, UK teaching are designed to meet the needs of International Professional Doctorate in T +44 (0)1273 876560 professionals in teaching, management, and Education F+44 (0)1273 678568 education and development. We aim to provide Admissions requirements E si-admissions@sussex.ac.uk programmes that are grounded in research; For information on overseas qualifications that www.sussex.ac.uk/education recognise and build upon prior knowledge and meet the admissions requirements, see pages For the MA in Lifelong Learning experience of students; develop professionally 172-175 Contact the Centre for Continuing Education at relevant knowledge, skills and understanding; MA, postgraduate diploma and the address above. and enable the acquisition of further postgraduate certificate T +44 (0)1273 872584 qualifications that enhance career prospects. A second-class undergraduate honours F +44 (0)1273 877534 Some programmes are part-time, combining degree or equivalent qualification and normally E l.m.morrice@sussex.ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/cce attendance in the evenings with occasional at least three years’ experience of work in day schools. education or a related area For the Postgraduate Certificate in MSc Education (PGCE) Assessment is through coursework assignments. Admissions: The result is that you acquire greater confidence, An upper second-class undergraduate honours Graduate Teacher Training Registry, enhanced capabilities and different ways of degree in education or a related subject, but Rosehill, New Barn Lane, Cheltenham, thinking. applicants from other backgrounds may also be Gloucestershire GL52 3LZ, UK considered Please note that some MA and postgraduate PGCE T+44 (0)1242 544788 www.gttr.ac.uk diploma programmes run occasional Saturday In order to qualify for admission to the PGCE workshops. Further PGCE subject information: programme, you must be a graduate of an Contact PGCE Admissions at the Sussex Additional admissions requirements approved institution of higher education School of Education address below left. We consider applications from non-graduates or validating body, or hold some other T +44 (0)1273 678405 who can demonstrate that they are sufficiently qualification (eg from a professional body) F +44 (0)1273 678411 prepared for, and able to benefit from, the that is recognised as being equivalent to an Or programme. undergraduate honours degree. You must Contact employment-based routes at also have passed the equivalent of GCSE MA in Education Studies the Sussex School of Education address English and Mathematics (Grade C). If you are The MA in Education Studies is a research-based above. applying for the KS2/3 course, you must also MA and offers a flexible approach to Masters-level T+44 (0)1273 873238 have achieved a Grade C GCSE or equivalent work. This MA is distinctive because: F +44 (0)1273 678411 in a science subject. Evidence of having E si-admissions@sussex.ac.uk • you choose your area of study within the broad gained these qualifications must be provided www.sussex.ac.uk/education discipline of education, constructing your own at interview EdD, MPhil, DPhil, New Route DPhil and coherent integrated learning experience; International Professional Doctorate in • teaching focuses on one-to-one supervision with Education a tutor who has expertise in your area of interest; You should hold at least a second-class undergraduate honours degree or equivalent • each term there is a Saturday school and two qualification and normally a Masters degree, evening meetings specifically for Education and have had at least three years’ experience Studies students; of work in education or a related area • there is a wide range of optional seminars and lectures (mostly taking place on weekday evenings) where you can meet other students; 86
  • • you may choose to carry out library-based work, Programme structure research in the field, or workplace enquiry; Autumn term: Debates in International Education Education and teaching and Development; and Policy and Practice in • MA students can pace their studies to suit their International Education and Development. circumstances: a full degree can take from two to five years part time or one to three years Spring term: you choose two of the following four full time. options: Educational Planning and Governance for Development; Gender, Inclusion and The programme also allows for professional Educational Development; Quality Education: responsibilities and staff development activities Learning, Pedagogies and Assessment for to be used as a basis for accreditation. Students Development; and Teacher Education for from one institution or a group of institutions can Development. Alternatively, you may take one make an application collectively. option from within the programme and another Current faculty areas of research available from selected development studies courses for supervision include 14-19 curriculum, across the University (eg in the Institute for assessment for learning, Higher Education policy, Development Studies or the School of Social pupils’ behavioural issues, person-centred Science and Cultural Studies) upon approval. education, environmental education, student Summer term: Research Methods in voice, science education, and special education. International Education and Development. We work in partnership with West Sussex LA, East Academic Skills for International Education and Sussex LA, the Guerrand-Hermès Foundation Development is a course that runs throughout for Peace, and a consortium of local schools to each of the three terms to provide specific forms provide postgraduate professional development of support to students on the programme. (PPD) for serving teachers and other education professionals. Assessment You write an assignment on a chosen subject Assessment related to each of the courses taken in the first We award an MA in Education Studies for the two terms (30 credits each), a short research accumulation of 180 credits. This is through proposal (15 credits), and a final dissertation on a successful completion of 90 credits by an topic of your choice during the summer term and appropriate combination of 5,000-word (22.5 vacation (45 credits). credits), 6,000-word (30 credits) and 10,000- word (45 credits) assignments, plus a 20,000- MA in Lifelong Learning word dissertation for a further 90 credits. 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Whatever field of lifelong learning you are in, The Sussex School of Education offers a Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate hands-on approach to educational innovations you will be offered an excellent opportunity to Certificate in Education Studies and kinaesthetic learning step back and reflect critically on your work. Postgraduate Diploma, 4 terms minimum You will be exposed to a range of ideas and MSc in Social Research Methods Postgraduate Certificate, 2 terms arguments relating to lifelong learning in general (Education) minimum and specifically offered opportunities for your 1 year full-time/2 years part-time These programmes are research-based, offer own development in the fields of management A Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate are also a flexible approach to Masters-level work, and and pedagogy. You will also explore the rich and available. See Routes to postgraduate study at allows for professional responsibilities and staff growing field of auto/biographical approaches, Sussex on pages 14-15. development activities to be used as a basis which offers considerable potential for the for accreditation. The aim of this MSc is to provide you with development of new approaches to work competence in a broad range of social scientific Assessment practices in lifelong learning. Your career methods appropriate for researching education, We award a Postgraduate Diploma in Education progression possibilities will be enhanced by the and to equip you to pursue specialist research for Studies for 120 credits gained through successful achievement of this qualification. Classes are a DPhil in the field. completion of one 6,000-word (30 credits) and four Wednesday afternoons plus two Saturdays two 10,000-word (45 credits each) assignments. per term. Funding This programme qualifies for ESRC support We award a Postgraduate Certificate in Education Additional admissions requirements under its 1+3 system of doctoral support. For Studies for 60 credits gained through successful Appropriate professional experience is taken into information on ESRC and other funding, see Fees completion of a combination of two 6,000-word account. Admissions tutors will give guidance on and funding on pages 176-186. (30 credits each) assignments. the evidence required. Programme structure MA in International Education and Degree structure There are three main elements to the MSc Development Year 1 programme that run concurrently through the 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Autumn term: Lifelong Learning – Culture, academic year: a research elective, involving This innovative programme links theory with Politics and Values. supervised reading in your individual research research, policy and practice, and critically area and the writing of a dissertation; credited Spring term: Managing Lifelong Learning – engages with the educational challenges of courses in the philosophy and methodology of Theory and Practice. developing countries. It takes a multidisciplinary research; and training in both quantitative and development perspective to analyse the complex Summer term: Teaching and Learning – qualitative research skills. educational issues of resource-constrained Reflecting on Theory and Practice. and/or rapidly expanding educational systems. Autumn term: you take a research elective; Year 2 Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific The programme is geared to students with Autumn term: Auto/biographical Approaches to Research Practice; and Research Design in professional experience in education and Lifelong Learning. the Social Sciences. development, and to those with a strong academic background in a relevant discipline. Spring and summer terms: independent study. Spring and summer terms: you choose from You have the opportunity to develop research a selection of courses in data analysis and Assessment skills and to specialise in one of four areas. Most collection. The research elective continues You are assessed by essays, portfolio, students aim to develop or strengthen their across all terms, culminating in the writing of a presentation and supporting papers, totalling expertise for work in a government department, dissertation. 6,000 words for each of the first four courses. development agency, non-governmental The independent study course is assessed by a Assessment organisation, for research or consultancy. 15,000-word dissertation. Taught course units are variously assessed by Additional admissions requirements term papers of 3,000-4,000 words or equivalent Appropriate professional experience is taken into coursework portfolios. The research elective is account. Admissions tutors can give guidance on assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words. evidence required. 87
  • • a portfolio of professional development, which you collate, based on your school placements, Education and teaching presentations and written assignments; • written assignments for your specialist subject (and core subjects for the 7-14 route). Timetable The programme is full time and runs from mid- September until late June. Winter and spring vacations are fixed by the term dates of the schools in which you undertake teaching practice. PGCE award levels Students register on the Postgraduate Certificate in Education and are assessed at Masters level. Successful students may obtain a Postgraduate Certificate in Education, while students who fail to obtain enough M-level credits are able to exit with a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education. Further details are provided in the Initial Teacher Education (ITE) prospectus (see www.sussex.ac.uk/education). Admissions and applications Places on the programme are offered following interview, subject to availability of school placements. Applications are through the Graduate Teacher Training Registry for home students and by direct enquiry for overseas students. Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) Teachers in state-maintained schools must have QTS, and qualified teachers in England are registered with the General Teaching Council for The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme. Experience of placements in two England (GTCE). For the purpose of registration schools gives you the opportunity to develop your professional skills with the close supervision with the GTCE, all successful students from the of a subject mentor 11-18 or 11-16 programmes are registered on an 11-16 track. The Postgraduate Certificate in Education teaching and learning strategies. You learn about (PGCE) programme national curriculum requirements and about QTS is awarded to teachers who meet nationally (11-18, 11-16 and 7-14) ways of covering these in imaginative lessons, agreed standards. The standards are specified 1 year full-time (English, Geography, aimed at a wide range of abilities. to ensure that all teachers have the appropriate History, Mathematics, Modern Foreign professional knowledge and skill. This includes Through school-based research we encourage reaching a high standard of literacy and numeracy, Languages, Music, Science) you to develop your own understanding of your and use of information and communications 2 years part-time (Music) subject’s specific pedagogy. technology. Our programmes have been You are normally based in schools in East and West Sussex and Brighton & Hove. School- School Experience redesigned to meet the new QTS standards from based training by mentors and professional On this course the focus is on the practical 2007. Details are available from the government, tutors is supported by University-based application of professional skills. Experience and include online help and self-study materials. work. There are three elements of the PGCE of placements in two schools gives you the Details of the Standards, Requirements and programme: opportunity to develop your teaching skills with Regulations can be seen on the website of the Professional Knowledge for Schools the close supervision of a subject mentor. Training and Development Agency for Schools: The focus of this course is to encourage the This includes: www.tda.gov.uk development of key professional attributes. • developing your knowledge of the school PGCE fees and support This course develops your understanding of: curriculum in your subject; Fees for full-time 2009 PGCE entrants are aligned • broad educational issues; • planning lessons and schemes of work, with with those for our undergraduate programmes, at clear learning objectives; £3,225. PGCE students are able to defer payment • national priorities, for example, 14-19 until after completing their studies. Students curriculum; • managing the classroom, ICT and other deferring fee payment will have that fee converted • whole-school policies; resources; and addeed to any existing student loan, which • organising a range of well-paced activities to becomes repayable after you have left and are in • teachers’ duties, legal liabilities and paid employment responsibilities. suit different learning styles; • presenting topics and using effective Offsetting the new fee, home PGCE students may Part of the course is taught in schools, through be able to get a maintenance grant or special meetings with your professional tutor (the senior questioning strategies; support grant (up to £2,835 in 2008/9), and a teacher responsible for all trainees in a school); • monitoring and assessing pupils’ work. tax-free bursary; the value of this depends on the the rest is covered at the University. Topics include subject you train to teach, but in 2008/9 ranged the Every Child Matters Agenda, the remodelled Assessment You are assessed to ensure you meet national between £4,000-£9,000. Full-time students school workforce, special educational needs, are also eligible for a University bursary of £320. teaching and learning styles, equal opportunities standards. When you have successfully completed your issues, and presentation skills. Evidence of your professional skills comes from: course and accepted a newly qualified teacher Curriculum Studies • classroom observations, usually performed by (NQT) position, you may be eligible for a one-off The central focus of this course is subject-specific your school mentor and professional tutor in taxable golden hello payment (currently between professional knowledge and understanding. addition to your University tutors; £2,500 and £5,000). As funding schemes frequently change, we strongly recommend that University tutors and school mentors teach • a record of evidence of achievement, which you inform yourself thoroughly by consulting this component. It extends the knowledge and charts your development during the year; www.teach.gov.uk and understanding both of your subject and of how www.dfes.gov.uk/go4itnow pupils learn, enabling you to explore a variety of 88
  • How to apply for the PGCE You should apply to the Graduate Teacher Education and teaching Training Registry for an application form (see contact details in Essentials). Please do not apply directly to the University. You must provide an appropriate written reference on your application form, which should be an academic reference if you are at university or college. If you finished your studies in the last five years, your principal referee should be a tutor or lecturer who can comment on your academic achievements and your personal qualities. If you finished your studies more than five years ago, your principal referee should be a responsible person who knows you well enough to write with authority about you, such as an employer, a training officer or a careers officer. No candidate will be offered a place without being interviewed. This serves not only as a selection device, but also as an opportunity for further explanation and questions. Unfortunately, we are unable to reimburse travelling and other expenses incurred in attending for an interview. Trainees with disabilities We welcome applications from students with disabilities, although the availability of suitable school placements may be limited. Contact PGCE admissions at the Sussex School of Education (details in Essentials) for further information. Working with children The Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) now provides International education graduates have volunteered for the project ‘Impact of the tsunami on poverty access to records held nationwide by the police, in Sri Lanka’, which focuses on how the tsunami and the post-tsunami relief and reconstruction Department of Health and Department for activities affected the Sri Lankan economy and social structure Education and Skills, through its disclosure service. All trainees must be checked with the CRB before starting an initial teacher-training Research programmes Funding programme as it involves working with children. For information on ESRC funding, see Fees and Research centres funding on pages 176-186. Various bursaries, The fee is currently £36 for an Enhanced The School of Education contains three research Disclosure. including University-sponsored graduate centres that provide the intellectual bases for assistantships may be available for full-time Mental and physical fitness to teach its research, consultancy and teaching activity. research study. For further details, contact the All trainees must be screened for mental and These centres reflect its interdisciplinary and relevant address listed in Essentials. physical fitness to teach by the University’s international character: Occupational Health Department. A small charge MPhil/DPhil programme in Education • The Centre for International Education has Research degree studies in education are carried is made for the service. an international reputation for its work on out across a wide range of fields. Employment-based routes educational development, mainly in Africa, • Graduate Teacher Programme Asia and Latin America. The aim of the MPhil/DPhil programme is to provide the support and resources necessary to • Overseas Trained Teachers • The Centre for Research on Cognition, complete a substantial piece of research which, For further information, contact the address Learning and Teaching (CIRCLETS) examines in most cases, has an empirical component. in Essentials. the nature of learning and teaching. Current To this end, students are normally required to research includes formative assessment, take courses offered within the MSc in Social Withdrawal of offer personalised learning (Becta-funded), The University will make all reasonable efforts Research Methods (Education) (see page 87). teachers’ professional learning, and student The MSc courses are supplemented by to provide the programme as set out in this voice. prospectus. However, it may be obliged to education-specific inputs, including individual withdraw an offer of a place if it cannot obtain • The Centre for Higher Education and Equity tutorial support, termly research student sufficient placements for the school experience Research (CHEER) is a new centre, which seminars to discuss work in progress, weekly component of the programme, where trainees provides a platform for the growing field of open seminars and student self-support groups. are placed in a school within a 50-mile radius of higher education and aims to be a world- Additional admissions requirements the University or of the student’s home. leading centre for research and scholarship in In exceptional cases, we consider applications this area. from non-graduates who can demonstrate that See Terms and conditions on page 188-189 for more information. Routes into doctoral study they are sufficiently prepared for, and able to There are four routes into doctoral study in benefit from, the programme. This usually means education. These are: extensive relevant professional experience. • The MPhil/DPhil programmes Coursework Depending on previous experience and • The New Route DPhil/1+3 DPhil (see page 15) qualifications, you may be required to undertake • The Professional Doctorate in Education EdD coursework in addition to attendance at research methods seminars. • The International Professional Doctorate in Education. Fieldwork For students working overseas on fieldwork, Doctoral research at Sussex has ESRC recognition. a reduced fee structure may be available (see Fees and funding on pages 176-186.) 89
  • Recent thesis titles Years 3 and 4 For full-time research and MA students, we Teachers’ participation in community The research component. A research-based provide access to computing facilities (including Education and teaching development in Ghana thesis/dissertation to be completed over six personal computers), which supplement those terms (35,000-45,000 words). available through the University Computing Mathematics student teachers’ anxieties: case The programme is taught through twice-termly Centre. There is a research student workroom, study of a Malaysian teacher training college residential weekend workshops (ie six weekends equipped with PCs. Cyber-education: the impact of computers on per year) plus occasional Saturday day schools. the interaction between lecturers and students in a university setting: a case study of the ITESM, Additional admissions requirements Academic activities Mexico Candidates who do not hold a Masters degree may be admitted to the programme on the We encourage and, if possible, support research Gender and equity in teacher education: a case basis of a portfolio of prior professional work students in attending conferences, especially study from Nigeria of Masters-level equivalence. Applicants may where they are presenting material based on be considered for admission with advanced their research. Students are encouraged to New Labour’s reform of the Advanced level publish material from their higher degree work. curriculum in England and Wales, with particular standing to the second year of the programme reference to its implementation in Sussex if they have successfully completed appropriate courses on research design and methodology, as Pluralism in education. Waldorf education – part of a comparable doctoral programme or on Faculty an alternative vision of learning and teaching a Masters-level research programme associated The major research interests include: methods and its relevance in the 21st century with doctoral studies (eg the Sussex MSc in international education; student and Choices: why not science? A study of why most Social Research Methods). Such admission will professional learning; and higher education young people do not choose science in their be considered on a case-by-case basis. Anyone and equity issues. For full information on faculty post-16 options wishing to apply on this basis is advised to for all programmes except the MA in Lifelong contact the programme convenor in advance. Learning, visit www.sussex.ac.uk/education Developing reading and creative writing skills amongst children at risk International Professional Doctorate For full information on faculty (including research in Education (EdD) interests) for the MA in Lifelong Learning, visit An evaluation of the validity of the assessment 3-4 years www.sussex.ac.uk/cce methods used in schools to measure This innovative programme offers structured reading progress Recent faculty publications study at the doctoral level through a series of Kwame Akyeampong ‘Vocationalisation of Teachers judging each other’s competence: taught components followed by a research Secondary Education in Ghana’, in R Maclean experience of performance management thesis. The intensive courses are taught at an and J Lauglo (eds) Vocationalisation of annual summer school (lasting three to four Ideal nurses: the social construction of Secondary Education Revisited (2004). weeks) on the University of Sussex campus, emotional labour allowing you to remain in your home country Professor Jo Boaler ‘Promoting “relational Accountants learning in the workplace for the rest of the year. You are registered as an equity” and high mathematics achievement Independent Distant Student of the University. through an innovative mixed ability approach’, MPhil/DPhil in Continuing Education British Educational Research Journal (2007). and Lifelong Learning Programme structure and assessment Suitable topics include the use of life history in The programme will develop your research skills Pat Drake ‘A case of learning mathematics the lifelong learning, gender and learning, feminist and will place a major emphasis on understanding hard way as a teaching assistant’, Review of theory and research, citizenship and lifelong the nature, conduct and use of research and Mathematics Education 7, 19-31 (2005). learning, adult learning, community-based evaluation in professional and organisational Máiréad Dunne, John Pryor and Paul Yates learning, participation and inclusion/exclusion. settings within an international context. Becoming a Researcher: A Companion to the Other topics in this very large field of scholarship Year 1 Research Process (2005). can be considered. These topics are most The common taught component. Research and suitable for direct supervision in the Centre Máiréad Dunne and Fiona Leach Gendered the Professional (assessed by a 5,000-word for Continuing Education. Other topics can, School Experiences: The Impact on Retention essay); Research Methods and Methodology however, be considered, as joint supervision may and Achievement (2005). (5,000-word essay); and Research and be available elsewhere in the University. Evaluation in Professional Organisations (7,000- Angela Jacklin, Vivienne Griffiths and Carol Research degrees can be taken full or part time, 8,000-word research or evaluation project). Robinson Beginning Primary Teaching: Moving Beyond Survival (2006). providing maximum flexibility. A degree at Masters Year 2 level is normally required for admission to an The specialist component. Selected from a Professor Fiona Leach ‘Gender Violence in MPhil or DPhil. range of options and assessed by a critical Schools in the Developing World’, Gender and analytic study of an area of professional practice Education 18, 1, 75-98 (2006). Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) (18,000 words). 4 years part-time Professor Keith Lewin with Y Sayed ‘Non-State The part-time EdD is offered for senior Years 3 and 4 Secondary Schooling in Sub-Saharan Africa?’, professionals who already hold a relevant The research component. A research-based Exploring the Evidence in South Africa and Masters degree and want to pursue research thesis/dissertation to be completed over six Malawi (2006). in the context of a structured programme. It terms (35,000-45,000 words). Professor Louise Morley ‘Gender Equity in provides the opportunity to work at doctoral Additional admissions requirements Commonwealth Higher Education’, Women’s level on problems that are of direct relevance to You should be able to satisfy selectors that you Studies International Forum, 28, 209-221 professional concerns and interests. have the basic infrastructure to support your (2005). Programme structure and assessment studies, including email access for ongoing Linda Morrice ‘Lifelong Learning and the Year 1 communication with the programme team Social Integration of Refugees in the UK: the The common taught component. Research and and research supervisors. If you do not hold Significance of Social Capital’, International the Professional (assessed by a 5,000-word a Masters degree, you may be permitted to Journal of Lifelong Education 26,2 (2007). essay); and Research Methods and Methodology register, based on an examination of a portfolio (5,000-word essay); Research and Evaluation in of prior professional work at a level equivalent to John Pryor and Barbara Crossourad ‘ Professional Organisations (7,000-8,000-word a Masters. A Sociocultural Theorization of Formative research or evaluation project). Assessment’, Oxford Review of Education 33,5 (2007). Year 2 Specialist facilities Study becomes more focused on an area Pauline Rose ‘Is there a fast track to of specialisation, supported by a range of You will have access to extensive library support achieving the Millennium Development Goal in theoretical, substantive and methodological through the main University Library and, with Education?’, International Journal of Education seminars chosen from a range of options. It is prior permission, certain specialist research and Development, 25, 4, 381-394 (2005). assessed by a critical analytic study of an area of libraries on the campus. Professor Judy Sebba ‘Policy and Practice professional practice (18,000-20,000 words). in Assessment for Learning: the Experience of Selected OECD countries’, in J Gardner (ed) Assessment and Learning (2005). 90
  • Engineering and design Taught programmes Engineering and design MSc programmes are made up of a total of 180 credits from a combination of taught courses and a dissertation. The taught courses are assessed by a range of methods, including laboratory reports, essays and unseen examinations. The project dissertation comprises approximately one-third of the programme. MSc in Advanced Mechanical Engineering 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Mechanical engineering plays an essential role at every level in society. The MSc in Advanced Essentials Fees Mechanical Engineering at the University of See pages 176-181 for information on fees Sussex aims to provide you with in-depth skills Taught programmes in computational fluid dynamics, advanced MSc degrees Admissions and further information Postgraduate Coordinator manufacture techniques, engine testing, Advanced Mechanical Engineering vehicle design and modelling, and heat Aerospace Technology (Mathematics and Engineering), Room 4C1, Pevensey 3 Building, transfer. Included in the taught courses is a Automotive Engineering significant proportion of project work to allow Embedded Digital Systems School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Falmer, the development of practical skills. The taught Mechanical Engineering Brighton BN1 9QH, UK element is followed by an individual project Modern Communication Technologies with Business Management T +44 (0)1273 678108 where you devote your time to investigating a Modern Digital Communication Systems F +44 (0)1273 877873 particular aspect of mechanical engineering. The Satellite Communications and Space Systems E engpgadmiss@sussex.ac.uk combination of taught subjects and project work Scientific Computation (see page 132) www.sussex.ac.uk/engineering provides an excellent platform to further your Security Technologies and Systems career in engineering. Turbomachinery • The Department of Engineering and Design Programme structure Postgraduate diplomas received a grade 5 (recognising research of Autumn term: core courses: Computational Fluid Advanced Mechanical Engineering national and international excellence) in the most Dynamics; and Mechanical Dynamics. Options Automotive Engineering recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). Communications and Space Systems include: Engine Testing and Instrumentation; Embedded Digital Systems • Our MSc degrees are very popular and our Automotive Design; Marketing Analysis; and Modern Communication Technologies with graduates are successful in gaining employment Financial Strategic Planning. Business Management in leading engineering and design companies Spring term: core courses: Advanced Modern Digital Communication Systems throughout the world. Manufacturing Technology; and Heat Transfer Security Technologies and Systems • Our five strong research groups, each Applications. Options include: Finite Element Turbomachinery international leaders in their fields, offer MPhil/ Modelling; Turbomachinery and Turbocharging; Postgraduate certificates DPhil research degree opportunities for our and Strategic Management. Automotive Engineering MSc graduates and well-qualified direct-entry Embedded Digital Systems applicants. Summer term and vacation: continue and Modern Communication Technologies with complete MSc project. Examinations. Business Management • The Department has well-equipped research Modern Digital Communication Systems laboratories and excellent teaching laboratories Specialist facilities dedicated to Masters-level courses. The Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre Research programmes (TFMRC), incorporating the Rolls-Royce MPhil, DPhil Engineering • We offer excellent supervision to our research supported University Technology Centre in Aero- students, who are strongly encouraged to Admissions requirements Thermal Systems, forms one of the University’s publish their research in leading international For information on overseas qualifications that journals. meet the admissions requirements, see pages 172-175 • We have a vibrant international community MSc, postgraduate diploma and within the Department, with students and faculty The Department has well-equipped research postgraduate certificate coming from all over the world. laboratories and excellent teaching laboratories A first- or second-class undergraduate dedicated to Masters-level courses honours degree in engineering, mathematics or an applied science. For the programmes Embedded Digital Systems, Modern Communication Technology with Business Management, and Modern Digital Communication Systems, the undergraduate honours degree will normally be in the fields of electronics or computing Note that the MSc, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate in Automotive Engineering are admitted by the University of Brighton. For more information, see www.brighton.ac.uk/prospective/postgrad/ application MPhil and DPhil A first- or upper second-class undergraduate honours degree in an engineering discipline. Candidates from other backgrounds may be considered if they have suitable qualifications and interests English language requirements IELTS 6.0, with not less than 6.0 in each section. For more information and alternative English language requirements, see page 174 91
  • You will benefit from the research expertise and industrial links of both Universities. The Engineering and design Heat Transfer Research Unit at the University of Brighton has strong links with Ford, ND Marston, Delphi and Ricardo Consulting Engineers. Engineering is a hands-on experience and on this programme you will benefit from the combined laboratory facilities of both Universities, especially the Ricardo Universities IC Engines research facility hosted by the University of Brighton. Note that the MSc, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate in Automotive Engineering are admitted by the University of Brighton. For more information, see www.brighton.ac.uk/prospective/postgrad/ application Programme structure Autumn term: core courses: Engine Testing and Instrumentation; Automotive Design; and Power Train Engineering. Options include: Computational Fluid Dynamics; Mechanical Dynamics; and Marketing Analysis and Financial Strategic Planning. Spring term: core courses: Automotive Control Systems; Automotive Electronics; and Vehicle Design. Options include: Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Finite Element Modelling; and Heat Transfer Applications. Summer term and vacation: MSc project. MSc in Embedded Digital Systems 1 year full-time The aim of this programme is to develop MSc students working in the newly refurbished embedded systems, communications, postgraduate communications laboratory academic and professional excellence for space systems, finite element modelling, newly qualified, as well as practising, engineers strongest research groups with excellent manufacturing technologies, and heat transfer. who wish to extend their knowledge and skills experimental and analytical facilities. Activities The programme draws upon the substantial in the field of embedded digital systems. The include specialist research of fundamental fluid experience of the Thermo-Fluid Mechanics programme uses a combination of taught flow and heat transfer phenomena, generation Research Centre at the University of Sussex – courses (including lectures, workshops, and of design data for the major jet engine a research unit that includes the Rolls-Royce practical laboratories) and a large variety of manufacturers, and specialist development of supported University Technology Centre in projects in the subject areas related to research technologies for microturbines and combined Aero-Thermal Systems. University faculty from and commercial applications. heat and power (CHP) units. Practical project the Communications Engineering and the Programme structure work may be undertaken in the TFMRC, the Industrial Informatics research teams teach key Autumn term: core courses: Real-Time Fluids Laboratory and at sponsor companies, components of this MSc programme. Embedded Systems; and Digital Signal as well as in the Department of Engineering Programme structure Processing (Advanced). Options include: and Design. Autumn term: four core courses: Computational Advanced Network Technologies; RF Electronic The TFMRC is equipped with a wide range of Fluid Dynamics; Mobile and Satellite Design; and Mobile and Satellite Communication air supplies including a 0.8 kg/s, 7.5 bar screw Communication Technologies; Real-Time Technologies. compressor, two 1 kg/s, 1.5 bar blowers, a Embedded Systems; and Marketing Analysis and Spring term: core courses: Advanced 10 kg/s, 3 bar centrifugal compressor and Financial Strategic Planning. Microprocessor Systems; and High-Level IC standard shop air line supplies and smaller Design. Options include: Advanced Digital fans and blowers. In addition, instrumentation Spring term: three core courses: Advanced Communications; Fibre Optic Communications; and measurement systems are given a high Manufacturing Technology; Turbomachinery and Robotic Sensory Systems; Advanced Space priority in the Centre with both high- and low- Turbocharging; and Advanced Space Systems. Systems; and Strategic Management. speed data loggers, vacuum deposition of Options include: Finite Element Modelling; and thin-film instruments and high-speed pressure Heat Transfer Applications Summer term and vacation: continue and sequencers. The Centre has a variety of jet complete individual project full time from March- Summer term and vacation: MSc project. September. Examinations. engines including a 2400 hp engine and microturbines. The Centre specialises in high- MSc in Automotive Engineering Projects speed computing with Silicon Graphics and HP 1 year full-time/2 years part-time You undertake individual project work workstations, and high-speed parallel processing The automotive sector is a key contributor to on a full-time basis for the summer term and PC clusters. society. The modern automotive product requires vacation. All projects are designed to enable the application of diverse interdisciplinary skills MSc in Aerospace Technology individuals to excel in their personal and and expertise in order to provide competitive 1 year full-time/2 years part-time professional development and to consolidate and innovative solutions to an increasingly The modern aerospace industry relies on the material covered in the taught courses. sophisticated and changing market. The MSc advanced technology and on engineering in Automotive Engineering, run jointly by the The projects normally emanate from academic practice that demands significant Universities of Sussex and Brighton, provides research associated with the research groups interdisciplinary skills. Newer aircraft such as key skills with a design theme forming the core as well as industry. Each year a number of the Airbus A380 and the Boeing Dreamliner element of the programme, supported by a range projects will be offered to individuals, who will be are built on technology and systems that are of specialist courses including computational expected to work closely with a supervisor. integrated, often at both component and system fluid dynamics, engine testing, dynamics, At the end of the project you will be expected to levels. This MSc enhances the interdisciplinary modelling, control, power-train and automotive give a demonstration and complete a project capabilities of aerospace engineers. You will electronics. The MSc programme culminates dissertation. develop engineering skills over a range of engine in a project, which may be either industrial or and related technologies covering jet engines to research based. rocket technology, computational fluid dynamics, 92
  • MSc in Mechanical Engineering At the end of the project you will be expected to 1 year full-time give a demonstration and complete a project Engineering and design Engineering is an exciting activity and vital to dissertation. society. Mechanical engineers are responsible MSc in Modern Digital for a huge range of designs, equipment and Communication Systems systems. Examples include fuel cells, diesel 1 year full-time and petrol reciprocating engines, jet engines, The aim of this programme is to develop suspension systems, generation equipment, academic and professional excellence for newly aerospace technology and a host of gadgets and qualified, as well as practising, engineers who mechanisms. Mechanical engineering requires wish to extend their knowledge and skills in the use of design, and generative and evaluative the field of modern digital communications. skills, as well as analysis. This MSc aims to The programme uses a combination of taught expand your skills set across a wide range of courses, including lectures, workshops, and related disciplines. Over the autumn and spring practical laboratories, as well as a wide variety of terms, you are required to take eight courses projects in the subject areas related to research from a number of options. A particular feature of and commercial applications. this MSc is the group project, usually with direct industrial involvement, undertaken from the end Programme structure of the spring term. Autumn term: core courses: Advanced Network Technologies; and Mobile and Satellite Programme structure Communication Technologies. Options Autumn term: core course Mechanical Dynamics. include: Real-Time Embedded Systems; RF Options include: Computational Fluid Dynamics; Electronic Design; and Digital Signal Processing Engine Testing and Instrumentation; Automotive (Advanced). Design; and Real-Time Embedded Systems. Spring term: core courses: Advanced Spring term: core course Advanced Digital Communications; and Fibre Optic Manufacturing Technology. Options Communications. Options include: Advanced include: Finite Element Modelling; Heat Microprocessor Systems; Robotic Sensory Transfer Applications; Turbomachinery and Systems; Advanced Space Systems; High-Level Turbocharging; and Strategic Management. IC Design; and Strategic Management. Summer term and vacation: continue and Summer term and vacation: continue and complete group project. complete individual project full time from MSc in Modern Communication March-September. Examinations. MSc project students working with high-speed Technologies with Business Management exhaust gas analysis equipment attached to a Projects 1 year full-time Diesel engine test rig You undertake individual project work on a full- The aim of this programme is to develop time basis for the summer term and vacation. academic and professional excellence for newly market for opportunities in the communications, All projects are designed to enable individuals qualified, as well as practising, engineers who media and aerospace industries. You will also to excel in their personal and professional wish to extend their knowledge and skills in the be eligible to apply for openings in the space development and to consolidate the material fields of modern digital communications and agencies, or in a research institute involving the covered in the taught courses. The projects business management. The programme uses design or construction of satellites, spacecraft, normally emanate from academic research a combination of taught courses (including space instruments, or space-related systems. associated with the research groups as well as lectures, workshops, and practical laboratories) Programme structure industry. Each year a number of projects will be and a large variety of projects in the subject Autumn term: core courses Mobile and Satellite offered to individuals, who will be expected to areas related to research and commercial Communication Technologies; and Digital Signal work closely with a supervisor. applications. Processing (Advanced). Options include Real- At the end of the project you will be expected to Programme structure Time Embedded Systems; Advanced Network give a demonstration and complete a project Autumn term: core courses Advanced Technologies; Electrical Power Systems; and RF dissertation. Network Technologies; Mobile and Satellite Electronic Design. Communication Technologies; and Marketing MSc in Satellite Communications Spring term: core courses Advanced Analysis and Financial Strategic Planning. and Space Systems Digital Communications; and Advanced Options include: Real-Time Embedded Systems; 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Space Systems. Options include Advanced RF Electronic Design; and Digital Signal Satellite systems are now the pre-eminent Manufacturing Technology; Advanced Processing (Advanced). communications technology. Satellites are used Microprocessor Systems; Advanced Electronic for TV broadcasting, mobile communications, Spring term: core course Strategic Management. Systems; Fibre Optic Communications; and internet access, navigation (Global Positioning Options include: Advanced Microprocessor Strategic Management. System), environmental monitoring, Systems; Advanced Digital Communications; Summer term and vacation: MSc project. surveillance, and defence. Fibre Optic Communications; Robotic Sensory Systems; and High-Level IC Design. Space systems (launch vehicles, guidance MSc project systems, etc) are vital technologies that have The major project for MSc candidates runs Summer term and vacation: continue and through two terms and is assessed on the final permitted the development of the global complete individual project full time from March- report of about 12,000 words. The purpose communications revolution that is now a part September. Examinations. of the project is to provide independent of everyday life, having developed into a multi- Projects billion dollar international commercial activity. learning, research, and skills enhancement You undertake individual project work on a through a major practical exercise. The topic The subject is taught by a combination of full-time basis for the summer term and selected is relevant to the needs of the satellite lectures, workshops and laboratory sessions, vacation. All projects are designed to enable communications and space systems industry including a wide variety of practical projects. individuals to excel in their personal and and is supervised by one of the University faculty. A close association with the latest research professional development and to consolidate Through close supervision, you are able to and with industrial and commercial contexts is the material covered in the taught courses. contribute to the level of understanding in the maintained throughout the programme. As with The projects normally emanate from academic subject area and to fulfil the individual objectives other engineering degrees at Sussex, there is research associated with the research groups in their project brief. In their project report, you a major component of project work, ensuring as well as industry. Each year a number of are expected to show evidence of technical a sharp focus on developing practical skills. projects will be offered to individuals, who will be achievement, understanding of the subject, self- expected to work closely with a supervisor. As a graduate of this degree, you will be organisation, planning, and the ability to write a multidisciplinary engineer, and will be coherently and informatively. competitively placed in the international job 93
  • Programme structure Autumn term: core courses: Computational Fluid Engineering and design Dynamics; Engine Testing and Instrumentation; Mechanical Dynamics; and Marketing Analysis and Financial Strategic Planning. Spring term: core courses: Turbomachinery and Turbocharging; and Heat Transfer Applications. Options include: Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Finite Element Modelling; and Strategic Management. Summer term and vacation: continue and complete MSc project. Examinations. Related centres on campus/ specialist facilities Engineering at Sussex has an excellent standing in the area of mechanical engineering and the related areas of turbomachinery and automotive engineering. Resources and facilities include a concurrent engineering laboratory with high- speed workstations running Fluent, Ansys, Pro- Engineer and AutoCAD, extensive mechanical workshops, clean rooms and rapid prototyping equipment, the Rolls-Royce supported University Technology Centre for Aero-Thermal Systems with the TFMRC, the Centre for Industrial Informatics and Manufacturing Systems and the Centre for Automotive Systems, Dynamics and Control. Postgraduate diplomas and postgraduate certificates The aim of these programmes (see the list in Essentials on page 91) is to develop academic and professional excellence for newly qualified, A supply vehicle approaches the International Programme structure Space Station over the equator west of Africa. as well as practising, engineers who wish to You take eight core courses, a group project, and Image taken by Commander Leroy Chiao, who lived extend their knowledge and skills in the fields three options (two in the autumn term and one in aboard the Station for six months (image courtesy of communications, embedded systems, and the spring term). of NASA) business management. The programmes use Core courses: Security Systems; Mobile a combination of taught courses, including and Satellite Communication Technologies; lectures, workshops, and practical laboratories, MSc in Security Technologies and Systems Cryptography; Advanced Space Systems; and as well as a large variety of course-related 1 year full-time/2-4 years part-time Robot Sensory Systems. projects in the subject areas related to research The security sector has developed into a Group project: Security Group Project. and commercial applications. multibillion dollar commercial activity that has lead to a significant requirement for graduates Options: Digital Signal Processing; Real-Time The postgraduate diplomas, which are taken with knowledge and skillls in the area. There are Embedded Systems; Advanced Network full-time over two terms (or in the case of four global international priorities: making the Automotive Engineering and Turbomachinery, Technologies; Cybernetics and Neural Networks; world safer from global terrorism and weapons can be taken part-time over two years), are the Fibre Optic Communications; Advanced Digital of mass destruction; preventing and resolving same as the corresponding MScs, but without Communications; Advanced Electronic Systems; conflict through a strong international system; the project. and Strategic Management. achieving climate security by promoting a faster The postgraduate certificates, which are taken transition to a sustainable, low-carbon global Assessment full-time over two terms (or in the case of economy; and crime prevention. This degree Course work and exams. Automotive Engineering can be taken part-time allows you to explore all aspects of global and MSc in Turbomachinery over two years) are awarded for successful national security issues. 1 year full-time/2 years part-time completion of the four modules from the MSc The aim of this MSc is to develop academic programme, of which at least two must be core The European Security Research Advisory Board modules. and professional skills in the subject of (ESRAB) has four security missions relating to turbomachinery relevant to the needs of the specific security threats: security of citizens; UK and international jet gas turbine engine and security of infrastructures and utilities; intelligent Research programmes turbocharger industry. surveillance and border security; and restoring security and safety in case of crisis. This degree Turbomachinery is a broad subject area Funding addresses many of these issues with a focus on requiring advanced skills for improvement of EPSRC studentships, including CASE awards, security technologies and integrated systems existing engines and components, extension are available. Various projects are funded by that can be deployed for the protection of to new applications or development of new industry, research organisations, government citizens and infrastructure. concepts. Design of jet and industrial gas turbine departments and medical charities. Bursaries engine elements involves concept generation, may be available for research students (see Fees The degree has employability and graduate skills applications of thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and funding on pages 176-186). as its priority. The programme should enable and aerodynamics, heat transfer, stress analysis graduates to operate as major innovators within and the consideration of manufacturing Recent thesis titles a large company or government department, or technologies within an integrated design strategy. A laser centred CASE tool for software give graduates the skills to start up a company engineering This MSc will address the broad subject of providing security solutions to various clients. turbomachinery by considering each area within A neural death model for visual cortex Project work is key to this programme. Projects a number of taught courses and project work. A pattern recognition Wiener filter for realistic will be conducted in small groups. Project The courses address the need for skills in the clutter backgrounds planning will start in the spring term and specific engineering science subjects, as well as developing an understanding of the holistic Advances in quality of optical waveguides on continue in the summer term. design process, performance characteristics of Nd:YAG and LiNbO3 This programme is under development and gas turbine engines, environmental issues and Analysis and representation of heart sounds subject to validation. benefits. and murmurs 94
  • Analysis and test of a centrifugal compressor Engineering and design Applications of ambulatory body surface potential mapping to the diagnosis of coronary heart disease Attenuation of thermal radiation by water sprays Clinical application of automated CRT based grating systems Colour image segmentation and restoration with non-linear local operators Comparison of interpolation techniques for polar to rectangular coordinate transformation with application to real-time image processing Computer-enhanced network design Design of optimal neural network control strategies with minimal a priori knowledge Diagnosis of pump faults and flow regimes Electric motor assisted turbocharger Electromagnetic levitation and propulsion for spacecraft launch Enhanced sensitivity and speed in photomultiplier tubes Evaluation of a turbocharger for use as a small 16-element two-dimensional imaging array of electric potential sensors, designed and built in the gas turbine Centre for Physical Electronics and Quantum Technology Experimental investigation of roughness effects Quantum dynamics and measurement of single capability as for electric field NMR; novel on centrifugal compressor performance quantum objects machine interfaces for controlling prosthetic Experimentally verified fluid loading models devices or biometric signal acquisition; and Relay feedback identification and model-based for slender horizontal cylinders in waves interfacing with biological systems at the cellular controller design level for hybrid bioelectronic systems. Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine high- Statistical classification of magnetic resonance pressure (HP) compressor internal air systems Centre facilities include electromagnetically imaging data shielded rooms; cryogenic facilities; clean Flow and heat transfer in rotationally induced The development of robust heat transfer rooms; electron beam lithography fabrication; buoyancy flow instrumentation for rotating turbomachinery electronic systems spanning dc to the millimetre Heat transfer and fluid flow in the high pressure The investigating and stochastic modelling waves; and surface-mount facilities. compressor drive cone cavity of an aeroengine of cyclic cylinder pressure variation during Faculty research interests include: Insulin sensitivity estimates from a linear model combustion in spark ignition engines Chris Harland Non-invasive electromagnetic of glucose disappearance The role of femoral broaches in the creation sensors; biomedical electronics; human body Integrated vector encoding/decoding designs of cement mantles in total hip replacement electrophysiological monitoring; electric field for non-stationary sources and noisy channels array imaging; biological cell imaging; and neural The validation and coupling of computational signal propagation. Ion beam induced luminescence of materials fluid dynamics and finite element codes for solving ‘industrial problems’ Helen Prance Superconducting circuits for Joint diversity trellis-coded modulation quantum technologies; ultra-low noise receivers for frequency selective environments Theoretical modelling of quantum circuit systems from RF to microwave; cryogenic electronics, Luminescence spectra of lead tungstate, non-linear circuit dynamics; and non-invasive spodumene and topaz crystals sensors. Specialist research areas Magnetic suspension systems, motor/ Robert Prance Pervasive sensors; imaging generators and power electronics for flywheel Research in the Department of Engineering and arrays; electric and magnetic field imaging; energy storage Design is organised into several groups, briefly biological cell imaging; geophysical described below. For more detailed information, measurements; non-destructive testing of Modelling and simulation of integrated see www.sussex.ac.uk/engineering/research composites; nuclear magnetic resonance; low- operational and information processing systems Centre for Physical Electronics and noise instrumentation; quantum technologies; in manufacturing and non-linear dynamics. Quantum Technology Modelling of automotive damper characteristics The Centre is a strongly performing research John Torry Heart-sound monitoring, software to Multiphase flow measurement based on group currently comprising six full-time faculty aid diagnosis of heart valve conditions; spectral conventional flowmeters using signal analysis plus research assistants, postgraduate students analysis; time-frequency and wavelets; and and technicians. It has an excellent track record neural networks. Non-invasive circuit and material imaging using in attracting funding from diverse sources, with a the electric potential sensor broad spread of research projects and a healthy Professor Peter Townsend and David publication record. Current funding includes Hole Understanding of imperfections and Non-invasive imaging of metal structures using a platform grant from the EPSRC on sensor application of ion implantation in insulating electric potential probes technology, as well as significant industrial materials, including fundamental studies of Non-linear behaviour of a superconducting support. defect properties of insulating materials; optical quantum interference device coupled to a radio absorption; thermoluminescence emission frequency oscillator Research projects encompass activities as spectra; and the role of nanoparticles in non- diverse as electrophysiology, nuclear magnetic linear optics (www.sussex.ac.uk/pei). On the design of a processor node for the resonance (NMR), quantum technologies, direct manipulation of asynchronous transfer non-destructive testing, remote sensing, ion Communications research group mode cells implantation, and optoelectronics. The sensor The communications research group covers research has the potential to impact on a a wide range of topics within the fields of On-line diagnosis of faults in induction motor number of strategically important areas such as communications and networking, with more than and pump 15 research staff and postgraduate students. security, safety, healthcare, manufacturing and Optimisation of construction implemented as The group is supported by three laboratories with environmental monitoring. Examples are: ease of a manufacturing process dedicated hardware and software. use as for electrophysiology; new measurement 95
  • Image processing (Young, Chatwin, Birch) Computer-assisted diagnosis with Prof K Miles Engineering and design of the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The research provides imaging biomarkers in cancerous tissue by wavelet filtering an apparently normal contrast-enhanced CT image of the liver. We are currently extending the technique to 3D texture analysis of the whole liver and lung. This research is the subject of a patent application and commercialisation of the software. Networks and Control Systems (NCS) (Yang) NCSs are being investigated for power generation control applications and in vehicle control systems. This research is motivated by its potential for wide application within the engineering infrastructure. NCSs are being explored for use in cars, manufacturing plants, aircraft, HVAC systems, etc. Optoelectronic and lasers (Chatwin, Young Birch) Research activities include: fibre optic communications; Q-switched Yb-YAG lasers, photo-refractive holography; holographic optical memory; four-wave mixing; spatial light modulators; dynamic light-shaping elements; phase-modulation spatial light modulators for kinoforms; optical pattern recognition; hybrid optical computing; optical filtering; and electro- optic systems design. Security systems (Chatwin, Young, Birch) Machine vision and image-processing: The MSc in Turbomachinery develops skills relevant to the needs of the international aerospace and gas algorithm development covering a wide range turbine industry of techniques suitable for DSP or hybrid optical/ digital implementations; neural networks; It has attracted much interest from the industrial Industrial Informatics and Manufacturing Wiener filtering; foveating systems; security sector and has strong links with national and Systems Research Centre and surveillance, mobile image acquisition; international companies. In addition it has Professor Chris Chatwin, Rupert Young, Tai Yang, autonomous mobile robots; and biometrics. demonstrated its leading research with a strong Lionel Ripley, Phil Birch. This multidisciplinary funding income from government and industry. Centre was created in 1995 in response to the We have created mobile-phone hardware and Government’s Technology Foresight programme. software to the point where we can use the The communications research group has The Centre’s areas of activity are: phone to scan and recognise human irises using expertise in the fields of computer networking, wireless and mobile communications, and novel algorithms that have been patented. This Advanced manufacturing (Chatwin, Young) has led to a spin-out company called xVista Ltd. embedded systems for multimedia applications. We are active in manufacturing and enterprise The work involves theoretical studies, modelling, simulation and modelling, and characterising InQbate – The Centre of Excellence in simulations, development and implementations virtual enterprises in order to create low-cost Teaching and Learning in Creativity (CETL) with advanced digital hardware and software service-oriented architecture (SOA) IT designs This £4.1 million HEFCE-funded investment, systems. exploiting the business process execution is focused on technology-enabled innovation Faculty research interests include: language (BPEL) in integrated total quality and design. A major research effort, under the management. direction of Professor Peter Childs, concerns the Falah Ali, Elias Stipidis Networking: data application of creative design methods wherein communications, protocols, local- and wide- Biomedical engineering (Ripley) We have close the status of a product is kept fluid for longer in area networks; IP ATM, CAN, xDSL and ethernet , working relationships with visiting academics networks; distributed real-time systems; the design process, enabling better and more and medical personnel from other research cost-effective design. intelligent and automated systems; wireless institutions and hospitals. Excellent progress ad hoc networking; mobile networks; and has been made in the areas of eye disease, Professor Peter Childs Creativity; creative integration of mobile and wireless networks. cardiology and orthopaedics. Colour-vision methods and their application in industry Mobile wireless communications: advanced deficit is being used to measure the progress of including structured brainstorming, lateral digital transmission techniques; multiple access; various ophthalmic and neurological conditions, thinking, six hats, boundary shifting; synectics, error correction coding; source coding; single and especially screening for sight-threatening functional analysis, TRIZ and morphological and multicarrier modulation; adaptive and diabetic retinopathy. Neurology with the Royal analysis; styling; product design; detailed reconfigurable DSP (digital signal processing) Sussex County Hospital, especially diagnosis of design; mechanical design; sustainable energy algorithms; adaptive and blind equalisation; Parkinson’s disease via tremor analysis. component, concept and system design; fluid smart antennas; software radio; video coding flow in rotating applications; and heat transfer. and streaming; 3/4G mobile systems; wireless Links with the local orthopaedic community have broadband access; and wireless local-area centred on the supervision of specialist registrars networks. who have carried out projects to investigate such problems as the failure of total hip replacements. Embedded systems: embedded digital hardware New techniques for cutting and drilling bone. design; FPGA/DSP systems; real-time distributed Development of an expanding femoral nail. software; computer architectures; parallel structures; fault tolerance; reconfigurable systems and real-time computing; and vetronics. 96
  • Space Science Centre Faculty research interests include: The University of Sussex Space Science Centre is Engineering and design Professor (Emeritus) Derek Atherton an interdisciplinary, cross-departmental research Control engineering. Non-linear control theory; centre. Currently the Centre has instruments computer-aided control system design; and on the four European Space Agency Cluster simulation and target tracking. spacecraft and the Chinese Double Star Probe. In 2008 a Sussex instrument will be mounted on Julian Dunne Engineering dynamics. Non- the outside of the International Space Station. linear system modelling and analysis; optimal control; vehicle, engine and rotor dynamics; and Faculty members include Andrew Buckley, NHV applications in automotive and aerospace Professor Paul Gough and Natalia Beloff engineering. and their research interests cover a wide range of topics: space instrumentation, space Zhijin Peng Automotive systems. IC engine plasma diagnostics, space weather science combustion; performance and emissions interpretation and exploitation, particle control; engine in-cylinder flow and combustion correlation technique, intelligent instruments, diagnostics; fuel injection and heat transfer; smart autonomous instruments, real-time HCCI combustion on gasoline and diesel data analysis within space instruments, engines; gasoline-lean combustion and embedded systems, data compression, parallel stratification combustion; characterisation of processing and fault tolerance, artificial neural diesel sprays, and effective use of exhaust gas networks for data classification and analysis, recirculation on diesel and gasoline engines. associative list memory, fuzzy logic for control of William Wang Machinery condition monitoring; instruments, evolutionary instruments to adapt digital signal processing techniques; solving to unforeseen environments, graphical display phase-angle distortion problems in nuclear and dissemination of complex datasets for magnetic resonant scanners; vibration analysis rapid human-machine interaction, knowledge and structural dynamics; vibration reduction accumulation from databases, and remote in hand-held vibration power tools; wavelets data gathering and processing for unmanned and neural networks for condition monitoring; instruments in inhospitable locations. measurement fault diagnostics for flows in pipes; Many of the above instrument aspects are and flapping-wing flight. being implemented directly in hardware using Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays. This dedicated research laboratory specialises The Centre has a Clean room, Vacuum chamber in energy concepts and technology, and and Thermal Chamber for the development and rotating flow and heat transfer. Its experience Research students and their supervisors meet testing of space instruments. represents over 1,000 person years of regularly to discuss progress The Automotive Dynamics and Control Group accumulated research. A particular focus is flow (ADC) and heat transfer in prime movers such as gas The ADC is internationally known for its high- turbine engines and other rotating machinery quality automotive research and fundamental applications, as well as large- and small-scale Faculty research interests include: work in dynamics and control. A particular research programmes on flow, heat transfer, strength of the Group lies in the combination of computational fluid dynamics and energy Nick Atkins Heat transfer modelling; general advanced theory and practical applications. The technology concepts. turbomachinery; aerodynamics; computational Group has strong capability to address a range fluid dynamics; unsteady flows, high-pressure Research grants received from the Research turbines; turbine efficiency measurements in of IC-engine issues, which impact on global Councils, industry and the European Union warming, in particular on thermal and emissions transient turbine test rigs; instrumentation; totalled over £10 million over the last 10 years. internal flow; valve technology; two-phase flow; management, turbocharging, combustion technologies and power-train controls. The Centre incorporates both the Rolls-Royce non-invasive instrumentation; temperature supported University Technology Centre for measurement; and design. Reducing vehicle carbon-dioxide emissions is Aero-Thermal Systems and the Dantec Centre the most pressing transport issue – the ADC is Professor Peter Childs Sustainable energy of Excellence in Non-Invasive Instrumentation. concepts, wind turbine optimisation, saturated meeting this challenge through better modelling The expertise available within the group in heat and control. This complements the activities vapour cycles, recuperation, solar collectors, transfer and fluid flow and energy solutions energy audits and thermodynamics cycles; within the Rolls-Royce University Technology enables us to tackle a wide range of energy Centre and SPRU – Science Technology and fluid flow, especially rotating applications in concepts, with applications ranging from machinery and geophysical flows; heat transfer; Policy Research (Energy Group). domestic combined heat and power units to gas turbine engine technologies including The Group’s activities focus on advanced power- industrial units as well as aviation power-plant turbomachinery design, internal air systems, train modelling, control, condition-monitoring applications. seals; creativity, creative methods; styling, and (including emissions control via after-treatment, A speciality of the Centre is non-invasive product design. automotive turbochargers, and steam traps); instrumentation including pyrometry and thermal vehicle dynamics; vibro-accoustic analysis; Christopher Long Experimental heat transfer imaging, particle image velocimetry (PIV), laser and fluid-flow measurements; computational stochastic computation; non-linear dynamics; Doppler anemometry (LDA), and phase Doppler target tracking; control-system design and rapid fluid mechanics and heat transfer in rotating anemometry (PDA). systems; turbulence; application of optically prototyping. As the Dantec Centre of Excellence in non- based measurements in gas turbine engine The laboratory infrastructure includes: heavy- invasive instrumentation, we provide a direct applications including laser Doppler anemometry duty engine-test facility; full range of emissions route for the development and application of (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV); measurement – high speed (50Hz) and low non-invasive measurement capability. The recent turbomachinery; and sustainable and renewable speed; calibration equipment (ETAS-INCA) appointment of Professor Abdulnaser Sayma energy. for engine control; dSpace rapid prototype brings more than 14 years’ experience with equipment; E6 single-cylinder test engine; and Professor Abdulnaser Sayma Computational computational fluid dynamics, and aeroelasticity fluid dynamics; modelling of unsteady four further test beds. The Centre for Automotive to the research group, and the appointment of Systems, Dynamics and Control at the University compressible flow aeroelasticity and Nick Atkins augments our skill base in heat aeroacoustics; turbomachinery performance, of Sussex has links with Ford, Jaguar, BMW, Johnson Matthey, Caterpillar, Ricardo Consulting transfer with state-of-the-art blade tip heat forced response and flutter; unstructured grid Engineers and BP . transfer and transient measurement capability. generation; parallel computing; and renewable and sustainable energy. 97
  • MA in International English Language English language Teaching English language teaching 1 year full-time/2 years part-time The MA in International English Language teaching Teaching is aimed at native and non-native speakers of English who wish to make a career in teaching English overseas (or in a related field such as ELT publishing) but who may have little or no teaching experience. This programme gives students the opportunity to explore research methods, current research and issues in ELT, and to acquire an understanding of the theoretical and practical questions that impact on the classroom. Essentials • The Sussex Language Institute (SLI) is concerned with all aspects of language Core courses examine: research methods in Taught programmes second-language teaching and learning; the MA degrees teaching and learning, including teacher education, translation training and language principles and practice of ELT pedagogy; the English Language Teaching social, psychological and cultural aspects of International English Language Teaching classroom research. second-language acquisition; and language- Postgraduate diploma • SLI runs a state-of-the-art digital multimedia analysis. It also includes the core course English Language Teaching language learning centre, for use by teachers Practical Teaching Techniques. Admissions requirements and learners. There are a number of options, which may For information on overseas qualifications that • SLI offers two Masters degrees and a include: Teaching Young Learners; meet the admissions requirements, see pages Postgraduate Diploma, taught by highly ELT Management; and Using Technology in the 172-175 experienced, qualified and practising ELT Classroom. An upper second-class undergraduate language teachers and teacher trainers. You will also undertake a research-oriented honours degree and two years’ experience of • The hallmark of these programmes is the project, to be written up as a dissertation, as part teaching English as a foreign language practical and relevant application of theory of the programme. English language requirements and research, designed to enhance students’ Postgraduate Diploma in English IELTS 7.0, with not less than 6.5 in each section. professional standing and career prospects in Language Teaching For more information and alternative English English language Teaching (ELT) and related 2 terms full-time/4 terms part-time language requirements, see page 174 fields of work. The Postgraduate Diploma aims to increase Fees experienced teachers’ knowledge and critical See pages 176-181 for information on fees Taught programmes understanding of current theories and research in language acquisition, as well as to deepen Further information MA in English Language Teaching their understanding of the linguistic, theoretical Sue Sheerin, Director, Sussex Language 1 year full-time/2 years part-time and practical issues that impact on classroom Institute, University of Sussex, Falmer, This MA is aimed at experienced language practice. The programme is identical to the MA in Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9SH, UK teaching professionals worldwide, native or English Language Teaching except that an option T +44 (0)1273 877715 non-native speakers of English. The programme course and the dissertation are omitted. E s.sheerin@sussex.ac.uk will give practising teachers the opportunity www.sussex.ac.uk/languages to explore research methods together with current research and issues in ELT, as well as to Faculty research interests deepen their understanding of the theoretical Specialist areas are described briefly below. and practical questions that impact on the For further information on SLI and SLI faculty, classroom. Core courses examine: research see www.sussex.ac.uk/languages/postgrad The Sussex Language Institute runs a state-of- methods in second-language teaching and the-art digital multimedia language learning learning; the principles and practice of ELT Andrew Blair Teacher education and teacher centre, for use by teachers and learners pedagogy; the social, psychological and cultural development; phonology and pronunciation; aspects of second-language acquisition; second-language acquisition; English as an language analysis. international language; research methods in education; English for business; and uses of There will be a number of option courses, technology in language teaching and learning. which may include: Using Technology in the ELT Classroom; Advanced Practical Teaching Jennifer Book Teacher training; materials Methodology (this course includes at least five development; young learners; English for hours’ supervised teaching practice, which will Academic Purposes; and technology in language grant experienced, TEFL-initiated teachers* teaching and learning. full TEFL-qualified status as required by the Alison Chisholm English for Academic British Council ‘English in Britain’ Accreditation Purposes; English language and study skills Scheme); ELT Management; and Teaching support for international students in Higher Young Learners. Education; and teacher training. You are expected to undertake a research- Ray de Witt Teacher training; English for Specific oriented project, to be written up as a Purposes; testing and assessment; and IELTS dissertation. materials development. Additional admissions requirements Jeremy Page Testing and assessment; uses of A recognised ESL/ESOL teaching qualification, literature in language teaching; teacher training; such as the Cambridge CELTA or the Trinity intercultural teaching and learning; curriculum College London Cert in TESOL, plus two years’ development; and educational management. experience of teaching English to speakers of other languages. Sue Sheerin Self-access and autonomous learning; learning strategies; intercultural *TEFL-initiated teachers have a Certificate teaching and learning; listening comprehension; in English language teaching from Cambridge/ phonology and pronunciation; vocabulary Trinity or equivalent. teaching and learning; curriculum development; action research; teacher education; and educational management. 98
  • English literature English literature Essentials Further information Taught programmes www.sussex.ac.uk/english Taught programmes The Department of English offers nine MA Research programmes programmes described in detail below. MA degrees Margaret Reynolds, School of Humanities, Colonial and Post-Colonial Cultures Full-time programmes can also be followed part University of Sussex, Falmer, Creative and Critical Writing time over two years, with taught seminars in the Brighton BN1 9QN, UK Creative Writing and Personal Development autumn and spring terms. T +44 (0)1273 678098 (see page 73) F +44 (0)1273 625972 Funding (for all programmes) Critical Theory E m.reynolds@sussex.ac.uk UK and EU applicants may be eligible to apply Early Modern Literature and Culture Literature and Culture 1700-1900 MA in Creative and Critical Writing for AHRC studentships (see Fees and funding on Literature and Philosophy Professor Nicholas Royle, School of pages 176-186 for more information). Literature, Film and Visual Culture Humanities, University of Sussex, Falmer, Programme structure (for all programmes) Modern and Contemporary Literature, Brighton BN1 9QN, UK Each programme consists of four one-term Culture and Thought T +44 (0)1273 606755 ext. 7396 courses chosen from a range of options, and Sexual Dissidence in Literature and Culture F +44 (0)1273 623246 a dissertation. Courses are taught as weekly E n.w.o.royle@sussex.ac.uk seminars, two in the autumn term and two in Research programmes MPhil, DPhil Colonial and Post-Colonial Cultures All other MA information the spring term, and it is normally possible to MPhil, DPhil Creative and Critical Writing Humanities Graduate Centre, choose up to two other courses from another MA MPhil, DPhil Creative Writing (see page 73) University of Sussex, Falmer, programme. MPhil, DPhil Creative Writing and Personal Brighton BN1 9QN, UK Assessment (for all programmes) Development (see page 73) T +44 (0)1273 678468 You are assessed by four 5,000-word term MPhil, DPhil Critical Theory F +44 (0)1273 625972 papers and a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. MPhil, DPhil Early Modern Literature and Culture E humsgrad@sussex.ac.uk MPhil, DPhil Literature and Culture 1700-1900 MA in Colonial and Post-Colonial Cultures MPhil, DPhil Literature and Philosophy 1 year full-time/2 years part-time MPhil, DPhil Literature, Film and Visual Culture • English at Sussex has a well-established This MA is associated with the Centre for Colonial MPhil, DPhil Literature, Religion and Philosophy international reputation for producing and Post-Colonial Studies MPhil, DPhil Modern and Contemporary research that develops and extends the (www.sussex.ac.uk/hums/cscpc). Literature, Culture and Thought boundaries of the subject. Programme structure MPhil, DPhil Modern French Thought • We received a grade 5 (recognising research Autumn and spring terms: you take four options MPhil, DPhil Modern German Studies of national and international excellence) from Race and Colonialism in Early Modern MPhil, DPhil Renaissance Studies in the most recent Research Assessment English Literature; Post-Colonial Locations MPhil, DPhil Sexual Dissidence in Literature Exercise (RAE). (an introductory course recommended to and Culture newcomers to this field of study); Contemporary • English runs a wide range of innovative MA Admissions requirements programmes, taught by faculty working at the Post-Colonial Women’s Writing; The Migrant For information on overseas qualifications that forefront of English studies. Writer: Post-colonialism and Creativity; Sexuality meet the admissions requirements, see pages and Identity in 20th-Century Post-Colonial 172-175 • We support research centres such as the Cultures; and Writing the New South Africa. MA Centre for Modernist Studies and the Centre for Early Modern Studies, which focus on Summer term and vacation: supervised and An upper second-class undergraduate honours independent work on the MA dissertation. degree in a subject relevant to the chosen interdisciplinary research and teaching, and Masters degree. In addition, applicants to the MA attract high-profile speakers from around the MA in Creative and Critical Writing in Creative and Critical Writing will need a portfolio world. 1 year full-time/2 years part-time of creative writing • We have a diverse and thriving community of The MA in Creative and Critical Writing at Sussex MPhil and DPhil postgraduate students who contribute to an is the first of its kind in the UK. It develops out of A Masters degree in a literary subject or another long-standing teaching and research interests outstanding research culture. discipline relevant to your chosen area of in creative writing, as well as in psychoanalysis, research eco-poetics, cultural materialism, post- colonialism, deconstruction, feminism, and Overseas applicants who apply after 31 March queer theory. should submit a sample of their written work with This programme is designed to enable you to their application combine an interest in intellectually challenging English language requirements critical and theoretical ideas with an interest IELTS 7.0, with not less than 6.5 in each section. in creative writing. The MA is based on the For more information and alternative English supposition that theory and practice are not language requirements, see pages 174 opposites, though the relations between them may entail productive tensions and paradoxes. It Fees is impelled by the sense that the critical and the See pages 176-181 for information on fees creative are necessarily intertwined. 99
  • MA in Critical Theory Summer term: supervised work on the MA 1 year full-time/2 years part-time dissertation English literature This MA is associated with the Centre for Additional assessment information Literature and Philosophy Taught courses are assessed by term papers of (www.sussex.ac.uk/clp). 5,000 words. The dissertation of 15,000 words Programme structure is submitted at the end of the year. Autumn and spring terms: you take four of the following options: Benjamin and Adorno; MA in Literature, Film and Visual Culture Deconstruction and Creative Writing; Derrida; 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Detective Fiction: Texts and Theories; Freud; This MA is associated with the Centre for Visual Marxism and Creative Writing; Marxist Literary Fields (www.sussex.ac.uk/cvf). Theory; Music, Critical Theory and Modernity; Programme structure The Photograph in Modernism; Post- Autumn and spring terms: you take four of structuralism; Psychoanalysis and Creative the following options: Psychoanalysis and the Writing; Psychoanalysis, Literature and the Image; Photography and Fiction; Cinema and Cinema, Part 1 and Part 2; Sexuality/Sexual the Domestic; Fragments: Theory, History, Visual Difference; Sexuality, Fiction and Subculture; Culture; Image and Text; Theorising Modernism: Space and Representation; Text-Music-Drama; The Avant-Garde in Literature and Film; and The Critical Issues in Queer Theory; and Fragments: Visual Culture of Romanticism. Theory, History, Visual Culture. With the consent of the programme convenor, Summer term and vacation: supervised work on you may take one or more courses from related the MA dissertation. MA programmes. MA in Early Modern Literature and Culture Summer term and vacation: supervised work on 1 year full-time/2 years part-time the MA dissertation. This MA is associated with the Centre for Early Modern Studies (www.sussex.ac.uk/cems). MA in Modern and Contemporary Literature, Culture and Thought Programme structure 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Autumn and spring terms: you take four of the This MA is associated with the Centre for following options: Marriage; The Idea of the Modernist Studies (www.sussex.ac.uk/ Renaissance; Public Shakespeare; Edmund modernist). Spenser; Race and Colonialism in Early Modern English Literature; The Renaissance Body; Programme structure The University of Sussex Library curates several Sexuality in Early Modern England; and All’s Well Autumn and spring terms: you take four of the collections relating to the ‘Bloomsbury Group’, that Ends Well: Comedy and Laughter in Early following options: Anglo-American Modernism: including an important collection of Virginia Modern Europe. Poetry and Poetics; Contemporary Writing I; Woolf’s manuscripts and letters Contemporary Writing II; Reading and Time: Summer term and vacation: supervised work on the MA dissertation. The Long Modernist Novel; Modernist/Post- modernist Fiction 1900-1995; The Photograph Programme structure MA in Literature and Culture 1700-1900 in Modernism; Sexuality and Identity in Autumn and spring terms: you choose two 1 year full-time/2 years part-time 20th-Century Post-Colonial Cultures; Theories options in each term from the following Programme structure of Representation: Memories of the Holocaust; list: Psychoanalysis and Creative Writing; Autumn and spring terms: you take four of Theorising Modernism: The Avant-Garde in Autobiography, Culture and the Emergence of the following options: Culture and Intellect in the Literature and Film; Modern European Theatre; Self; Deconstruction and Creative Writing; 19th Century; Image and Text 1780-1880; The Modern European Lyric; Postmodernity and On (Not) Being Able to Write; Marxism and Fin de Siècle; The Visual Culture of Romanticism; Fiction; Aspects of 20th-Century Drama; and Creative Writing; the Migrant Writer: Post- and Romantic and 19th-Century Sexualities. Victorian Fin de Siècle. colonialism and Creativity; Sexuality and Creative Writing; and Creativity and Utopia. Summer term and vacation: supervised work on Summer term and vacation: supervised work on the MA dissertation. the MA dissertation. Writing workshop: this runs through the autumn and spring terms and is designed to enable MA in Literature and Philosophy MA in Sexual Dissidence in Literature students to meet, talk, read and exchange ideas 1 year full-time/2 years part-time and Culture about their creative writing. This MA provides an advanced programme of 1 year full-time/2 years part-time study for those interested in questions that arise This MA is associated with the Centre for the Summer term and vacation: you undertake at the intersection of the two disciplines. The supervised work on the dissertation, which will Study of Sexual Dissidence core course addresses explicitly the question of (www.sussex.ac.uk/cssd). normally include both critical discussion and the relation between philosophy and literature in creative writing. contemporary thought. Three further courses are Programme structure Additional assessment information chosen from a range of options. Autumn and spring terms: you take four of You are assessed by term papers and either a the following options: Critical Issues in Queer This MA is associated with the Centre for dissertation of up to 20,000 words or a portfolio Theory; Sexuality, Fiction and Subculture; Literature and Philosophy of creative writing of between 10,000 and Queering Popular Culture; Sexuality and (www.sussex.ac.uk/clp). 15,000 words. Creative Writing; Sexualities in Early Modern Programme structure England; Sexuality and Identity in 20th-Century Autumn term: Explorations in Philosophy and Post-Colonial Cultures; and Romantic and Literature, and one further course from the 19th-Century Sexualities; and Querying the following list: Analytic Aesthetics; Contemporary Unconscious. Philosophy of Religion; Derrida; Phenomenology; and Fragments: Theory, History, Visual Culture. Summer term and vacation: supervised work on the MA dissertation. Spring term: two courses from the following list: Continental Aesthetics; Frankfurt School and Critical Theory; Freud; Image and Text; Wittgenstein and Cavell: Literature and Scepticism; Philosophy of Film; Postmodernism and Contemporary Literature; and Power and Religion: Nietzsche, Foucault, Kafka. You may substitute courses from other MAs. 100
  • Research programmes David Barnett Post-war European drama and theatre, especially German and English English literature The English faculty encompasses research language; post-Brechtian political theatre; post- strengths and interests that span most periods dramatic theatre, especially theatre texts, their of English literature and contemporary critical treatment and direction; documentary theatre; theory. metadrama and metatheatre; playwrighting and Particular areas of expertise include Renaissance the representation of business; Heiner Müller; and writing; culture and ideology; the novel from Rainer Werner Fassbinder. the 18th century to the present; romantic, Adriana Bontea 17th-century French literature; Victorian and modern poetry; and all aspects of literary genres in relation to philosophy, grammar modernism and post-modernism. and rhetoric; and foundations of modern There is a strong commitment to the inter- discourse genres. disciplinary study of literature in its historical Peter Boxall Modern and contemporary fiction and discursive context in relation to philosophy; and drama; aesthetics and cultural politics, history of art and the history of ideas; to post- particularly in the work of Samuel Beckett; the colonial and feminist criticism; to gay and utopian function in 20th-century Irish writing; lesbian criticism; and to recent developments in psychoanalytic, Marxist, post-structuralist and creative writing. and ‘new historicist’ criticism. Sara Crangle Codirector of the Centre for Funding Modernist Studies. 20th-century literature, Home applicants may be eligible to apply for including Joyce, Woolf, Stein, Hardy, Beckett. AHRC studentships; 13 of the current Sussex Brian Cummings 16th- and 17th-century English research students did so successfully. literature and history (especially poetry); A limited amount of funding, which could entail medieval and Renaissance philosophy and some teaching, may be available from the theology; and theories of language. University for outstanding research students. Alistair Davies Modernism and postmodernism, Alice in Wonderland, Carroll’s fantasy for children, For further information see Fees and funding on 20th-century English and American literature; is a vital part of Victorian culture pages 176-186. and post-war European cinema. Recent and current thesis titles Andy Medhurst Post-1945 British cinema; The body in sickness in England 1558-1640 Denise DeCaires Narain Post-colonialist popular television genres; film and television writing, particularly that of Africa and the comedy; and constructions of masculinity in the Shakespeare and cyberspace Caribbean; feminist cultural theory; media. The poetic culture of English Republicanism contemporary women’s writing in English, Richard Murphy Modernism and post- especially poetry. Gossip: gender and genre from Pepys to Woolf modernism; cultures of the avant-garde; and Katerina Deligiorgi Kant, Hegel, moral film, visual culture and theory. The hotel in fiction 1870-1939 philosophy and its history, the relation between Stephanie Newell West African literature; west Thomas Hardy’s relations with contemporary ethics and literature, and contemporary African popular culture; post-colonial theory; readers aesthetics. and the social history of reading in Africa. TS Eliot, mass culture and the music hall Matthew Dimmock 16th- and 17th-century Peter Nicholls 19th- and 20th-century English Virginia Woolf’s essays: a woman writer’s literature and history, especially cultural, and American poetry; 19th- and 20th-century production of literary history racial and religious ‘otherness’, Shakespeare; American fiction; and literary radicalism of the Marlowe; national identity; and Islam. Law and form: Joyce, Beckett and philosophy 1930s and 1960s. Mary Dove Medieval literature, especially Temporality in modernist literature Catherine Packham 18th-century literature religious literature; Biblical interpretation and and philosophy; political economy and moral Waking nightmares: a critical study of Ian translation, and the Middle English (‘Wycliffite’) philosophy in the Scottish Enlightenment; 18th- McEwan’s novels Bible. century natural philosophy and physiology; and More intimate than violence: rape, Elena Gualtieri European and Anglo-American Erasmus Darwin. representation and the civic bond modernism; Virginia Woolf and feminist literary Vincent Quinn Lesbian and gay studies; the history; and the representation of photography in Rewriting the Nation: nationalist interventions history of sexuality; 18th-century studies; Irish modernist literature. in literary history studies, especially the relationship between Andrew Hadfield Renaissance literature and nationalism and sexuality; and the history and politics; Britishness; Shakespeare; Spenser; and theory of biography. Faculty research interests national identity. John David Rhodes Italian cinema, especially Faculty research interests are described briefly Margaret Healy Renaissance literature and post-World War II; Pier Paolo Pasolini; modernist below. For more detailed information, see culture; the political stage; Shakespeare; and avant-garde cinemas of Europe and the US; www.sussex.ac.uk/english/people Dekker; medicine and literature; and theory of cinema and the city; cinema and architecture; The following list includes all the English the body. queer art cinema; Hollywood’s relation to the faculty, and other contributors to English MA avant-garde; realism; and place. Margarete Kohlenbach Walter Benjamin; The programmes. Frankfurt School; Romanticism; and religion, Nicholas Royle Modern literature and Peter Abbs Poetry, autobiography, creative literature and politics. literary theory, especially deconstruction and writing, and arts education. psychoanalysis; the uncanny; and creative Jeremy Lane English and European modernist writing. Gavin Ashenden 20th-century myth and literature; the poetics of narrative fiction; theatre metaphysics; psychology, psychoanalysis and studies; and the geographical imagination in Martin Ryle 19th- and 20th-century fiction; the belief – C G Jung, Sigmund Freud, William James; early modern Europe. politics of ‘culture’, with especial reference to Charles Williams, C S Lewis and the Oxford education; and topographical and travel writing, Vicky Lebeau The convergence of psychoanalysis, Inklings. especially travel writing about Ireland. literature and cinema; and feminist theory. Sara Jane Bailes Contemporary experimental Minoli Salgado Post-colonial literature and William McEvoy Contemporary British and theatre practice (US and Europe); the historical theory, particularly relating to south Asia and European theatre; literary and critical theory; site- avant-garde; Live Art and body-based practices; the south Asian diaspora; memory and migrant specific performance; theatre, theory and ethics; critical theory; autobiography and the ‘self’ on identity; the short story; Rushdie; and Ondaatje. theatre criticism and journalism; the theatre work stage; the city/urban studies; feminist approaches and/or theory of Brook, Mnouchkine, Cixous, to representation; and writing for performance. Warner; and contemporary fiction. 101
  • English literature Courses from the English literature MAs are taught as weekly seminars Alan Sinfield Lesbian and gay studies; modern Norman Vance 19th-century literature, religion John David Rhodes Stupendous City, Miserable theatre; Shakespeare and his uses in our society; and society; Anglo-Irish literature; and classical City: Pasolini’s Rome (2007) post-1945 politics and culture; and Sidney. and Biblical influences on British writing. Nicholas Royle The Uncanny (2003) Lindsay Smith 19th-century literature and Marcus Wood Satire in the romantic period; the Minoli Salgado Writing Sri Lanka (2007) painting; photography in Victorian culture; and representation of slavery; and colonial and post- visual perception in the 19th century and the colonial literature and theory. Alan Sinfield On Sexuality and Power (2005) Renaissance. Lindsay Smith The Politics of Focus: Women, Recent faculty publications William J Spurlin Queer theory; post-colonial Peter Boxall Don DeLillo: The Possibility Children and 19th-Century Photography (1998) queer studies, especially southern Africa; critical of Fiction (2006) William J Spurlin Imperialism within the theory; 20th-century literature; South African Margins: Queer Representation and the Politics Brian Cummings The Literary Culture literature; and comparative literature, especially of Culture in Southern Africa (2006) of the Reformation (2002) francophone and Germanic 20th-century texts and cultures. Katerina Deligiorgi Kant and the Culture of Céline Surprenant Freud’s Mass Psychology Enlightenment (2005); Hegel: New Directions (2003) Daniel Steuer Goethe; Wittgenstein; and (2006) Jenny Bourne Taylor (ed) The Cambridge philosophy and science. Matthew Dimmock New Turkes: Dramatizing Companion to Wilkie Collins (2007) Céline Surprenant Aesthetics and literary Islam and the Ottomans in Early Modern England Sophie Thomas Romanticism and Visuality: history; 19th- and 20th-century European (2005) Fragments, History, Spectacle (2007) philosophy and literature (especially Marcel Proust and Flaubert); and philosophical Mary Dove The First English Bible (2007) Norman Vance Irish Literature since 1800 reception of psychoanalysis (Freud). Andrew Hadfield Shakespeare and (2002) Keston Sutherland Contemporary and Republicanism (2005) The journals Renaissance Studies; Textual 20th-century English and American poetry; Margaret Healy Fictions of Disease in Early Practice; The Oxford Literary Review and The Marxism and Frankfurt School critical theory; Modern England: Bodies, Plagues and Politics Year’s Work in Critical and Cultural Theory are phenomenology and philology; poetics; and the (2001) edited within the English Department. history of aesthetics. Vicky Lebeau Childhood and the Cinema (2008) Jenny Bourne Taylor 19th-century literature and culture; literature and science (especially Margarete Kohlenbach Walter Benjamin: psychology); feminist epistemology and criticism; Self-Reference and Religiosity (2002) and illegitimacy, law and culture. Laura Marcus and Peter Nicholls, eds Sophie Thomas Romantic period literature and The Cambridge History of Twentieth Century visual culture; literary and aesthetic theory; and Literature (2005) fragments and ruins. Stephanie Newell The Forger’s Tale (2006); Pamela Thurschwell Codirector of the Centre West African Literature (2006) for Modernism Studies. The intersection of Peter Nicholls George Oppen and the Fate of psychoanalysis, interest in the supernatural at Modernism (2007) the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, and new technologies. 102
  • Environmental science Environmental science Essentials Funding Recent students have been funded by Research Research programmes Council studentships (NERC, EPSRC, BBSRC, MPhil, DPhil Environmental Science including CASE awards) the EU, UK government Admissions requirements (FSA and DTI), and charities (eg Leverhulme). For information on overseas degrees that meet Limited funding may be available for outstanding the admissions requirements, see pages research students who are prepared to 172-175 undertake demonstrating and teaching. A first- or upper second-class undergraduate Recent thesis titles honours degree in environmental science, Uncertainty of geochemical measurements of chemistry, geography, geology, biology or related contaminated land: causes, estimation and subjects cost-based optimisation English language requirements Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: their IELTS 6.5 overall. For more information and speciation and fate in marine water and alternative English language requirements, see sediments page 174 The fate of 4-tertiary octylphenol in soil and Admissions plant systems Karen White, Graduate Centre Coordinator, The hydrology and sediment dynamics of the School of Life Sciences, John Maynard Smith Sussex Ouse Estuary, UK Researchers are investigating how grasses use Building, University of Sussex, silica, taken up from the soil and deposited in Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK The fate of oestrogenic contaminants in the their leaves, to protect themselves. Silica affects T +44 (0)1273 872774 roach (Rutilus rutilus) herbivores, including voles and sheep, by deterring E pglifesci@sussex.ac.uk Eicosanoid biosynthesis in the gonads of feeding and reducing their ability to extract nutrients from food, slowing their growth and Fees the mussel Mytilus edulis reproduction See pages 176-181 for information on fees Optimising uncertainty from sampling and analysis of foods and environmental samples • Environmental science at Sussex was Development and application of cross-flow Jeanette Rotchell Aquatic toxicology. Molecular awarded grade 5 (recognising research of ultrafiltration in the study of the interactions level effects of environmental contaminants on national and international excellence) in the between colloids and organic micropollutants detoxification mechanisms, cell cycle control most recent Research Assessment Exercise components and endocrine function in aquatic Uncertainty in the estimation of bioavailability organisms; biomarker development of endocrine (RAE). and its implications for human health-risk disruption in molluscs and bleaching in corals; • Environmental science forms a central part assessment cancer gene characterisation in molluscs and fish; of the Environmental Systems and Processes development of a retinoblastoma knockout fish; Research Group (ESPRG), which acts as and DNA damage in tumours. a focus for interdisciplinary environmental Faculty research interests research across the University. John Zhou Environmental organic geochemistry. Research centres around the processes Understanding the sources, fates and • ESPRG has been recognised as a Marie Curie controlling the mobility, persistence, availability bioaccumulation of organic micropollutants in Training Site by the EU. and biological effects of toxic substances in soil aquatic and terrestrial environments; developing and aquatic systems. Areas of current research analytical methods for trace organics; marine are briefly described below. For more detailed pollution; novel technologies for the removal of Research programmes information, see www.sussex.ac.uk/biology endocrine-disrupting chemicals from water and Elizabeth Hill Chemical pollution and chemical wastewater; and air-quality monitoring. Diverse research projects are available that often ecology. Identification and fate of endocrine There are also several other areas of involve collaboration with other research groups disrupting chemicals, including (anti)estrogenic interdisciplinary research within ESPRG and across biology and chemistry. Areas include: and (anti)androgenic contaminants, in aquatic the School, for example the examination of the • assessment of contaminated land; biota and the environment. Metabolite profiling effects of heterogeneity of contaminant and (metabolomics) to investigate the mechanisms nutrient concentrations in soil on the uptake • uptake of heavy metals in soils by plants and of toxicity of contaminants to aquatic organisms of heavy metal by plants. This has applications its implications for risk assessment; and to study plant signalling mechanisms in for human health risk assessment and the • uncertainty of measurements caused response to insect or fungal attack. phytoremediation of contaminated land (Michael by primary sampling of food and of the Hutchings, Elizabeth John and Michael Michael Ramsey Environmental geochemistry. environment; Ramsey). Another new collaboration seeks Estimating the inevitable uncertainty in the • biological effects of various classes of measurement of contamination in the environ- to investigate the extent to which plants take environmental contaminants in fish; ment, primarily that caused by heterogeneity and up silica in order to defend themselves against its effect on the sampling process. Applications herbivory by grazing animals (Sue Hartley and • fate of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in Michael Ramsey). include human health, risk assessment and the aquatic environment; characterisation of contaminated land, and the • geochemical cycling and reactivity of reliable detection of contaminants in foods. contaminants in estuarine and coastal systems; • behaviour of heavy metals in the environment. 103
  • Finance Taught programmes Finance MSc in Corporate and Financial Risk Management 1 year full-time This programme is designed to cover the main aspects of risk management in businesses, focusing on quantitative analysis, regulation, implementation and management structure in business organisations. This MSc covers topics such as financial portfolio theory, risk modelling, risk management and implementation within corporate structures. Essentials Further information It also provides options in programming, For further information about Corporate and probability, statistics and a range of Taught programmes Financial Risk Management, and Financial management courses offered at Sussex. MSc degrees Mathematics, contact: This programme is under development and Corporate and Financial Risk Management Dr Q Tang, Department of Mathematics, subject to validation. Financial Mathematics Mantell Building, University of Sussex, Funding International Accounting, Finance and Strategy Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RF, UK The University has a number of award schemes International Finance T +44 (0)1273 877457 that you may be eligible for. For more information, Management and Finance E q.tang@sussex.ac.uk refer to Fees and funding on pages 176-181. Postgraduate diploma www.sussex.ac.uk/maths From time to time, we have industrial funding Financial Mathematics For further information about the Primer in from investment companies for well-qualified Admissions requirements Economics programme, contact: students who can undertake mathematics/ For information on overseas qualifications that Professor Andrew McKay, Department of statistics and programming projects. meet the admissions requirements, see pages Economics, Arts E, University of Sussex, Programme structure 172-175 Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SN, UK Autumn term: you take Financial Portfolio MSc in Corporate and Financial Risk T +44 (0)1273 678889 Analysis, Corporate and Financial Risk Management; MSc in Financial Mathematics E a.mckay@sussex.ac.uk Management, plus an option chosen from A first- or second-class undergraduate www.sussex.ac.uk/economics mathematics, management or computing honours degree in mathematics, finance, For further information on all other courses. economics, business, science, engineering or computing. Non-standard qualifications programmes, contact: Spring term: you take Mathematical Modelling combined with suitable experience can also be Teaching Office, in Finance and Industry, Corporate and considered SPRU – Science and Technology Policy Financial Risk Analysis and options chosen MSc in International Accounting; MSc in Research, The Freeman Centre, from mathematics, management or computing Finance and Strategy; MSc in International University of Sussex, courses. Finance; MSc in Management and Finance Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QE, UK A first- or upper second-class undergraduate T +44 (0)1273 678168 Summer term and vacation: MSc dissertation honours degree E sprupgadmission@sussex.ac.uk (usually in banking risk assessment or www.sussex.ac.uk/spru investment risk assessment). For all programmes: if your background is not in finance or a related discipline such as MSc in Financial Mathematics • Our finance programmes are taught jointly 1 year full-time economics, you may be required to complete by the Departments of Economics and This MSc is designed to cover the main aspects the one-month (pre-sessional) Primer in Mathematics and SPRU – Science and of quantitative finance including general finance Economics programme in September, Technology Policy Research, ensuring that theory, finance models and programming before starting the MSc. This is useful for a wide variety of knowledge and skills are for graduates with a science, engineering or understanding the economic framework in available. economics/business background. which financial institutions work • In the most recent Research Assessment The programme includes topics such as: interest English language requirements Exercise (RAE), Mathematics and SPRU were rate theory, arbitrage theory, GARCH models, MSc in International Accounting; MSc in awarded a grade 5 (recognising research of corporate finance, the Black-Scholes model Finance and Strategy; MSc in International national and international excellence), and and numerical analysis, programming in C and Finance; MSc in Management and Finance Economics received a grade 4 (recognising Java, and the use of mathematical computing IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and research of national excellence). software. Some options offer probability and 6.0 in the other sections statistical theory that are essential for further MSc in Corporate and Financial • Both departments and SPRU are active development of the mathematical analysis of Risk Management; MSc in Financial across a diverse range of research areas, financial problems. Mathematics from corporate risk modelling to international IELTS 6.0, with not less than 6.0 in each economics. Funding section The University has a number of award schemes • Sussex has good links with financial that you may be eligible for. For more information, For more information and alternative English institutions. The Financial Mathematics refer to Fees and funding on pages 176-186. language requirements, see page 174 programme currently has co-operation from From time to time, we have industrial funding Pre-Masters for non-EU students City firms who provide sponsorship. Activities from investment companies for well-qualified If your qualifications (including English language) also include: students who can undertake mathematics/ do not yet meet our entry requirements for - an industrial consultation programme in statistics and programming projects. admission direct to the MSc in International banking risk assessment; and - investment fund sponsorship on hedge fund Programme structure Finance, we offer a Pre-Masters entry route. For Autumn term: you take the core courses more information, see page 35 investment risk assessment. Monetary Theory Analysis; Financial Portfolio Fees • Our graduates have progressed to successful Analysis; and Corporate Finance; plus one See pages 176-181 for information on fees careers in many fields, including banking, option chosen from Java programming; statistics hedge funds, fund management firms and courses; or other options. international organisations such as the Spring term: you take the core courses World Bank, as well as further research. Our Mathematical Models in Industry and Finance; teaching is designed to provide you with the Financial and Time Series Econometrics; Matlab knowledge and skills to compete effectively in Programming; plus options from C programming; these kinds of areas. statistics courses; or other options. 104
  • Summer term and vacation: MSc dissertation (usually in banking risk assessment or Finance investment risk assessment). Assessment Assessment modes vary, with a mixture of unseen examinations and dissertation/projects. Postgraduate Diploma in Financial Mathematics Funding See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Programme structure The structure is identical to that of the autumn and spring terms of the corresponding Masters programme. MSc in International Accounting, Finance and Strategy 1 year full-time This programme provides you with the essential skills and knowledge for a successful career in management or finance, and will develop the managerial and technical analytical skills required by employers in the private and public sectors. Distinctive features of the programme are: • the global perspective on the interactions between business, management and finance – critical to the sustainability of the advanced economies; and • growth and development of emerging economies. This contemporary programme brings into focus, among other things, the themes of sustainability, required by the contemporary finance industry • an awareness of the use of quantitative ethics, corporate and social responsibility and and learn about the impact and uses of finance, techniques in finance; and the growing need for accurate reporting of as well as more technical aspects such as • the study within finance of how it is applied company information in an international context. corporate finance and risk management. internationally and to developing countries. Current debates concerning the need for the Funding This programme is under development and measurement of change will be examined and The University has a number of award schemes subject to validation. placed within appropriate contexts, both national that you may be eligible for. For more information, and international. Programme structure refer to Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Autumn term: you take the foundation courses A case study approach is taken to facilitate You may also be eligible to apply for a Sasakawa Fundamentals of Global Management; Managing the development of skills and understanding. Scholarship to cover fees and maintenance. and Working Across Cultures; and Managing The University is in the process of seeking Programme structure Innovation. In addition, you develop relevant accreditation for the programme from relevant The degree comprises six core courses, (three skills and techniques in Management Methods professional bodies. taught in the autumn term and three taught in and Tools; and Quantitative Methods for Finance. This programme is under development and the spring term), plus a dissertation, completed subject to validation. Spring and summer terms: subject-specific during the summer term and vacation. knowledge is further developed in International Programme structure Autumn term: you take the core courses Finance and Macroeconomics; and Finance for Autumn term: you take two foundation courses Corporate Finance; Quantitative Methods for Development. In addition, a Business Analysis to help you develop an understanding of basic Finance; and Monetary Theory and Policy. Report offers the opportunity to pursue selected management concepts – Fundamentals of issues in greater depth, and to integrate Global Management and Managing Innovation. Spring term: you take the core courses these with broader theoretical and analytical In addition, relevant skills and techniques are International Finance and Macroeconomics; work based on Financial and Time Series developed in a course on Management Methods Finance for Development; and Financial and Econometrics. and Tools. Financial Institutions in the Global Time Series Econometrics. Market is a course that offers a first introduction Assessment Summer term and vacation: you concentrate on to your chosen specialisation. supervised research leading to the writing of your All courses contribute to the final mark in line MSc dissertation. with their credit weighting. Spring and summer terms: subject-specific knowledge is further developed in the courses Assessment International Accounting and Financial The six core courses are assessed by unseen Faculty research interests Reporting; and Strategy and Corporate examinations. The dissertation is the final Governance. In addition, a Business Analysis assessment unit. For faculty research interests in the Department Report offers the opportunity to pursue selected of Economics, refer to the economics subject issues in greater depth, and to integrate these MSc in Management and Finance entry on pages 83-85, or go to with broader theoretical and analytical work. 1 year full-time www.sussex.ac.uk/economics This degree provides you with the essential Assessment skills and knowledge for a successful career in For faculty research interests in the Department All courses contribute to the final mark, in line management or finance, and will develop the of Mathematics, refer to the mathematics with their credit weighting. managerial and technical analytical skills required subject entry on pages 132-133, or go to by employers in the private and public sectors. www.sussex.ac.uk/maths MSc in International Finance 1 year full-time Distinctive features of the programme are: For faculty research interests in SPRU – Science This is a demanding degree that has been • the global perspective on the interactions and Technology Policy Research, refer to the designed in consultation with senior between business, management and finance, Science and technology policy and management professionals from London’s financial sector to critical to the sustainability of the advanced subject entry on pages 158-161, or go to provide you with essential skills and knowledge economies and to the growth and development www.sussex.ac.uk/spru for a career in international finance. You will of emerging economies; develop the technical and analytical skills 105
  • Funding Gender studies You may be eligible to apply for a Sasakawa Gender studies Scholarship (see Fees and funding on pages 176-186). Programme structure (full-time) Core courses aim both to familiarise you with key debates on gender issues and to present feminist challenges to the theories and concepts of a broad range of established disciplines. You take two core courses and two options, and you also write a dissertation. Autumn term: you take two core courses Gender and Representation; and The Politics of Gender. Essentials • The Centre for Gender Studies encompasses research on gender and sexuality and Spring term: you take two options from: Women Taught programmes and Human Rights; Queering Popular Culture; MA degrees on gender, inequality and work, as well as covering many other areas of gender Gender, Nation and Identity; and Race and Gender Studies Critical Theory. Gender and Development (see page 78 ) research. Gender and Media • Gender studies is quintessentially Summer term and vacation: you undertake work MSc degree interdisciplinary. It is an excellent area for on the MA dissertation under faculty supervision. Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research lifelong learning, providing perspectives and Assessment Methods (Gender Studies) information that will illuminate personal All courses are assessed by 5,000-word term Research programmes experience and enhance career prospects. papers. You are also required to submit a MPhil, DPhil Gender Studies • Gender studies at Sussex draws together dissertation of 20,000 words. Admissions requirements faculty and graduate researchers, and MA in Gender and Media For information on overseas qualifications that offers opportunities to work on issues of 1 year full-time/2 years part-time meet the admissions requirements, see pages representation, identity and sexuality, as well This programme offers a rare opportunity 172-175 as politics and social relations. to focus on the relationship of the media to MA • You will explore the ways in which gender questions of gender and sexuality. You will We encourage applications from a diverse intersects with other markers of difference examine the production and reception of media range of backgrounds. Applicants normally such as ‘race’, ethnicity, class and sexuality. representations of masculinity, femininity and have an upper second-class undergraduate sexuality; engage with theories of identity, honours degree or comparable experience • The subject also familiarises you with subjectivity, culture and narrative; and have the MSc and MPhil feminist research methods appropriate to chance to engage with some of the key social, An upper second-class undergraduate the examination of gender issues across a cultural and policy issues of the present day. honours degree in any relevant social science, wide thematic range, within different social, historical and cultural contexts. This MA provides perspectives and information but applicants from other backgrounds may for people already in the media field or wishing be considered. Applicants should submit an to enter it, or for any occupation where gender outline (two to three pages) of their research awareness would be an advantage. interests Taught programmes DPhil Funding A Masters degree in a subject relevant to your MA in Gender Studies See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. research. Applicants should submit an outline 1 year full-time/2 years part-time The MA applies historical, sociological, Programme structure research proposal indicating the nature, anthropological, political and cultural Autumn term: you take Gender and ambitions and primary questions of the perspectives to the field of gender studies. Representation, which introduces conceptual research project The programme aims to cater equally for those frameworks (particularly from feminist, English language requirements seeking to develop an existing research interest, postmodern and queer theory) and offers IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and those in a career in which issues of gender play medium-specific case studies; and Media Theory 6.0 in the other sections. For more information an important role – such as personnel or equal and Research I, which introduces a range of and alternative English language requirements, opportunities – and those who simply wish conceptual, institutional and methodological see page 174 to explore a broad range of issues concerning perspectives on the media. Fees gender. Spring term: you take two options from a list See pages 176-181 for information on fees The MA explores the following: that has previously included Feminism and Film; Further information Gender, Nation and Identity; Media Audiences; • the contribution of feminist theory to a range Competing Equalities; Gender and Globalisation; Dr Alison Phipps, of academic disciplines; Director of Gender Studies, History of British Feminism; Viewing Women; University of Sussex, Falmer, • the use of life histories in feminist research Women and Human Rights; Gender and Brighton BN1 9RQ, UK and practice; Race; Queering Popular Culture; Emotion, T +44 (0)1273 877689 Representation and Culture; Culture, Experience, • identity and the social construction of ‘gender’ E a.e.phipps@sussex.ac.uk History; Media Theory and Research II; Space across different cultures and societies; www.sussex.ac.uk/gender and Representation; Rethinking Radio; European • cultural representations of femininity Media in Transition; Science, Technology, and masculinity; Culture; Video Documentary in Contemporary History; Rethinking European Cinema; and Latin • gender, media, nation; American Cinema. • visual representations of gender; Summer term and vacation: you undertake work • history of British feminism; on the MA dissertation under faculty supervision. • gender, power and politics in Europe; Assessment • emotions, embodiment and health. All courses are assessed by 5,000-word term papers, except Video Documentary, which has The MA is taught by a combination of seminars, a practical element. You are also required to tutorials and individual supervision. submit a dissertation of 18,000 words. 106
  • Gender studies The way we look, dress, walk and talk are all clues to how we self-define MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural Assessment Funding Research Methods (Gender Studies) Taught course units are variously assessed by Although gender studies is not itself recognised 1 year full-time/2 years part-time term papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent as an ESRC outlet, students working on gender- A Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate are coursework portfolios. The research elective is related topics may apply for ESRC funding also available. See Routes to postgraduate study assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words. through the departments of most supervisors. at Sussex on pages 14-15. This includes access to three interdisciplinary Quota awards in 2009. See also Fees and The MSc provides a rigorous training in social Research programmes funding on pages 176-186. research methods, an opportunity to develop a full doctoral research proposal and to write a Research and teaching in gender studies crosses Recent thesis titles supervised dissertation (the research elective), the subject boundaries of anthropology, art Gender, law and public policy in post- as well as exposure to debates and theories history, sociology, English, history, politics and authoritarian regimes: the cases of Chile within the broad field of gender studies. It international relations, and media and film and Brazil involves a mixture of supervised reading and studies, and there is a wide range of potential research supervisors for DPhil students in gender Hostile environments? Surveillance and the attendance at formal courses, and aims to equip you with the necessary skills to pursue research studies. The Mass Observation Archive on impact of everyday experiences on the emotional for a DPhil in the field. campus is an invaluable research resource. well-being of lesbians Funding Current faculty areas of research available Breaking the silence – lesbian clients speaking See Fees and funding on pages 176-186 for research supervision include: out about their experiences of counselling for information. • issues of gender and citizenship, nationalism Recreating ourselves as readers: women and globalisation; engaging with electronic texts Programme structure There are three main elements to the MSc • cultural representations of gender in art, Women’s social movements: the intersection programme that run concurrently through the literature and the media, including cyberspace; of the local, the national, the global academic year: a research elective involving • gender, inequality and work; Lone mothers and social policy in Korea supervised reading in your individual research area and the writing of a dissertation; credited • gender and health; Women, migration and social change: courses in the philosophy and methodology of • 19th- and 20th-century British women’s migrant women workers from the Philippines research; and training in both quantitative and history and literature; qualitative research skills. • gender, power and politics in Europe; Autumn term: you take a research elective, • gender, culture, identity; Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific Research Practice, and Research Design in a • gender and education; Cross-Cultural Context. • gender and social anthropology, gender Spring term: you take courses in quantitative and and development; qualitative data collection and analysis. • feminist life history work; Summer term: you choose from a selection of • feminist movements/women’s activism; courses in cross-cultural and comparative data collection and analysis. The research elective • gender and sexuality. continues across all terms, culminating in the writing of a dissertation. 107
  • Anne-Meike Fechter Gender, migration and anthroplogy. Gender studies Marzia Fontana Gender inequalities in development. Elizabeth Harrison Discourses of gender and development, especially in relation to sub- Saharan Africa. Gerry Holloway The history of women’s work, late 19th- to early 20th-century women’s organisations; women’s life histories; and local women’s history. Amber Jacobs Psychoanalysis; feminist theory; feminist re-readings of Greek myths; and representations of maternity, and mother- daughter narratives. Beate Jahn Issues of gender and culture in contemporary political and international theory. Professor Liz James The representation of women in the classical and medieval world, with a specialist focus on Byzantine art and culture. Kate Lacey Gender, media and public sphere theory; history of the media in Germany; history and theory of radio. Claire Langhamer Women’s leisure; popular culture, life histories; and courtship in 20th-century Britain. Vicky Lebeau Gender and psychoanalysis; 19th- and 20th-century novels; theories of cinema and visual representation; and images of childhood. Andy Medhurst Popular culture, sexuality, gender, and Englishness. Filippo Osella Migration, masculinity and consumption, especially in India and popular religion (Hinduism). Alison Phipps Gender and aspects of social policy, including labour market segregation, abortion and sexual violence. Vincent Quinn Lesbian and gay studies; 18th- century literature; and Irish literature. Jacqueline O’Reilly Gender, work and care, comparative cross-national research. Maya Unnithan Gender, culture and identity; poverty and women’s reproductive health in India. Makes you think: gender research at Sussex offers opportunities to work on issues of representation, Professor Ann Whitehead Changing gender identity and sexuality relations and social transformation, especially in rural Africa; family, kinship and marriage; and Academic activities Faculty research interests race, gender and difference. The Centre for Gender Studies runs a lively Research interests are briefly described below. Janice Winship Gender and representation; Research-in-Progress seminar series, with local For more detailed information, see advertising, promotional culture and and visiting speakers. Skills workshops for MA www.sussex.ac.uk/gender consumption. students are also available. Ruth Woodfield Gender in higher education and Caroline Bassett Gender and new media; and Recent seminars have included joint seminars gender in science, technology and culture. gender in employment. with Sociology, Migration Studies, Engineering Professor Gillian Bendelow The biological/ and Design, Geography, Anthropology, Media cultural divide, and gender and the body. and Film, and History. Topics covered included: Professor Jane Cowan Gender, nationalism, • gender and emotions memory and identity in Greece and the Southern • gender and migration Balkans; current work on the League of Nations. • women in eastern Europe Denise deCaires Narain Postcolonial and feminist discourses, especially in Caribbean • women and creativity (diasporic) texts. • femicide in Mexico. Professor Barbara Einhorn Gender and citizenship; gender and nation; and gender, landscape, nation and identity in German-Jewish women’s life histories. 108
  • Geography Geography Essentials • Geographical research at Sussex is Taught programmes characterised by its interdisciplinary links, its MA degree openness to the full range of philosophical Landscape History and Culture and methodological approaches, and its MSc degree policy relevance. Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research • Our teaching was awarded top grades in Methods (Human Geography) all areas in the most recent Governmental Research programmes quality assurance audit. MPhil, DPhil Geography • A range of external funding sources supports New Route DPhil Geography the research activities in geography. Over the Admissions requirements past few years, geographers have secured For information on overseas qualifications that funding amounting to over £5 million. meet the admissions requirements, see pages 172-175 • We offer research degrees in physical and MA human geography, and an ESRC-recognised An upper second-class undergraduate honours MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural degree in geography or related disciplines with Research Methods (Human Geography) that a focus on landscape, such as anthropology, is designed to provide in-depth research archaeology, art history, environmental training. The MA in Landscape History and Culture builds upon research strengths in The Long Man of Wilmington, mysterious guardian management, history, cultural studies, or of the South Downs, has baffled geographers, landscape studies. Applicants with relevant cultural and historical geography. archaeologists and historians for hundreds of years professional experience will also be considered • All of our programmes provide a strong MSc, MPhil and New Route DPhil intellectual grounding and sophisticated Programme structure An upper second-class undergraduate honours analytical skills appropriate to a wide variety Autumn term: you take Approaches to degree in any relevant social science, but of careers in the academic and policy fields Landscape History and Culture, and one applicants from other backgrounds may be and in the private sector. of the following options: Transformation of considered. Applicants should submit an outline Rural Economies, Societies and Spaces (two to three pages) of their research interests 1850-2000; Skills and Methods in Local and DPhil Regional History 1520-1780; Globalisation and Taught programmes The normal requirement is a Masters degree European Representations of Africa and India; or in geography or a related subject such as MA in Landscape History and Culture Modernism and the Cinematic City. environmental science or planning, but 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Spring term: you take Practising Landscape applicants from other backgrounds may This programme offers you the opportunity to explore the ways in which landscapes reflect, History and Culture, and one of the following be considered. Applicants should submit options: Skills and Methods in Local and an outline research proposal indicating the enact and shape cultures and histories. It is designed to balance conceptual understandings Regional History 1780-2000; Geographies of nature, ambitions and primary questions of Colonialism; or Space and Representation. the research project of landscape history and culture with practical hands-on research on specific landscapes. Summer term and vacation: you undertake English language requirements The MA draws on Geography’s research supervised work on a long dissertation. IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and 6.0 in the other sections. For more information strengths in modern historical and cultural Assessment and alternative English language requirements, geography and the geographies of colonialism, Courses are assessed by a variety of modes see page 174 but maintains an interdisciplinary outlook with including learning diaries, field and laboratory contributions from Media and Film, History and notebooks, short term papers, and the Fees Art History. It combines an in-depth coverage dissertation. See pages 176-181 for information on fees of theoretical advances in the understanding of Further information landscape history and culture with a practical Dr Ben Rogaly, engagement with landscape based upon field, Postgraduate Convenor, Geography, archival and textual research training. University of Sussex, Falmer, The programme consists of three interrelated Brighton BN1 9RQ, UK strands, each characterising a particular T +44 (0)1273 873710 approach to landscape: cultural landscapes; E geographypgconvenor@sussex.ac.uk British landscape history; and colonial www.sussex.ac.uk/geography landscapes. The MA in Landscape History and Culture will be invaluable to those working for, or wishing to work for, local authority or private company departments of arts heritage, planning, tourism, environment or museum services, or a range of other governmental and non-governmental bodies such as the Countryside Agency, English Heritage, English Nature and the National Trust. 109
  • Geography Snow vortex: intervention on the South Downs, Sussex MSc in Comparative and Cross-Cultural Summer term: you choose from a selection of Coursework Research Methods (Human Geography) courses in cross-cultural and comparative data There are three modes of entry for research 1 year full-time/2 years part-time collection and analysis. The research elective students. First is traditional entry to an MPhil or A Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate are continues across all terms, culminating in the DPhil. Second is the MSc plus DPhil pathway, also available. See Routes to postgraduate study writing of a dissertation. which is the 1+3 route required by the ESRC at Sussex on pages 14-15. for their studentship support. Third is the New Assessment Route DPhil offering an integrated four-year The MSc is designed to meet the most recent Taught courses are variously assessed by term programme of taught coursework in research ESRC requirements for social science research papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent methods and professional skills and supervised training. The programme provides a rigorous coursework portfolios. The research elective is doctoral research. All new research students will training in social research methods, an assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words. be required to participate in research training opportunity to develop a full doctoral research courses and to take other courses that may proposal and to write a supervised dissertation Research programmes be recommended by the supervisor of their (the research elective), as well as exposure research. to debates and theories within the broad field Applications for research degrees are welcomed of human geography. It involves a mixture of across any of our four research clusters, each (Exemption from research training courses can supervised reading and attendance at formal of which maintains a strong international be granted to those who have already taken courses, and aims to equip you with the reputation. such courses at postgraduate level; students necessary skills to pursue research for a DPhil can also qualify for interim awards, such as in the field. Geographers also provide interdisciplinary the Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate in doctoral supervision in subject areas such as Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research Funding contemporary European studies, development Methods, for any research training courses taken This programme qualifies for ESRC support studies and migration studies. concurrently with their research; see Routes to under its 1+3 system of doctoral support. For Funding postgraduate study at Sussex on pages 14-15.) information on ESRC and other funding, see Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Research students in geography are supported by a number of grant-awarding bodies. We have Programme structure full 1+3 and +3 recognition from the ESRC, There are three main elements to the MSc including one Quota Award in 2009, and a programme that run concurrently through the track record of successful CASE studentship academic year: a research elective involving applications. Geographers have been successful supervised reading in your individual research in obtaining interdisciplinary Quota and area and the writing of a dissertation; credited competition awards from the ESRC. Studentships courses in the philosophy and methodology of may also be available from the AHRC and NERC research; and training in both quantitative and (see Fees and funding on pages 176-186). qualitative research skills. We also offer departmental bursaries. Please Autumn term: you take a research elective, contact the Postgraduate Convenor, Geography Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific (see Essentials) for further information. Research Practice, and Research Design in a Cross-Cultural Context. Spring term: you take courses in quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. 110
  • Geography ESRC-funded research in the Larkman housing estate in Norwich showed that social identities are in The cluster was recently ranked 1st in the UK for flux, influenced by relationships between classes, generations, genders and ethnic groups, and by impact in economic geography, see Jamie Foster, categories used about people by others and by organisations, including the state Chris Muellerleile, Kris Olds and Jamie Peck, ‘Circulating economic geographies: citation Recent thesis titles Threats to coastal shingle biodiversity in patterns and citation behaviour in economic Cities in motion: towards an understanding of the Rives Manche geography, 1982-2006’, in Transactions of the the cinematic city Institute of British Geographers, 32(3), (2007). The response of shingle beaches to storm The impact of the Second World War on the rural events: a managed approach Current research on regional inequality and landscape of Britain regional economic performance has focused Traditional leadership and the modern South on regional economic performance in Europe, Specialist facilities including governance and cohesion in an African state We have a Geography Resource Centre enlarged Europe. ESRC-funded research has Homosexuality and everyday life in post-war concentrated on the Three Italies and on the supervised by a full-time map curator; a London comparative performance of continental, well-equipped Geography Soils Laboratory; a The global-local interplay and foreign direct computer laboratory with IBM-compatible PCs, Nordic, Mediterranean, east European and investment in the European Union Macs, Plotters, etc; and a Land Rover and mini ‘neo-American’ economies. This research is MPV. All facilities are supervised by technicians. underpinned by an interest in the relationships The internationalisation of productive capital: between globalisation, integration, transition, Specialist cartographic facilities are also Korean textile and clothing foreign direct convergence, inequality and social cohesion available. investment in China (including analyses of the structural and Pastoral-farmer conflict in the Hadejia-Nguru cohesion policies of the EU). It draws upon wetlands of north-eastern Nigeria Faculty research interests theories of regulation in which the group has a strong interest. Current plans centre on an Food crop marketing and local economic Geography faculty enjoy reputations for world- extension of this research to a comparative study development in Eastern Cape Province, class academic research as well as policy- of the EU and China. South Africa relevant studies on global socio-economic and cultural transformations, and on sensitive Our research on global value chains involves Institutional needs for natural resource close relationships with the research of environmental systems. Our research includes conservation in mountain areas the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) a number of research projects funded by UK Greek American return migration and identity research councils such as the ESRC, AHRC and Globalisation Group. This research includes construction NERC, as well as major contributions to policy the development of theoretical frameworks for debates within the UK government, EU and other global value-chain analysis, analyses of the Representations of diversity and cultural role of value chain governance in shaping the participation: performances of multiculturalism international organisations. upgrading strategies for clusters, and research in Bologna and Barcelona Research in Geography is divided into on sectors that include food retailing, the four research clusters, which have strong automotive industry, the steel sector and the Media, imagination and migration: the role of relationships with interdisciplinary research textile and clothing industries. Scope exists for Italian television in the Albanian migration to Italy centres at Sussex: joint supervision with IDS in this area. An evaluation of GIS as a countryside Economic geographies of globalisation and management tool to inform the creation of a development large scale, near forest habitat network in This research cluster focuses on global value West Sussex chains, developing country industrialisation, Sediment transport in the Ouse-Newhaven Estuary industrial change and regional economic performance, the nature and impact of the emergence of China and spatial price formation. 111
  • Geography Research on value chains links closely with a Highlights of this research effort include a six- The Sussex Centre for Migration Research looks third main area of research: developing-country year ‘Development Research Centre’ funded by at the migration of agricultural, horticultural and industrialisation and spatial price formation. the Department for International Development packhouse workers Much of this research concentrates on Chinese on the relationship between migration, economic reform and, in particular, on the globalisation and poverty; research on issues impact of WTO accession and international of integration, social cohesion and identity standards on manufacturing performance and among migrants to the UK, funded among others state-owned enterprises in China. This work is by the ESRC, the Home Office, the Joseph being expanded to explore intra-national aspects Rowntree Foundation and the Department of parallel trade involving the use of transaction- for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; and cost economics and agency theory to develop a extensive research of migration issues in Europe principal-agent-subagent framework to examine that is facilitated by our leading role in the the spatial pricing behaviour and conduct of EU’s Network of Excellence on ‘International Coca-Cola in the competitive Chinese beverage Migration, Integration and Social Cohesion in market. Europe’. The group also supervises a number of doctoral students working on migration issues Associated Geography faculty include: around the world. Professor Mick Dunford Comparative regional The Centre is home to the internationally and urban economic performance; inequality established Journal of Ethnic and Migration and social cohesion in Europe; and theories of Studies, edited by Russell King. Alongside regulation. Richard Black’s co-editorship of the Journal of Godfrey Yeung Globalisation and the Chinese Refugee Studies, the world’s leading journal in economy, including foreign direct investment and the field of forced migration, this makes Sussex Chinese competitiveness after WTO accession. the main agenda-setting centre for journal-based Map of population density in Europe. Geographers at Sussex use Digimap, the online mapping data Geographies of migration empirical research outside the US on all aspects service of the Ordnance Survey, the UK’s national This cluster constitutes the core of the Sussex of migration. mapping agency Centre for Migration Research, co-directed by The Centre also facilitates extensive Canarias (ES) Richard Black and Russell King since 1997. interdisciplinary connections with researchers It is a unique venue for migration research in politics, economics, law, history and social Guadeloupe Martinique Réunion in Britain: centered on creating a close-knit, anthropology. Guyane interdisciplinary environment for faculty and Associated faculty include: graduate researchers alike, linking research with (FR) Açores (PT) its now well-established MA in Migration Studies. Professor Richard Black Migration, In the most recent Research Assessment globalisation and poverty; refugees and Madeira Exercise (RAE), this cluster was a ‘flagged’ displaced persons in Africa and Europe; and research group, meaning it was assessed as migration and entrepreneurship. equivalent to the highest possible level of quality. Mike Collyer Migration policy; refugees and Central to this effort has been high-quality asylum; and Europe and North Africa. original research, which has drawn funding from Jamie Goodwin-White Geographical contexts of research councils, government departments and social and economic inequality; North America; charitable foundations. Europe; and quantitative methods. REGIOgis Metropolitan and Urban Regions 112 Population of main LUZ* 250'000 - 500'000 500'000 - 1'000'000 > 1'000'000
  • Professor Russell King International migration in Europe; rural geography; the Mediterranean; Geography and islands. Ben Rogaly ‘Race’, immigration and class relations in the UK; temporary migration for work in rural areas in the UK and India; agricultural workers; employment relations; migration, inequality and social change. Professor Ronald Skeldon Population migration in the developing world, especially Asia. Katie Walsh Migration, home and belonging; transnational spaces and identities; British expatriates; and Gulf region. Histories, cultures, networks This cluster coheres thematically around the connections between culture and landscape. This is orchestrated around two interdisciplinary research centres: the Centre for Colonial and Post-Colonial Studies and the Centre for World Environmental History. Associated faculty include: Grace Carswell Rural livelihoods in eastern Africa, population-environment interactions and agricultural change under the influence of colonialism. Associated research in the Department has focused on colonial forestry and natural resource management in Mozambique. Professor Alan Lester works on the historical geography of the 19th-century British Empire, emphasising the traffic in people, ideas and Modelling and monitoring of sensitive earth Cecil Rhodes statue, Cape Town: researchers systems at Sussex focus on the intersections between materials between different colonial and This research cluster focuses on modelling colonialism and landscape in former colonies metropolitan spaces. Together with Fae Dussart, he is currently completing a Leverhulme-funded and monitoring of sensitive earth surface and project on the trans-imperial history of Aboriginal atmospheric systems. The study of sensitive Protection, particularly in Australia and New systems such as mountains, coasts, the atmosphere and the arctic is becoming a Associated faculty include: Zealand. critical issue to societies, as they adjust to Professor Bob Allison Mass movement; Simon Rycroft is a leading geographer of radical the impacts of environmental change. Our geotechnical properties of sediment; and arid urban cultures in the 1960s, especially in Los research investigates sensitive systems by field environments. Angeles and London. He has pioneered the monitoring, physical and numerical modelling, analysis of such cultures from a countercultural geotechnical analysis of sediments and rocks, Mick Frogley Quaternary palaeoecology, and perspective and shown, for the first time, how and reconstruction of quaternary environments. climatic history of lake basins. they engage with ‘nature’, an engagement that Dominic Kniveton Climate systems; and drew upon a series of influences. He is currently Our expertise concerns: hydrological cycle in Southern Africa. working on a monograph entitled Swinging City: • Climate systems The Cultural Geographies of London 1950-1975. Cherith Moses Rock weathering; coastal • Coastal and estuarine systems processes; and karst landforms in the British Professor Brian Short has mapped contested Isles, the Mediterranean Basin and Australia. ideologies of rural landscape conservation • Permafrost and Arctic systems and the politics of landownership in Victorian • Quaternary palaeoenvironments Julian Murton Permafrost; physical modelling; and Edwardian England, examining for the first and Quaternary environments in Arctic Canada time the place of micro-history within historical • Soil systems and UK. geography. He has recently begun to explore the Key achievements David Robinson Rock weathering; coastal impact of the Second World War on English rural Recognition for the high quality of our research processes; soil erosion and conservation; and communities. has led to several recent achievements: landform evolution. Katie Walsh works at the intersection of • Papers in Science, Geology and Geophysical See www.sussex.ac.uk/geography for more migration, home and belonging; transnational Research Letters information. spaces and identities; British expatriates; and Gulf region. • Grants: more than £3.5 million (for example from the EU, INTERREG, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, NERC, Royal Society, Environment Agency) • Beaches At Risk project – a showcase Franco- British project • Chair of NERC Grant awarding panel • Chair of the British Society for Geomorphology • Associate editor of Journal of Geophysical Research – Earth Surface • Dorothy Hodgkins Royal Society Research Fellowship to a former DPhil student 113
  • Globalisation, ethnicity Globalisation, ethnicity and culture and culture Essentials • Globalisation is an important process of Faculty research interests contemporary social and economic change Research interests are briefly described below. Taught programme and a major new interdisciplinary field of For more detailed information, see MA Globalisation, Ethnicity and Culture study. www.sussex.ac.uk/development Admissions requirements For information on overseas qualifications that • Our MA programme seeks to bridge the gap Vinita Damodaran is convenor of the MA in meet the admissions requirements, see pages between social science and humanities Globalisation, Ethnicity and Culture, and 172-175 approaches to globalisation, ethnicity and Lecturer in History. Her work focuses on modern cultural difference. India, especially protest and nationalism, An upper second-class undergraduate honours and she is currently studying the way in which degree in a relevant social science or humanities • The degree aims to explore the history of globalisation and European expansion as environmental change constrains and shapes subject social and cultural protest. She is author of well as globalisation as a critical issue of our English language requirements times. Broken Promises (1992) and Post-Colonial IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and India (2000). 6.0 in the other sections. For more information Geert De Neve lectures in social anthropology. and alternative English language requirements, Taught programme His research focuses on Tamil Nadu, India, and is see page 174 MA in Globalisation, Ethnicity and Culture concerned with labour relations, power, gender, Fees 1 year full-time/2 years part-time industrialisation and modernity. See pages 176-181 for information on fees Drawing on contributions from history, Professor Saul Dubow is Professor of History. Further information anthropology, politics and geography, this His interests are race, colonialism and the history Dr Vinita Damodaran, programme will be of interest to those working of modern Africa, South African racism and the Globalisation, ethnicity and culture, in the fields of ethnic and cultural studies in politics of apartheid. His books include Scientific Arts B 368, global, regional and national contexts including Racism in Modern South Africa (1995). University of Sussex, Falmer, southern Africa, South Asia, Latin America and the UK. The programme tackles the key issue Katy Gardner is a social anthropologist and Brighton BN1 9QN, UK of globalisation as a process of social change, author of Global Migrants, Local Lives: Travel E v.damodaran@sussex. ac.uk www.sussex.ac.uk/development its impact on ethnic identities, the politics of and Transformation in Rural Bangladesh (1995), representation and cultural production, the rise Development, Anthropology and the Post- of fundamentalisms, including terrorism, and Modern Challenge (1996) and Age, Narrative the way in which these are rooted in historical and Migration: the Life Course and Life Histories contexts. of Bengali Elders in London (2002); Editor, with Filippo Osella, of Migration and Modernities in Funding South Asia (2004). See Fees and funding on pages 176-186. Professor Alan Lester is an historical Programme structure geographer. Interests include British colonial Autumn term: you take Globalisation and discourses in the 19th century, with a particular Culture; and Globalisation and European focus on the Cape Colony, and the geographies Representations of Africa and India. of 19th-century humanitarianism. He is author Spring term: you take two from Contemporary of Imperial Networks: Creating Identities in Post-Colonial Women’s Writing; Idea of Race; 19th-Century South Africa and Britain (2001), Migration, Inequality and Social Change; and co-editor of Colonial Lives Across the British The Ethics and Politics of Globalisation; and Empire: Imperial Careering in the Long 19th Transnational Migration and Diaspora. Other Century (2006). options are also available. Peter Luetchford is a social anthropologist with Summer term and vacation: you undertake a particular interest in coffee producers and fair supervised work on a dissertation. trade in Costa Rica. He is the author of Fair Trade and a Global Commodity: Coffee in Costa Rica Assessment (2007). You are assessed by term papers of 5,000 words, and a 20,000-word dissertation. Ben Rogaly is a human geographer and a member of the Sussex Centre for Migration Research. His research in India and the UK connects analysis of global and national political economy with the lifeworlds of migrant agricultural workers and those who recruit and employ them. From Hollywood to Bollywood – culture in a social, historical and global context 114
  • MA in Contemporary History History 1 year full-time/2 years part-time History Sussex has a long-established reputation for cutting-edge historical research in contemporary history. The MA in Contemporary History is different in scope from those available at other universities. Its distinctiveness lies in the emphasis on social and cultural, economic as well as political history, and in providing opportunities to study important aspects of the contemporary history of Asia, Africa and north America, as well as Britain. It aims to provide you with the knowledge, understanding and conceptual, intellectual and subject-specific Essentials • History is a vibrant, ambitious and highly skills to analyse problems of importance in Taught programmes research-active department with major the contemporary world historically, ie in their MA degrees strengths in contemporary history, intellectual long-run context as distinct from the necessarily Contemporary History history and early modern history. Cultural, shorter focus of the contemporary social Early Modern History 1500-1800 social and economic history are particularly sciences. There is a strong emphasis upon Intellectual History well represented. the comparative study of different countries Life History Research: Oral History and Life • History is home to a number of innovative or regions. A highly distinctive feature of this Story Documents research centres, including the Centre for programme is the training it offers in making Modern European History War, Representation and Society; the Centre video documentaries relating to the recent past, MSc degree for Modern European Cultural History; the as in the spring term all students are offered the Social Research Methods (Economic and Centre for German-Jewish Studies; and option of taking the course Video Documentary Social History) the Sussex Centre for Intellectual History. in Contemporary History. Former students have Sussex historians also play leading roles in produced films of outstanding quality and have Research programmes cross-departmental Centres in Colonial and gained external acclaim for their work. MPhil, DPhil Contemporary History MPhil, DPhil Early Modern History Postcolonial Studies, Life History, and Early The MA in Contemporary History draws upon MPhil, DPhil Intellectual History Modern Studies. our expertise in modern British, north American, MPhil, DPhil Life History Research • Sussex students have access to an Asian and African history to offer a carefully MPhil, DPhil Modern European History impressive range of archives including the constructed programme of study split into two internationally renowned Mass Observation pathways. Each pathway through the programme Admissions requirements Archive, which is housed in the University is linked to a Sussex Interdisciplinary Research For information on overseas qualifications that Library. Centre. In this way students are integrated into meet the admissions requirements, see pages the research culture of the University and are 172-175 MA and MSc encouraged to attend Centre seminars and An upper second-class undergraduate honours symposia. Taught programmes degree in history or another arts or social The Centre for the Study of Colonial and Teaching methods sciences subject Postcolonial Cultures reflects significant MPhil and DPhil Most courses are taught in weekly small-group interdisciplinary and cross-school interest in A Masters degree in history or a related seminars, for which you prepare written work the histories and cultures of colonialism, and discipline and oral presentations. Lectures, workshops in postcolonial studies. It organises annual and conferences organised by the History English language requirements conferences, a seminar series and provides Department give you further access to the latest IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.5 in Writing and opportunities for more informal discussions of historical research and debate. work in progress among its members. 6.0 in the other sections. For more information and alternative English language requirements, Taught courses include training in appropriate The Research Centre in War, Representation see page 174 research techniques, including the development and Society has strong links with the Imperial of skills in using concepts and sources likely War Museum and the internationally recognised Fees to play a part in the research project for the See page 176-181 for information on fees Mass Observation Archive, a unique resource dissertation. Teaching is also available, where for the study of 20th-century Britain. For further Further information required, in languages, palaeography, statistics details, visit www.massobs.org.uk/index.html History, Arts B, and computing. The Centre also has close research links with the University of Sussex, You may, on certain programmes and subject Sussex Centre for Life History Research Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QN, UK to the approval of the programme convenor, (www.sussex.ac.uk/clhr). www.sussex.ac.uk/history write any or all of their assessment exercises in Funding Contemporary History, Early Modern a language other than English. Please note that Successful EU applicants are advised to apply History, Intellectual History, and Modern all teaching is in English. For further information to the AHRC (see Fees and funding on pages European History contact the programme convenor at the address 176-186). Dr Claire Langhamer at the address above given in Essentials. T + 44 (0)1273 606755 Programme structure The range of option courses may vary depending The options listed below are an example of E c.l.langhamer@sussex.ac.uk on demand and the availability of faculty. courses that may be available. You take four Life History Research Dr Margaretta Jolly, European cooperation courses during the MA. Centre for Continuing Education, The History Department at Sussex is one of Autumn term: Historical Skills and Methods; University of Sussex, Falmer, 27 European history departments that are Empire, Nation, State in the 20th Century; and Brighton BN1 9RG, UK developing a joint European curriculum. War, Gender and British Society, 1914-1945. T + 44 (0)1273 873585 Within the framework of this European pilot E m.jolly@sussex.ac.uk project, many exchanges are possible with the Spring term: Segregated Societies: The SOCRATES programme. American and South African South, 1860-1970; Imperialism, Nationalism and Popular Protest in Late Colonial India; Video Documentary in Contemporary History; The Falklands; and Vietnam War. You may substitute one of these options with an option chosen from other MA programmes, subject to the agreement of the convenor. 115
  • Summer term and vacation: you undertake supervised work on the MA dissertation, History which – subject to agreement – may involve research anywhere in Britain or another country, depending on the topic chosen. Assessment Historical Methods and Historiography is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an essay and a research proposal. Each of the other courses is assessed by a 5,000-word term paper, each paper to be written in the vacation following the end of the course in question. All students write a 20,000-word dissertation, which is submitted towards the end of the summer vacation. MA in Intellectual History 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Intellectual history is one of the liveliest and most rapidly developing subjects in contemporary humanities in Britain. Sussex has been one of the main contributors to the flourishing of intellectual history and is today a leading centre in the field, both in scholarship and teaching. It was one of the first universities in Britain to create a major in Intellectual History and it remains one of the few to offer graduate degrees specifically in this exciting discipline. The MA in Intellectual History is central to the Sussex programme. It aims, first of all, at giving you the opportunity to acquire a thorough knowledge of the interrelations between philosophy, political thought, science and Poster from the Paris Commune Collection, which documents the events of 1871 when republican Paris, religion in the early modern and modern period at odds with Thiers’s government for ratifying a humiliating peace treaty with Bismarck, found itself autonomous for 73 days after the government’s retreat to Versailles across Britain and Europe. You study the major transformations of the reflective and intellectual Summer term and vacation: you undertake You also benefit from membership of the life of both thinkers and doers whose ideas are supervised work on the MA dissertation, which – Sussex Centre for Early Modern Studies (see approached through their literary texts as well as subject to agreement – may involve research www.sussex.ac.uk/cems) which, building their practical contexts. anywhere in Britain or another country, upon a powerful tradition of early modern In addition, the MA programme’s aim is to prepare depending on the topic chosen. studies, pursues interdisciplinary research and you for more advanced study. To this end, and postgraduate teaching in all areas of the early Assessment to put the whole course of study into broader Historical Skills and Methods is assessed by a modern period. You are therefore encouraged to perspective, you take an intensive pro-seminar in portfolio consisting of a group submission, an participate in the cross-disciplinary postgraduate methods and approaches to intellectual history. individual essay and a research proposal. Video reading group and to attend the seminar series This course provides methodological research Documentary is examined on the basis of the for visiting speakers. training in addition to detailed knowledge of the documentaries produced as group projects. Each The Sussex Centre for Intellectual History (see major research areas of intellectual history as it is other course is assessed by a 5,000-word term www.sussex.ac.uk/cih) provides for additional currently practised internationally. paper, each paper to be written in the vacation intellectual exchange through its symposia and following the end of the course in question. All The MA is based in the Sussex Centre for seminars. students write a 20,000-word dissertation, Intellectual History (see www.sussex.ac.uk/cih), which is submitted towards the end of the Funding which arranges seminars and symposia on the summer vacation. Successful EU applicants are advised to apply latest research and is home to significant research to the AHRC (see Fees and funding on pages projects, editorial projects (including ‘The Newton MA in Early Modern History 1500-1800 176-186). Project’ and ‘Natural Law and Enlightenment 1 year full-time/2 years part-time Classics’), and two leading academic journals This programme draws on the range of expertise Programme structure The options listed below are an example of (History of Science and History of European Ideas). in early modern history at Sussex to offer a carefully constructed programme of courses courses that may be available. You take four Funding from English, British, European and American options during your studies. Successful EU applicants are advised to apply history. You take core courses on historical skills Autumn term: Historical Methods and to the AHRC (see Fees and funding on pages and historiography in the autumn term; training Historiography; Making and Unbreaking Britain, 176-186). in early modern palaeography at the East Sussex 1600-1800; Skills and Methods in Local and Programme structure Record Office is also available. Spring term Regional History 1520-1780: Administrative Autumn term: The Theory and Practice of courses emphasise our research strengths in History and Palaeography; and Intellectual Intellectual History; and Intellectual History I: early modern England, Britain and France. The History I: Philosophical Ideas. Philosophical Ideas. University Library is well supplied for the early Spring term: Reading, Writing, Texts; Power and Spring term: Intellectual History II: Political Ideas; modern period: it subscribes to Early English Culture in Early Modern France; Intellectual Books Online, holds the Hartlib papers CD-Rom and Intellectual History III: Scientific Ideas. History II: Political Ideas; and Intellectual History and is home to the Travers Collection of rare III: Scientific Ideas. You may substitute one of Summer term and vacation: you undertake books, of value to scholars of the history of the these options with an option chosen from other supervised work on the MA dissertation, book and rich in examples of printing and binding MA programmes, subject to the agreement of which – subject to agreement – may involve from the 15th to the 19th centuries. There are the convenor. You are particularly encouraged to research anywhere in Britain or another country, also rich archival holdings in the local record select options offered by other MA programmes depending on the topic chosen. offices in Lewes and Chichester. associated with the Centre for Early Modern Studies. 116
  • Assessment The autumn-term courses are examined by History 5,000-word essays. The Theory and Practice of Oral History is examined by a 5,000-word essay plus interview tape and transcript or log. Public History Placement is examined by a 5,000-word report. The Theory and Practice of Life Writing is examined by a 5,000-word portfolio of critical or creative writing. The summer-term dissertation is up to 20,000 words. MA in Modern European History 1 years full-time/2 years part-time Sussex has a long tradition of cutting-edge historical research in modern European history. The MA in Modern European History draws explicitly upon this expertise to offer a carefully constructed programme of courses from Spanish, German and French history. The University Library is well supplied for the study of Modern European History. The Mai ‘68 collection held in the Library’s Special Collections includes printed agitprop, black and white prints, leaflets and handouts, printed papers and contemporaneous editions of a wide Taking it easy? Design and material culture The University of Sussex is a leading international range of magazines. The collection also includes are studied in their historical, social and centre for life history research and teaching. material relating to student unrest in Germany. political context It has the advantage of being able to draw The Library also houses the Eugene W Schulkind upon the Mass Observation Archive (a major Paris Commune collection, the only one of its Assessment international resource, as well as the base for kind in the UK, and one of the four strongest Each course is assessed by a 5,000-word term an ongoing research project in autobiographical on its subject in the world. It documents in paper, each paper to be written in the vacation and documentary writing), which is housed in the extraordinary detail (there are around 2,500 following the end of the course in question. All University Library, and has close links with local items) the events of 1871. students write a 20,000-word dissertation, oral and community history projects. MA students are attached to the Centre for which is submitted towards the end of the Funding Modern European Cultural History, which has summer vacation. Successful EU applicants are advised to apply to strong connections with European institutions MA in Life History Research: Oral History the AHRC for support (see Fees and funding on and organises conferences and seminars among and Life Story Documents pages 176-186). other activities. You also benefit from strong 1 year full-time/2 years part-time departmental links to the Centre for German- Programme structure Jewish Studies (see www.sussex.ac.uk/cgjs/). In the last three decades, life history research This MA consists of three core courses and a has been at the forefront of the development Established at Sussex in 1994, this Centre has fourth course chosen from an array of options. developed into a major institution for the study of of qualitative research as a legitimate and The core courses are taught in a series of day important research methodology. It has also the history, culture and thought of Jews in central schools in the autumn and spring terms to Europe and for the training of a new generation been part of a significant intellectual, social and facilitate access by students living at a distance political movement in this country and abroad. of teachers and researchers in this field. The or studying part time. Over two years, p