University of Sussex undergraduate prospectus: How To Choose your degree
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Undergraduate prospectus - University of Sussex

Undergraduate prospectus - University of Sussex

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University of Sussex undergraduate prospectus: How To Choose your degree University of Sussex undergraduate prospectus: How To Choose your degree Document Transcript

  • How to choose 040 American studies How to choose your degree 043 Anthropology 045 Archaeology and landscape your degree 047 140 Art history Astronomy (see Physics and astronomy) 049 Biochemistry 052 Biology 054 Business and management studies 056 Chemistry 058 Cognitive science 060 Community development (part-time) C hoosing the right degree is one of the most important decisions you will make. Think carefully about what 061 065 067 Computing Contemporary European studies Creativity and the arts (part-time) you want from your studies and what the 068 Cultural studies University can offer. Sussex degrees are 070 Cultures and communities (part-time) 147 Design and technology (see Product design) designed so you can explore subjects in 071 Development studies ways that interest you, as you develop your 073 Drama studies knowledge and understanding. Students 075 Ecology and conservation on single honours programmes choose 077 Economics several courses from outside their 080 Engineering: electrical, electronic and computer systems discipline, while joint degrees and minor 083 Engineering for society: environment options allow you to study exciting or international development 085 Engineering: mechanical, automotive combinations of different subjects. and design Single honours 088 English Single honours programmes allow you to focus mostly on 091 English language one subject, such as Anthropology, English or Psychology. 094 English language teaching (ELT) Within this subject, you will have a range of options so 095 Environmental science you can explore particular areas. You will also select 097 Film studies complementary courses from other subjects to help you 111 French (see Languages at Sussex) understand the subject in its wider context. 099 Geography Joint degrees 111 German (see Languages at Sussex) If you want to study more than one subject in depth, our joint 103 History degrees offer exciting combinations of subjects, like History 106 Human sciences and Film Studies, or Politics and Philosophy. 061 Information technology (see Computing) What you learn in one subject complements and enhances 108 International relations what you learn in the other. Spending half your time on one 111 Italian (see Languages at Sussex) subject and half on the other, you can still choose options 045 Landscape studies (see Archaeology that interest you in each. and landscape) Majors and minors 111 Languages at Sussex Finally, if you want to have a main area of study, but gain 114 Law some understanding in another subject as well, we offer 117 Linguistics an exciting range of ‘minors’ alongside the main degree 054 Management (see Business and programme, such as American Studies with Spanish or management studies) Law with Anthropology. This means you spend three-quarters 119 Mathematics of your time on the major subject and a quarter on the minor 122 Media studies subject. 125 Medical neuroscience 127 Medicine Understanding each subject area Details of all the single honours, joints and minors available 129 Molecular genetics in each subject area are set out on the following pages. 131 Molecular medicine For each, you can see what studying that subject involves 133 Music and where it might take you. As well as looking at the 136 Neuroscience subjects that first interest you, take time to look at a variety 138 Philosophy of others. Sussex offers areas of study that may be new to 140 Physics and astronomy you. But as you explore them, you may find they are just 144 Politics what you want to do. 147 Product design The best way of really understanding what is involved in 149 Psychology any particular degree programme is to talk to us at Sussex. 152 Social work We give contact details for each subject area so you can 154 Sociology get in touch. 111 Spanish (see Languages at Sussex) 172 Alphabetical degree finder and fee bands 39
  • Lalla’s American studies perspective American studies x chose American Studies at Sussex ‘I x I thought it would be an interesting as complement to my English degree. x x tutors in the American Studies The Department are inspirational, x constantly bringing new, exciting x ideas to seminars and changing my x perspectives. x ‘The fact that it’s a relatively small x department really enhances the x learning experience: classes are more x Essentials Why American studies? intimate, and students are able to x The United States is the sole superpower in the 21st century and its political, economic and cultural build a good relationship with their x What American studies degrees are there? influence is increasingly pervasive and important to us tutors. x American Studies American Studies and English all, wherever we may live. Studying American history, x currently on my year abroad at ‘I’m American Studies and Film Studies culture and society in the context of the Americas Reed University, in Portland, and so x American studies and French therefore provides much needed understanding of how x it’s been an incredibly enriching far, American Studies and History an increasingly interconnected world has come to be the experience. The tutors here expect x American Studies and International Relations way it is. different qualities in their students’ x American Studies and Politics work from those at Sussex, which x American Studies and Spanish Why American studies at Sussex? has pushed me to re-examine my American Studies with French • Our Department achieved a grade 5 (recognising writing and argumentation styles. x American Studies with Spanish research of national and international excellence) in ‘Both at Reed and at Sussex you are x the last Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). What degrees can I do with American studies encouraged to express personal, yet x as a minor? • We are among the UK’s leading research centres in intellectually rigorous opinions, all x Law with American Studies (3 years) (p115) the study of American literature and history. x which is supported by a focus on of Law with American Studies (4 years) (p115) • International faculty, including both American and research at Sussex. The combination x Psychology with American Studies (p151) European scholars, provide you with a range of critical x the two will be incredibly useful once of What A levels do I need? perspectives. x have to write my dissertation, as I’m I gaining so much more confidence in x (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications • We offer you the opportunity to specialise in your x expression of my own ideas. the information, see pages 159-162) preferred field: literature and culture or history and ‘Beyond that, I think American Studies x politics. Typical offer range ABB-BBB x Sussex provides an excellent base at • We have the most extensive Year Abroad scheme of For American Studies and English, A levels (or x postgraduate study, partly because for any American studies programme in the UK. equivalent) must include English, English Literature or x the flexibility of the programme, of the combined A level in English Language and Literature • The experience of studying on the Year Abroad scheme x mainly because of the brilliant but at grade A gives our graduates a competitive advantage in the academic staff.’ job market. For programmes including languages, see page 112 for information about entry requirements What sort of career could I have? Lalla Wordsworth • broadcast and print media journalism What qualities should I bring? Enthusiasm and commitment; intellectual flexibility; • teaching expressive writing style; broad-based knowledge; • television and film production an independent mind • finance and industry Fees See pages 166-167 for information on fees • public relations English language requirements • political administration. IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English language requirements, see pages 162 How do I find out more? For more information, contact the subject coordinator: E ug.admissions@americanstudies.sussex.ac.uk T +44 (0)1273 678841 F +44 (0)1273 623246 University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QN, UK www.sussex.ac.uk/americanstudies When can I visit? Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or call 01273 876787 Graffiti on a mail box in Brooklyn, New York 40
  • Core courses American studies Year 1 You take survey courses covering America’s beginnings until the late 19th century, focusing on either literature and culture or history and politics. Alongside, you take a course that considers other parts of the Americas, and America Inside/ Out, which is about the way the US sees itself and the way the country is perceived by the rest of the world. A lecture series entitled Foundations of America: From Colonisation to Reconstruction serves as a comprehensive introduction to American studies for both major and minor students. Year 2 As in year 1, you take survey courses in your specialist track, now covering the period from Mount Rushmore: sculptures of the heads of former US presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, the late 19th century until Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln the present. You also choose two courses How will I learn? Degrees combining the study of literature, Initially, courses are taught by lectures and classes, giving history, culture and politics in you a structured approach to the topic. As you progress, American Studies various ways. For example, more teaching is conducted in seminars and lectures, so BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: T700 the study of American cinema, you have scope to demonstrate your oral and presentation This is our most popular American Studies degree, skills, as well as your ability to work in groups. You spend in which you can develop your knowledge of the US the question of race in America, your third year at a university in the Americas where a in the context of the Americas to the fullest extent. You the experience of immigrants, variety of teaching methods and tests are used. Back at specialise in literature and culture or history and politics or issues of gender. Sussex in your final year you are taught in small seminar from the beginning, but in order to enable you to work The lecture series America in the groups and through individual supervision. Assessment across subjects as well, you also take interdisciplinary 20th Century follows on from your includes coursework, short essays, take-away papers, courses on American topics throughout your degree lectures in year 1. unseen exams and in-class tests in years 1 and 2, with programme. longer essays and dissertations in your final year to reflect Year 3 First- and second-year lectures and classes cover your increasing ability to work independently and to design Individual study programme on the American history and politics, literature and culture right your own projects. As you become more experienced, your up to contemporary events. Within the course structure year abroad marks will carry more weight: you have to pass your first described in the core courses list, you also have options year to progress into the second, but only the work done in in years 1 and 2 in complementary subjects such as Year 4 years 2, 3 and 4 will count towards your final degree. Marks cultural studies, English, film and media studies, An important part of your work in the final year are more heavily weighted than in years 2 politics, or history. These, together with the in your final year is writing a and 3. interdisciplinary courses, broaden your knowledge dissertation on a topic of your What will I achieve? and increase your choices. choice with individual supervision. • Knowledge of the US in the context of the Americas You also choose options from a You spend year 3 abroad, where you choose your own across a range of topics and historical periods. programme of study in consultation with your Sussex range of specialist courses. • An appreciation and understanding of the ways in tutors. Returning to Sussex for your final year, you If you take American studies as which different fields of study combine to give a deeper take specialist options in your chosen track, as well as part of a joint degree, you spend understanding of American culture, history and society. interdisciplinary courses, and you write a dissertation half your time taking American • The educational, cultural and social experience of a on a topic of your choice. studies courses and half taking year abroad. courses from your joint subject. See the core courses list for more details. • The ability to recognise, represent and reflect on ideas If American studies is your minor and concepts from other cultures and periods, and American Studies and English subject, you take American to analyse texts within their historical, social and BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: TQ73 studies interdisciplinary courses cultural context. This degree gives you the opportunity to study a plus the lecture series in the range of literature in English from different periods. • The skills you need to learn independently and to first two years, so that you are You learn to appreciate literary genres and forms – communicate clearly what you have learned. well prepared for your year including poetry, drama, the novel and the short story – Specialists in literature and culture learn to analyse and and understand the contexts within which literary texts abroad. You do not specialise in a reflect critically on a range of forms and genres, from are produced and read, as well as the ways in which they particular track. poetry and the novel to film and other forms of popular interact with other media. You complement this with a If you are taking a minor in French culture. You understand the contexts in which literary specialised knowledge of the literature and culture of or Spanish, you will spend a texts and other forms of cultural expression are produced quarter of years 1 and 2 on your the US in the context of the Americas. and received, as well as different theories and critical language, and the rest either methods that we can use in our reading. First-year courses introduce you to the systematic study on American studies only, or on of English and American literature, with courses on American studies plus one free History and politics specialists gain knowledge and modern English literature and American culture in option course in a related subject. understanding of American history from colonial times year 2. After your year abroad you take in-depth special through to the present day. You learn to use different options in your final year. Your final year is fully devoted to historical methods and you develop awareness of historical American studies. See the core courses list for details of American studies specialisms (for example social, economic, gender, oral, and intellectual history). Most of all, you understand courses; refer to the English subject entry on page 88 for America’s past, but you are also able to analyse historical more information on these courses. processes that have given rise to the major political and social challenges facing today’s global society. 41
  • Tim’s You combine the study of British, European and perspective comparative history with a specialised knowledge of American studies the US in the context of the Americas across a range ‘I was attracted to Sussex because x of disciplines and historical periods. of x the interdisciplinary approach to First-year courses introduce you to the systematic study learning that the University promotes. x of British, American and European history, with courses I’ve x appreciated being able to take on modern American history and American culture in courses in linguistics, art history, x year 2. After your year in a North American university you philosophy and English, which have x take in-depth special options in your final year, including not x only broadened my horizons, but a documentary-based special subject in history. also complemented my American x Studies major. x See the core courses list on page 41 for details of ‘The year abroad in the US was a American studies courses; refer to the history subject x entry on page 103 for more information on these courses. definite high point, especially as x Sussex has exchange programmes x American Studies and with prestigious institutions. I spent x International Relations a x superb year at the University of BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: TL72 California, Berkeley, which was a x This degree aims to give you an understanding of the fantastic way to immerse myself in the x major practical, political and moral challenges facing American culture and way of life. x contemporary global society. You gain knowledge of the history of the modern international system and ‘The opportunities after such a well- x of the ideas that have been developed to explain it. rounded degree are boundless. The x In particular, you acquire specialist knowledge of flexibility of the year abroad enabled x the political, economic, military and cultural role me to take a course in human x the US plays in the modern world. You develop an resources management while I was at x understanding of the significance of the world economy Berkeley, and I’m hoping to pursue a x in the international system, and of the nature of power career in this area of business when xx and political processes within differing comparative and I graduate at the end of this year.’ cultural contexts. American Studies and Film Studies First-year courses introduce you to the systematic study Tim Rounding BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: TP73 of America and the international system, with courses In this programme you gain insight into the history, on theoretical approaches, political economy, modern literature and culture of the US in the context of the American history and American culture in year 2. Americas and, in addition, you learn to read visual Returning to Sussex for your final year, you take in- images on film and study the cinematic experience. depth special options, including a dissertation on an international relations topic. The film studies elements of the programme offer a firm foundation in visual literacy, film genres and film theory, See the core courses list on page 41 for details of by introducing you to a diverse range of film-making and American studies courses; refer to the international viewing across the globe. relations subject entry on page 108 for more information on these courses. In year 1 you focus on the technical aspects of film analysis, and you study aspects of the history of film American Studies and Politics and of cinema from different cultures. BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: TL7F Scott’s This degree focuses on the importance of politics In year 2 you look at issues of film theory and genre in and places its study in a wider context of American career perspective greater depth, before moving on to explore a range of historical and political development. You gain an ‘My x American studies courses taught cinematic practices. Alongside this, you select American understanding of modern political thought and of studies courses from options that include modern key developments in modern British and American me x a huge amount about history, American history, culture and literature. political history. You also learn to analyse events, ideas, politics and social structures – all x incredibly useful for journalism. x During your final year you have the opportunity to work institutions and practices in the political world. I x spent my year abroad in Chicago, on a dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor, See the core courses list on page 41 for details of where I learned a great deal about the x and you choose from a range of film options. American studies courses; refer to the politics subject US x press, and I also got invaluable See the core courses list on page 41 for details of entry on page 144 for more information on these courses. experience working on the University’s x American studies courses; refer to the film studies entry American Studies with French monthly magazine. x on page 97 for more information on these courses. BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: T7R1 ‘When I graduated, I got a job as a staff x This programme is particularly suited to those American Studies and French writer on a business magazine, which x BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: TR71 interested in Canadian as well as American studies. I x went on to edit. After that, I spent a American Studies and Spanish The combination with French allows you to gain year or so freelancing, before going x BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: TR74 proficiency in the language so that you can study travelling for eight months. When I got x These programmes allow you to study the culture and Canadian bilingual literature and culture, as well as the back to the UK, Caspian Publishing x history of the US in the context of the Americas, in early Francophone regions of the US. Your year abroad asked me to set up and launch Real x combination with developing your knowledge of French will be spent in French Canada or the Caribbean. IR, x a new business magazine, which or Spanish. Your year abroad will be spent in a university See the core courses list on page 41 for details I’m x editing now. If you’re thinking of a in Francophone Canada or in Latin America, where you of American studies courses; refer to the languages career in journalism, I can’t think of x can further improve your linguistic skills and your cultural at Sussex entry on page 111 for more information on a x better place to study than Sussex. knowledge. these courses. And Brighton is tons of fun.’ See the core courses list on page 41 for details of American Studies with Spanish American studies courses; refer to the languages subject BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: T7R4 Scott Payton entry on page 111 for more information on languages. Editor of Real IR This programme is especially suited to those American Studies and History interested in Hispanic America, such as Mexico and BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: TV71 Cuba, or Hispanic regions in the US. You will be able to This degree aims to give you a knowledge and study the literature, culture and history of North America understanding of the human past and awareness and in the context of the Americas and at the same time understanding of historical processes that have a develop your language skills in Spanish. Your year abroad will be spent in a university in the Caribbean or Latin bearing on the present. You learn to reflect on differing America, to enable you to further your knowledge of interpretations of the medium and distant past and these areas. come to appreciate the rich diversity of historical specialisms including social, economic, cultural, political, See the core courses list on page 41 for details of intellectual, gender, oral, and environmental history. American studies courses; refer to the languages at Sussex entry on page 111 for more information on Spanish courses. 42
  • Anthropology Anthropology Essentials Why anthropology? Anthropologists study cultural and social diversity. What anthropology degrees are there? Historically, they studied so-called ‘small-scale’ and Anthropology ‘traditional’ societies. Increasingly, anthropologists Anthropology and Contemporary European Studies are concerned with towns and cities in a modern and Anthropology and Cultural Studies changing world. Anthropology and Development Studies Anthropologists collect information through participant Anthropology and French Anthropology and Italian observation – living in the societies they are studying for Anthropology and Languages (French and Spanish) lengthy periods of time and learning their languages. Anthropology and Spanish This attention to close, detailed accounts of particular cases (known as ethnography) enables anthropologists Art History and Anthropology (p48) to analyse and explain aspects of social change that Geography and Anthropology (p101) may not be visible at the larger, or macro, level. History and Anthropology (p104) Top: performance of a young International Relations and Anthropology (p110) Although anthropology depends on the detailed study men’s masquerade cult Politics and Anthropology (p145) of specific cases, the issues we investigate are much in south-eastern Nigeria broader and are concerned with understanding humans What degrees can I take with anthropology both as being created by, and as the creators of, culture Below: lyra-accompanied singers on as a minor? and society. the Greek island of Nisyros Law with Anthropology (p116) See also Development studies (p71), Why anthropology at Sussex? Human sciences (p106) • Sussex has one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK and attracts applicants from What A levels do I need? around the world. (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications information, see pages 159-162) • Our Department has an ‘excellent’ rating from the Typical offer range AAB-BBB most recent assessment of teaching quality and its research is internationally rated. It is among the most For programmes including languages, see page 112 for active research departments in Britain. information about entry requirements • Our research interests include the impact of What qualities should I bring? Intellectual curiosity; creative thought; independence; globalisation in Africa, Europe and Asia; the Ivan’s enthusiasm meaning and social effects of economic change and perspective ‘development’; and the politics of human rights in an Fees international context. The undergraduate curriculum ‘When I first came to Sussex, I liked x See pages 166-167 for information on fees reflects these areas of research. the x idea of a discipline concerned with cultural diversity. I thought of x English language requirements • The Department is young and dynamic, and our anthropology as a fascinating subject, x IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the teaching and research focus on contemporary which looked at “other” people and x Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English developments in anthropology. studied different cultures. x language requirements, see pages 162 • We provide a range of degrees that allow you to ‘The Anthropology degree at Sussex x Foundation year for non-EU students combine anthropology with other disciplines in a has x helped me appreciate the diversity If your qualifications (including English language) do not coherent and structured framework. of x the world we live in. Through lectures, yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to seminars and film screenings, I’ve been x the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an • There are opportunities for placements overseas presented with a world where people x international foundation year entry route. See page 30 through our year abroad programme and through the make claims, debate power relations, x for details Erasmus exchange scheme. and x define themselves and others. How do I find out more? What sort of career could I have? ‘I’ve learned to think of “others” as x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: Anthropology tends to attract students with creative individuals who try to come to grips x E ug.admissions@anthropology.sussex.ac.uk minds. Given this, and the central interests of with local questions and global x T +44 (0)1273 877185 anthropologists in cultural diversity in a changing world, dynamics. The Anthropology degree x F +44 (0)1273 623572 anthropology degrees lead to a wide range of career at x Sussex has taken me beyond the Anthropology, University of Sussex, Falmer, opportunities. These include jobs in: rhetoric of multiculturalism and has x Brighton BN1 9SJ, UK • journalism shown me the complexity of human x www.sussex.ac.uk/anthropology experience around the world.’ When can I visit? • development work: employees of or consultants for Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and agencies such as the Department for International, Ivan 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Development (DFID) and international non- Costantino Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors governmental organisations (NGOs), such as Oxfam or call 01273 876787 or Amnesty International • Civil Service, including local government and the Foreign & Commonwealth Office • the world of business. Alternatively, you are equipped to go on to further study to gain professional qualifications, for example in law, or to develop research interests in anthropology. 43
  • How will I learn? Anthropology and Development Studies We emphasise interactive forms of teaching such as BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LL69 Anthropology seminars, workshops and tutorials, though there are This degree provides you with an excellent also lectures. You will develop your ability to work understanding of contemporary anthropology and independently and to communicate ideas through development studies and the close (if at times tense) essays and other forms of presentation. Assessment relationship between them. includes exams and coursework, as well as end-of- In years 1 and 2 you take the core courses in both course essays and dissertations. anthropology and development studies. In year 3 What will I achieve? you choose options from both subjects. • A wide understanding of contemporary cultures and See the core courses list for details of anthropology societies and an ability to understand processes of courses; refer to the development studies subject entry change in the modern world. on page 71 for more information on these courses. • The ability to relate anthropology to a broad range Anthropology and French of practical contexts. BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: LR61 • An understanding of the nature of cultural and social Anthropology and Italian differences and how to approach these differences BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: LR63 in the contemporary world. Anthropology and Spanish BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: LR64 • Competence and confidence in presenting your own These degrees allow you to acquire a near-native ideas as well as those of others. competence in a European language other than English • Analytical skills, useful in a wide range of contexts. as well as an excellent understanding of contemporary anthropology. Your language skills, and immersion Degrees in another culture, will give you an awareness of how language informs our conception of the world, Anthropology helping you to view your own position from an outside BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: L600 perspective. At the same time you will develop the skills This degree provides you with an excellent under- necessary for an anthropological understanding of social standing of contemporary anthropology. It develops and cultural phenomena. your intellectual and practical skills in the analysis and interpretation of ethnographic data and your grasp In years 1 and 2 and your final year you spend half your of anthropological theory. time studying anthropology and half studying a European language in its linguistic, cultural and social context. By the end of the degree you will understand the major contemporary debates in anthropology and the history You spend year 3 studying at a university appropriate to of the discipline. You learn about a wide range of your selected language, in Europe, Spanish-speaking Women fetching water at a well in Rajasthan, India ethnographic data and the ways in which theory can be Latin America or French overseas territories, before used to understand this material. You also develop an returning to Sussex for your final year. Core courses appreciation of the ethical issues involved in research See the core courses list for details of anthropology and analysis. courses; refer to the languages subject entry on page Year 1 In years 1 and 2, in addition to the courses listed 111 for more information on these courses. You take: Anthropology in Theory; Ethnographic Film; Ethnographic above, you have a choice of complementary course Anthropology and Languages Methods; Reading Ethnography; options drawn from related subjects such as art history, (French and Spanish) and The Anthropological development studies, languages and international BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: LR68 relations. These courses give you greater breadth and This degree allows you to acquire near-native Imagination. choice in your studies. In the third year you devote all competence in French and Spanish, as well as an your time to anthropology. excellent understanding of contemporary anthropology. Year 2 See the core courses list for details of anthropology Your language skills, and immersion in other cultures, You take: Culture and courses. will give you an awareness of how language informs Representation; Issues in our conception of the world, helping you to view your Contemporary Anthropology; Anthropology and Contemporary European Studies own position from an outside perspective. At the Material Cultures; Politics, Power BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LR69 same time you will develop the skills necessary for an and Legitimacy; and Reproduction, This degree provides you with an excellent grasp anthropological understanding of social and cultural Self and Society. of the ways in which anthropology can expand our phenomena. understanding of Europe and the significant Year 3 contemporary theoretical debates. In years 1 and 2 and your final year you spend half your You take: Anthropology of time studying anthropology and half studying the two You take core courses in both anthropology and languages in their linguistic, cultural and social context. Economic Processes; and Religion contemporary European studies in years 1 and 2 and Ritual. and choose options from each subject in year 3. You spend year 3 studying at an appropriate university You also take one or two in Europe, Spanish-speaking Latin America or French advanced topics in anthropology See the core courses list for details of anthropology overseas territories, before returning to Sussex for your including: Anthropology of courses; refer to the contemporary European studies final year. subject entry on page 65 for more information on Fertility, Reproduction and Health; See the core courses list for details of anthropology these courses. Anthropology of the Body; Culture, courses; refer to the languages subject entry on Anthropology and History; Current Anthropology and Cultural Studies page 111 for more information on these courses. Themes in the Anthropology BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LR6X of Latin America; Feminist You graduate from this degree with a comprehensive Anthropology; Human Rights, Law knowledge of anthropology and cultural studies and the and Power; Landscape/Memory/ complex ways in which the two disciplines relate to, and Identity; Medicine and Culture; inform, each other. The Anthropology of Africa; The In years 1 and 2 you take the core courses in both Anthropology of Development; anthropology and cultural studies. In year 3 you choose The Anthropology of Europe; and options from both subjects. The Anthropology of South Asia. See the core courses list for details of anthropology courses; refer to the cultural studies subject entry on page 68 for more information on these courses. 44
  • Archaeology and landscape Natalia’s Archaeology and landscape perspective ‘Although I’ve never had a clear idea x of x my perfect job, I knew I wanted to pursue the fields where my passions x have always been – geography and x archaeology – so a joint degree is ideal x for x me. ‘The two subjects complement each x other perfectly and I’ve often found x that the specific aspects you learn x in x one area can be applied to the other, giving me that extra lift in my x Essentials Why archaeology and landscape? understanding in the two subjects. x Archaeology provides interdisciplinary frameworks ‘The benefit of this joint degree is that x The BA Archaeology and Landscape (part-time) and methodologies for understanding and interpreting the past. It enables you to investigate the human I x get to explore a wide range of topics, is offered by the University’s Centre for Continuing Education past – from our ancestral origins in Africa to modern and x the options available allow me times. Complementing this, the study of landscape to x study my personal interests in What archaeology and landcsape degrees are enables historical, cultural, ecological, geological and greater depth. x there? geographical elements to be considered as components ‘The flexible schedule gives me x Archaeology and Landscape (part-time) of both past and present landscapes. time to venture to the many active x Art History and Archaeology (see also p48) archaeological sites locally. I’ve had x Our archaeological and landscape heritage is a What qualifications do I need? valuable, finite and vulnerable resource, which requires some extraordinary experiences in x For Art History and Archaeology, see page 48 studying geography and archaeology x investigation, recording and analysis to high professional For Archaeology and Landscape (part-time), there standards. In our ever-changing world an appreciation at x Sussex, and I’ve only been here just are no standard entrance requirements; offers are and understanding of these issues is needed by over a year.’ made on the basis of a written application and (where government, planners and the general public. appropriate) an interview and a further short piece of Natalia Borg These subjects will appeal to those with a sense of written work. Apply direct to the Centre for Continuing exploration and discovery of the world around them. Education (not through UCAS) for admission. You should normally apply by the end of June for admission Why archaeology and landscape at Sussex? in October Sussex offers two distinct approaches to studying What qualities should I bring? archaeology and landscape. You can choose to Intellectual curiosity; lateral thinking; readiness to be take archaeology alongside another subject that challenged; passion for the past and the environment; complements and enhances your studies, as part commitment; a love of the outdoors of a full-time joint degree programme – the BA in Art History and Archaeology. Alternatively, our BA in Fees Archaeology and Landscape (offered by the University’s See pages 166-167 for information on fees Centre for Continuing Education) allows students from David’s English language requirements a wide range of academic interests and vocational perspective IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the backgrounds to pursue interdiscliplinary study of ‘When I joined an evening open course x Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English archaeology and landscape on a part-time basis. run x by the Centre for Continuing language requirements, see page 162 Education on Vernacular Architecture, I x Archaeology and landscape at Sussex offers you: How do I find out more? had x no idea of where it would, or could, • Full-time and part-time routes. lead. Now I’m taking a part-time BA x For more information, contact the admissions coordinator: • Part-time BA Archaeology and Landscape is taught involving archaeology and landscape. x E si-admissions@sussex.ac.uk evenings and weekends. Highlights have included Bronze Age x T +44 (0)1273 877888 digs on the Downs; exploring medieval x • Both degree programmes have a strong vocational F +44 (0)1273 877534 cellars in Winchelsea; and trying to tell x element with many employment-specific transferable Centre for Continuing Education, my x Erica tetralix from my Ulex minor in skills. University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QQ, UK Ashdown Forest! x www.sussex.ac.uk/cce • Archaeology is offered in combination with ‘After the initial core year I had x complementary disciplines. the x chance to choose from many Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. • Excellent opportunities for fieldwork and research in interesting courses and decided to x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors contrasting landscapes. specialise in achaeology. This ranged x or call 01273 876787 from learning basic excavation x • Tutors are actively engaged in practical archaeology techniques at Barcombe Roman x CCE holds various events throughout Sussex. Please and landscape fieldwork. villa x to individually researching the check the CCE website for details • The University is situated within easy reach of a rich local chalk and lime industry in x variety of contrasting landscapes and archaeological archives and the field. All is framed x sites. within the landscape and mankind’s x What sort of career could I have? continuing influence on what we now x • field archaeologist see s all around us. I’ve learnt so much about my surroundings that I feel x • conservation policy maker or practitioner the x programme should come with a • estate management warning that all who enter will never x see x anything in quite the same way • environmental and land management again.’ • teaching David Millum • professional researcher. Vertical photography of a Roman well at the University’s excavation at Barcombe, Sussex 45
  • How will I learn? Degrees Archaeology and Landscape BA in Archaeology and Landscape Archaeology and landscape core courses The core teaching methods of the BA in Archaeology Archaeology and Landscape and Landscape are seminar sessions, field work and BA (Hons), 6 years part-time Year 1 practical sessions. You are given every encouragement This innovative programme is designed with the needs Investigating Archaeology and and assistance to make full use of the resources on of local part-time students in mind. CCE’s open-entry Landscape campus to aid your private study in support of the policy, flexible progress arrangements and specially People in the Landscape taught sessions. Field trips are an important element of timetabled classes allow you to organise your part-time this programme. Assessments for this degree include studies to fit in with your life. Many of our students Years 2 and 4 essays, practical reports, field notebooks, poster manage to balance full-time work with their university Courses from a range of options presentations, and a final dissertation. Assessed studies. Although normally taken over six years it may such as Archaeology; Field assignments at level 1 (normally the first two years of be possible to ‘fast-track’ through the programme in as Biology; Field Geology; and study) do not contribute to your final classification. The little as four years. Local History dissertation, based on your own research project, is the The degree provides an opportunity for students with a most significant assignment. range of academic interests and vocational backgrounds Year 3 BA in Art History and Archaeology to explore issues that cross and confront disciplinary Past Societies Most study takes place in lecture and seminar sessions, boundaries. We are experienced in working with mature Human Palaeoecology supported by practical work and field work. This degree and part-time students. Specialist support and guidance requires some weekend work and various field trips/site are available for students who would like help adjusting Year 5 visits. All BA Archaeology and Art History students are to the demands of university-level study. Researching Archaeology and required to undertake a minimum of 15 days of practical Landscape, and either Credits from courses taken either in CCE or at other work (excavation, survey, finds processing, etc). higher education institutions may, where appropriate, Conservation, Agriculture and Assessments include essays, practical reports, field contribute towards completion of the degree. It is Landscape, or notebooks, unseen exams and a final dissertation. possible to exit from the programme with a Certificate Geographical Information What will I achieve? of Higher Education after successfully completing Systems, or BA in Archaeology and Landscape two years or a Diploma of Higher Education after Material Culture • An understanding of how landscapes have been successfully completing four years. constructed and exploited – physically (in terms of Year 6 The degree links hands-on practical work to theory. natural and human occupancy), socially and culturally. Current Debates in Archaeology In the first and third years you will take core courses: • Key skills including physical observation, recording and Landscape Investigating Archaeology and Landscapes, People and the analysis of secondary scholarship. Independent Study: Archaeology in the Landscape, Past Societies, and Human and Landscape • Experience of comparative work and training in Palaeoecology. In the second and fourth years you deriving conclusions from a variety of evidence. will be able to choose option courses from various disciplines across archaeology and landscape. In years • Experience of different modes of presentation, 5 and 6 you will take one further option and further Art History and Archaeology from short verbal reports and concise summaries to core courses, including an individual research project core courses extended written analyses of particular problems. supported by a supervisor, which will lead to the writing • Quantitative and qualitative skills, combining the of a dissertation. Year 1 visual and aural with the measurable. Archaeological Survey Art History and Archaeology Archaeological Excavation and • Understanding of the principles and methods by BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS code: VV34 Post-Excavation which archaeological, ecological and other data is This programme is designed to meet the needs of full-time Archaeological Fieldwork acquired, recorded, analysed and used to understand students wishing to study two disciplines rather than one. the human past as well as past, present and future The especially timetabled archaeology classes (usually one evening a week and some weekend day schools) will Year 2 landscapes. suit students who wish to undertake part-time daytime Past Societies • Knowledge of some of the key stages in cultural Option courses such as: British work during their degree programme. This degree builds on evolution during the last four million years. Prehistory; British Archaeology links between art history and archaeology, especially with BA in Art History and Archaeology regard to material culture. The archaeology component of of the First Millennium AD; • Understanding of the principles and methods by which our joint degree programme provides practical hands-on The Archaeology of Medieval archaeological data is acquired, recorded, analysed work linked to theory. England and Wales; Aspects of and used to reconstruct the human past. Post-Medieval Archaeology; and Year 1 introduces the nature of archaeological data and the practical approaches by which that data is located, The Recording and Analysis of • Broad knowledge of the range and varied nature of archaeological data, and the ability to identify, recorded and analysed. Thus, in the first term, students Artefacts and Pottery describe and record various types. take Archaeological Survey, which introduces the subject of archaeology, the threats to our archaeological heritage, Year 3 • Knowledge of some of the key stages in cultural Independent Study and the non-excavation methods (eg aerial photography) evolution during the last four million years. Option courses such as those by which archaeologists locate and record sites. In the • The acquisition, through practical work, of a range following term, students take Archaeological Excavation offered in year 2 of basic fieldwork techniques that can be used on and Post-Excavation, which covers methodology, reports archaeological projects. and dating techniques. The final component of the first year of study for archaeology involves the undertaking of • An appreciation of the history of the discipline and the 15 days of practical work. ability to gather, assess and present evidence. Year 2 provides you with more theory and knowledge about • Understanding of the principles and methods by which some aspects of human cultural evolution. In the autumn archaeological data is acquired, recorded, analysed term you will take Past Societies and explore the wide and used to reconstruct the human past. variety of human experience in the past. In the spring and • Broad knowledge of the range and varied nature summer terms you will choose an option course in order of archaeological data, and the ability to identify, to gain an in-depth knowledge of the archaeology of a describe and record various types. selected period (eg British Prehistory or Medieval England and Wales), or subject (eg The Recording and Analysis of • Knowledge of some of the key stages in cultural Artifacts and Pottery). evolution during the last four million years. In year 3 you will take Researching Archaeology and • The acquisition, through practical work, of a range Landscape in the autumn term. This course will provide of basic fieldwork techniques that can be used on you with the necessary skills to undertake the final archaeological projects. course, an independent research project, supported by a • An appreciation of the history of the discipline and the supervisor, which will lead to the writing of a dissertation. ability to gather, assess and present evidence. See the core courses list for details of archaeology courses; refer to the art history subject entry on page 47 for more information on these courses. 46
  • Robert’s Art history perspective Art history x first looked at the University of Sussex ‘I x because of its proximity to London, x enabling me to visit the galleries there x very easily. This closeness is reflected x the partnership with the Victoria and in x Albert Museum, and the bonus of being x able to work with, and learn from, their x curators. x ‘The Art History Department at Sussex x quite small, and is centred around is x slide library, a private study space the Essentials Why art history at Sussex? x students and lecturers alike, with a for • We achieved a grade 5 (recognising research of x comfortable and friendly atmosphere. What art history degrees are there? national and international excellence) in the last x ‘The courses on offer cover a broad Art History Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). x interesting spectrum, with the trip and Art History and a Language (one from French, German, Italian or Spanish) • Excellent facilities, including a comprehensive slide x Rome in the first year a particularly to Art History and Anthropology library and student working space the envy of many xx interesting, memorable and Art History and Archaeology (see also p46) larger institutions. enjoyable experience.’ Art History and Cultural Studies • A small, friendly department with a close-knit Art History and Film Studies Robert Sutton community of students and staff. Art History and History • All first-year students go on a supervised study English and Art History (p89) trip abroad, subsidised by the University, providing What A levels do I need? opportunities to explore art works in their original (For International Baccalaureate and other location. qualifications information, see pages 159-162) • Unusually for a UK university, we cover a wide Typical offer range ABB-BBB range of periods and places from Byzantium to Renaissance Italy to contemporary America. For programmes including languages, see page 112 for information about entry requirements • A staff exchange with the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London allows you to take courses What qualities should I bring? based on the Museum’s collections and curatorial Visual skills; broad understanding; motivation and expertise. In recent years, students have studied commitment; independence; writing skills; creativity contemporary photography, Indian art and Spanish Fees sculpture with V&A curators. See pages 166-167 for information on fees What sort of career could I have? English language requirements • Museums and galleries. Recent graduates are IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the working at the V&A and the National Portrait Gallery, Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English at the Regency Town House (a restoration project in language requirements, see page 162 Brighton), and for a photographic gallery in New York. How do I find out more? For more information, contact the subject coordinator: • Publishing. E ug.admissions@arthistory.sussex.ac.uk • The media and public relations. A recent graduate is T +44 (0)1273 873525 now a TV scriptwriter. F +44 (0)1273 625972 Art History, Arts B, University of Sussex, How will I learn? Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QN, UK Courses are taught by a mixture of lectures, seminars www.sussex.ac.uk/arthistory and workshops. In your first year you write essays, give When can I visit? presentations to the tutor and other students, keep Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and portfolios of your work, undertake group projects and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. keep a logbook while you are on the field trip abroad to Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors help you record your work with both text and illustration. or call 01273 876787 In your second and final years you write longer essays, work individually towards a dissertation and do Why art history? assessed presentations. All these help to pull together Art history is about how we see and have seen the your skills of organising text and communicating with world around us. Art historians study material produced visual material. for particular functions (such as religious worship, decorating and furnishing interiors, and clothing), An art history study tour in Rome for commentary on the social and political issues of the day, as well as for visual pleasure. We explore buildings, paintings, sculptures and a variety of objects by looking at how these things were made, used and thought about, we can place them in their historical and social context. The study of art history is a vital tool towards an understanding of how we communicate by visual means in our own time. It also identifies what works of art from the past are essential for preservation and conservation in the context of today’s environment. 47
  • What will I achieve? See the core courses list for details of art history; Core courses • An understanding of the way different types of art have refer to the anthropology subject entry on page 43 Art history Year 1 been made, used and discussed in a variety of for more information on these courses. Courses will lay the groundwork historical and cultural contexts. Art History and Archaeology for your study and help you make • Experience of using different approaches, methods BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VV34 informed choices in years 2 and 3. and theories of art in a critical fashion. This programme builds on links between art history Stories of Art: lectures on art from and archaeology. Exploring past and present • Knowledge of how institutions and structures such as the time of classical Greece to the relationships between power, culture and the museums or television series influence the present day in Europe, America, environment, the archaeology component provides production, consumption and display of artworks. China and India. you with a firm understanding of archaeological data: Visual Cultures I and II: comprises • A developed sense of the cultural diversity of things its varied nature; how it can be used to reconstruct the seminar-based explorations of that we look at today and have looked at in the past. past; and the methods by which it is acquired, analysed an art-historical issue such as and interpreted. • Experience in communicating your ideas and an individual artist, or a type of arguments orally and working effectively with others. You take art history core courses in years 1 and 2, object. alongside at least one special period in the subject. Sites of Art: lectures prepare you • An understanding of how you learn and how you can In the final year you take a further, more focused Art go on learning in the future. for the particular city of your in Context course and a thematic course, leading to a study trip abroad in the spring dissertation. You also take archaeology core courses term. They are followed Degrees over the three years. by lectures on the art and Art History See the core courses list for details of art history architecture of Brighton and BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: V350 courses; refer to the archaeology and landscape subject Sussex, with a group project The single honours degree provides a flexible and entry on page 45 for more information on these courses. around a local site of artistic broad-ranging approach to the study of art history. Art History and Cultural Studies significance. It offers opportunities to develop practical skills that you BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VRH9 The first-year trip abroad, will need for employment, while demanding a high level The cultural studies element of this degree aims a distinctive feature of this of intellectual engagement. to develop your awareness and understanding of a degree, takes place at the end wide range of cultures and their contexts. Art history In year 1, you take core courses in art history with of the spring term and enables complements this approach by considering the additional options from related subjects such as all students to work together anthropology, cultural studies, English, film and history. relationship between visual materials and the cultures intensively on site in a European These either give you the chance to explore in greater that make and use them. city. You are asked to make a depth something you have studied before, or offer You take art history core courses in the first two years, contribution towards the cost you the chance to look at new areas of interest. followed by a focused Art in Context course and a (£180 in 2007/8 but may well thematic course in the final year. You also take cultural increase in line with airfare and In year 2 you take some core art history courses but also have choices from a range of special periods within the studies core courses over the three years. hotel costs). subject. You will continue to combine these with one See the core courses for details of art history courses; course from a related subject. In your final year, you refer to the cultural studies subject entry on page 68 Year 2 specialise in art history and complete two dissertations. for more information on these courses. All students take Methods and Approaches in Art History, and Art See the core courses list for details of art history Art History and Film Studies and Text. Single honours students courses. BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VP33 also take Exhibition Studies. All In this programme you learn to ‘read’ visual images, Art History and a Language (one from these courses examine different with the opportunity to compare how art history French, German, Italian or Spanish) has been studied with the newer discipline of film. critical views and perspectives on BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: VR39 Common to both halves of the degree is the study of the subject. This degree allows you to study art history and to the connections between national institutions and Special Period options offer a become proficient in another European language. identities, and how they are presented in painting, range of subjects across eastern It enables you to develop your understanding of visual sculpture, architecture, film and visual culture. Film and western cultures: current cultures in different periods and places, and provides studies looks at visual literacy, film genres and theory options include 19th-Century Art direct engagement with objects in their original settings. across the globe, just as art history looks at cultures and Society; Art and Society in Language courses complement art history through outside the western tradition. the Contemporary World; Art and an emphasis on social and cultural developments, and by providing the linguistic skills necessary for life and For the art history part of your degree, you take core Society in Renaissance Italy; Art courses in the first two years, followed by a focused Art study abroad. in 18th-Century Europe; Art in in Context course and a thematic course in the final year. Late Antiquity; Dutch Art of the Acquiring a knowledge of visual and linguistic culture 17th Century; and Surrealism allows a fuller understanding of the texts, images and See the core courses list for details of art history to Conceptualism. objects you study. courses; refer to the film studies subject entry on page 97 for more information on these courses. You take art history core courses in the first two years Final year and specialise in your final year. You also have tuition Art History and History Art in Context allows the focus on in your chosen European language and take courses BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VV13 a short period of art history, or a on European culture and society. The additional year 2 The combination of art history and history offers the particular place. Options offered course in Text and Image is designed to provide a bridge opportunity to study images and objects from a variety include Art in the Time of Raphael between the different subjects. of periods and places in relation to their historical circumstances, not only in Europe but across the and Michelangelo; Byzantine Art You spend year 3 studying at a European university world. Knowledge of the visual and material cultures 843-1204; Paris 1904-14; The before returning to Sussex for your final year. of different societies provides new perspectives on Late Baroque; and The Museum their policies and histories. Art history aims to make See the core courses list for details of art history and its Objects (a chance for you familiar with the structures and institutions that courses; refer to the languages subject entry on page finalists to study with a curator influence the production and consumption of works 111 for more information on these courses. from the V&A). of art. A thematic course is also taken Art History and Anthropology BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VL36 You take art history core courses in the first two years, and leads to a dissertation and By studying forms of representation alongside the and a focused Art in Context and thematic course in presentation. Choices currently the final year. You also take history core courses over include Architecture and Interiors; societies that produce and use them, you will gain a broader understanding of the relationship between three years. Art in its Literary Context; Myth visual culture, power structures and kinship relations. See the core courses for details of art history; refer into Art; Popular Print Culture; You take art history core courses in your first and second to the history subject entry on page 103 for more Commemorative Art; and information on these courses. Representing Women. years, alongside at least one special period in the subject. In the final year you take a further, more focused Art in Context course and a thematic course, leading to a dissertation. You also take anthropology core courses over the three years. 48
  • Biochemistry Biochemistry Essentials Why biochemistry? Biochemistry seeks to understand and explain living BSc (Hons) degrees systems at the molecular level. It is a scientific discipline Biochemistry that finds applications across the biomedical and Biochemistry (with a sandwich year) biological sciences and underpins the biotechnology Biosciences (with a Foundation Year) revolution. Its rapid rate of development is amazing, making it an exciting and challenging subject to study. See also Medicine (p127), Molecular genetics (p129), Molecular medicine (p131) Biochemists try to answer questions that are fundamental to life. What are the molecules that What A levels do I need? constitute living organisms? How are they made and (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications how is their synthesis regulated? How are they information, see page 159-162) organised into cells and how do cells assemble to Typical offer range ABB-BBB create whole organisms? What is the molecular basis of such processes as genetic inheritance, evolution, the A levels (or equivalent) must include Chemistry and one immunological recognition of invading micro-organisms other science subject and the astonishing powers of the mammalian brain? What else do I need? What goes wrong to cause human diseases such as GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics and English cancer, strokes, heart attacks and mental illness? How can such errors be corrected? Special entrance requirements apply to Biological Sciences (with a Foundation Year). See the programme This knowledge finds practical application in medicine, description on page 51 for details agriculture, brewing and biotechnology. Biochemists In your final year you join a research devise new ways of diagnosing and treating human, team and undertake a project What qualities should I bring? animal and plant diseases; identify new targets within your chosen field of study, Intellectual curiosity; an interest in using practical work for the pharmaceutical industry; and design new allowing you to experience the to solve biological and biochemical problems; problem- biotechnological treatments and processes. A degree excitement of working at the cutting solving skills; enthusiasm in biochemistry is one of the best preparations for a edge of biochemistry Fees scientific career in these fields. See pages 166-167 for information on fees Why biochemistry at Sussex? Kemi’s What scholarships are there? • Biochemistry at Sussex was rated equal 3rd among perspective The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers a university biochemistry departments in the 2006 number of scholarships worth up to £1,000 per year for ‘Studying biochemistry at Sussex x National Student Survey (NSS). students who obtain AAA at A level, or £500 per year for has been an exciting as well as x students who obtain AAB • Sussex is one of the UK’s leading research centres challenging experience for me. I chose x for the biological sciences. It is internationally rated English language requirements for its research, with dedicated and expert teaching. biochemistry because I’m very much x IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the interested in the molecular basis x Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English • You are taught by active researchers using state- of life. x language requirements, see page 162 of-the-art equipment, and have the opportunity ‘There’s a wide variety of courses x to undertake an independent project in one of our on x offer such as Cell Regulation and Foundation year for non-EU students research teams in your final year. Cancer, which I found particularly x If your qualifications (including English language) do not interesting as it deals with the x yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to • The Biochemistry degree offers a range of options enabling you to pursue the subject in different signalling pathways involved in the x the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an international foundation year entry route. See page 30 ways according to your particular interests and formation of cancer. Other courses x for details preferences. deal with diseases and the roles of the x immune system. x How do I find out more? • The flexible structure of the degree programme ‘I’ve really enjoyed working in the x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: makes it possible to transfer between Biochemistry lab x doing my final-year project as I E ug.admissions@biochemistry.sussex.ac.uk and other related degrees within the biological have gained a lot of new scientific x T +44 (0)1273 678297 sciences in the first year. skills, which have helped improve my x F +44 (0)1273 877586 • The optional sandwich year provides you with a employment prospects. Also, it’s been x School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, year’s experience of working in industry, equipping very useful having such encouraging x Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK you with a wide range of transferable and laboratory tutors and supervisors who are always www.sussex.ac.uk/biochemistry x skills, enhancing your employability. willing to help out to ensure that I’ve x When can I visit? got the best out of my degree.’ Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Kemi Lawal Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or call 01273 876787 49
  • Core courses Biochemistry Year 1 The first year has the Cellular Biochemistry and Biological Chemistry courses at its core. You will also study topics such as chemical techniques in biochemistry and energy in life, and courses introducing you to Molecular Genetics, Introduction to Organic and Bio-organic Molecules and Reactions, and Neuroscience and Behaviour. You take a specialised laboratory- based course, Research Methods in Biochemistry, and a data- handling course that will introduce you to the concepts and skills required to become confident in the laboratory. Year 2 You take courses in Bioenergetics, Proteins in Action and Molecular Cell Biology. In addition, courses in Cell Regulation and Cancer, Clinical Aspects of Biochemistry and The Immune System focus on the relationship of biochemistry to disease processes and medicine. You also study related topics such as metal ions in biochemistry, As a biochemistry undergraduate at Sussex you are taught by active researchers and learn to use synthetic methods, developmental state-of-the-art equipment biology, and genes and genomes, and may choose to pursue your What will I achieve? studies in other disciplines. What sort of career could I have? • The knowledge, professional expertise and • higher degrees with a view to either entering research laboratory skills needed to develop real insight into in biochemistry and the biomedical sciences or posts the phenomenal progress of the biological and in the other professions allied to medicine biomedical sciences. • research assistant in industry, hospitals, university • First-hand experience of research. and government research laboratories • An understanding of how to learn: especially important • scientific administration or management posts in the in fields such as this, where progress is so rapid. NHS, or the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries • Skills in communication, teamwork, numeracy and information technology. • graduate entry into Medicine • teaching • journalism and publishing • sales and financial services Bacteria under microscope • law. How will I learn? Courses are taught by a mixture of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Assignments for tutorials include essays, data handling, computer-based studies and preparation of short talks. Developing your laboratory skills is a key objective of the first two years of the degree programme. There are weekly research seminars, where staff or visiting scientists explain recent developments in a specific field. In the final year you join one of our research teams to carry out an individual research project. Courses are assessed by a mixture of coursework, dissertations and annual exams. If your programme includes a sandwich year, this also contributes to the overall assessment of your degree. 50
  • Core courses cont’d Degrees Biochemistry Final year Biochemistry You may opt for courses BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: C700 in biochemistry such as BSc (Hons), 4 years (with a sandwich year) UCAS Biochemistry of Gene Expression; Code: C706 Endocrinology and Disease; The core biochemistry courses are designed to provide Immunology: Health and you with essential foundations in a wide variety of topics related to biochemistry, and give you the Disease; Molecular Biology of opportunity to engage with practical laboratory work. Cancer; and Protein Form and They will prepare you for the more advanced options Function; or learn more about and the research project that you undertake in your related areas with courses in final year. You may also opt to broaden your area of Molecular Genetics; Genes and expertise and combine your biochemistry with other Development; or Genomics. options (see core courses list), opening up a wider range Much of your focus this year will of career prospects. be on your research project. In year 1 you gain a general grounding in biochemistry with contributions from subjects such as chemistry, physiology and genetics. You will undertake practical work with most of the courses in the list opposite. This provides the necessary background for the wide range of courses available in the second and final years. Biochemistry courses form the basis of the second year. You will cover how a knowledge of biochemistry helps us to understand both the development of disease processes, and how the body responds to infection. In addition you will take courses to expand your knowledge into related areas including chemistry, developmental biology and genetics. There is a strong practical component running throughout the year, with practical classes incorporated into many of the courses. If you have previously chosen courses in different disciplines, you may also choose to follow these at a more advanced level. If you select the sandwich-year programme, you ‘There’s plenty of interesting lab work to back up will spend your third year on an industrial training the theory’ placement before returning to Sussex for your final Kyle Morris year. The placement is in either an industrial laboratory (typically in a pharmaceutical or biotechnology Teaching is by means of lectures, tutorials, classroom company) or in a research institute. You are paid by the discussions and exercise classes. Small-group teaching host laboratory during the placement year. is emphasised throughout. All courses run in parallel throughout the year and assessment is by coursework Because of the breadth of your studies in the first and and exams. second years, you will have a wide range of courses to choose from in the final year. You can choose to After successful completion of the foundation year you specialise with topics in biochemistry, or combine are guaranteed a place on one of the following BSc these with courses from other areas of life sciences, for programmes at the University of Sussex: Biochemistry; example chemistry, genetics or developmental biology. Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Molecular Genetics; You will also join a research team and undertake a or Neuroscience. Other BSc programmes may also project within your chosen field of study. This will allow be available. you to experience the excitement of working at the cutting edge of biochemistry and provide you with the opportunity to contribute to new discoveries. Celine’s perspective Biosciences (with a Foundation Year) BSc (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: C701 ‘I’m x now in my second year and really The standard A/AS level offer is CC (including a science enjoy what I’m studying, especially the x subject). However, other post-GCSE qualifications may practical aspect of it. It’s also good x be suitable for entry. to x have a personal tutor who helps This four-year programme is designed for those who me x out with all my academic-related want to study the biological sciences at a top-rated questions. x university but lack the qualifications necessary for direct ‘Additionally, this degree offers work x entry to one of our other degree programmes. Typical experience. I’m already in the process x entrants include those with non-science A levels, mature of x applying for a placement in a students, overseas applicants and students whose company that will employ me for a x science A level performance fell below expectations. whole year and enable me to work with x Teaching of the foundation year is at Chichester College experienced scientists, who will teach x in West Sussex. me x new technical skills. It’s a great The foundation year is specifically designed for the needs opportunity.’ of students who will subsequently transfer to one of the Celine degree courses offered by the Department of Biology Parmentier and Environmental Science, or the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, at the University of Sussex. Introductory courses in biology and chemistry each make up 40 per cent of the study content. Practical work is an important element of these courses. The remaining 20 per cent of time is split between mathematics and study skills, including IT. 51
  • Biology Core courses Biology We give our students a modern, broad-based knowledge of the fundamentals of Biology. Core courses are concentrated on subjects such as molecular genetics and biological conservation that are most likely to be of future importance. We also allow you a very substantial level of choice so that you can adapt the curriculum to fit your own interests Why biology? and career plans. Essentials There is no single answer to this question. Some people What biology degrees are there? choose to study biology because it is a fascinating Year 1 Biology fundamental science that encompasses the richness You take courses in Evolution, the of all life on this planet. It is also chosen because it is a Diversity of Life, Neuroscience, See also Biochemistry (p49), Biosciences (with a pathway to a wide range of rewarding careers or a way Animal Behaviour and Molecular Foundation Year) (p51), Ecology and conservation to understand more about ourselves and our relation and Cell Biology. These courses, (p75), Environmental science (p95), Human sciences to other organisms. These might be the reasons you intrinsically interesting in their own (p106), Medical neuroscience (p125), Medicine are interested in biology, or you may have your own very right, also provide a grounding in (p127), Molecular genetics (p129), Molecular medicine personal motivation. (p131), Neuroscience (p136) aspects of the modern biological Studying biology will allow you to understand and explore sciences that are essential for What A levels do I need? how biologists contribute to some of the most interesting the more specialist study of (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications and important scientific issues that currently confront subsequent years. There are information, see pages 159-162) us. Biology is without doubt the science of today; it is options in topics such as human Typical offer ABB rapidly moving and important issues associated with physiology, environmental biology such as genetics, health, global control of science and biological modelling, A levels (or equivalent) must include at least one disease, environmental change and conservation are while those who need additional approved science subject other than mathematics constantly in the news. background knowledge can take What else do I need? chemistry. During the first year GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics and either Chemistry Why biology at Sussex? you will gain valuable study skills or Double Science • Enthusiastic faculty teach you to the highest from a variety of different modes standard and focus on the most current challenges of of teaching including lectures, What qualities should I bring? modern biology such as the structure and properties An interest in learning about biology and its wide-ranging tutorials and practicals that will of DNA, the neurochemistry of the brain and the implications allow you to get the most from the ecological effects of climate change. Biology degree programme. Fees • A wide range of options allows you to tailor your See pages 166-167 for information on fees degree to reflect your interests and ultimate career Francesca’s English language requirements choice. perspective IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the • You will be taught to think in scientifically rigorous Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English x decided to study biology at Sussex ‘I terms and are given a modern scientific training. You language requirements, see page 162 because of the University’s strong x will carry out experiments in well-furnished modern reputation, particularly in the field of x Foundation year for non-EU students laboratories. science. x If your qualifications (including English language) do not • You will have a range of fieldwork opportunities, both ‘With the various methods of teaching x yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to in the UK and abroad. x Sussex, from small, classroom- at the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an international foundation year entry route. See page 30 • You can spend a term abroad studying biology in the based tutorials, lectures, seminars x for details USA and other countries. x laboratory work to work in the field and (including field trips abroad), I’ve been x How do I find out more? • You will find the Department is a warm, supportive given an opportunity to maximise my x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: and enjoyable place to study, with staff who have a understanding of biology at a level that x E ug.admissions@biology.sussex.ac.uk genuine concern for their students. x keeps me intrigued and wanting to still T +44 (0)1273 678511 • You will carry out an independent research project continue my studies. I feel the degree x F +44 (0)1273 678937 in your third year, under the supervision of an programme has opened up my mind x Department of Biology and Environmental Science, experienced professional scientist working in the x the scientific world in a way that I to School of Life Sciences, area of the project. The most recent project titles University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK would never have expected. x include: www.sussex.ac.uk/biology x studying biology and environmental ‘By Cuttlefish camouflage science, I know I’ll be able to x When can I visit? contribute to the bigger issues x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and Visually guided behaviour in ants x the world, for instance climate in 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Behavioural ecology of urban badgers change, conservation, genetics x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or call 01273 876787 Gene expression and compartments in inner ear x cancer research, and also and development enrich my understanding of these x processes. Biology has always been x Developing molecular DNA damage indicators in x widely fascinating, yet consistently a stressed coral challenging degree programme for me, x Investigating the conservation and growth of and I wouldn’t want it any other way.’ endangered native orchids Francesca Does natural selection act on insertion and deletion Eckersley mutations in humans? Targeted genetic and molecular characterisation of new genes involved in limb development. 52
  • Core courses cont’d What sort of career could I have? Biology Year 2 A Biology degree gives you a modern scientific training that allows you to deal rigorously with many You choose four strands of different subjects and is highly valued by employers. study, each consisting of related Approximately one third of our graduates become courses covering a key theme in professional biological scientists, either directly or by biology. The choices you make taking a higher degree. Other career paths include: enable you to learn more about areas that reflect your developing • pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies interests and career plans. • the health service Subjects currently available for study include animal diversity, • government research institutions fungi, evolution, human evolution, • teaching in schools or higher-education institutions genetics, cell regulation and • publishing and journalism cancer, developmental biology, the immune system, marine biology, • business management and the financial sector neural circuits, biodiversity and • civil service. conservation, and wildlife and habitat conservation. You also have How will I learn? the choice of taking a field course, We employ a wide range of learning and teaching ie in marine biology, and our field methods. We use lectures and laboratory work to biology course in Portugal, where introduce you to fundamental concepts and provide students conduct a group research hands-on experience with laboratory methodology project has been very popular. If and data collection. Small-group tutorial teaching you wish to diversify outside of encourages structured discussion that brings out biology, our flexible curriculum the complexities of specific topics, and helps you to allows a wide range of other areas develop confidence in your own judgement. Seminars to be studied, with as much as 25 are used to examine controversial and topical issues such as the use of GM crops, genome mapping, per cent of your study time taken cloning and the reintroduction of species to natural up with this. Possible subjects habitats. The third-year project gives you experience include science writing, people in many of the activities carried out by a professional and plagues, environmental and scientist. By receiving detailed feedback on course work climatic change and environmental assignments, you will learn to think for yourself and economics. develop effective presentation skills. We encourage, and Sussex is establishing a centre where social insects, provide instruction in, the use of electronic resources. such as wasps, bees and ants, will be studied and final- Final year year projects will be offered on this subject You have a wide range of What will I achieve? • A modern scientific training in biological science. choices with courses in biology, Degrees ecology, environmental science, • An understanding of biological phenomena at many genetics, neuroscience and different levels in a wide variety of organisms. Biology psychology. Among the biology BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: C100 • An understanding of ethical issues relating to recent and environmental science The Biology degree programme will equip you with a advances in the biological sciences. options that are currently available wide range of knowledge and skills relevant to modern are: Animal-Plant Interactions; • The ability to access and evaluate research literature biological sciences. Cooperation and Conflict in and electronic databases. In years 1 and 2 you take a range of biology courses Animal Societies; Intelligence in • Command of a range of presentational techniques and designed to give you a broad introduction to modern Animals and Machines; Modern communication skills. biological research, with opportunities to select areas Human Evolution; Neuronal of particular interest. In year 3 you specialise in areas • The interpersonal skills necessary to achieve Transduction and Transmission; of biology that most appeal to you by choosing four final- cooperative group planning and decision-making. Plant Conservation; Biodiversity; year options, and you gain hands-on experience of doing Developmental Neurobiology; • Learning, thinking and problem-solving strategies that research by carrying out a research project (see the core Genes and Development; Neuronal have life-long value. courses list). Plasticity and Gene Regulation, Biology researchers at Sussex study the salivary gland and Topics in Evolutionary Theory. cells of the fruit fly Drosophila in order to understand the The final year also includes a mechanisms of cell proliferation and growth in animals. research project, in which you The pictures below show cytoplasm (green), DNA (blue) work personally with an expert and a particular protein, dFOXO (red). In the nuclei, the research scientist. This is a most DNA and dFOXO protein coexist and yield a purple colour stimulating experience that can involve cutting-edge laboratory or field research, or original work in areas such as science journalism, web design or science education. The project enables you to develop a wide range of skills involved in carrying out research, from designing a project to producing a professionally formatted final report. Students on our field biology course in Portugal, where they carry out a group research project 53
  • Pete’s Business and career perspective Business and management studies ‘From the offset I knew Sussex was the x management studies place for me. The tutors made me feel x very welcome on my first visit during x x open day, and their friendliness an x approachability was something and that I could rely on for the whole time x x was there. I ‘The Economics and Management x Studies degree programme focused x x developing employment credentials on x I was actively encouraged to think and Essentials Why business and management? beyond the completion of the degree x How is the world of work changing? How can we x x to take ownership of my future. and What business and management studies influence global markets and what do ethical business Sussex equipped me with many life x degrees are there? and entrepreneurship really mean? These are some Business and Management Studies of the key questions that you investigate when you skills and attributes that employers x study business and management, which involves the seek. I recall using examples from my x Economics and Management Studies (p79) application of practical and conceptual knowledge. As studies of leadership, teamwork, time x What A levels do I need? organisations seek to meet business challenges, their management and communication x (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications futures will increasingly depend on the abilities of their x x in interviews. For example, skills information, see pages 159-162) staff. Gaining a business and management qualification employers were genuinely interested x opens doors to new opportunities. x the “Refresh” business idea – short in Typical offer ABB stay hotels in airports for time-poor x What else do I need? Why business and management at Sussex? travellers – which my friends and I x GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics grade B • Top 25 in the UK for undergraduate study in business developed on our Entrepreneurship x and management studies (the Guardian University What qualities should I bring? Guide, 2007). course. x Interest and motivation; flexibility; independent and ‘There was a great feeling of x critical thinking; ability to construct and present • Interdisciplinary study provides you with business teamwork among my friends on the x an argument skills and an understanding of the world around you. programme. We all benefited from x x shared experience and have gone this Fees • Programme designed and delivered by SPRU – Science and Technology Policy Research, an x in a variety of directions such as off See pages 166-167 for information on fees internationally recognised research centre that advertising, hedge funds, and internet x English language requirements specialises in the management of science, start-ups. x IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the technology and innovation. ‘The degree introduced me to areas x Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English that I wouldn’t have otherwise x language requirements, see page 162 • SPRU achieved a grade 5 (recognising research of encountered and, as a result, I x national and international excellence) in the last Foundation year for non-EU students Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). discovered my own interest and x If your qualifications (including English language) do not aptitude in accounting. I’m now x yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to What sort of career could I have? continuing my studies as a trainee x the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an • entrepreneur chartered accountant at Mazars LLP x , international foundation year entry route. See page 30 London.’ • management consultant for details • chartered accountant Pete McNulty How do I find out more? Trainee Chartered For more information, contact the admissions tutor: • investment management Accountant, E ug.admissions@mbs.sussex.ac.uk Mazars LLP, • social enterprise T +44 (0)1273 678169 London F +44 (0)1273 685865 • marketing Business and Management, SPRU, University of Sussex, • retail management. Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QE, UK www.sussex.ac.uk/spru/bams/ When can I visit? Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or call 01273 876787 54
  • Core courses Business and management studies The courses are designed and delivered to provide you with a foundation in management concepts and practical skills essential for your future career. Year 1 The first-year management courses introduce concepts, issues and methods that aim to develop a critical approach to management in organisations. Introduction to Management * Business and Economic Framework * Quantitative Methods * Business Research Skills * Communication Skills for Management * Management Case Studies * Contemporary Issues in Management Social Responsibility and Ethics Organisational Game Year 2 You will investigate and become familiar with the core processes of management: planning, organising and changing, leading and controlling. Financial Accounting and Performance Analysis * Marketing * Organisational Behaviour * Information Systems * Operations and Services Management * How will I learn? Degrees Management Accounting * You are involved in a range of interactive learning Management of Innovation opportunities. Courses are taught using a variety Business and Management Studies Firm Strategies and East-Asian of lectures, workshops, case studies and informal BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: NN12 Economies discussions. Assessment is varied, including individual You take all of the core courses. In addition to these, Leadership and Negotiation and group projects, essays and examinations. the management curriculum will be integrated with, and complemented by, the choice of a pathway What will I achieve? Year 3 from economics, contemporary European studies or • A clear sense of the organisational environment in the You consolidate and extend development studies (see page 71). The choice of the 21st century and readiness to take on employment in your conceptual and practical pathway will enable you to create a curriculum of studies a management position. knowledge in the domains that fits with your interests. As a successful business • In-depth knowledge of modern approaches to and management student you will be able to: of strategy, enterprise, and business and management. innovation. • describe the role of management and how Strategy * • An understanding of the relationship between people, management practices affect organisational Entrepreneurship * organisations, and business and management in development; Learning Portfolio * different organisational structures. • employ management tools and skills; Public Administration and Third • An understanding of financial requirements for Sector Activities * • analyse business scenarios, develop strategies and business, including published financial information, International Business * make a case for decision-making across a range of and an ability to make judgements about the financial Science, Technology and organisational positions. performance of companies. Innovation Systems * You progress through three stages: the role of Dissertation • An understanding of the central importance of management, managing functions, and strategic innovation in a range of different organisational management. As you study the courses in the first two contexts – entrepreneurial start-up firms, stages, you will also benefit from training workshops to small firms and other organisations, and large develop your personal and career management skills. business corporations. Management joint degree • An understanding of the broader social context of the In addition to the core courses, the Economics and world of work, and the opportunity to assess your own Management joint degree includes additional subjects personal development needs to help you focus your in each term. These cover topics such as operations career in the future. management, innovation management, and business research skills. You take the courses marked * in the core courses list. 55
  • Chemistry Chemistry Essentials Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science What chemistry degrees are there? for many technologies and has played an integral role MChem degrees in many of the advances made by modern society, from Chemistry genetics to human health, and from environmental Chemistry (with a sandwich year) control to information technology. Studying chemistry Chemistry with Forensic Science will enable you to understand these developments and allow you to contribute to them in the future. BSc degrees Chemistry Chemistry is challenging: developing your understanding Chemistry with Forensic Science of the very fabric of matter is both stimulating and rewarding. By studying chemistry you will gain the What A levels do I need? confidence to attack and solve problems both in (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications chemistry and in other areas. information, see pages 159-162) Chemistry is an exciting experimental science: you will Typical offer for MChem degrees ABB be a member of a research team exploring the frontiers Typical offer for BSc degrees BBB of chemical knowledge. For all degrees, A level (or equivalent) at grade B Chemistry provides you with transferable skills: a Chemistry chemistry degree prepares you for obvious jobs in the chemical industry, education, and related fields. What else do I need? More fundamentally, it develops your ability to solve For all degrees, GCSE (or equivalent) grade B or above problems, to think critically, and to communicate your Mathematics and either Chemistry or Double Science ideas. These are transferable skills that will make you What qualities should I bring? attractive to any potential employer. An enthusiastic commitment to the subject; motivation; Jess’s the desire to be intellectually challenged; initiative; Why chemistry at Sussex? perspective clear and logical thinking; the ability to work both • Number 1 chemistry department in the UK (the ‘I x originally applied to do English and independently and in groups Guardian University Guide, 2008). Drama degrees, but I realised after my x Fees • Strong employment record (always high scoring in gap x year that I wanted to do something See pages 166-167 for information on fees the university guides). different. I felt that a chemistry x • The University recently invested £3m to refurbish our degree has the potential to help me x What scholarships are there? The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers teaching and research laboratories. help others on a practical level. The x a number of scholarships worth up to £1,000 per year forensic science element of my degree x • All degree programmes are recognised by the Royal fascinates me: using the clues around x for students who obtain AAA (with an A in Chemistry) at Society of Chemistry (RSC) and incorporate the most A level, or £500 per year for students who obtain AAB you, both micro- and macroscopic, to x up-to-date scientific advances. (with an A in Chemistry) at A level be x a “chemical detective” and discover • World-leading research (the Department has had two things is a huge buzz. x English language requirements Nobel laureates on its faculty in the recent past). ‘As x soon as I came to Sussex on IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the • The optional sandwich year will allow you to my x x first open day, I knew it was the Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English experience a year working in industry, and will equip place for me. The Department were x language requirements, see page 162 you with a range of transferable and laboratory skills, friendly and enthusiastic – they were x Foundation year for non-EU students enhancing your employability. just x as interested in making things If your qualifications (including English language) do not explode as I was! Overall, there is x yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to • The Department is warm and friendly. a x fantastic vibe running through the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an the x x campus and I have always felt international foundation year entry route. See page 30 perfectly at home. x for details ‘Studying chemistry is like a jigsaw x How do I find out more? puzzle that you fill in as you find out x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: more and more about the world around xx E ug.admissions@chemistry.sussex.ac.uk you – once I got started with it, I T +44 (0)1273 678125 couldn’t leave it half finished! I’m in my x F +44 (0)1273 677196 first x year of study now and who knows Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, how four more years of study may x University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ, UK change my view of the world?’ www.sussex.ac.uk/chemistry When can I visit? Jess Higgins We welcome visitors to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Please contact the admissions tutor at the above address to arrange a date and time Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or call 01273 876787 You will study chemistry by performing hands-on experiments in the laboratories 56
  • What sort of career could I have? Degrees Core courses Chemistry • Direct employment in the chemical industry, Chemistry You will take some or all including pharmaceutical companies such as MChem (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: F103 of the following courses: GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, British Biotechnology, or the MChem (Hons), 4 years (with a sandwich year) materials sector, working on plastics, electronics or UCAS Code: F102 Year 1 paints. BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: F100 Chemical Energetics • Over half of our graduates go on to carry out Students following the MChem and BSc programmes Chemical Techniques research in chemistry to PhD level before entering take the same chemistry courses for the first three in Biochemistry employment in the chemical industry. years, but make the final decision between BSc and Environmental Cycles MChem at the end of the second year. • Opportunities in chemistry teaching have never been Functional Group Chemistry greater and about 10 per cent of our graduates go on In year 3 you will choose your courses from a range of Introduction to Chemical Biology to train the next generation of chemists. options, allowing you to start specialising in one area of Introduction to Materials chemistry, or to maintain a broad interest. If you opt for Introduction to Organic and Bio- • Transferable skills gained during the chemistry the MChem programme, you will select options to best Organic Molecules and Reactions degree enable our students to go on to careers such prepare you for your advanced work in year 4. Introduction to Reaction Kinetics as accountancy, administration, advertising, charity work, computing, finances, law, marketing and sales. In year 4 of the MChem programme you select from a Introduction to Structure series of options, allowing you to specialise further and and Bonding How will I learn? bringing you to the forefront of current research. You will Numeracy Skills for Natural You will learn through a variety of methods, including have the opportunity to take part in the Department’s Scientists tutorial workshops, laboratory work, lectures and small- programme of research seminars and you will also be Periodicity group presentations. Our selection process ensures offered professional skills training in areas such as Redox and Electrochemistry that you will be among other dedicated students and communication. the small class size permits the lecture to be delivered Year 2 Chemistry with a sandwich year at an appropriate pace. The Department is a sociable Atmospheric Chemistry While studying for your degree in chemistry it is and friendly place and lecturers are happy to answer Chemical Kinetics possible for you to spend up to one year away from questions both inside and outside the lecture room. Coordination Chemistry the University, as a sandwich year. Industrial placements You will put theory into practice in the laboratory, are made in many internationally prestigious chemical Heterocyclic Chemistry undertaking experiments that provide you with the companies, many of whom have close ties with Inorganic Mechanisms research skills you will need to undertake advanced the faculty at Sussex and sponsor their research Introduction to Spectroscopy research projects. programmes. Such placements are normally made Introduction to Symmetry and either in the UK or mainland Europe. Chemical Bonding You are actively encouraged to work in small groups as part of the practical course, as well as on coursework. You may choose to spend a year at another university Metal Ions in Biochemistry Extra support is provided via academic advisors, student as an exchange student. You will then take courses at Organic Reaction Mechanisms mentors, student advisors and the student support team. a university located in Europe, Canada or the US. Organometallic Chemistry I For European universities it is possible to select a host Strategy in Organic Synthesis What will I achieve? States of Matter institution where chemistry is taught in English. • A degree that is professionally recognised by the Royal Society of Chemistry and can ultimately lead to Chemistry with Forensic Science Year 3 chartered chemist status. MChem (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: F1FK Bio-Organic Chemistry BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: F1F4 • A comprehensive base of chemical knowledge and Chemistry Project This programme reflects the latest developments in the practical skills, as well as an awareness of the current Colloid and Surface Science fast-changing world of forensic science. It will allow you challenges at the forefront of chemical research. Computational Chemistry to use chemistry and other sciences in one of their most • An enthusiasm for chemistry and an appreciation of its important applications – the prevention and detection of Conceptual Models in Chemistry economic and environmental importance. crime. As a student on this degree programme, you will Forensic Science and the Legal study crime scene investigation and learn about legal Process • The ability to apply your chemical knowledge and skills Instrumental Analysis aspects of evidence. You also study all types of forensic to the solution of theoretical and practical problems in Main Group Chemistry analysis, from the use of lasers for visualising footprints, chemical research. to the types of insects that feed on corpses. In the third Organometallic Chemistry II • Proficiency in a range of transferable skills, valuable in year, you have the chance to pursue special interests in Synthesis of Pharmaceutically a variety of careers. criminology and forensic archaeology. Important Molecules MChem and BSc For the first three years of both the MChem and the BSc, At Sussex we offer a four-year MChem degree and a 75 per cent of your programme will contain chemistry Year 4 three-year BSc in Chemistry. core courses and 25 per cent of your programme will Professional Skills for Chemists consist of courses in forensic science. Advanced Project The MChem programme is aimed at students who wish Two options from: to become professional chemists and specialise in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry particular areas of the subject. The MChem programme Advanced Organic Chemistry has been designed to offer you maximum flexibility You will carry out research using state-of-the-art instrumentation Advanced Physical Chemistry during your study at Sussex, while ensuring your qualification as a professional chemist. An MChem degree provides the academic basis for professional chartered chemist status. Our BSc programme is designed for students who wish to study the full breadth of the subject as a route to a range of other careers. The first three years are core to both degrees. The fourth-year courses and year-long research projects allow you to deepen your knowledge in specialist topics at the forefront of chemical research. Applicants unsure about MChem or BSc are strongly advised to opt initially for an MChem programme. If your eventual A level grades meet the offer level for a BSc but not an MChem, we will automatically offer you a place on the BSc programme; subject to satisfactory progress, it is then possible to opt for the MChem programme at the end of year 1 or year 2. Students on MChem programmes can opt to transfer to BSc at the end of the first or second year. 57
  • Cognitive science Cognitive science Essentials Why cognitive science? How does the mind work? What is the relation between At Sussex you take cognitive science alongside another mind and body? How can consciousness exist in a subject as part of a joint degree or as a minor physical world? These questions have been posed for millennia, but only now are we in a position to What cognitive science joint degrees are there? begin answering them scientifically. Consolidating Philosophy and Cognitive Science (p139) recent scientific and philosophical breakthroughs, What can I take with cognitive science and placing the notion of computation centre-stage, as a minor? cognitive science offers the best explanations to date Psychology with Cognitive Science (p151) of all aspects of the mind: thinking, memory, creativity, Cognitive Neuroscience (p137) imagination, free will, perception, action, language, and more. It is informed by, and also informs, See also Computing and Artificial Intelligence (p62) advances in artificial intelligence (AI). The study of What A levels do I need? cognitive science offers substantial knowledge of our See relevant subject entry for details current scientific understanding of mind, and elicits a profound respect for those aspects that we have What qualities should I bring? yet to explain. Not only will you acquire skills and Curiosity; enthusiasm; interest in both the arts and knowledge valued in the workplace, you will participate sciences; creativity; critical and independent thinking; in humanity’s most ambitious intellectual enterprise: to a desire to look at topics from more than one perspective understand ourselves. Fees Why cognitive science at Sussex? See pages 166-167 for information on fees Your cognitive science degree will • Sussex is a world-famous pioneer in teaching and give you a range of intellectual, English language requirements research in cognitive science. practical and transferable skills IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the • Sussex is one of the few universities in Britain to offer Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English an undergraduate programme in cognitive science. language requirements, see page 162 • The tutors who design and run the cognitive science How do I find out more? programme are members of the Centre for Research For more information, contact the subject coordinator in Cognitive Science (COGS), which means that your Core courses E ug.admissions@informatics.sussex.ac.uk tutors will be internationally recognised experts in, T +44 (0)1273 678829 Courses are taken by students and have a passion for, the material they teach. F +44 (0)1273 877873 studying cognitive science as part Admissions, Department of Informatics • The programme emphasises interdisciplinarity, with of a joint degree (ie when cognitive University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH, UK options available in computing/artificial intelligence, science occupies 50 per cent of www.sussex.ac.uk/cogs linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, psychology the overall degree programme). and other relevant fields. When can I visit? If you take cognitive science as All applicants offered a place are invited to an What sort of career could I have? a minor (ie when it occupies 25 admissions day during the autumn or spring terms. Our graduates have gone on to a wide range of possible per cent of your programme), you These give an insight into our degrees and what it’s like career paths, including: take Ghost in the Machine and to study here, through talks, tours, demos and course one other option in year 1, and two • AI-based IT sampler sessions rather than four options in each of • the stock market years 2 and 3. Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. • management consulting Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors Year 1 • journalism You are introduced to the various or call 01273 876787 • publishing disciplines of cognitive science in The Ghost in the Machine: an • games software Introduction to Cognitive Science. • language teaching In Solving Real-World Problems, • human factors research you consider, for example, how children learn maths, and whether • web development talking on a mobile phone while • postgraduate study, including teaching and research driving is dangerous. Philosophy positions in higher education. of Science teaches you about the concepts that play a Our graduates have been employed by: crucial role in the theories and • BT explanations of the mind, and • LogicaCMG raises questions such as: what are mental representations? Could a • Motorola robot have a mind? In Cognitive • PricewaterhouseCoopers Modelling you learn how computer models can be used to understand • Reuters. problem solving, learning, language and perception, and also consider the limits of computer modelling. 58
  • Core courses cont’d Cognitive science Year 1 cont’d Other options currently include: Psychobiology; Cognitive Psychology I; Contemporary Issues in Psychology; and Neuroscience and Behaviour. Year 2 You choose how you want to build on the fundamentals acquired in year 1, taking four options from a list that currently includes: Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Science; Philosophy and Science of Consciousness; Language Acquisition; Brain and Behaviour; Abnormal and Clinical Psychology; Cognitive Psychology II; Developmental Psychology; Independent Study in Psychology; Applied Cognitive Psychology; and Principles of Neuroscience. Year 3 In the final year you choose options addressing more specialised topics in depth, taking options from a list that currently includes: Models of Discovery; Invention and Design; Introduction to Logic Programming; Topics in the Philosophy of Cognitive Science; Current Issues in Cognitive Science; Computational Models of Creativity; Language Processing in the Mind; Cognitive Linguistics; Biology and Evolution of Language; Reading Faces; Art as Psychology; Cognitive Neuropsychology; Psychobiology of Motivation and Emotion; Conscious and Unconscious Mental Processes; Psychobiology of Cognitive Ageing and Dementia; Social Cognitive Development; Cognitive science offers the best explanations to date on all aspects of the mind, and also informs advances in AI From Language to Understanding; Neurobiological Mechanisms of How will I learn? Cognitive Science Learning and Memory; Sensory You attend lectures and seminars, complete take-away First, you explore how different disciplines employ and Motor Functions of the problem sets, and undertake guided independent different techniques and methods to tackle the Nervous System; Intelligence reading and research. Your learning involves other same fundamental questions about issues such as activities, such as writing computer programs, perception, reasoning, consciousness and language. in Animals and Machines; and participating in email discussion groups, or designing You also look at how cognitive science can help solve Developmental Neurobiology. psychology experiments, depending on the options real-world problems. Then, in the spring and summer you choose. Feedback on your assignments will be terms, you choose whether to learn more about the an integral part of the learning process. use of computational systems to model the mind, Assessment takes the form of essays and, depending philosophical issues in science, current work in on your options, may also include a learning diary, psychology, or the nervous system and the brain. computer-based practical work, unseen examinations In year 2, you can decide to delve deeper into cognitive and extended essay writing. or abnormal psychology, how a child’s mind develops, What will I achieve? the connections between cognition and language, how • An understanding of: the computational approach to the brain works, applying cognitive science to the real understanding the mind; the principles and methods world, or the philosophical issues that arise in trying to of artificial intelligence, linguistics, neuroscience, understand thinking and consciousness. philosophy and psychology; current and historical The third year allows you to either further deepen the approaches to the notion of mind and how to critically interests and knowledge you acquired in year 2, or to evaluate them. broaden your learning experience by moving onto other • Intellectual, practical and transferable skills such as: topics. Options are offered from the fields of artificial applying scientific findings about cognition to real- intelligence, philosophy, psychology, linguistics and world problems; comparing and evaluating competing neuroscience (see Core courses). theories; constructing and using models, particularly computational ones, as a means of explanation; and producing (and evaluating) rigorous, factual arguments. You will also develop independent essay and project writing, oral presentation and valuable time-management skills, as well as strategies for managing your own learning. 59
  • Community development Core courses Community development (part-time) In addition to your work-based learning in each year, you will take (part-time) the following courses: Year 1 Learning in Higher Education; Understanding Social Exclusion and Developing Equal Opportunities; Community Development: Principles and Practice; and Skills for Community Why community development? Support and Empowerment Essentials With the current launch and expansion of a range of The Foundation Degree in Community Development community-based initiatives, a knowledge of community Year 2 is offered by the University’s Centre for Continuing development is becoming increasingly important at local Understanding How Organisations Education. The programme will be taught at different and regional levels. A degree in community development Work; Key Issues in Community venues across Sussex will help you to play a part in building communities, Development; Management strengthening social ties and improving people’s quality and Support in Community FdA degree of life. Community Development (part-time) Development Contexts; and an Action Learning Set What qualifications do I need? Why community development in CCE Entry requirements are flexible, but you should be able at Sussex? • The degree combines work-based learning with Year 3 to show an ability to work at degree level, as well as have International Perspectives on classroom-based study. some practical experience in the field Community Development. • Practical skills are underpinned by rigorous broad- Apply direct to the Centre for Continuing Education You also complete an Action based academic learning. (not through UCAS) for admission Research Project • Employers and practitioners of community You should normally apply by the end of June for development are involved in both the design and the admission in October regular review of the degree. What qualities should I bring? • Successful completion of this degree can lead you on Experience of working in communities; a reflective to a full honours degree and/or further professional approach to work and learning; willingness to learn from qualifications. others; and commitment to issues of social justice, self • Recognised as a professional qualification in determination, sustainable communities and participation community work by the English Standards Board for in decision making Community Work Training and Qualifications. Fees • Mapped to the National Occupational Standards for See pages 166-167 for information on fees Community Development Work. English language requirements • Part-time study attracts a wide range of applicants, IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the of all ages and experience, and you will have the Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English opportunity to benefit from studying with a diverse language requirements, see page 162 group with similar goals and aspirations. How do I find out more? Lyn’s For more information and an application form, contact What sort of career could I have? perspective At a time of renewed interest in communities and the admissions coordinator: community engagement this degree is relevant to, and ‘Entering my second year of the x E si-admissions@sussex.ac.uk will enhance, a broad range of career paths. foundation degree, I’ve already x T +44 (0)1273 877888 • community regeneration and development learnt from my fellow students – all x F +44 (0)1273 877534 of us bring our own experiences and x Centre for Continuing Education, University of Sussex, • management in both the voluntary and local Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QQ, UK perspectives. x authority sectors www.sussex.ac.uk/cce/communitydevelopment ‘Having worked within communities x • health promotion and other work with Primary for the last 10 years, I’ve both x When can I visit? Care Trusts welcomed and enjoyed this x CCE holds various events throughout Sussex. Please see the CCE website for details • education and widening participation opportunity to formalise and build on x my experience and skills. x • social sector working with particular communities. Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and ‘I’ve gained wider understanding of x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. the concepts of “community” and x How will I learn? Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors “community work” by engaging with xx This is a part-time modular programme, offered on or call 01273 876787 a flexible basis over three years. Study takes place academic theories and research, and x Working with communities for change in seminar groups (usually of between 10 and 18 explored governmental perspectives x students), in addition to work-based projects. Key on this field while building upon x learning and teaching methods include seminars, my practical skills for community x workshops, presentations, individual and group projects, involvement. x reflections on work-based learning, individual tutorials ‘I’m looking forward to continuing and xx and group action learning sets, using problems posed developing my studies in this area.’ in work-based learning contexts. You are given every encouragement and assistance to make full use of Lyn Strong the learning resources. ‘Return to study’ support will be available as appropriate. Assessments include essays, projects, individual and group presentations, portfolio development, learning diaries, case studies, reflections on work-based learning, and an action research project. What will I achieve? You will develop a range of vocational, academic and key skills including: communication skills in a range of working contexts; learning to work individually and in teams; developing your own approaches to learning; problem solving; and research and evaluation skills. 60
  • Computing Computing George’s Essentials When can I visit? perspective All applicants offered a place are invited to an What computing degrees are there? admissions day during the autumn or spring terms. x see computing as a platform for ‘I MComp These give an insight into our degrees and what it’s like creating. As a musician, it was only x Information Technology for E-commerce to study here, through talks, tours, demonstrations and natural that at some point I should x course sampler sessions x computing as a means for use BSc Computer Science creating music. x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and Computing and Artificial Intelligence 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. x found Sussex offered exactly the ‘I Games and Multimedia Environments Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors degree I had in mind, in the form of x Human-Computer Interaction Design or call 01273 876787 Music Informatics. I was concerned x Information Technology for E-commerce that my background in computers or x Internet Computing x knowledge of music might not be my Why computing? Multimedia and Digital Systems substantial enough, but the degree is x Computing is an essential part of 21st-century life, and Music Informatics is an exceptionally fast-moving subject that gives rise constructed in a way that allows for x Computing Sciences (with a Foundation Year) to a range of interesting and challenging problems. The exploration of either discipline with xx BA implementation of today’s complex computing systems, guidance from the ground up. x Music Informatics networks and multimedia systems requires the skills x enjoy studying Music Informatics ‘I What degrees can I do with computing of knowledgeable and versatile computer scientists. because it’s exactly what I want to be x as a minor? Computer networks and the internet are now central doing with my life. I make music every x Mathematics with Computer Science (p121) to the study of computing and information technology, day, and when I’m not making music x presenting both technical and social challenges. x get to play with computers! If this Ix What A levels do I need? Artificial intelligence (AI) – the study of intelligent degree programme sounds like fun to x (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications behaviour – is having an increasing influence on you, I can guarantee you’ll enjoy it.’ information, see pages 159-162) computer system design. Typical offer range ABB-BBB The expertise of graduates in computing is in high George Bashi For BA Music Informatics, A levels (or equivalent) demand, and the degrees we offer will equip you with must include Music or Music Technology, grade B, the skills and knowledge required for a career in this or other evidence of advanced musical literacy dynamic market. (to Grade VlI Theory standard) Why computing at Sussex? What else do I need? • We are a leading centre for teaching and research GCSE (or equivalent) in Mathematics in many aspects of computing, including computer Special entrance requirements apply to Computing science, IT, multimedia, human-centred computing, Sciences (with a Foundation Year). See the programme music informatics, AI and cognitive science. entry on page 64 for details • Cutting-edge courses informed by our international What qualities should I bring? research – grade 5 in the last Research Assessment Creative and analytical ability; ability to work Exercise (RAE). accurately with numbers and symbols; planning • Our courses teach core skills such as Java and time-management skills; a self-starter attitude; programming and teamwork, and professional perseverance; and group participation and team- issues and career development, with a focus on working skills employability. Fees See pages 166-167 for information on fees • Our degree programmes provide a firm foundation in the core topics and in addition allow you to select What scholarships are there? strands of courses that reflect your particular Unlimited scholarships of £1,000 are available. These interests (for example computer graphics and will be awarded on entry to students who firmly accept animation, robotics, or web technologies). our offer of a place by the UCAS deadline and achieve three A grades at A level, excluding General Studies • Attractive, well-equipped computer laboratories with high-spec PCs, a state-of-the-art multimedia English language requirements laboratory, and a special-purpose studio with IELTS 6.0, with 6.0 in each of the four components. computers, PA and recording equipment for music- For alternative English language requirements, see based courses. page 162 • InQbate – the on-campus Centre of Excellence in Foundation year for non-EU students Teaching and Learning in Creativity, with state-of- If your qualifications (including English language) do not the-art technology to support the creative process – yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to offers you opportunities to work in spaces that foster the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an collaborative, self-directed and experiential learning. international foundation year entry route. See page 30 for details • One of the world’s largest groups of researchers studying artificial life and evolutionary computation – How do I find out more? research in ALife at Sussex has lead to breakthroughs For more information, contact the admissions tutor in the development of autonomous, mobile robots. E ug.admissions@informatics.sussex.ac.uk T +44 (0)1273 678829 Applicants to computing degrees do not require previous F +44 (0)1273 877873 programming experience. We encourage applications Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH, UK solving and relishes the potential of new technology. www.sussex.ac.uk/informatics 61
  • Digital video-mixing facilities in the Department of Informatics’ dedicated media technology lab Course strands Computing Our computing degrees consist of What will I achieve? various combinations of the core • You can expect to develop a firm foundation in your strands described below. chosen area that will provide a solid basis for your The programming strand equips future career development. Our degrees also provide you with the basic skills necessary a range of invaluable transferable skills, including to realise working systems. those of presentation, organisation, communication, problem solving, time management and teamworking. In year 1 it focuses on object- oriented programming and • You learn to apply and implement appropriate theories design, and in years 2 and and techniques to the design and development of 3 more advanced courses computing systems, and to use the correct criteria and introduce the main programming tools for the planning, development, documentation, paradigms, including functional, testing and evaluation of software systems. concurrent, distributed and logic • You will gain an understanding of the underlying programming. hardware and software that supports computer The software engineering strand, systems and the internet, and attain a fundamental much of which is taught in year 2, knowledge of how sound, image and video trains you in the craft of building applications are supported, developed and used. large systems. You will learn to • In the AI courses, you discover how AI supports the move from the analysis of required design of intelligent computer systems and gain an functionalities to the conception understanding of the study of intelligence in both of a computer system to deploy humans and machines. them. Teamworking will be • You also learn to manage your own personal important throughout. professional career development in preparation for The computer systems strand further study or the world of work, and beyond. introduces you to the inner working of the main systems Degrees currently used in computing. In year 2 this includes courses Computer Science on computer architectures, BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: G400 database systems, operating We are in the midst of a revolution in the world of systems, compilers and networks. computing that will have far-reaching implications for all In year 3 it covers advanced fields What sort of career could I have? of our lives. Within a few years we will be surrounded by many thousands of (mostly invisible) microprocessors such as pervasive computing. The range of careers open to computing graduates The foundations strand introduces pervading our homes, offices, hospitals, classrooms, is constantly widening as the IT industry diversifies. the fundamental logical and cars and even outdoor environments. The emergence Computing graduates have higher employment and of this new digital era will bring with it many scientific, mathematical principles of average pay levels than graduates from most other technological and social challenges. Our Computer computing, allowing you to disciplines. Science degree has been designed to prepare you for a approach problems in the IT-related: career at the forefront of these exciting developments. scientific, systematic manner • software/multimedia development By focusing on underlying principles, you will be able to required for efficient thinking and quickly grasp both today’s technologies and those of the effective problem solving. Most • games programming future. You will also develop an appreciation of advanced of the courses in this strand are • project management topics in computing and you can adapt the degree to taken in the first year. your specific interests and career objectives. The professional issues strand • search engine analysis This degree includes five core strands: programming, trains you in skills such as • data migration and IT consultancy. software engineering, computer systems, foundations, public speaking and technical Non-IT-related: and professional issues (see course strands list). In communication, and allows you to addition, you have the opportunity to choose one of deepen your understanding of the • treasury associate a wide range of specialist strands: web computing, societal impact of computing, • retail manager computer graphics and animation, robotics and adaptive as well as of your role in society systems, and intelligent systems. • examinations officer as a scientist. Computing and Artificial Intelligence (Course strands continued on • corporate finance and investment banking. BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: G475 page 64.) We maintain a database of employers and cultivate Sussex has a world-wide reputation for research in AI, and personal links with relevant organisations to help you the Computing and Artificial Intelligence degree explores find jobs. Many of our graduates find employment in the scientific basis of intelligence in animals and machines the flourishing computing, multimedia and games and attempts to build intelligence into various sorts of machines, as well as providing a thorough understanding industry in the Brighton area, and these employers of how to design intelligent computer systems. also provide opportunities for interesting and fulfilling summer jobs and part-time work. AI specialists can write programs that extract facts from newspaper articles, and enhance search engines for How will I learn? the ‘semantic web’ by taking account of the meaning We teach by a combination of lectures, seminars, in web articles. They look at ants in order to develop exercise classes, small-group supervisions and navigational abilities in robots, and find new ways to computer-based practical work. Some teaching is by program computers that interpret images for airport means of group projects, linked to particular courses, surveillance. You will learn about the technologies while studio work provides a team-based environment required to do all these things and more. for technical development and implementation. You take the intelligent systems, robotics and adaptive We also run a peer-assisted learning scheme, which systems, and professional issues strands (see course has non-compulsory additional group-study classes strands list), together with most of the programming and to provide extra support for particular courses. These foundations strands. You also have a choice between classes are run by students who have already taken extending your degree in the direction of computer science the course. or cognitive science. In the first case you will take further courses from the software engineering and computer Assessment is by a combination of exams, coursework systems strands; in the second you will take complementary (such as software exercises, reports, oral presentations courses in philosophy, psychology or linguistics. and essays), group projects and a large-scale individual project. Nearly all courses are assessed at least partly by coursework, and many also have an end-of-year exam. 62
  • In either case you will leave Sussex well equipped for the job market. Computing and AI are subjects highly Computing regarded in industry, and many companies seek to recruit our graduates. The IT and computing skills you acquire through your degree are widely sought by employers, as are the transferable skills such as practical problem solving, communication skills and an understanding of scientific method. Games and Multimedia Environments (GAME) BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: GG46 With this degree you will be in the forefront of advances in game production, multimedia, audio technology, artificial intelligence, advanced computer graphics and special effects. This programme covers both the fundamentals of game systems and software development, together with creation of the media content necessary for the implementation of games. This degree gives you the experience and qualifications necessary to work in many multimedia and gaming industries. You are taught skills in areas including software development, 3D graphics, artificial intelligence, multimedia and video systems fundamentals, multimedia content creation and web design, computer architecture and networks. You also undertake games-based individual and group projects. The Department of Informatics supports this programme with its excellent state-of-the-art facilities, providing software development tools, 3D modelling and rendering tools, multimedia content creation tools, studio facilities, professional video-editing systems and sound-recording facilities. The media technology laboratory enables you to undertake various practical work assignments using up-to-date facilities that you would find in the modern gaming and digital media industries. hardware and software, and have access to modern Robots in the autonomous systems lab Human-Computer Interaction Design computing labs to undertake a wide range of practical BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: G440 Human-Computer Interaction Design ensures that the work assignments. Nicola’s needs of people are at the heart of the design of a wide You take the software engineering, computer systems, perspective variety of digital systems, for example mobile phones, web computing and professional issues strands (see ‘I x chose Multimedia and Digital laptops and computer games. Building computing course strands list), with some of the programming Systems because I wanted to learn x systems involves much more than programming, and and foundations strand. In addition you take a specially about creating graphics, video and x this course is about employing people-centred design designed strand concerned with web-based commerce animation, as well as the more x practices to build better systems. Such systems need and business. technical side involving programming x to be easy to use as well as useful; providing a satisfying Information Technology for E-commerce user experience involves applying insights from fields and x computer systems. I also wanted MComp, 4 years UCAS Code: G500 a x degree programme that would such as psychology and the social sciences to the The first three years of this degree are the same as design process. be x recognised by employers as the BSc in Information Technology for E-commerce worthwhile. x You will design technical solutions ranging from desktop- described above. As a Masters graduate, you will have a greater breadth of knowledge extending over the ‘For x the Technical Communications based applications to cutting-edge technologies such as hand-held devices, sensors and computers embedded areas articulated in the BSc and will have a deeper Skills course we had to give a x in the environment and even your clothes. understanding gained from postgraduate-level study presentation based on a technical x in advanced subjects such as the organisation and subject. We had to present in front of xx Throughout the degree you will have the opportunity management of innovation, management for a x camera, while our slides were shown to work in small groups on practical projects that will e-commerce, ICT policy and strategy, managing on x a green screen behind us, and enable you to apply the skills and knowledge you have innovation in complex product systems, and web- learned. You take all of the professional issues strand, other students watched in the next x based commerce. You will undertake a Masters- room. I did mine on “How to turn cows’ x most of the software engineering strand, part of the level dissertation or project, culminating in deeper computer systems strand and a number of multimedia methane into energy”. I was nervous at x understanding of these subject areas. courses (see computing course strands list). You also first, x x but I loved it! take courses from the product design (see page 147) This programme is aimed at top-flight students looking ‘Studying at Sussex has helped me to x and cognitive science programmes (see page 58), with for an IT career within the e-commerce sector. As such, learn new skills that will be valuable x options to build up expertise in particular areas. you will be expected to demonstrate an ability to use in x the world of employment. Group knowledge and understanding in a creative way. You will coursework projects allow you to gain By the end of this degree programme you will have the x investigate new and emerging technologies, develop design and team skills to create the human-centred experience of working with others to x new solutions, and work with minimum supervision technology innovations of the future. get x the work finished and handed in to integrate IT design and practice, and the business Information Technology for E-commerce context, to solve a broad range of e-commerce on x time. From studying at Sussex I BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: GH56 problems. You will be able to work at the interface have also made friends with students x Revolutions in information technology, multimedia and between business processes and innovative IT solutions. of x varying ages and from different e-commerce affect all aspects of our lives – and you can walks of life that I would otherwise not x Internet Computing be at the heart of it. This degree offers excellent career have met.’ BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: G450 prospects and if you are interested in the internet and web The internet is one of the most important technological Nicola Cousins development, computers and multimedia, e-trading and developments of recent years. It was invented and e-commerce, this is the degree for you. It blends developed in the computing departments of universities information technology and software development with around the world, and it is through the application of international trading and management to address the computing principles and engineering that it continues emerging fields of e-commerce and e-business. to develop and grow. To be a part of the evolving internet, The programme enables you to gain skills in software you need to understand how computers work, how design and development, computer networks and they can be used to develop applications and how they digital communications, information technology and can be connected together. But to keep pace with web services, as well as in innovation and marketing, these technological changes, you need to understand business and management, and e-business. You the underlying principles from which the technology will also gain practical skills using various types of is developed. 63
  • Music Informatics BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: WG34 Computing BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: WGH4 The degree in Music Informatics develops in-depth creative musical and computer skills side by side. It is more than learning about digital recording studios and common music software; it is about applying cutting- edge technologies from artificial intelligence, computer science, interactive multimedia, and a range of other disciplines to develop new kinds of creative machines and new approaches to music making. To explore these challenges you need to be a competent musician. The BA requires, in addition, advanced musical literacy; BA students who have also attained a high level of performance in instrument or voice (to Grade VIII standard) may have the benefit of small-group and one-to-one tuition at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. Both degrees include core courses on computational music, which involve both theoretical and practical work around using the computer as a musical tool, and Directing a live webcast from studio 2 of the media music technology courses to develop traditional studio Course strands cont’d technology lab production and composition skills. You also follow advanced courses in artificial intelligence, as well as The web computing strand By concentrating on the fundamental computing exploring the interdisciplinary nature of the programme introduces leading internet with a course in music perception. principles underpinning the internet, we will enable you technologies, allowing you to to easily understand and use new technologies. You will become an internet programmer. The first year provides you with a grounding in both be equipped with the skills to enter the world of The focus will be on web music and computing, and includes an exploration e-commerce, and to manage the complex technologies of the role music plays in our society as well as an architectures and systems such needed to use the internet effectively. You will administer introduction to composition, taught through practical as web services. Advanced intricate networked computer systems and appreciate workshop sessions. In informatics you will learn courses cover concurrent the opportunities that will arise from the development of computer programming and be introduced to the history programming, networks and pervasive computing environments. Most importantly, and techniques of artificial intelligence. distributed computing. you will be taught to understand problems clearly and to harness internet technology to produce solutions. In the second year, BA students select a specialism from The graphics and animation composition, performance or analysis, and develop strand explores key 2D and 3D You take the software engineering, computer systems, this through to the final year, while BSc students select computer-generated graphics web computing and professional issues strands course options in informatics. and animation techniques. In the (see course strands list), together with most of the programming and foundations strands. You also take The third year covers advanced topics in computational second year you take courses in a set of specialised courses in pervasive computing, music, with additional core courses in creative software 3D modelling and rendering, and systems and multimedia, and BSc students will also information security and e-business. programming for 3D. You build have a chance to select two options from third-year on this in year 3 with courses Multimedia and Digital Systems informatics courses. By this stage you will also be in virtual reality systems, 3D BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: G460 spending more of your time on project work including a With a degree in Multimedia and Digital Systems you animation and multimedia design substantial Music Informatics project. will be at the forefront of advances in multimedia, applications. music production, audio technology, video production, BA composition students will be required to submit a The robotics and adaptive systems advanced computer graphics and special effects. portfolio of work, and performance students will give a strand focuses on adaptive This degree covers the fundamentals of digital systems recital or other public presentation. robotics, ie autonomous systems and software development, together with creation of Brighton is the perfect base for music informatics, with that adapt their behaviour the media content necessary for the implementation of its huge diversity of alternative music venues, games according to their environment. It multimedia systems. and multimedia companies, wide range of music and covers topics such as behaviour- The degree programme gives you the experience and arts festivals, and London only a short distance away. based cybernetics and the qualifications necessary to work in many multimedia This interdisciplinary degree provides the opportunity relationships between robotics and digital systems industries, from video production to study a highly creative subject while developing a and neuroscience, psychology and and computer animation to web design and digital vocational and much sought after skill set. biology. Later modules study and broadcasting. You gain skills in areas including illustrate in practice stochastic multimedia systems basics, multimedia content Computing Sciences (with a Foundation Year) search, learning algorithms and creation and web design, software engineering and BSc (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: G402 design, creation and manipulation of video and audio The entrance requirement is the standard A level offer evolutionary robotics. content, 3D graphics, computer architecture, and CC. However, other post-GCSE qualifications may be The intelligent systems strand computer networks. You work on both individual and suitable for entry. focuses on the design and group projects. This programme incorporates a foundation year taught implementation of intelligent at Central Sussex College, and leads on to one of computer systems. It introduces The degree is supported by the media technology lab, the following computing degrees offered within the which provides state-of-the-art digital facilities, software automated reasoning and Department of Informatics: Computer Science; development tools, multimedia content creation tools, machine learning techniques. You Computing and Artificial Intelligence; Games and studio facilities, professional video editing systems also learn to program in a high- Multimedia Environments; Human-Computer Interaction and sound recording facilities. The lab enables you to level AI programming language Design; Information Technology for E-commerce; undertake various practical work assignments using the Internet Computing; Multimedia and Digital Systems; which supports rapid systems up-to-date facilities that you would find in the modern and Music Informatics. prototyping. Further courses cover digital media industry. topics in computer vision and This route to a Sussex degree provides courses on You take the software engineering, graphics and natural language processing. topics such as object-oriented programming, computer animation, and professional issues strands (see course systems and computing methods, as well as study strands list), together with much of the programming, skills. On satisfactory completion of the foundation year, foundations and computer systems strands. In addition you transfer to the University of Sussex onto one of the you take a special multimedia strand, including courses degree programmes listed above. in audio systems, video techniques, 3D computer graphics, virtual reality and multimedia design. The programme is particularly suitable for strong mature candidates whose background would otherwise require them to take an Access course before university study, or for candidates whose A/AS level results do not meet the requirements for year 1 entry, as an alternative to A/AS level retakes. The degree assumes fluency in English. 64
  • Camilla’s Contemporary perspective Contemporary European studies ‘I’ve always been interested in x European studies the x world around me, and the emergence of Europe as a key actor x on x the international stage highlights the importance of understanding x economics within a wider framework. x The x contemporary European studies element of my degree has allowed me x to extend my knowledge of the crucial x developments that have taken place x throughout Europe in the post-war era. x Why contemporary European studies? Essentials ’The courses I’ve chosen provide x Europe in the 21st century is marked by opportunities fantastic opportunities to engage in xx At Sussex you take contemporary European studies as well as uncertainties, presenting challenges to its alongside another subject as part of a joint degree citizens and partners that need to be understood and debates about highly controversial x or as a minor explained in Britain and beyond. Europe is integrating matters, such as the role of the World x and growing rapidly, the European Union (EU) now Trade Organization and the increasing x What contemporary European studies embraces 27 countries and over 400 million people: importance of globalisation as a x degrees are there? how should it be governed? Is a multicultural Europe political force. x Anthropology and Contemporary European possible, or must ethnicity and religion remain sources ‘Sussex promotes interdisciplinary xx Studies (p44) of conflict in the region’s politics? study, offering a greater insight x International Relations and Contemporary European into your area of interest, and x Studies (p110) Contemporary European studies gives you an in-depth Language(s) (one or two from French, German, Italian or the x combinations are highly and comprehensive appreciation of the evolution Spanish) and Contemporary European Studies (p113) of Europe and its prospects, drawing on insights complementary. The sheer diversity x Philosophy and Contemporary European Studies (p139) from across the social sciences, and is intellectually provided allows you to personalise x Politics and Contemporary European Studies (p145) rewarding and career friendly. your degree, something that I’ve also x achieved through studying at the x What can I take with contemporary Why contemporary European studies University of Seville in Spain during my x European studies as a minor? at Sussex? third year. The flexibility offered by the x Law with Contemporary European Studies (p116) • Our Department obtained 23 out of 24 in the last programme opens the door to many x What A levels do I need? teaching quality assessment. opportunities, ensuring that you really x See relevant subject entry for details • One of the leading UK research centres in European do x maximise the benefits from your For programmes including languages, see page 112 studies. time at Sussex.’ for information about entry requirements • A challenging undergraduate programme taught by Camilla What qualities should I bring? experts from a range of disciplines in the arts and Rogers Motivation and commitment; independent and critical social sciences. thought; awareness of current affairs; curiosity about • Well-developed exchange programmes with other Europe and its future European universities for students on language and Fees non-language degree programmes. See pages 166-167 for information on fees • A diverse international student base drawn from all English language requirements corners of Europe and beyond. IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the • Excellent library facilities for the study of Europe and Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English the European Union. language requirements, see page 162 What sort of career could I have? How do I find out more? • Public and private sector careers, based on your For more information, contact the admissions tutor: in-depth knowledge of government affairs at both E ug.admissions@ces.sussex.ac.uk national and EU level. T +44 (0)1273 678578 • Our graduates have been successful in the EU F +44 (0)1273 673563 Commission, the EU Council secretariat, NATO and in Contemporary European Studies, University of Sussex, the British Civil Service European Fast Stream. Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SJ, UK www.sussex.ac.uk/sei • The media and public relations. Your studies here will enable you to make the contacts and connections for When can I visit? a successful career in these areas. Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. • Many of our students go on to further study in Europe. Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or call 01273 876787 65
  • Core courses Contemporary European studies Year 1 The core course – The Making of Modern Europe – puts today’s Europe into the context of past events and processes. It does so through a series of thematic modules that examine issues such as the evolution of the ideas of Europe and European integration; and questions of the development of political structures, human rights and identity across the continent. If you follow Contemporary European Studies for 50 per cent of your programme, you will take an additional seminar exploring topics from the core course in greater depth. Year 2 The second-year core course – The Transformation of Contemporary Europe – focuses on Europe as it is now. This course examines the challenges facing Europeans in the world of work, and the changing nature of economics, politics and society. If you follow Contemporary European Studies for 50 per cent of your programme, you will take additional courses The German Parliament building in Berlin: What will I achieve? addressing how Europe interacts European politics is an important part of the • You gain basic historical insights into the way today’s with the rest of the world (covering Contemporary European Studies degree programme Europe evolved and what the challenges are for the questions of migration and future, as well as learning about current issues such as economic relations). How will I learn? how the European Central Bank operates and why EU The degree uses a range of teaching methods, including: law is relevant in national courts. Year 3 contact with highly qualified staff in both lectures and • In a degree programme such as this, many matters In the final year of the programme, seminars; tutorials and workshops – working with your peers and tutors; use of online materials and are deeply controversial. We aim to give you an you choose from a number of techniques; and access to one of the finest libraries understanding of what the main points of view options covering different aspects of European materials in the UK. are, which facts are broadly agreed and which are of European studies. Current contested, and to show how you can use academic options cover such topics as the We encourage debate and discussion with teachers policy process in the EU, and methods and reasoning to put forward your point of and other students. You enhance your communication view. You also become part of an intellectual and cultural pluralism in Europe. and research skills by making presentations and by social community composed of students from around analysing and interpreting academic, government and the world. media sources. • Contemporary European studies offers a range of The reading in this field ranges from broad historical courses drawn from across the social sciences. works to more specialised social science materials. The aim is to provide you with an overview of the The first year looks at the historical element underlying economic, political and social dimensions of Europe, today’s Europe; the second year looks in more detail both as it is today and in historical perspective. at modern Europe as a whole; and in the third year you study a range of special topics. During the first and second years the programme has a core and a more in-depth seminar stream, and you can choose whether to take just the core or both streams. 66
  • Creativity and the arts Why creativity and the arts at Sussex? • Taught by experts in a wide variety of creative fields Creativity and the arts (part-time) including practising artists and writers. (part-time) • Flexible programme allows you to develop your personal interests. • Strong element of choice (option courses). • An opportunity to study for a degree part time – many classes are taught during evenings and weekends. • Open-entry policy (no qualifications needed). • Specialist teaching, support and guidance for adults. • Flexible progress arrangements allow you to leave Essentials Adrian’s with a certificate or diploma if you are unable to perspective complete the full programme of study. The BA in Creativity and the Arts is offered by the x University’s Centre for Continuing Education (CCE) ‘I x began this degree for interest, What sort of career could I have? pleasure and self-development. The x • publishing BA (Hons) degree Creativity and the Arts degree allows you to take a pathway x • the media through the subject, focusing on your x What qualifications do I need? own interests (in my case art history) x • arts and cultural institutions There are no standard entrance requirements; offers are alongside the core material, common x • teaching made on the basis of a written application and (where to x all. The beauty of a CCE degree is appropriate) an interview and a further short piece of • further study and research, including creative that it builds on known and familiar x written work practice. topics and then takes you into whole x Apply direct to the Centre for Continuing Education new areas of study, often providing x How will I learn? (not through UCAS) for admission unexpected interest and pleasure. x Most study takes place in seminar groups (usually You should normally apply by the end of June for ‘I’m x x a part-time, mature student with 14-18 students) plus lectures and tutor presentations. admission in October a x full-time day job. Being able to study The core teaching method is reasoned debate supported in my city of residence is not only ideal, x by evidence and with close reference to textual What qualities can I bring? examples and artistic practice in a variety of forms and but x is really the only feasible way I Enthusiasm for the arts; interest in the creative imagination media. Assessments include presentations, essays, could blend study with work. x and the various ways it is expressed; a desire to stretch research notes, summaries and a final dissertation. yourself intellectually; an open mind ‘The fantastic library, coupled with the x knowledgeable and personable faculty Assessed assignments at level 1 (normally the first xx Fees two years of study) do not contribute to your final members, make studying at Sussex x See pages 166-167 for information on fees classification. The dissertation is the most significant a x journey in which there is always a assignment. English language requirements challenge, but always someone ready x IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the Listening to help should you need it.’ What will I achieve? and Writing sections. For alternative English language • Knowledge of creative practice and the ability to requirements, see page 162 Adrian Hull discuss it in terms of originality, the practitioner’s aesthetic and artistic choices, and the address to How do I find out more? the intended audience. For more information and an application form, contact the admissions coordinator: • The ability to compare and evaluate cultural and E si-admissions@sussex.ac.uk artistic works and to deploy appropriate critical terms. T +44 (0)1273 877888 • The skills of research, analysis and presentation: F +44 (0)1273 877534 the ability to work independently on diverse materials, Centre for Continuing Education, University of Sussex, to form sound and autonomous judgements, and to Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QQ, UK present your findings and views effectively. www.sussex.ac.uk/cce • The opportunity to acquire and enhance IT skills, to When can I visit? use various media in supporting your arguments, and CCE holds various events throughout Sussex. to access materials from diverse sources. Please see the CCE website for details Core courses • Experience of meeting your own goals and defining Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and Years 1 and limiting your field of enquiry. 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Telling Stories: Narrative, Artist Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors and Audience Degrees or call 01273 876787 Genre, Form and Innovation Creativity and the Arts Why creativity and the arts? BA (Hons), 6 years This innovative programme develops a broad and Years 2 and 4 If you are interested in the arts professionally or as in-depth understanding of the arts. Historical critique is You select options as available a means of self-development, this programme will integrated with the study of creative practice in a range from among the following subject encourage you to reflect on the creative process and of media, including music, film, painting and writing. areas: art history; arts and cultural situate the work of the individual in a wider context. Interdisciplinary courses investigate social and cultural management; creative writing; In the first year you are introduced to concepts essential dimensions of creativity, but you will also examine film studies; literature; music; and for an understanding of how creativity expresses itself in the way in which individual artists approach form and opera. the practice of the arts. The year 3 courses develop this technique, imitation and innovation. You may choose understanding by focusing on the relationship between to reflect on your own work in the final independent Year 3 life and work in Autobiography and Creative Practice, study. However, creative practice is not a requirement: Autobiography and Creative and on the dialogue between a given work of art and its we welcome all those who wish to develop their Practice predecessors in Influence and Intertextuality. appreciation and understanding of the arts. Influence and Intertextuality In years 2 and 4, option courses allow you to deepen or broaden your understanding of creative practice. Year 5 Year 5 comprises core courses that are particularly but Creativity and the Marketplace not exclusively concerned with contemporary aspects The Spirit of Place? Art and of creativity and the arts. The final year is devoted to Environment independent study, offering you the opportunity to reflect, if you wish, on your own creative practice. Year 6 Researching Creativity and the Arts Independent Study: Creativity and the Arts 67
  • Cultural studies Stephen’s Cultural studies perspective ‘Culture has always interested me and x I x think that it deserves to be studied in x depth because it surrounds us in our x daily lives. Sussex is a great place to study culture because its mixed x student community brings viewpoints x from all over the world into the seminar x discussions. I also like the variety of x Sussex teaching styles. We’re able to x analyse culture from outside the UK x at x different historical moments. Many of x the tutors at Sussex are leading experts in cultural studies and it’s x really exciting to be taught by them. x They help you to look at the world in x a different way.’ Why cultural studies? Stephen Essentials Greenlees Cultural studies offers an exciting chance to study What degrees can I take with cultural studies? culture in all its forms: from opera to soap opera; in Anthropology and Cultural Studies (p44) settings worldwide, from the UK and Europe to China Art History and Cultural Studies (p48) and Africa; and in different historical periods, from the Drama Studies and Cultural Studies (p74) Ming dynasty to the present. Studying cultures alongside English and Cultural Studies (p89) another subject offers a second set of knowledge and Language(s) (one or two from French, German, skills to take into the workplace. Italian or Spanish) and Cultural Studies (p113) Media and Cultural Studies (p124) Why cultural studies at Sussex? Music and Cultural Studies (p134) • High-quality teaching from research leaders in the Philosophy and Cultural Studies (p139) field of cultural studies. Sociology and Cultural Studies (p155) • Interdisciplinary approach drawing from both the What A levels do I need? humanities and the social sciences. See relevant subject entries for details • Cultural studies can be studied alongside a wide Yemisi’s range of other subjects. For programmes including languages, see page 112 perspective for information about entry requirements • Unique comparative orientation reflecting on ‘I x chose to take cultural studies at cultural production in different historical periods and What qualities should I bring? Sussex because I’m fascinated by the x geographical settings. Wide-ranging knowledge; understanding of how culture concept of culture and how it informs x is produced and reproduced; research skills • Wide understanding of culture in all its societal attitudes and structures the x manifestations and forms, across the boundary of world over. The interdisciplinary nature Fees high and popular culture. x See pages 166-167 for information on fees of x the Sussex degree programme • Focus on the global circulation of culture to ensures that students have a rich, x English language requirements understand a fast-moving and increasingly colourful and sound understanding of x IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the interconnected world. the x key concepts on the programme Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English language requirements, see page 162 by x drawing from other related areas of x knowledge such as media studies, How do I find out more? sociology and anthropology. As I’m x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: taking a joint degree in Media and x E ug.admissions@cultural.sussex.ac.uk Cultural Studies, this has been of x T +44 (0)1273 676616 Cultural studies at Sussex looks at great importance in facilitating x F +44 (0)1273 673563 culture from a global perspective my x understanding of the cultural Cultural Studies, Arts C357, University of Sussex, influences displayed by the modern x Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SJ, UK www.sussex.ac.uk/cultural media industry. x ‘The intriguing conceptual frameworks x When can I visit? and x theories I’ve had to engage with Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and through reading and essay writing x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. have helped me develop strong x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors analytical skills and given me a x or call 01273 876787 wealth of experience in producing x well-articulated pieces of writing. This x is x certainly a degree that heightens your awareness of the way the world x works and is grounded at the heart of x contemporary issues. For me, that’s x got to be good!’ Yemisi Cookey 68
  • Core courses Cultural studies Year 1 Culture Across Space and Time covers the development of the concept of culture in the West and how this has affected ideas about civilisation, difference and identity. Culture and the Everyday explores theories concerning people’s engagement with the world and the way culture operates in everyday life. Representing Culture looks at how people represent ideas, objects, persons, practices and experiences from ‘their own’ and ‘other people’s’ cultures. Studying Cultures considers approaches to studying culture and compares them with approaches taken by anthropologists, geographers, historians, literary and media specialists and musicians. Year 2 Culture, Race and Ethnicity is an examination of the relationship between ideas of culture, race and ethnicity both historically and in contemporary society, showing how these concepts have been used in political projects or movements. The Allure of Things explores processes of circulation of Culture refers to a number of creative forms but always stands at the centre of human experience significant objects (material or otherwise) within specific cultural Cultural Studies What sort of career could I have? and historical contexts, and also The Cultural Studies programme is designed to • Community work of various types, particularly in analyses the social, cultural and introduce you to the excitement, pleasures and areas of multiculturalism. economic relationships that shape demands of university-level study: you explore, develop and are shaped by the movement • Tourism, museums, and the heritage industries. and acquire a thorough grasp of new ideas and skills. of ‘things’. Your first-year courses introduce the most important • Media and the arts, including arts administration. Theory, Taste and Trash, an account themes. In year 2 these are expanded and consolidated • Marketing, advertising, and product design. and, in year 3, you are ready to explore areas of interest of how the study of popular culture in depth and develop research interests of your own. came to be established in British • A Cultural Studies degree will also prepare you for academia, and of some of the key postgraduate studies in cultural studies and related The programme is based on three principles, which theoretical approaches that helped disciplines. distinguish it from other cultural studies programmes: to shape those studies. • Firstly, Cultural Studies at Sussex has a historical Either Culture, Gender and Sexuality, How will I learn? dimension, not only looking at contemporary culture which discusses how culture and You learn in a variety of ways: lectures, workshops, group but also at cultures in history. the arts have been instrumental in discussions, shared project work, preparing and making negotiating constructions of gender presentations, field trips and tutorials. In your final year • Secondly, Cultural Studies at Sussex is global in you are encouraged to undertake individual research outlook, not only looking at western culture but at and sexuality throughout history; projects with your tutor’s support. cultures throughout the world. or The Meaning of Things, which asks how objects acquire meaning What will I achieve? • Thirdly, Cultural Studies at Sussex is concerned with and value, both in the past and in • An understanding of what ‘culture’ means and the both ‘high’ culture – the arts, literature – and ‘popular’ the present, considering how our way in which it shapes who we are and how we live, culture – film and television, pop music, fashion. attitudes towards objects change as well as our family, social and national These principles make Cultural Studies at Sussex over time and place. characteristics, rituals and beliefs. uniquely comparative: across time, across culture and • Familiarity with the way ‘culture’ in turn affects the across the boundary of ‘high’ and ‘popular’ culture. Year 3 things we use and value, whether they be food, art You work with leading researchers objects or performance. on topics such as the Body in • An understanding of the part played in culture by Society; Carnival, Symbols and gender, class and sexuality and the way we are taught Society; Colonialism and Post- to view them, exploring many geographical settings Coloniality; Comedy and Cultural and historical periods. Belonging; Consuming Passions; Cultural Landscapes in Britain; • Intellectual skills in understanding, summarising, Culture and Representation; synthesising, criticising and analysing material. Culture, Anthropology, History; • Practical skills in IT, written and oral presentation, Cultures of Colonialism; Cultures personal organisation and timekeeping and, if you of Media Production; Geographies so choose, proficiency in a foreign language. of Resistance; Globalisation and Culture; Imperial Networks and Colonial Discourse; Landscape/ Memory/Identity; Madness and Society; Performance, Celebrity and Fandom; Ritual, Performance, Spectacle. You then go on to develop your independent research topic. 69
  • Jasumati’s Cultures and communities perspective Cultures and communities (part-time) ‘I originally enrolled as an adult learner x (part-time) on an Access to Higher Education x course. I wanted to enhance my job x prospects as a project coordinator x in international development. The x access course whetted my appetite for x further study, so I decided to enrol on x a certificate programme in women’s x studies. I learned about women’s x struggle for equality and their role in x contemporary society. Progress on to x Essentials • An opportunity to study for a degree part-time – the degree came quite naturally once x classes are taught during evenings and weekends. I realised that I could use my existing x The BA in Cultures and Communities (part-time) is offered by the University’s Centre for Continuing • Open-entry policy (no qualifications needed) and credits towards the BA. x Education (CCE) flexible progress arrangements. ‘The degree is the perfect choice for xx me as I hope to do community work x BA degree • Specialist teaching, support and guidance for adults. in the voluntary sector in the future. x Cultures and Communities (part-time) • You can leave with a certificate or diploma if you are It’s challenging and has made me xx What qualifications do I need? unable to complete the full degree. think about the world around me from x There are no formal entrance requirements; offers are What sort of career could I have? different perspectives.’ made on the basis of a written application and (where • opportunities in the heritage industry and other appropriate) an interview and a further short piece of history work Jasumati written work Vaghadia • the media, arts and cultural institutions Apply direct to the Centre for Continuing Education (not through UCAS) for admission • community development You should normally apply by the end of June for • further study and research. admission in October How will I learn? What qualities should I bring? Most study takes place in seminar groups. Many An interest in people, their culture and communities; a courses involve lectures and tutor presentations. The desire to understand how the social world operates core teaching method is reasoned debate supported by evidence, and you are given every encouragement and Fees assistance to make full use of the resources on campus. See pages 166-167 for information on fees Assessments include essays, presentations, research English language requirements notes, summaries and a final dissertation. Assessed IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the assignments at level 1 (normally the first two years of Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English study) do not contribute to your final classification. language requirements, see page 162 The dissertation is the most significant assignment. How do I find out more? There are no unseen exams on this programme. For more information and an application form, contact What will I achieve? the admissions coordinator: • The ability to reflect on your own and others’ E si-admissions@sussex.ac.uk experience, and how culture and community can T +44 (0)1273 877888 shape, sustain and challenge forms of identity F +44 (0)1273 877534 and belonging. Centre for Continuing Education, University of Sussex, • An understanding of the society in which we live and Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QQ, UK our place within it. www.sussex.ac.uk/cce • The skills of research, analysis and presentation: the When can I visit? ability to work independently on diverse materials, CCE holds various events throughout Sussex. to form sound and autonomous judgements, and to Core courses Please see the CCE website (above) for details present your findings and views effectively. Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and Year 1 • Enhanced IT skills and the ability to apply these to 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Please Concepts in Cultures and your work. book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or call Communities 01273 876787 • Experience of meeting your own goals, and defining Lives, Cultures and Communities and limiting your field of enquiry. Why cultures and communities? Year 2 Cultures and communities explores the interrelationship Degrees A range of option courses focusing of lives, cultures and communities, and the ways in on different aspects of lives, which new understandings can contribute to cultural Cultures and Communities BA (Hons), 6 years cultures and communities change and community development. By working with life stories we explore how people make their lives This degree is designed to develop your interests in how and articulate their experiences within and against society operates at a personal, cultural and community Year 3 social structures. Through engaging with cultural level. You will engage with the themes, arguments and Community and Cultural Politics theory we understand the significance of power and historical perspectives central to our understanding Making Communities representations within lives, cultures and communities. of life in Britain today. You will come to understand By interrogating further what we mean by community what is meant by ‘culture’ and ‘community’, how they Year 4 we can investigate how people are sustained interact with our everyday experiences and how they A range of option courses focusing and shaped by and are active creators of myriad are influenced by global forces. You will be able to frame on different aspects of lives, relationships or communities. your particular interests, enthusiasms and experiences cultures and communities in terms of an informed understanding of what culture Why cultures and communities in CCE and community are and how they operate. Year 5 at Sussex? The degree follows a core and options structure. See the Constructing the Self • CCE has a strong track record in innovative cultural core courses list for details. Material Culture studies courses and is a pioneer in life history approaches. Year 6 • CCE supports numerous community education and Research Methods development projects across Sussex. Independent study 70
  • Development studies Development studies Essentials Why development studies? In an increasingly polarised world, a knowledge of What development studies degrees are there? ‘developing countries’ is particularly relevant. Development Studies Development studies analyses social, political and Development Studies with French cultural change in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the Development Studies with Spanish Caribbean and South America. It deals with such key issues as globalisation, inequality, poverty, gender Anthropology and Development Studies (p44) relations, ethnicity and cultural representation. Economics and Development Studies (p78) Geography and Development Studies (p102) The subject has taken on a much broader meaning International Relations and Development Studies (p110) than economic development, and now has ecological, Politics and Development Studies (p146) cultural and moral implications. How does development Sociology and Development Studies (p155) affect the environment and human rights? How do religious and other cultural values influence economic What degrees can I take with development development? studies as a minor? Business and Management Studies (with a Development If you have a global perspective or if you are fascinated Studies Pathway) (p55) by other cultures, development studies offers new Environmental Science with Development Studies (p96) opportunities at university and in the world of work. See also Why development studies at Sussex? Anthropology (p43), Engineering for society: • The University of Sussex is a leading centre in the UK environment or international development (p83) for development studies. Moving fodder in the Atlas mountains What A levels do I need? • We focus on the critical analysis of development (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications issues. information, see pages 159-162) Typical offer range ABB-BBB • Our interdisciplinary framework encourages a Mai’s broad contextual focus cross-cutting anthropology, perspective For programmes including languages, see page 112 economics, international relations and geography. for information about entry requirements x ‘Studying International Relations • The degree programmes offered place social and x Development Studies at Sussex and What qualities should I bring? cultural issues as central to the understanding of the x enabled me to build a deeper has Analytical skills; commitment to the subject; writing development process. x understanding of the world today. skills; desire to learn about other cultures • We explore the global dimension to poverty x interdisciplinary approach means The Fees alleviation. x are encouraged to look at issues we See pages 166-167 for information on fees • Sussex encourages time overseas as part of x from a variety of perspectives, giving a the degree programme. We will advise you on x holistic and balanced view on several English language requirements IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the appropriate institutions that can provide suitable x exciting topics. Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English courses, etc related to development studies. x ‘With its high number of international language requirements, see page 162 x students, and its location near • The Nicola Anderson bursary, awarded competitively x Brighton, the University has a lot to Foundation year for non-EU students to development studies students who put forward x offer students looking for a vibrant and If your qualifications (including English language) do not a viable project to work overseas, is available to x inspiring place to be. yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to assist financially during periods of time abroad. xx ‘Being the student representative the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an Recent projects have included establishing a non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Rwanda, x Development Studies has given for international foundation year entry route. See page 30 for details providing teaching in Tanzania and delivering a x an important insight into how the me course on football refereeing also in East Africa. xx University works at the department How do I find out more? This allows you to combine personal talents with x level. Members of faculty come For more information, contact the subject coordinator: the experience of working in new environments and x from diverse backgrounds and E devstudiesoffice@sussex.ac.uk enhances your appreciation of the more academic have international expertise from a T +44 (0)1273 678722 aspects of your programme. x variety of places, making lectures F +44 (0)1273 673563 x seminars interesting and highly and Development Studies, University of Sussex, Falmer, What sort of career could I have? Our graduates have gone on to careers in: x relevant. I have greatly improved Brighton BN1 9SJ, UK x research skills as well as my my www.sussex.ac.uk/development • NGOs and associated development agencies. confidence in expressing my opinions!’ When can I visit? Several of our graduates have gone on to create their Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and own NGOs as a result of their experiences obtained Mai Juliett 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. while at Sussex B Amundsen Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors • civil service or call 01273 876787 • jobs with ethnic minorities, social regeneration projects and multiculturalism • commerce, where an understanding of global social issues is important • further study and training. 71
  • Drama studies Drama studies Essentials Why drama studies? In the postmodern world everything – it has been claimed At Sussex you take drama studies alongside another – is theatricalised. Studying drama enables you to see subject as part of a joint degree how society can be described as a dramatic space and equips you with a range of skills, both practical and What drama studies degrees are there? theoretical, that you can take forward into a variety of Drama Studies and a Language (one from French, cultural spheres after graduating. German, Italian or Spanish) Drama Studies and Cultural Studies Why drama studies at Sussex? Drama Studies and English • Rated a grade 5 (recognising research of national Drama Studies and Film Studies and international excellence) in the last Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). What A levels do I need? • Specialist teaching from active researchers in the (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications field of modern and contemporary drama, theatre information, see pages 159-162) and performance. Typical offer range AAB-ABB • Our curriculum explores the complex relationships For Drama Studies and English, A levels (or equivalent) between theory and practice in the seminar room and in the studio. must include English, English Literature or the combined A level in English Language and Literature, at grade A • Programme of study that moves from the introduction of first principles, via their more sophisticated For programmes including languages, see page 112 application, to areas of specialism. for information about entry requirements • Emphasis on group work in teaching and assessment. What qualities should I bring? • Major performance projects. A critical mindset; creative approaches to theatre and performance; an interest in practical work What sort of career could I have? • theatre and performing arts Fees • media, film and journalistic professions See pages 166-167 for information on fees • further study at professional conservatoires and drama English language requirements schools IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the • further study in higher education Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English language requirements, see page 162 • teaching How do I find out more? • other professions (law, accountancy) for which a good For more information, contact the admissions officer: degree is necessary. E ug.admissions@english.sussex.ac.uk Donna’s T +44 (0)1273 876612 How will I learn? perspective Your work is assessed by various means including F +44 (0)1273 623246 essays or dissertations, which train you in the academic ‘Initially, I was nervous about studying x Drama Studies, Arts A, University of Sussex, disciplines of data analysis, researching, writing, logical at x university, as I am a mature student Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SH, UK thought, articulation of complex concepts, succinct with two young children. However, x www.sussex.ac.uk/english expression, and meticulous verbal presentation. There my x worries were unfounded as the When can I visit? is also scope to produce your own creative writing. Your staff and other students at Sussex x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and practical work is assessed through performance, group have been extremely friendly and x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. work, portfolios, and learning logs. welcoming. x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors What will I achieve? ‘My x study of drama has incorporated or call 01273 876787 • A detailed knowledge of the development of theatre acting, which was the last thing I x from the Greeks to the present day. ever dreamed of participating in, x • Exploration of practical and performative concepts in but x it’s been a fantastic experience drama, staging and the writing of texts. both academically and for personal x • An understanding of theatre as a social construct and fulfilment. The texts used have been x as a major form of communication: its gestures, thoroughly enjoyable, inspiring x costumes, music and voices are constructions that and x thought-provoking. My time at provide rich sources of information on the way culture the x University of Sussex has been and society have developed. incredibly rewarding and an experience x • Intellectual understanding of the role of drama within that I would recommend.’ society, as well as practical awareness – gained through exercises in writing, acting and performance – Donna of how drama is enacted. Mahoney • By studying drama alongside other related subjects such as film, culture or languages, you gain knowledge of both drama and the audiences who have participated in the experience. • A wide range of skills relating to data analysis, research, bibliographic construction, word-processing, presentation and articulation. • If the degree includes a language, the ability to speak and write the language to a high level, and to read dramatic texts in their original language. 73
  • Core courses Drama studies Year 1 Making Theatre Reading Theatre Texts Staging Text Year 2 Approaches to Contemporary Performance Second-Year Performance Project Modern and Postmodern Drama Writing for the Theatre Year 3 Making Theatre Politically Site-Specific Theatre: Theory and Practice Options, which may include Early Modern Drama; Final-Year Performance Project; and Drama Dissertation. Drama studies at Sussex develops your intellectual understanding of the role of drama within society, as well as your practical awareness – gained through exercises in writing, acting and performance – of how drama is enacted Degrees Drama Studies and English BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: WQ43 Drama Studies and a Language This degree is for students who are keen to focus upon (one from French, German, Italian or drama in a wider literary context. The combination Spanish) BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: W4RX enables you to pursue drama both in relationship to This degree combines drama and language studies and other literary genres such as the novel, poetry and offers the opportunity to acquire a foreign language non-fiction prose, and in relation to a wide spectrum of and historical, dramatic and cultural knowledge in an theoretical approaches to literature and culture. integrated fashion. The degree allows you to develop The programme encourages the study of dramatic language skills while spending a year at a university in texts not simply as literature, but also as the basis France, Germany, Italy or Spain. for performance. From the Greeks to the present Rachel’s Alongside your drama courses, you focus on a language day, drama is taught in a variety of ways. You explore perspective in combination with courses on the culture of that practical and performative concepts in the staging country, or of Europe generally. and writing of texts, in particular historical and cultural ‘Upon arrival here at Sussex my x contexts. Drama core courses such as Writing for the initial fears about starting university x See the core courses list for details of the drama studies Theatre, and English courses from Tradition, Innovation were soon curbed as I discovered a x courses; refer to the languages entry on page 111 for and Genre, and Writing, Translation and Performance welcoming and incredibly supportive x more information on these courses. provide complementary fields of study that enrich your environment. Now, three years on, x Drama Studies and Cultural Studies understanding of both subjects. I x can’t imagine being happier anywhere BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: WR49 else! x See the core courses list for details of the drama studies The degree deliberately aims to move away from a ‘Drama at Sussex provides a balanced x courses; refer to the English subject entry on page 88 for definition of cultural studies and drama as contemporary structure between theoretical and more information on these courses. x and UK-based. You are introduced to cultures from practical teaching, offering both core x different periods of history and in diverse geographical Drama Studies and Film Studies skills and plenty of choices to study x settings. The subjects you study range from Greek to the BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: WP43 different and exciting theatrical areas, x present day, taking in the major European cultures. You This degree provides an approach that integrates two ranging from site-specific theatre to x discuss concepts such as ‘high’ and ‘popular’ culture, ways of presenting cultural narratives and explorations; creative writing and Greek tragedy. x modernity/postmodernity, identity, representation film and dramatic performance. The film studies element (visual, text- and performance-based, and musical), ‘The small-group approach to x of the programme offers a firm foundation in visual literacy, nationality, race and difference, location and hybridity, film genres and film theory by introducing you to a wide teaching groups offers a real sense of x consumption, production and performance. range of film-making and viewing across the globe. community among the students and x the x support of the tutors has been Topics involve theories of culture and drama, cultural As well as the drama studies core courses, first year continuous and reassuring throughout x constructions, and questions of drama and culture as courses include Film Analysis, and Issues in Film Studies. the degree programme.’ representation and as social and material life. In year 2 you look at issues of film theory and film genres See the core courses list for details of drama studies in greater depth, before moving on to explore a range of Rachel Snaydon courses; refer to the cultural studies subject entry on cinematic practices. page 68 for more information on these courses. In the final year, you take two thematic options from a range of film studies courses and complete a film studies dissertation. You take all the drama studies core courses for the full three years, alongside film studies core courses. See the core courses list for details of drama studies courses; refer to the film studies subject entry on page 97 for more information on these courses. 74
  • Ecology and conservation Ecology and conservation Essentials Why ecology and conservation? As the human population continues to grow, the natural What ecology and conservation degrees are environment is put under ever-increasing pressure. there? Losses of biological diversity and major environmental Ecology and Conservation changes are occurring as a direct result of human exploitation of resources. Growing public concern over See also issues such as degradation and destruction of coral Biology (p52), Engineering for society: environment reefs and tropical rain forests, species extinctions and and international development (p83), Environmental the impacts of global climate change make ecology and science (p95), Geography (p99) conservation one of the most relevant areas of science What A levels do I need? today. The need to find solutions to these problems (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications means that there is a growing demand for professional information, see pages 159-162) ecologists and conservation biologists, and that they have a key role to play in protecting the environment for Typical offer BBB future generations. A levels (or equivalent) must include at least one To be successful, conservation action should be approved science subject other than mathematics. based on a good understanding of the ecological (Please contact the admissions tutor for further processes and relationships that are being impacted information) by environmental change. What makes some species and habitats more vulnerable than others? How can What else do I need? degraded ecosystems be improved? What are the GCSE (or equivalent) in Mathematics and either implications of increased ecotourism for tropical Nesting sea birds. As part of your Chemistry or Double Science ecosystems? The study of ecology and conservation has degree you will have the opportunity What qualities should I bring? a key role to play in answering these and many other to undertake practical work in a rich questions posed by practical conservation issues around variety of habitats and protected Concern for the natural environment and enthusiasm for the world. areas studying it; a strong interest in biological sciences and taking a scientific approach to understanding the threats to our planet; enjoyment of practical work, problem- Why ecology and conservation at Sussex? solving abilities; creative thinking; and an enquiring mind • Taught by lecturers who are leaders in ecological Victoria’s research, with a broad range of experience and perspective Fees expertise, including plant, mammal, bird and insect See pages 166-167 for information on fees ‘Studying Ecology and Conservation at x ecology. Sussex has changed my whole outlook x English language requirements • Opportunities throughout the degree programme to on x life. I’m much more aware of the IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the meet professional ecologists, many of whom are our world around me, and have a greater x Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English own graduates. understanding of the environment and x language requirements, see page 162 ecology of species and habitats. For • Campus location gives ready access for practical x Foundation year for non-EU students work in a rich variety of habitats and protected areas. example, I now bore all my friends by x If your qualifications (including English language) do not showing them how to identify grasses x • Two residential courses teach you key field skills in yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to and x flowers and telling them about the ecology and conservation. the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an life x history of moss! international foundation year entry route. See page 30 • Options of field courses in Portugal and studying ‘There are so many interesting aspects x for details marine biology in Scotland. to x this degree. The week-long field How do I find out more? • Collaborative conservation projects with Papua New trips and excursions are invaluable and x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: Guinea, Fiji, Mexico, Ecuador and Japan. I’ve x also enjoyed the mix of practical E ug.admissions@biology.sussex.ac.uk What sort of career could I have? field work and theoretical lectures. x T +44 (0)1273 678511 • ecological consultant (for many companies including It’s x great studying here because F +44 (0)1273 678937 Cresswells Associates, RPS, Carter Ecological, there’s a huge range of habitats x Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Thomsons) close by and it’s one of the driest and x University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK sunniest places in England. x www.sussex.ac.uk/biology • conservation officer (Natural England) ‘I’ve found the standard of teaching x When can I visit? • biodiversity officer (Sussex Wildlife Trust) here to be excellent. The lecturers are x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and • programmes officer (RSPB) actively engaged in research work and x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. their enthusiasm for their subjects x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors • projects officer (Birdlife International) really shows. Because the number of x or call 01273 876787 • reserve warden (East Sussex County Council) people taking this degree is relatively x small, the level of support is first-rate x • environmental or wildlife journalism (BBC) and I’ve made some lifelong friends.’ • teaching • business and industry. Victoria Hume About one in five of our graduates goes on to further study. Some take a taught Masters programme to specialise in a particular area of ecology and conservation or in a related field such as environmental law, development studies or economics. Others decide that they want to continue with their own research and take a doctorate. 75
  • Core courses Ecology and conservation Year 1 You will concentrate on the study of whole organisms, with courses on animal behaviour, evolution and the diversity of life. You will also take an ecology field course. Year 2 You will begin to put the knowledge and skills acquired in year 1 into practice by studying subjects such as biodiversity conservation, wildlife and habitat conservation, animal diversity, statistics, and methods in ecology. There is a field course in conservation biology, and the options of a biology field course based in southern Portugal or a marine biology field course in Scotland. Year 3 The final year consists entirely of options and your own research project. There are a wide variety of courses to choose from including animal-plant interactions, biodiversity, conservation in practice, cooperation and conflict in animal societies, ecotoxicology, environment and human health, marine pollution and impacts, and plant conservation. Students often choose to include some geography options in their choices, such as Polar Regions and Environmental Change. Your final-year project will give Japanese monkeys cause extensive damage to crops following loss and degradation of their forest habitats. you first-hand experience of the Conflicting needs of wildlife and local people is one of the themes addressed in our second- and third-year courses development and execution of a piece of scientific research, How will I learn? • A wide range of practical field skills, including methods presenting your findings to fellow The programme begins with an exploration of some of for surveying biodiversity in a variety of habitats, and the major themes in biology and environmental sciences the National Vegetation Classification. students and writing up a detailed including evolution, the diversity of life and ecology, report on your work. • Familiarity with a range of current conservation environmental cycles, animal behaviour and cellular issues, as conveyed in lectures, by guest speakers biochemistry. Lectures are supplemented with small- from conservation organisations and from meeting group tutorials where you have an opportunity to discuss practitioners of conservation management in the field. issues raised by the programme. There are also practical classes, both in the laboratory and in the field, to gain • Skills required to plan and carry out your own research direct experience of some of the techniques discussed project through all stages, from project development, in lectures. design of methodology, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, through to writing the final report Second-year courses introduce you to key issues and giving a presentation about it. in conservation, looking at both the problems and Forest fire. Plants have adapted remedies designed to tackle them, and a variety • The ability to evaluate critically information and ideas to most of the environments on of practical field survey methods. Residential field in the scientific and popular literature, to debate the planet. In your final year you courses introduce you to the ecology of upland moors contentious issues, to present your own ideas to have the opportunity to study Plant (including close encounters with bats and deer!) and to others in a concise and informative way, and to make Conservation conservation issues in a variety of habitats in Devon. decisions as part of a small group. In the final year you choose from a range of courses including Biodiversity, Animal-Plant Interactions, Degrees Conservation in Practice, Cooperation and Conflict Ecology and Conservation in Animals and Plant Conservation, and many more. BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: CD94 You also do your own research project, supervised by This degree will give you an understanding of the a member of faculty, and working in the field, in the processes affecting the distribution and abundance of laboratory, or both. This gives you first-hand experience organisms and the conservation of their habitats. of working in an active research environment alongside professionals. It provides you with the knowledge and skills required for a career in ecology or conservation, beginning in the What will I achieve? first year with a solid foundation in the biology of animals • Comprehensive training in the science of ecology and and plants, including their biochemistry, physiology, its application to current issues in conservation. behaviour and evolution as well as their ecology. In the • An appreciation of the diversity of biological and second year you will move on to study more specialist environmental processes and the impact that human courses in animal diversity, ecological methods, and activity is having on them at various different scales, wildlife and habitat conservation, which will equip you including molecular, individual organisms and with the techniques to study and conserve biodiversity. populations, considered locally, regionally and globally. In the third year you will choose options from a range of advanced courses in ecology as well as undertaking a research project in an area that particularly interests you. 76
  • Economics Morilake’s Economics perspective ‘I’ve really enjoyed studying Economics x and x Politics at Sussex. Prior to studying here I’d little knowledge of x economics and politics but I enjoy x analysing data and understanding x the x concepts behind the political headlines. x ‘Despite my limited knowledge before x coming to university I’ve learned so x much during my time here through x the x help of my lecturers and personal Essentials Why economics? tutor, as well as the student-formed x Addressing many of the world’s problems and issues “pol-eco” study group. x What economics degrees are there? requires an understanding of economics. Why are some countries so rich and others so poor? Should Microsoft ‘Studying among such a diverse group x Economics (BA) be broken up? Should the private sector be involved in of x students has also been a good Economics (BSc) providing health and education? Could environmental experience as I have been able to put x Economics and Development Studies Economics and International Relations taxes help reduce global warming? Should the UK join some of my ideas to the test as well as x Economics and Management Studies the euro? learn from different cultures around x Economics and Politics the world.’ Economics provides a framework for thinking about What can I take with economics as a minor? such issues in depth, allowing you to get to the heart of Morilake Akinshipe Mathematics with Economics (p121) complex, topical problems. The methods of economics can be applied to a wide range of questions and will What A levels do I need? prove useful to you in your future career. In addition, the (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications study of economics teaches you a variety of practical information, see pages 159-162) skills, including the ability to use and evaluate evidence Typical offer range ABB-BBB (often statistical) in order to arrive at sound conclusions. What else do I need? Why economics at Sussex? GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, grade B • We emphasise the practical application of economics What qualities should I bring? to the analysis of contemporary social and economic Intellectual curiosity; ability to abstract; confidence problems. with numbers; independence • We have strong links to the major national and Fees international economic institutions such as the See pages 166-167 for information on fees European Commission, the World Bank and the Athena’s Department for International Development. career perspective English language requirements IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the • The Department has strong research clusters in ‘After graduating, I returned home to x Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English labour markets and in development economics, and Greece to work for Unilever Greece, x is one of Europe’s leading centres for research on as x trainee manager in the financial/ language requirements, see page 162 issues of international trade. commercial department. I then went x Foundation year for non-EU students • We offer you the chance to conduct an economics on x to join the Athens 2004 Olympic If your qualifications (including English language) do not research project supervised by a faculty member. Games Organising Committee as x yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to What sort of career could I have? deputy venue manager of the Port x the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an international foundation year entry route. See page 30 • accountancy and finance of x Piraeus. This was an amazing for details experience and a great adrenalin rush. x • management I’m x currently working as head of the How do I find out more? • economics consultancy. procurement division with Tourism x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: Development Co, a state-owned x E ug.admissions@economics.sussex.ac.uk How will I learn? company. It’s very stimulating work, of x T +44 (0)1273 678889 The core ideas and analytical techniques are presented which I’m proud to be a part. x F +44 (0)1273 673563 in lectures and supplemented by classes or workshops x firmly believe that Sussex was ‘I Department of Economics, University of Sussex, Falmer, where you can test your own understanding and explore Brighton BN1 9SJ, UK the x best place to start, not only my the issues in more depth. These provide the opportunity education but also my entry into x www.sussex.ac.uk/economics for student interaction, an essential part of the learning “adult society”. I ended up having x When can I visit? process at Sussex. The more quantitative skills, such the x best time both academically and Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and as using statistical software, are taught in computer workshops. On the Applied Economics dissertation course socially. Sussex always combined x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. a in the final year, you receive one-to-one supervision as x solid education with an open and Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or you investigate your chosen research topic in depth. multinational environment and x call 01273 876787 attitude. My degree programme x Formal assessment is by a range of methods including taught me how to work well in teams, x unseen exams and coursework. In addition there are to x communicate, and to seek synergy regular assignments, which allow you to monitor your progress. In the first year, you have regular meetings with (skills that have been recognised x your personal tutor to discuss your academic progress in x all the positions I’ve held since and provide feedback on assignments. graduating). One result has been that x I’ve x aimed at a career with vision and a What will I achieve? multinational dimension.’ • A detailed knowledge and understanding of the principles of economics. Athena • The skills to abstract the essential features of a problem Markomichelaki and use the framework of economics to analyse it. Head of Procurement • The ability to evaluate and conduct your own at Tourism Development Co empirical research. • The confidence to communicate economic ideas and concepts to a wider audience. • A range of transferable skills, applicable to a wide variety of occupations. 77
  • In 2005 Turkey officially launched talks with the EU on joining the Economics 25-nation bloc. Our Economics degrees reflect the increasing importance of Europe for the world economy. Membership of the EU, the impact of the Common Agricultural Policy and the emergence of the euro as a currency all have important economic implications Degrees Economics (BSc) Core courses BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: L102 Economics (BA) The Economics BSc is for students who wish to follow Year 1 BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: L100 a quantitative approach to the subject. Alongside Introduction to Economics The Economics BA offers a combination of theoretical the economics courses listed for the Economics Computer Literacy (BSc) and practical courses, with plenty of economic BA degree programme, you take courses in Applied Contemporary Economic Issues applications to illustrate the use of economics at work. Mathematics for Economists, Further Statistics, Applied Introduction to Mathematics The degree is based around a core of microeconomics Statistics, and Applied Econometrics. These deepen Macroeconomics I and macroeconomics courses, the former focusing on your knowledge of the foundations of economics and Microeconomics I the behaviour of individuals and firms (eg monopolies), provide you with a range of advanced skills that are especially useful in some careers (eg modelling financial The World Economy the latter covering the broader issues such as markets or equity prices). Having these technical skills since 1945 (BSc) unemployment and inflation. also enables you to read some of the more advanced You take the core courses listed, plus Introduction to research in economics, published in academic journals, Year 2 Mathematics in year 1 and Statistics for Economists and is invaluable if you choose to go on to postgraduate Macroeconomics II and Applied Economics Topics in year 2. Your courses study in economics. Microeconomics II provide a firm grounding in the principles of economics, A level Mathematics is not an entrance requirement Advanced Macroeconomics which are illustrated and put into context by the material for this degree, but you must be willing to engage with Advanced Microeconomics offered on the Contemporary Economic Issues and Applied Economics Topics courses. These examine a mathematical concepts and techniques that go beyond Applied Economics Topics range of topical issues (eg trade barriers, European A level standard. Applied Mathematics for enlargement), largely based on the research interests of See the core courses list for more details. Economists (BSc) faculty. You take three options in the final year, allowing Applied Statistics for Social Economics and Development Studies Scientists (BSc) you to specialise and follow your interests. BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LL19 Statistics for Economists We do not place a heavy emphasis on mathematics The Economics and Development Studies degree is a in our BA programmes. However, any study of natural choice for those interested in applying economic economics requires the use of some mathematics, so tools to developing country issues (eg should we cancel Final year we supplement your existing knowledge (to beyond Third World debt?). This area is currently the subject of Econometrics GCSE level) at appropriate stages of the degree. much research and active (and sometimes acrimonious) Options such as Applied The mathematics and statistics courses (including debate. The meetings of the WTO have become a Econometrics; Econometrics; Econometrics in the final year) provide the quantitative regular focus for protesters concerned about the Economics of Development; skills that enable you to construct suitable economic effects of globalisation upon developing countries. Economics of European models and to manipulate, interpret and analyse data. Economics provides a powerful framework for thinking Integration; International about the issues raised in development studies. Finance and Macroeconomics; Alongside your economics courses, which comprise approximately three-quarters of your study time, The development studies component offers courses International Trade; Labour you have a choice of options drawn from a range of in theories of development, the history of developing Economics Monetary Theory and complementary subjects such as development studies countries and a wide range of options such as aid Policy; Understanding Global and management studies. We provide guidance so to developing countries, development within the Markets; and Political Economics that you construct a coherent set of courses that international economy and culture and gender. Applied Economics Dissertation complement your economics studies. In years 1 and 2 you take the economics core courses. See the core courses list for a summary. In the final year you take Statistics for Economists, Statistics Project, and an option. See the core courses list for a summary of the economics courses; refer to the development studies subject entry on page 71 for more information on these courses. 78
  • Economics and International Relations BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LLC2 Economics The connection between these disciplines is currently best illustrated by the issue of globalisation. Much can be said about this topic from the point of view of international trade theory, which has a long history in economics and is still developing. However, some of the conclusions are challenged by those working in international relations, who focus more on the unequal bargaining powers of developed and developing countries, for example. By taking this degree, you see how each discipline challenges the other and hence gain a deeper appreciation of the respective strengths and weaknesses. You take the core international relations and economics courses in years 1 and 2. In the final year you take Statistics for Economists, Statistics Project, and choose options in both subjects. You also conduct your own research. See the core courses list for a summary of the economics courses; refer to the international relations subject entry on page 108 for more information on these courses. Economics and Management Studies BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LN12 Economics and Management Studies is an excellent degree for those who wish to enter the management field, yet would like to combine practical management skills with the more analytical approach of economics. Courses often complement each other, such as the Industrial Economics option and the Strategy course, which give different perspectives on similar issues. Thus, for example, you learn about discounted cash-flow techniques for investment appraisal, and also about the role of investment within the economy as a whole, such A global perspective on economics – the Department of Economics specialises in research as its influence upon the business cycle. on issues of international trade, and the economics of developing countries. Our economists You take management studies courses and the work closely with all the major international agencies, from the World Bank to the European economics core courses in years 1 and 2. In the final Commission, and this depth of experience is brought to the teaching of our degree programmes year you take Statistics for Economists, Statistics therefore shed light on the issue of the regulation of Project, and options in both subjects. You also conduct a monopolies. By taking Economics and Politics you gain case study of a particular business issue. an appreciation of the contribution each discipline can See the core courses list for a summary of the make to the study of important contemporary issues. economics courses; refer to the business and In years 1 and 2 of the politics component you take core management subject entry on page 54 for more courses as well as selecting a Politics of Governance information on these courses. option. In the final year you choose specialist options, Economics and Politics including a dissertation allowing you to conduct your BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LL12 own piece of research. Economics and politics complement and support one In years 1 and 2 you take the economics core courses. Sibel’s another, as economics operates within a political and In the final year you take Statistics for Economists, perspective institutional framework. The topic of monopoly, for Statistics Project, and an option. ‘Studying economics at the University x example, can be examined as an economic question of how a producer can exploit the consumer. It can also See the core courses list for a summary of the of x Sussex has been a great experience. be seen in terms of the power of large corporations economics courses; refer to the politics subject entry on Over the past two years we’ve been x relative to governments. Both these approaches can page 144 for more information on these courses. given the opportunity to study a wide x variety of economic models and look x at x empirical analysis. Sussex was my first choice because of its well- x structured degree and the support x provided by lecturers, who are all very x approachable and resourceful. x ‘There’s a chance to specialise in the x areas we’re most interested in and x put x in to practice some of the models encountered in the first and second x years. I believe that Sussex has xx given me the necessary knowledge x and x skills to start work or go on to postgraduate study.’ Sibel Toygun 79
  • Engineering Gabriella’s Engineering (electrical, electronic and computer systems) perspective ‘I chose Sussex because it came x electrical, electronic highly recommended and when I was x applying the staff members were really x enthusiastic and helpful. Now I’m here, x and computer systems some of the greatest things about x studying engineering at Sussex include x having friendly and highly experienced x teachers, being able to take advantage x of the excellent facilities, and meeting x and x working with people from a diverse range of cultures. x Essentials When can I visit? ‘The chance to experience working x All applicants who are made an offer of a place are invited in a laboratory environment during x What engineering (electrical, electronic and to one of our admissions days from December to April my x final-year project and having computer systems) degrees are there? Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and excellent guidance and support from x MEng degrees 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. my x supervisor are the things that have Computer Systems Engineering Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors Electrical and Electronic Engineering stood out most and helped me to x or call 01273 876787 Electronic and Communication Engineering develop skills that, I hope, will be the x Robotics and Autonomous Systems Why electrical, electronic and computer systems key x to my future career. I’m continuing engineering? my x study at Sussex next year, when I BEng degrees Engineers create the technology demanded by society begin a DPhil in Engineering. x Computer Systems Engineering to cater for everything from the fun (games and ‘Although engineering students x Electrical and Electronic Engineering entertainment) to the vital, such as health-care systems have lots of work to do, the weekly x Electronic Engineering and food production. What is more, electrical, electronic Engineering degrees (with a Foundation Year) workshops help to review the material x and computer systems are embedded in almost any learnt at the lectures, the engineering x Robotics and Autonomous Systems device you can imagine. There are few disciplines with staff are all very helpful and are willing x See also Computing (p61), Engineering for society: such a diverse range of opportunities. As a graduate, you to x help with any problems on and off environment or international development (p83), will have acquired the skills, knowledge and expertise to the x course, and the personal tutors are Engineering (mechanical, automotive and design) (p85), make your contribution to creating and implementing the technology for the 21st century. great to have around if needed.’ Product design (p147) What A levels do I need? Professional engineers are involved in a range of Gabriella (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications different activities: design and development, financial Ascanio information, see pages 159-162) management, research, marketing and production. They need qualities ranging from interpersonal and Typical offer range ABB-BBC management skills to a high level of technical expertise. A levels (or equivalent) must include Mathematics The career of an engineer is richly rewarding in terms of personal satisfaction, status and salary. According to Direct entry to year 2 of a BEng or MEng programme is the Association of Graduate Recruiters, engineers are possible for applicants offering good Higher National now among the top earners of the graduate population Diploma (HND) results (or equivalent) and are one of the most likely groups to fast track into For BEng in Engineering (with a Foundation Year), management positions. qualifications are flexible, particularly for mature students. The standard A level offer is CC in science- Why electrical, electronic and computer systems based A levels and BCC in purely arts subjects engineering at Sussex? • Ranked 10th in the UK for electrical/electronic What qualities should I bring? engineering in the Times University Guide and the An interest in electrical, electronic and computer Good University Guide, 2007. systems; analytical ability; commercial awareness; communication skills; teamworking skills • The Department achieved a grade 5 (recognising research of national and international excellence) in Fees the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). See pages 166-167 for information on fees What scholarships are there? • All electrical, electronic and computer systems An unlimited number of scholarships of £1,000 are programmes are accredited by the professional available. These will be awarded on entry to students Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) up to who firmly accept our offer of a place by the UCAS the 2008 intake of students. Subsequent intakes are deadline and achieve three A grades at A level, excluding subject to the standard reaccreditation process as General Studies. We also award generous prizes for part of the normal procedures of the accrediting body. outstanding performance in each year of study • Two final-year undergraduates won prestigious English language requirements Kaufmann scholarships in 2007 for entrepreneurship, IELTS 6.0, with 6.0 in each of the four components. to fund graduate training and make business contacts For alternative English language requirements, see in the US. page 162 • The structure of our degrees is sufficiently common in Foundation year for non-EU students the first and second years to allow you the flexibility to If your qualifications (including English language) do not change programmes if desired. yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to • Depending on your performance, you can select BEng, the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an MEng and/or MSc as your target degree at key stages international foundation year entry route. See page 30 of your study. for details • Over £1 million investment in a newly equipped How do I find out more? undergraduate laboratory building provides project For more information, contact the admissions tutor: labs, test, measurement and manufacture facilities E ug.admissions@engineering.sussex.ac.uk with disabled access and technician support on hand. T +44 (0)1273 678743 F +44 (0)1273 678399 • Emphasis on career development, transferable skills Department of Engineering and Design, and professional business management. University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QT, UK www.sussex.ac.uk/engineering 80
  • How will I learn? Engineering (electrical, electronic and computer systems) Engineering at Sussex is based on strength in the practical application of engineering principles. The Department has been congratulated by external reviewers on the quality of its education in design and the use of team-based project work. We underline the importance of individual development through the completion of a personal portfolio. All students are expected to build a portfolio or personal website that captures their achievements. There are many ways to acquire skills, from taught sessions (such as lectures and workshops) and laboratory assignments, to independent and computer-based learning. In addition, the first-year and foundation-year timetables include frequent one-hour small-group tutorials. Individual topics are offered for third-year projects, arising from the extensive industrial and scientific research in the Department, from industrial contracts, and from student suggestions. Recent topics include a microwave communications system, robotic lighting, a disaster area remote survey unit, drive-by-wire, an electronic aid for the blind, motion telemetry for a racing car, and heart-sound monitoring. National businesses sponsor prizes for the best projects each year. Final-year MEng students work in a small interdisciplinary team on a group project often linked with an industrial organisation. Recent projects have included: combining inputs such as face, iris, fingerprint and voice recognition Top: a team of students display MEng or BEng? to improve security access; testing a portable vision- their design for a mechanical fish The four-year MEng programmes in electrical, electronic assessment system, now adopted as a standard for intended to study life below the sea and computer systems engineering are designed to assessing the vision of airline pilots; designing an active Bottom: foundation-year students meet the full educational requirements for chartered electromagnetic lift stabilisation system; and designing testing engine performance engineer status. They are accredited as such by the IET and implementing a drive-by-wire kit vehicle. up to the 2008 intake of students and reaccreditation What will I achieve? for subsequent intakes will be reviewed in 2008/09. • If you work hard, you will earn a well-respected degree, The fourth year of the MEng programmes has specialist opening the door to the career you want. You will gain technical courses that reach a higher level than the final a thorough understanding of, and the ability to apply, year of the three-year BEng, and also includes business the mathematical and scientific concepts required to and management courses. The MEng is for those who become an electrical, electronic or computer systems wish to become chartered engineers and who aim for engineer. You will also be able to apply the principles The Honda ASIMO robot. With this leadership positions. and theories of computing, information technology development Honda have created and mechanical engineering required to enter the the most advanced autonomous The three-year BEng programmes are for those more profession. humanoid robot in the world. enthusiastic about the technical courses than the Students graduating from the Sussex business aspects (though they will still cover the • Problem-solving and design skills will enable you Robotics and Autonomous Systems essential basics) and who either want to get into industry to analyse and solve engineering problems in your degree programmes will gain as quickly as they can or to take a more technical year 4 subject area. sufficient robotics knowledge to be in the form of a specialist MSc programme – which can able to work on projects as advanced • You will gain understanding of business management also lead to chartered engineer status. as ASIMO skills and techniques required to manage projects If you are not yet sure which you wish to follow, do not and balance risks, costs, reliability and environmental worry because you will not have to make a final decision impact. until the end of year 2. • Research skills provide a framework for innovative and creative thinking in order to generate and test systems What sort of career could I have? and designs. You should be able to analyse resulting • employment in sectors such as communications, data and determine its validity using computational aerospace, transport, marine or space exploration, tools and packages. environment, marketing, the supply chain, robotics, security and defence, power industry, health and • You also learn to manage your own personal medicine professional career development in preparation for • design engineer further study or the world of work, and beyond. • graduate engineer with international corporation • telecom systems engineer • government agency project officer • business development manager • engineering management • postgraduate study or research. Employers of our graduates include: • Cable and Wireless • Ericsson • Siemens • Thales • Amplicon • National Grid • Bela Electronic Designs 81
  • Degrees Core courses Engineering (electrical, electronic and computer systems) Computer Systems Engineering Year 1 MEng (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: GH4P The majority of courses are BEng (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: HH66 common to all of the Engineering Computer systems are everywhere in modern life. degrees. They provide the core They are most common in embedded systems where foundation in general engineering the computer is hidden alongside other electronics and key skills, along with the in electronic appliances, mobile phones, home flexibility to change programmes entertainment systems and industrial products. if you wish. Typical first-year Computer systems engineers need to be familiar with content includes: analogue and software programming techniques and with computer digital circuits, software and architectures and hardware. They must know how to embedded systems programming, take a creative approach to the design of a new product. an electronics group project, To support design they must possess good analytical engineering maths, materials and skills with a broad background in electronic engineering. technical communication skills. This programme aims to give you a combination of expertise in computer engineering, software In term 1, guest lecturers from engineering, and electronic and embedded systems. academia and industry describe the breakthroughs and challenges In addition to the basic skills provided by the BEng of modern technology in their own degree, students taking the MEng programme develop areas of interest. greater expertise in advanced technical topics while combining further breadth in essential professional Year 2 areas such as management and law. Laboratory work includes the integration of software with You will continue to develop Electrical and Electronic Engineering electronic hardware your engineering design skills MEng (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: H600 and explore your programme Robotics and Autonomous Systems BEng (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: H606 specialism in greater depth. You MEng (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: H675 Every aspect of modern life depends on electrical will develop the ability to plan BEng (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: H671 power systems, and manufacturing industry relies on and manage a significant project Robotics and automation have a vital role to play in any electric motors and other electromechanical devices. and also undertake a course in internationally successful modern economy and are now In these applications of electrical power, computer- Career Development, delivered pervasive in all the technologically advanced nations based electronic control is crucial. Power electronic of the world. Cybernetics is the key to the effective in conjunction with the University devices can handle enormous currents, which makes exploitation of these developing technologies: it provides Careers service, to improve your them suitable for controlling large electrical and the tools for the control of sophisticated machines using chances of progressing into electromechanical systems. sensory feedback, communications technology and rewarding graduate employment. Since electrical power engineering depends on intelligent knowledge-based agents. Typical second-year courses electronic and computer systems, you will gain a good include: Digital Systems Design, You will gain state-of-the-art knowledge of the understanding of these subject areas in your degree. Signal Processing, Feedback principles underlying the use of computers, embedded Electromechanical devices are introduced in the first microprocessors, sensors and power systems for the Control, Solid-State Electronics, year, with practical work in a modern laboratory using control of robots in a wide variety of applications. The Statistics, and group projects. the latest equipment. In a second-year project you will career opportunities that these degree programmes design a device using industry-standard electromagnetic open up are very broad and span some of the most Year 3 simulation software. The third year includes courses in advanced and exciting areas of global technological A range of specialist options electrical power systems, electrical machines and power and scientific activity. electronics. It is expected that you will be able to make allows you to configure your use of design techniques in your subsequent career The degrees include options in artificial life and artificial programme to suit your own to improve the design, efficiency and performance of intelligence. For those wishing to explore fundamental interests. Examples include radio modern electrical systems. questions of autonomous thinking machines, it is possible communication, neural networks, to investigate issues of emotion and consciousness. At robotics, electrical machines. You can study Electrical and Electronic Engineering MEng level you will have the opportunity to explore the You also draw on your previous as either a three-year BEng or a four-year MEng function of biological control systems, which provide courses and specialism to programme. In the final two years the engineering impressive examples of how to design autonomous undertake a significant individual and business content of the MEng programme is systems that integrate machine elements with sensors, project. The topic may be one greatly enhanced. MEng students also complete a control and energy delivery processes. group project. proposed by one of our leading We aim to strike a balance between the analytical research groups, by our industrial Electronic and Communication Engineering and practical aspects of robotics in lectures and in collaborators or one developed by MEng (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: H601 projects, which include: design and build projects; task yourself with the guidance of your Electronic Engineering accomplishment; team working; and involvement in supervisor. BEng (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: H610 research projects. Nowadays, most of the building blocks of electronic The MEng degree programme takes robotics content to Year 4 systems are fabricated and interconnected on minute a higher level than the BEng and incorporates a greater In the final year of the MEng, chips of silicon using packing densities of hundreds of components per square millimetre. The resulting level of group project work with managerial aspects the range of specialist options integrated circuits end up in computers, satellites, built in. is enhanced by the inclusion digital cameras, mobile phones, televisions, credit Engineering degrees (with a Foundation Year) of a number from our popular card security systems, intensive care monitors and BEng (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: H100 electronics MSc programmes. much more. These degree programmes incorporate a foundation In addition, you join an year to enable people from a wide range of backgrounds interdisciplinary team of students In these degrees you gain an appreciation of the to study for an engineering degree. The initial year to undertake a project modelled properties of integrated circuits, as well as a sound provides an introduction to engineering, as well as on those common in industry. You understanding of the basic electronic components the necessary background knowledge in science and will develop commercial skills of which they are constituted and the systems that use these devices. In year 4 of the MEng, the courses mathematics. This degree assumes fluency in English. and an enhanced understanding become more specialised, with additional emphasis on You will be well supported throughout, and your progress of engineering design and communications engineering. Through the project work will be closely monitored to help you achieve your full development. you benefit from the Sussex research programmes, potential. On satisfactory completion of the foundation including the design of personal and mobile year, you have a wide range of three-year BEng or four- communication systems, the development of quantum year MEng degree programmes from which to choose, circuits for future technologies, the design of circuits for in addition to degrees in electrical, electronic and graphics accelerators, instrumentation for spacecraft, computer systems engineering, so that you can progress unique systems for non-invasive sensing, and innovative to the degree that is best suited to your interests and approaches to cardiac and ophthalmic instrumentation. abilities. 82
  • Engineering for society Engineering for society (environment or international development) environment or international development Essentials Why engineering for society: environment or international development? What engineering for society: environment or Society is now facing new challenges such as creating international development degrees are there? technologies for reducing carbon emissions, adapting BSc degrees to climate change and delivering on sustainable Engineering for Society development. These challenges require graduates Engineering for Society (with a sandwich year) who not only have good technical knowledge but also understand the complex interactions between See also engineering and society. Sussex is strongly placed to Development studies (p71), Engineering (electrical, be able to offer a broad range of subjects to explore electronic and computer systems) (p80), Engineering the role of engineering in meeting the needs of (mechanical, automotive and design) (p85) society. Engineering for Society degrees provide the Environmental science (p95), Product design (p147) opportunity to learn core engineering skills and gain What A levels do I need? an understanding of the prime challenges now facing (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications society in the areas of environment or international information, see pages 159-162) development. Typical offer range ABB-BBC There is a growing demand for highly skilled and broadly based engineers who can take their place in all Both mixed Arts/Science and pure science A levels working environments. Engineering is a profession that welcomed (at least one science or mathematics A level required). If A/S or A level mathematics not offered, a covers many disciplines, and graduate engineers from minimum of grade A at GCSE (or equivalent) is required these degrees would share a core set of transferable Engineering for society is particularly skills, including communication, technical analysis, oriented towards the most topical What qualities should I bring? management and problem solving. engineering issues – such as our A creative imagination; an enjoyment of interacting with response to global warming others; a logical approach to working Skills learnt from Engineering for Society degrees include the ability to generate, recognise and use Fees practical ideas and be experienced in teamwork, as well See pages 166-167 for information on fees as being trained in the principles and working practice of What scholarships are there? technology. You will learn to become part of a profession An unlimited number of scholarships of £1,000 are whose activity is central to the issues of social available. These will be awarded on entry to students responsibility and a fair and equitable use of resources, who firmly accept our offer of a place by the UCAS as well as human and environmental well-being. There is deadline and achieve three A grades at A level, excluding no walk of life in which engineering does not play a large General Studies. We also award generous prizes for part in meeting human needs. outstanding performance in each year of study Career choices for engineers with these degrees are English language requirements broad and flexible. Graduates will have a wide range IELTS 6.0, with 6.0 in each of the four components. of skills that will equip them for technical engineering, For alternative English language requirements, see project management, team leadership and the Matthew’s page 162 development and management of ideas. Companies are perspective increasingly asking for creative engineers who are good ‘Engineers should expect to make Foundation year for non-EU students team workers and have an understanding of how they fit x If your qualifications (including English language) do not a x significant contribution to the in to industry and society. development of a modern, sustainable yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to x the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an society. Technological advancement x Why engineering for society: environment or international foundation year entry route. See page 30 is x central to the way people live international development at Sussex? for details their lives throughout the world. x • Our degree programmes are ground breaking, Our x engineers need to be properly How do I find out more? forward looking and unique in the UK. trained for such an important role, x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: • Sussex has great strengths in all three areas of which is why I’m so enthusiastic x E ug.admissions@engineering.sussex.ac.uk engineering, environment studies and development about supporting the new Engineering x T +44 (0)1273 678743 studies, with an excellent track record of for x Society degree programmes at F +44 (0)1273 678399 Department of Engineering and Design, internationally respected multidisciplinary research. Sussex.’ University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QT, UK • Enhanced interaction and learning through a series Professor Matthew Harrison, www.sussex.ac.uk/engineering of visiting speakers and a discussion forum relevant Director of Education, When can I visit? to the debate on environment and sustainable The Royal Academy All applicants who are made an offer of a place are invited development issues and the impact of new of Engineering to attend one of our admissions days from December technology. to April • Our Engineering for Society degree programmes are Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and designed to enhance your employability as a creative 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. engineer. Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors • Easy access to and collaboration with InQbate – the or call 01273 876787 Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Creativity (innovative technologies being one of the hallmarks of the degrees). 83
  • • You will also learn to manage your own personal • The Royal Academy of Engineering is specifically professional career development in preparation Engineering for society (environment or international development) supporting our four-year programme by enabling paid for further study or the world of work, and beyond, professional places in the sandwich year wherever you decide to take your career. • The degrees offer group and team activities as well as individual projects throughout all years of study. The Degrees individual projects also allow for specific interests to Engineering for Society be followed. BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: H190 BSc (Hons), 4 years (with a sandwich year) Environment or international development? UCAS Code: H191 You will spend 75 per cent of your time studying and Year 1 will help you to develop a set of skills in applying core technical skills (including both mechanical engineering methods covering both mechanical and electrical engineering) and transferable skills (such and electrical/electronic engineering. You will have as project and business management). The remaining the opportunity, through team-based activities, to 25 per cent of your time will be spent studying themed develop practical skills and to connect the principles courses in development or environment. You will use of engineering to the issues of designing and making this time not only to understand the subject but also to things work. In discussion with your tutor you will choose help put your engineering studies into context, to define complementary courses in development studies or projects and to apply some of the key skills you are environment studies. You can begin to construct a acquiring. You will develop more flexibility in your skills portfolio that describes your achievements. and working style – an important aspect of employability. In year 2, you will continue to develop your engineering If your interest is in the environmental applications of skills. You will continue with more challenging team- engineering, you will take courses in environmental based project work that will be closer to the kind of science, including courses on such subjects as global real-life challenge you will face in your career. You will warming and climate change and the response of Solar-powered lighting in rural continue with your chosen additional studies that will society to these issues. Alternatively, in order to Australia. Through a degree link to your project work. understand the place of engineering in developing in Engineering for Society you economies you will take a selection of development Paid professional development placements will be can explore the environmental studies courses, and you may have the chance to get provided with assistance from The Royal Academy of applications of engineering involved in schemes operated by organisations like Engineering. You can continue to add to your portfolio Engineers Without Borders. during this time. These placements will be spent in Core courses industry, or with a public body or NGO where you will What sort of career could I have? develop your skills in the working environment. Year 1 Companies are increasingly asking for creative You will study the principles of engineers who are good team workers and have an In the third and final academic year you will complete engineering and design and gain understanding of how they fit in to industry and society. your formal studies in both the engineering disciplines an understanding of how modern Engineering for Society degrees equip you for technical and your additional studies. Approximately half of and sustainable technology engineering, project management, team leadership and your time will be spent on an individual project, which operates. You will study courses the development and management of ideas: can reflect the interests developed during your earlier that give a working knowledge studies or sandwich-year period. You will round off your • engineering for climate change: working on the studies with the completion of the project, which you of the language of engineering design, testing and implementation of new technology can add to your portfolio. practice and also have the employed by local or national government (eg in opportunity for practical team response to the UK climate change bill) work. Each term, you will also study the core courses in your • international development: working on emergency disaster relief programmes with non-governmental chosen theme of environment or organisations (NGOs) and charities (eg engineering- development studies. related logistics, local liaison and deployment) Year 2 • engineering education: delivering teaching You will extend your skills and programmes to train engineers in developing countries design knowledge in engineering, • medical engineering: developing health-care and broaden your application devices (eg designing more advanced incubators for area to include areas such premature babies) as how people interface with • alternative energy systems: investigating the machines and computers. The effectiveness, appropriateness and environmental subjects for team-based project impact of these systems (eg tidal barrages and wind work will include engineering farms). for environment/development applications, depending on your How will I learn? interest. You may, for example, You will learn through a combination of lectures, work with team members on discussion seminars, workshops, laboratory classes the creation of product ideas and web-based learning. There will be project work in the new Fab Lab – a versatile throughout all years of the programme. The project work manufacturing space for forms the basis of a portfolio to show a future employer. converting ideas into working A programme of industrial visits and guest lectures objects. support the programme learning objectives. What will I achieve? Sandwich year • On completion of the programme you will have acquired You will work with a company or a set of skills in engineering and design. You will public body to complete a project understand the language of engineering and will have related to your studies. acquired important skills in teamwork, communication and project management. You will be able to make Final year technical judgements and offer informed opinions on You will continue with your theme engineering topics. and engineering courses and, • Through your study in the environment or development using your knowledge from both, theme you will balance your technical interests with you will complete your studies with a knowledge of another subject of interest to you. a substantial individual project Your broad set of skills and knowledge will allow you The challenge of ensuring access to clean drinking water that will be assessed as part of an to apply your technical abilities in a context that is for all in the developing world is just one of the issues you may explore as part of your degree in Engineering for exhibition of students’ work. important to you Society 84
  • John’s Engineering perspective Engineering (mechanical, automotive and design) ‘An engineering degree at Sussex gives x mechanical, automotive you x a solid foundation in a specialised engineering field, management, giving x presentations, finance, and design. x and design I chose to come to the University x because of its good reputation, links x with industry, and accreditation with x major engineering bodies. Career x prospects upon graduation are good. x The x engineering degrees on offer are diverse and continually updated, x Essentials When can I visit? allowing you to choose the subjects x All applicants who are made an offer of a place are you’re most interested in. x What engineering (mechanical, automotive invited to attend one of our admissions days from and design) degrees are there? December to April ‘I’ve found that there’s a lot of support x MEng degrees available and now, at the end of my x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and Automotive Engineering fourth year, I feel confident in my own x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Engineering Design abilities. My decision to do an MEng x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors Mechanical Engineering means that I can one day become x or call 01273 876787 chartered, which stands me in better x BEng degrees Automotive Engineering Why mechanical, automotive and stead for climbing the career ladder.’ Mechanical Engineering design engineering? Because you like to know how things work and you John Goodliffe Engineering degrees (with a Foundation Year) want to make them work better – faster, more quietly, See also more cleanly, more efficiently. You like the challenge of Engineering (electrical, electronic and computer real, practical problems and finding new and innovative systems) (p80), Engineering for society: environment or solutions to them. international development (p83), Product design (p147) Engineering is a diverse, wide-ranging profession. What A levels do I need? Graduates from mechanical and automotive engineering (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications have followed challenging careers in aerospace, the information, see pages 159-162) automotive industry, power production, robotics, project management, consultancy and investment banking. Typical offer range ABB-BBC Their projects range from the small scale to the large and A levels (or equivalent) must include Mathematics complex: from the design of a toy to the development and testing of a jet engine. Direct entry to year 2 of a BEng or MEng programme is possible for applicants offering good Higher National Why mechanical, automotive and design Diploma (HND) results (or equivalent) engineering at Sussex? For BEng in Engineering degrees with a Foundation • Our Department achieved a grade 5 (recognising Year, qualifications are flexible, particularly for mature research of national and international excellence) in students. The standard A level offer is CC in science- the last Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). based A levels and BCC in purely arts subjects • The MEng and BEng programmes in Automotive What qualities should I bring? Engineering and Mechanical Engineering are Analytical ability; commercial awareness; management accredited by the professional Institution of and communication skills; enthusiasm Mechanical Engineering (IMechE) up to the 2007 intake of students. Subsequent intakes are subject Fees to the standard reaccreditation process as part of the See pages 166-167 for information on fees normal procedures of the accrediting body. What scholarships are there? • Two final-year undergraduates won prestigious An unlimited number of scholarships of £1,000 are Kaufmann scholarships for entrepreneurship to fund available. These will be awarded on entry to students graduate training in the US in 2007. who firmly accept our offer of a place by the UCAS • The structure of our degrees is sufficiently common deadline and achieve three A grades at A level, excluding in the first and second years to allow the flexibility to General Studies. We also award generous prizes for change programmes if desired. outstanding performance in each year of study • Depending on performance, you can select BEng, English language requirements MEng and/or MSc as your target degree. IELTS 6.0, with 6.0 in each of the four components. For alternative English language requirements, see • Over £1 million investment in a newly equipped page 162 undergraduate laboratory building provides project labs, test, measurement and manufacture facilities Foundation year for non-EU students with disabled access and technician support on hand. If your qualifications (including English language) do not yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to • Emphasis on career development, transferable skills the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an and professional business management. international foundation year entry route. See page 30 for details How do I find out more? For more information, contact the admissions tutor: E ug.admissions@engineering.sussex.ac.uk T +44 (0)1273 678743 F +44 (0)1273 678399 Department of Engineering and Design, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QT, UK www.sussex.ac.uk/engineering 85
  • Engineering (mechanical, automotive and design) Team Sussex with their prototype car at the Formula Student competition. Design, construction and testing of cars form an important part of automotive engineering Core courses Year 1 MEng or BEng? In the first two years the programmes provide the broad The majority of courses are The four-year MEng programmes in Automotive base of the mechanical and automotive disciplines, common to all of the Engineering Engineering and Mechanical Engineering are together with design skills and an introduction to the degrees and provide the core designed to meet the full educational requirements electronic, control, computing and business techniques foundation in general engineering for chartered engineer status. They are accredited as essential for a successful career in modern engineering. and key skills, along with the such by the IMechE up to the 2007 intake of students Individual project topics are offered in the third year, flexibility to change programmes and reaccreditation for subsequent intakes is being arising from the extensive industrial and scientific if you wish. Courses typically processed at the time of going to press (January 2008). research at the University, from industrial contracts, include: Mechanics, Materials, The fourth year of the MEng programmes has specialist and from student-led suggestions. Examples of topics Electromechanics, Energy and technical courses that reach a higher level than the final include: designing a jet engine; medical ventilator Power, Engineering Design, year of the three-year BEng, and also includes business design; commissioning a 300kW air compressor; and Analogue and Digital Circuits, and management courses. The MEng is for those who a low-cost, autonomous stair climber for the disabled. Engineering Maths, and Technical wish to become chartered engineers and to aim for A number of national businesses sponsor prizes for the Communication Skills. In term 1, leadership positions as early as possible in their careers. best project work. guest lecturers from academia The three-year BEng programmes are for those more In the final year of the MEng degree programmes, you and industry describe the enthusiastic about the technical courses than the work in a small interdisciplinary team on a group project. breakthroughs and challenges of business aspects (though they will still cover the This gives you experience of the kind of team work that modern technology in their own essential basics) and who either want to get into industry you are likely to encounter in industry. These projects areas of interest. as quickly as they can or to take a more technical year 4 are frequently performed with industrial organisations. in the form of a specialist MSc programme – which can Recent projects have included a small jet engine (60kW) Year 2 also lead to chartered engineer status. for combined heat and power, and a short take-off and You will continue to develop landing vehicle for personal transportation. your engineering design skills If you are not yet sure which you wish to follow, do not worry because you will not have to make a final decision The Department encourages participation in design and explore your programme until the end of year 2. competitions including the Formula Student competition, specialism in greater depth. You which is a unique experience utilising the efforts of a will develop the ability to plan What sort of career could I have? joint team of specialists in mechanical engineering, and manage a significant project • employment in sectors such as aerospace, transport, product design and electronics. In 2005 the car pictured and also undertake a course in environment, marketing, the supply chain, industrial above was widely praised and performed well in its first Career Development, delivered products, power industry, health and medicine entry. In 2004 two of our students won second prize in conjunction with the University in the Melexis Safety Trophy, an international robotics Careers service, to improve your • automotive systems development engineer competition. chances of progressing into • design, technical support or installation engineer What will I achieve? rewarding graduate employment. • graduate engineer with international corporation If you work hard, and hopefully play hard too, you will Typical second-year courses • government agency project officer earn a well-respected degree opening the door to the include: Structural Mechanics, career you want and equipping you to succeed in it. Fluid Mechanics, Power Cycles, • business development manager In particular you will acquire: Feedback Control, Statistics and • postgraduate study or research. • An understanding of the commercial and social factors group design and manufacture Employers of our graduates include: that affect the realisation of engineering systems. projects. • Ricardo • The ability to analyse and design conceptual and • Rolls-Royce practical solutions to engineering problems. • Ford • Practical skills in measurement, instrumentation and information technology. • British Nuclear Group • Skills in communicating knowledge and ideas • ABS Technology through the written and spoken word and through • Cummins computer media. • engineering consultancies. • Interpersonal and teamworking skills and the business and management techniques you will need as you How will I learn? progress along your chosen career path. There are many ways to acquire engineering skills, • You also learn to manage your own personal from taught sessions (such as lectures and workshops) professional career development in preparation for and laboratory assignments, to independent and further study or the world of work, and beyond. computer-based learning. In addition, the first-year and foundation-year timetables include frequent one-hour small-group tutorials. 86
  • Engineering (mechanical, automotive and design) Jet engine studies in the Thermofluid Mechanics Core courses cont’d Degrees Research Centre, a Rolls-Royce-supported Year 3 Automotive Engineering University Technology Centre A range of specialist options MEng, 4 years UCAS Code: H330 allows you to configure your BEng, 3 years UCAS Code: H331 Mechanical Engineering programme to suit your own The automotive industry is one of today’s most exciting, MEng, 4 years UCAS Code: H301 interests, including engine high-technology global businesses. Intense competition, BEng, 3 years UCAS Code: H300 technology, machine dynamics, sophisticated customer demands and challenging Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest of all environmental requirements mean that technical design and manufacture, web engineering disciplines. It is concerned with the innovation, leadership and performance are critical to 3D applications. You also draw design and manufacture of products and with the success in this fast-changing industry. on your previous courses and conversion, control, transmission and storage of specialism to undertake a Tomorrow’s vehicles must define the leading edge energy in machinery and power plants. There is a huge significant individual project. The of technology in such fields as power generation, demand for mechanical engineers from the automotive topic may be one proposed by one dynamics, electronics, control, information and aerospace industries, as well as a vast number of of our leading research groups, management and communication. Engineering designs small- to medium-size enterprises. Today a mechanical must operate in the harshest of environments and engineer’s work will often be supported by computer by our industrial collaborators or provide unparalleled levels of reliability and function. techniques in design, drawing, vibration and stress one developed by yourself with the analysis, rapid prototyping and computational fluid guidance of your supervisor. The Department of Engineering and Design provides dynamics. the teaching and research to develop the leading Year 4 automotive engineers of the future. The powerful, The Mechanical Engineering programme at Sussex In the final year of the MEng, the integrated approach to teaching focuses on the will provide you with a broad knowledge of engineering range of specialist options is interdisciplinary needs of automotive engineering. principles, together with a sound grasp of analysis and enhanced by the inclusion of a design methods. The structure reflects the need for Engineering Design number from MSc programmes broad-based knowledge as well as in-depth skills. MEng, 4 years UCAS Code: H150 in mechanical and automotive The methods and processes used in the design of Design is viewed from a holistic perspective, extending engineering. In addition, you objects and systems is a particular strength at Sussex. from the marketing opportunity through specification, join an interdisciplinary team The Engineering Design programme is concerned with development of concepts, design embodiment and of students to undertake a the new theories and concepts in the application of detailed design, manufacture and sales. project modelled on those design. You will explore the methods needed to make Engineering degrees (with a Foundation Year) common in industry. You will use of new ideas and to build on the best aspects of BEng, 4 years UCAS Code: H100 develop commercial skills and established concepts. These degree programmes incorporate a foundation an enhanced understanding In the programme you will develop the skills required year, enabling a wide range of people to undertake of engineering design and for the design of a new product, and work both a degree in engineering. The initial year provides an development. independently and with a team where you will be able introduction to engineering, as well as the necessary to select and develop a role. You will acquire the skills background knowledge in science and mathematics. to continue learning as you develop your career and The degree is entirely equivalent to a standard degree participate in project work. and assumes fluency in English. In the fourth year you will take a series of courses that You will be well supported throughout the foundation have been developed in consultation with engineering year and your progress will be closely monitored to designers. You will gain an understanding of problem- help you achieve your full potential. On satisfactory solving and innovative techniques, and develop completion of the year, you have a wide range of techniques in support of the design process. three-year BEng or four-year MEng degree programmes to choose from in addition to Automotive Engineering, You will complete a major design project in partnership Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Design, so with a commercial company, and participate in the that you can select the degree that is best suited to your design show at the end of the year. interests and abilities. 87
  • English Emma’s English perspective ‘I chose to study English at Sussex x because I liked the variety of options x that the degree programme offered x me x from within the Department of English and also the interdisciplinary x approach that enabled me to study x complementary subjects such as art x history and American studies as part of x my degree. x ‘Lectures and seminars can be a x challenge at first, but the atmosphere x Essentials Why English? at x Sussex is extremely supportive Living in the contemporary world is about reading – not and friendly. Being at Sussex has x What English degrees are there? only of texts but also of images and film. Studying for a degree in English teaches you to become a critical and also helped me to develop additional x English imaginative reader. It not only introduces you to a canon skills and improved my employment x English and a Language (one from French, German, of great works, it allows you to work across a range of prospects through my involvement x Italian or Spanish) English and Art History disciplines – history, philosophy, media studies, visual with the student rep scheme during x English and Cultural Studies culture, film, architecture – with close attention to the my x first year and my current work as a English and English Language Teaching texture and the multiple meanings of the text. student mentor. There are lots of ways x English and Film Studies that students can get involved within x English and History Why English at Sussex? the University and the Student’s Union, x English and Media Studies • English at Sussex received a grade 5 in the last with many societies and opportunities x English with European Literature Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), recognising within student media.’ research of national and international excellence. American Studies and English (p41) Emma Corbett Drama Studies and English (p74) • Our Department received the top score in the most English Language and Literature (p93) recent assessment of teaching quality and is a Philosophy and English (p139) welcoming and stimulating community of motivated and dynamic students and faculty. What A levels do I need? (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications • Our teaching is informed by faculty research, which information, see pages 159-162) is at the cutting edge of our thriving international discipline. Typical offer range AAA-AAB • We have a challenging, exciting and innovative A levels (or equivalent) must include English, English curriculum that allows you to choose a broad range of Literature or the combined A level in English Language options from different historical periods, and crosses and Literature, at grade A a number of disciplinary boundaries. For programmes including languages, see page 112 • You have the opportunity to develop creative skills in for information about entry requirements options such as creative writing and drama. What qualities should I bring? Rowan’s • You have the opportunity to spend part of your degree Enthusiasm; creative intelligence; expressive writing career perspective studying in the US. ability; broad understanding What sort of career could I have? ‘I x chose to study English at Sussex Fees English is a multidisciplinary and flexible subject, which because of the University’s innovative x See pages 166-167 for information on fees gives our students the critical and communicative skills approach to interdisciplinary study and x English language requirements to prepare them for a rich and rewarding life in a very the x English Department’s reputation IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the large range of careers. for x academic excellence. Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English ‘As x well as studying periods of English language requirements, see page 162 Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in: literature and placing texts within their x How do I find out more? • higher education sociopolitical context, I was given a x For more information, contact: • journalism strong grounding in a vast range of x T +44 (0)1273 877303 theories for deconstructing different x E ug.admissions@english.sussex.ac.uk • the arts literary and critical texts. I also took x F +44 (0)1273 625972 • teaching advantage of the opportunities to x English, Arts B 239, University of Sussex, Falmer, broaden my knowledge beyond x Brighton BN1 9QN, UK • media. English, choosing to study a diverse x www.sussex.ac.uk/english range of courses from philosophy, x When can I visit? drama, history and film studies. x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and ‘Studying at Sussex has helped me to x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. work in my dream field: publishing. I x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors use x the skills I honed at Sussex – such or call 01273 876787 as x the ability to analyse texts critically and x creatively and to write clearly and engagingly – every day in my role as x an editor.’ Rowan January Assistant Editor, Publications and Branding Team, University of Sussex 88
  • Core courses How will I learn? The study of English requires you to develop skills in English These introduce you to a range interpretation, critical thinking and communication. of literatures in English from At Sussex you develop these skills through a range of different historical periods, learning methods. These include small-group seminars including the novel, poetry, drama, and practical workshops, as well as more formal the short story and autobiography. lectures. Courses are assessed through coursework, portfolios, extended essays, dissertations and exams. Year 1 What will I achieve? Approaches to English; Aspects • Knowledge of a range of different kinds of literature of Literary History; Methods of from various historical periods and contexts. Literary Study; Reading in the • Insight into the complex role that literature has played West; and What is Literature? in shaping culture in the past and the present. Year 2 • Understanding of the relevance of a wide range of Traditions, Innovations and theoretical approaches and how they shape the study of literature. Genres: the Novel. Novelists studied include Aphra Behn; • A sharp, critical awareness of how words can be used Daniel Defoe; JW Goethe; James and what they can do. Joyce; and Virginia Woolf. • Development of a range of conceptual skills that Writing, Translation and enable the study of English in the context of Performance. Options within this related disciplines. include: Arthurian Legends in the • Skills of independent thinking and learning, research Middle Ages; European Modernity skills and basic IT competence. and the Jews; Lyric Poetry and Personal Experience; Modernist Degrees Women Writers in Britain and America; Plato’s Legacy; Staging English the Renaissance; The Art of Short BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: Q303 Fiction; The European Short Story; This single honours degree aims to develop your Tragedy; Writing and The Great appreciation and understanding of English literature War; and Writing Lives. and its role in shaping culture and society in both the Period of English Literature present and the past. You become familiar with a range (post-1832). of approaches to the study of literature and explore the Reading Beckett is, in some respects, a deranging and relationship between literary texts and other cultural monomaniacal pastime, liable to induce pathogenic Year 3 forms, such as film and the visual arts. aversion to all other ‘kinds’ of prose. Samuel Beckett Culture and Revolution or Senses In addition to the core courses you have a choice of is one of the authors offered in our final-year Special of the Self. complementary course options drawn from related Author course Special Author. Options include: subjects such as American studies, cultural studies, film English and Art History Jane Austen; Charles Dickens; studies, art history and history. These courses, taken in BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QV33 Sigmund Freud; Thomas Hardy; your first two years, give greater breadth to your studies. This degree aims to develop your appreciation and Jamaica Kincaid; John Milton; You also take Aspects of Modernity in year 3. You will understanding of English literature, to complement Marcel Proust; Jean Rhys; Salman also study a range of Special Author and Special Subject this with a study of art history, and to explore the role Rushdie; William Shakespeare; options, subject to staff availability in any given year. of literature and the visual arts in shaping culture and Virginia Woolf. English and a Language (one from French, and society. Special Subject. Options include: German, Italian or Spanish) The art history component of the programme explores a English and European Revolution; BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: QRH9 wide range of visual material produced for both pleasure Literature and Psychoanalysis; This degree programme aims to develop your and use – from painting, architecture and sculpture, to Literature and Sexualities; appreciation and understanding of English literature dress, teapots and trainers – and places this material Postcolonial Women’s Writing; The and to complement this with a detailed study of the in its historical context. You will initially take core Literature of Africa; The Modern language, literature and thought of another European courses in each subject, including Text and Image, a European Mind; The Modernity of culture. You take language courses in each year of your course designed to provide a bridge between the two Photography; The Uncanny; and degree at Sussex, acquiring linguistic skills and historical subjects. In addition, you will choose a period of study and cultural knowledge in an integrated fashion. Women and Writing. in both subjects in years 2 and 3, and take Art and its Period of English Literature In years 1 and 2 you follow the English and language Institutions as well as a special author/subject course (pre-1832). core courses, with additional English options in year 2. in year 3. Your year abroad can be spent studying at a university in See the core courses list for details of English courses; Europe, a francophone country or Latin America. In the refer to the art history subject entry on page 47 for more final year you choose options from both subjects. information on these courses. See the core courses list for details of English courses; English and Cultural Studies refer to the languages subject entry on page 111 for BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QR39 more information on these courses. This degree aims to develop your appreciation and understanding of English literature and to complement this with a comparative study of cultures, both of particular texts and artefacts and of actual ways of living and thinking in different societies. In years 1 and 2 you will take core and option courses for each subject. You will take options from both subjects in year 3. See the core courses list for details of English courses; refer to the cultural studies subject entry on page 68 for more information on these courses. 89
  • English and English Language Teaching BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QX31 English This degree programme aims to develop your appreciation and understanding of English literature and to complement this with the opportunity to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to teach English to speakers of other languages. In years 1 and 2 you follow the English and English Language Teaching core courses, with additional English options in year 2. Year 3 offers you the opportunity to take options in English and to undertake an English language teaching research project alongside final-year courses in Second Language Acquisition and Advanced Teaching Methodology. The degree provides a broad perspective on English literature and English Language Teaching (ELT) pedagogy, and allows increasing specialisation in the later years of study. See the core courses list for details of English courses; refer to the English language teaching subject entry on page 94 for more information on these courses. English and Film Studies BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QP3H This programme aims to develop your appreciation and understanding of English literature and to complement this with a study of film. You study a wide range of European literature in translation and explore a broad variety of film in a comparative context. In year 1 you follow introductory core courses in both subjects. In years 2 and 3 you take a mixture of core and option courses from each subject, specialising within both English and film. See the core courses list for details of English courses; refer to the film studies subject entry on page 97 for more information on these courses. English and History BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QV31 This degree aims to develop your appreciation and understanding of English literature and to complement this with a detailed study of history, focusing on the contexts through which texts emerge and the relationship between cultures and human intellectual developments. The degree provides a broad perspective on human intellectual and cultural development, while allowing increasing specialisation in the later years of study. In year 1 you take English and history core courses. These include Texts and Contexts, and Culture and Intellect, designed to provide a bridge between the two The University of Sussex Library curates several collections relating to the ‘Bloomsbury Group’, subjects. In subsequent years you select further options including an important collection of Virginia Woolf’s manuscripts and letters in addition to the core courses for each subject. See the core courses list for details of English courses; See the core courses list for details of English courses; refer to the media studies subject entry on page 122 refer to the history subject entry on page 103 for more for more information on these courses. information on these courses. English with European Literature English and Media Studies BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QQ32 BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QP33 This degree aims to develop your appreciation and This degree aims to develop your appreciation and understanding of English literature while also introducing understanding of English literature alongside a study you to European literature in translation, and to develop of the media and an exploration of the role of each in your perception of national differences within the shaping culture and society. common European literary and intellectual tradition. In the media studies courses you learn how to analyse The first-year courses The History of Reading in the West media texts and the theory and practice of media and European Literature and Thought provide you with production, together with the histories, institutions a wide-ranging overview of important European works and technologies of the media. You also explore the from the Bible to contemporary literature. In years 2 relationship between literary texts and other cultural and 3 there are various thematic focuses, with a choice forms, including film and the visual arts. of options for each term. In year 2 you can study the First-year core courses include practical work in European Short Story or Representation and the Body; media, and Narrative and Culture, a course bridging and Plato’s Legacy or European Jewish writers. In year the two subjects. Subsequently you take core courses 3 there is a wide range of Special Author options, as and options in both English and media. You can take well as a course on The European Modern Mind, which Aspects of Modernity in year 3 instead of a Period of concentrates on the period 1880 to the present. English Literature. Options within Aspects of Modernity See the core courses list for details of English courses. include Literature and Democracy; Literature, Film and Modernity; The Fictions of Science; The Modernity of Photography; Writing and Childhood; and Writing the Body. 90
  • English language English language Essentials Why English language? English is the world’s leading international language. In What English language degrees are there? different countries around the globe English is acquired English Language as the mother tongue, in others it is used as a second English Language and English Language Teaching language. Some nations use English as their official English Language and Language(s) (one or two from language, performing the function of administration; French, German, Italian or Spanish) in others it is used as an international language for English Language and Linguistics business, commerce and industry. English Language and Literature What factors and forces have led to the spread of English Language with a Language (French, German, English which, only 400 years ago, was limited to a small Italian or Spanish) number of speakers in a tiny part of the world? Why is See also English (p88), Linguistics (p117) English now considered to be so prestigious that, across the globe, individuals and societies feel disadvantaged What A levels do I need? if they do not have competence in this language? (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications What has been the effect of the spread of English on information, see pages 159-162) indigenous languages, cultures and communities? How Typical offer range AAA-AAB has English changed through 1,500 years? These are some of the questions that you investigate when you For English Language and Literature, A levels (or study English language. equivalent) must include English, English Literature or the combined A level in English Language and Literature, You also examine the immense variability of English and at grade A come to understand how it is used as a symbol of both individual identity and social affiliation. You develop For programmes including languages, see page 112 in-depth knowledge of the intricate structure of the for information about entry requirements language. Why do some non-native speakers of English What qualities should I bring? claim that it is a difficult language to learn, while infants Caroline’s Enthusiasm; an analytical mind; precision; perseverance; born into English-speaking communities acquire their perspective independent thinking; broad understanding language before they learn to tie their shoelaces? At Sussex, you are introduced to the nature and grammar ‘Life at Sussex has been incredible and x Fees of English in all its aspects. This involves the study studying here has been even better. x See pages 166-167 for information on fees of sound structures, the formation of words, the I took a gap year after my A levels x English language requirements sequencing of words and the construction of meaning, and was worried about getting back x IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the as well as examination of the theories explaining these into education, but from the minute I x Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English aspects of English usage. You are encouraged to develop stepped in to my first lecture I felt at x language requirements, see page 162 your own individual responses to the practical and ease. The tutors here are always on x theoretical issues raised by studying how speakers and hand to help and are part of a huge x How do I find out more? writers employ English for a wide variety of purposes. student support network. Their friendly x For more information, contact the subject coordinator: E ug.admissions@linguistics.sussex.ac.uk and approachable attitude shines x Why English language at Sussex? T +44 (0)1273 876612 • We are rated excellent in the most recent audit by through, and you can tell they really x F +44 (0)1273 623246 the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) and were also love what they teach. x English Language Admissions Tutor, Arts B, ranked among the top 10 in the Times league table of ‘The range of subjects covered in x University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QN, UK linguistics departments in British universities (2007). English Language and Linguistics is x www.sussex.ac.uk/englishlanguage fantastic: you can expect to learn x • Active and diverse research culture encompassing everything from how language works x When can I visit? theoretical and applied aspects of English linguistics. in society to how your vocal tract x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. • A close and caring student/staff community. produces sounds. x Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors ‘Another reason why this degree x • The opportunity to combine language and literature or call 01273 876787 studies. programme has been so worthwhile is because of the variety of students it x What sort of career could I have? attracts. I’ve met people of different x • publishing ages and from such a variety of x • journalism, public relations cultures, backgrounds, and countries, x and I feel that I’ve learnt something x • communications-oriented business careers valuable from every one of them.’ • teaching (with further qualifications) Caroline Barnett • speech and hearing therapy (with further qualifications). 91
  • English language A recruitment poster in Taiwan, aimed at local people, Degrees Core courses demonstrates the dominance of the English language English Language Below is a list of all courses that How will I learn? BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: Q302 are core to the various degree English language teaching and learning takes place in English is the most widely used language in the world. programmes on offer. You will many contexts. You attend lectures in which you are This degree examines the dynamics of society in order study a selection of these, relevant guided through the relevant aspects of the topic, and to understand how language operates: how it becomes to your chosen degree programme. seminars in which you have the opportunity to make a symbol of nationality, culture, personal identity and your own presentations and debate relevant issues with social affiliation. You study English in all its forms and Year 1 fellow students. contexts, developing an understanding of wider issues Approaches to Meaning in English We use a range of assessment methods that provide the related to communication to explain how and why Approaches to Pronunciation best opportunity for you to express your knowledge and English has emerged as a world language. Language and Style understanding. Exams take the form of both unseen This programme offers you the opportunity for in-depth Language in Society and take-away papers. Many courses also have a study of the linguistic structure of English: you learn Modern and Contemporary English coursework component, which provides a continuous to examine and analyse English sound structure, form of appraisal. You write extended essays and are grammar and meaning. You learn about the historical Year 2 given the opportunity to undertake an individual research development of English and study present-day social Approaches to Grammar project which you present as a final-year dissertation. issues relating to the English language. You develop Language Acquisition In all of these methods of assessment, your tutors are analytical skills and are given the opportunity to use Language Variation and Change on hand to provide assistance and support. these in the investigation of different forms of spoken Sociology of Language What will I achieve? and written English. The Making of English • A thorough knowledge and understanding of modern You take the core courses in years 1 and 2. Alongside English structure and usage. your year 3 courses, you are given the opportunity to Year 3 • An understanding of the main historical processes pursue independent research on an aspect of English Biology and Evolution of Language that have led to its present-day status and use. language usage of your own choice. Communication Analysis • In-depth knowledge of a topic of central interest to you. English Language and English Language Teaching Discourse in Public Life BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QX33 Individual Research Project • Learning, research, information interpretation, critical Options from: Language English is the language of international communication thinking, debating, presenting, writing and time- and people worldwide have a need to learn English. Processing in the Mind; and management skills. You will explore the psychological, sociological, and Pragmatics • An advanced understanding of the particular cultural factors that affect second language acquisition relationship between English language and your and study the grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation joint or minor subject, if applicable. of English from the point of view of a foreign learner. You will also be trained to teach English by observing experienced teachers and undertaking supervised teaching practice. This degree is suitable for native English speakers, as well as foreign students already proficient in English who are interested in teaching the language in their own country. The degree will be of particular interest to students who wish to travel and work abroad after they graduate. 92
  • The first two years of the programme include Questions you will address in this programme include: preparation for the Trinity College London Certificate how do children acquire language? How is language English language in English Language Teaching, an internationally related to thought? What has led to the emergence of recognised English language teaching qualification, English as the world’s leading language, and what has and suitable candidates may enter for this qualification been the influence of English on other languages? if they wish (note that there is an examination entry fee In your first year, you study the main approaches to of around £90). explaining language, and take courses in the historical In year 1 you take the first two core courses plus development of English, stylistic variation in the Introduction to English Language Teaching (ELT); English language, and the structure of English. In your Phonology and Pronunciation Teaching; Language second year, you study grammar and the development Teaching Methods and Approaches; ELT Methodology of English, and select from a number of options in and Materials I; and Developing Language Skills. sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics. In your final year, you study Historical Linguistics and investigate In year 2 you study the core courses plus Pedagogical the reasons why living languages change. A number of Grammar of English; Lexical Development; ELT How do children acquire language? option courses are available to you, including Discourse Methodology and Materials II; and Curriculum This is just one of the questions you Analysis, and Linguistic Typology. Development and Syllabus Design. The Methodology can explore on the English Language and Materials courses in years 1 and 2 are both highly In your final year, you are also given the opportunity to and Linguistics programme practical and include lesson planning, materials carry out independent research on a linguistic aspect preparation and supervised teaching practice, with of English. individual feedback from a trainer. See the core courses list for details of English language Year 3 offers you the opportunity to pursue independent courses; refer to the linguistics subject entry on page research in an area of study relating to English 117 for more information on these courses. language. You also select English language options; take Intercultural and Pragmatic Competence and English Language and Literature Second Language Acquisition, and undertake an English BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: Q300 language teaching project. The richness and variety of English, in the contexts of both its linguistic structure and its literary heritage, are See the core courses list for details of English language the focus of this degree. You examine how language courses; refer to the English language teaching subject operates, in theory and in practice, both in society and entry on page 94 for more information on these courses. in literature, to become a symbol of culture, personal English Language and Language(s) (one or identity and social affiliation. Your study covers literary two from French, German, Italian or Spanish) genres and introduces you to a range of non-literary BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: QRJ9 texts to develop an understanding and appreciation of This degree offers an in-depth study of the theory the relationship between different styles of discourse. of human language and its use in practice. It provides an The English Language and Literature degree offers an opportunity to study the linguistic structure of modern in-depth study of sociolinguistic theory and the linguistic languages including sound structure, grammar and structure of English. You approach literary theory through meaning. Your studies at Sussex provide linguistic the study of historical context and through the study and (including sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic) analysis of contemporary discourses in literature, art knowledge of English and other modern languages, and culture. and an opportunity to develop critical and analytical linguistic skills. In years 1 and 2 you take English language core courses plus a literature core course and second-year literature In years 1 and 2, you take the core courses in addition to options. In year 3 you take English language options, your chosen language course and choices from courses carry out supervised research in an area relating to Becky’s on European culture and society. During the third year you study abroad at a university in mainland Europe, English language and literature and study a special perspective subject or a special author in English literature. acquiring first-hand experience of your chosen language ‘Studying English language at Sussex x and getting to know its speakers. See the core courses list for details of English language x a real treat. I think you’d be hard is courses; refer to the English subject entry on page 88 pressed to find another degree x Returning to Sussex for the final year, you have the for more information on the literature courses. opportunity to carry out supervised research in an area programme that covers such a wide x relating to English and other modern languages. You English Language with a Language (French, range of topics. The programme x also take European Thought and select courses from German, Italian or Spanish) demonstrates how English language x among the core courses. BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: Q3RY x be described systematically, how can This degree offers an in-depth study of English as x history has shaped the language its See the core courses list for details of English language a language operating in society and acquired by x use today and the ways in which it we courses; refer to the languages subject entry on page native speakers. It provides an opportunity to study x used socially, which can at times be is 111 for more information on these courses. the linguistic structure of English and your chosen quite surprising. x English Language and Linguistics language through analysis of sounds, grammatical ‘Students benefit from being taught x BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: QQ31 structure and meaning. You also choose from a range x a dedicated and highly enthusiastic by Human language lies at the heart of understanding of option courses, closely related to an aspect of your group of faculty members who provide x all aspects of human cognition, culture and conduct. field of study. This degree provides a linguistic and x support network that is second to a It is through the study of language that we can come sociolinguistic framework for your studies, and an none. x to know the intricacies of human nature, psychology opportunity to develop critical and analytical language skills. ‘The diversity of backgrounds and x and development. English is the most widely used international language, and its global status means variety of ages represented by x In years 1 and 2 you take the core courses, plus a students who choose this programme that people all over the world feel themselves to be x course in the language of your choice. You spend year 3 disadvantaged if they do not have a command of it. The reflects the fact that English language x abroad, acquiring first-hand experience and proficiency English Language and Linguistics degree offers you the x Sussex offers something for at in your chosen second language and understanding the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding everyone.’ social and cultural heritage of its speakers. You continue of the workings of human language and leads you to an to study your foreign language throughout the final year awareness of the relationship between linguistics and Becky Wright along with the core courses. other aspects of human behaviour. See the core courses list for details of English language You will come to understand how historical and social courses; refer to the languages at Sussex entry on factors have shaped the development of English Language. You will also investigate the various ways in page 111 for more information on these courses. which different social and cultural groups use English. Degrees You will receive tuition in the central areas of English language and linguistic study (eg sound, meaning and grammar) and have the opportunity of developing the analytical skills necessary for the investigation of linguistic knowledge and language use. 93
  • English language Core courses English language teaching (ELT) Year 1 You will be introduced to the role teaching (ELT) of English and of English language teaching in the world today, and learn about different approaches. You will learn about classroom management and lesson planning, and start teaching under the guidance of your tutor. Year 2 You will learn in greater depth about Essentials • Acquire a professional qualification – the Trinity the lexis and grammar of English, At Sussex you take English Language Teaching College London Cert TESOL – alongside your degree. as well as more about how to teach alongside another subject as part of a joint degree • First-rate language teaching and learning facilities these areas of language; and about at your disposal, including a fully computerised curriculum development and how What English language teaching language laboratory with internet access and to design an English language degrees are there? English Language Teaching and Language(s) (one or two satellite TV. syllabus. You also complete your from French, German, Italian or Spanish) teaching practice, entering for the What sort of career could I have? • English language teaching in the UK and overseas Trinity College London certificate English and English Language Teaching (p90) in TESOL towards the end of the English Language and English Language Teaching (p92) • materials writing second year. Linguistics and English Language Teaching (p118) • teacher training What A levels do I need? Final year (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications • ELT publishing You learn about more specialised information, see pages 159-162) • marketing. areas of methodology, eg teaching Typical offer range ABB-BBB children and using information How will I learn? technology. You also study second For programmes including languages, see page 112 In addition to seminars and workshops, you will be language acquisition, ie the for information about entry requirements trained to teach English by observing experienced psychological and social factors See other individual programme entries for details teachers and by undertaking supervised teaching which affect the way in which people practice with feedback from a tutor. Your teaching skills learn languages. In addition, you What qualities should I bring? will be assessed as part of your degree. In the final undertake a research project, eg a Excellent communication skills; aptitude and feeling year you undertake a research project on an aspect of case study of a learner of English or for language; keen interest in other cultures; an language teaching or learning that interests you. independent, outgoing personality; willingness to take a small piece of classroom research. the initiative What will I achieve? • An understanding of the principles and practice of Charlotte’s Fees language teaching. perspective See pages 166-167 for information on fees • Skill in the use of teaching techniques and classroom ‘Sussex’s good reputation and its x English language requirements management. location – on the South Downs and x IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English • Awareness of the psychological, sociological and in x Brighton – was a major attraction language requirements, see page 162 cultural factors that can affect second language for x me. I have always wanted to be a acquisition. teacher, so ELT is my perfect degree. x How do I find out more? ‘I’ve been at Sussex for a term, and I x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: • Knowledge of how the grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation of English ‘work’ from the perspective never thought I would have learnt so x E ug.admissions@languages.sussex.ac.uk T +44 (0)1273 877433 of a non-English-speaking learner. much in such a short amount of time. x The x degree programme is very well F +44 (0)1273 678476 • An appreciation of the broader educational and social organised, and the atmosphere in the x Sussex Language Institute, contexts within which English is taught worldwide. seminars is great. We cover different x University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SH, UK www.sussex.ac.uk/languages topics such as teaching methods, and x Degree how to keep pupils interested and x When can I visit? motivated. We also learn things like x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and English Language Teaching and Language(s) phonology and pronunciation which x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. (one or two from French, German, Italian are x both interesting and informative. Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors or Spanish) ‘We x were taught a foreign language or call 01273 876787 BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: RX91 This degree provides the opportunity to gain the skills this x term, in order to make us aware and understanding necessary to teach English as a of x the difficulties learners may come Why English language teaching? English is a language of international communication, foreign language, combined with intensive study of across when learning English, which x and children and adults worldwide have a desire to your chosen European language and relevant aspects was s very helpful and good fun. learn English. Learning to teach English gives you a of European thought, history and culture. Alongside ‘I’m s extremely happy with my choice global perspective and offers you the opportunity to your English language teaching core courses, you have and s I would definitely recommend this travel and live abroad. classes in your chosen language. You also study aspects degree to people who would like to s of European society in year 1, choose from courses on teach, because you will be guaranteed s Why English language teaching at Sussex? European issues and topics in year 2, and choose from a job anywhere in the world.’ • Rigorous practical training in the skills of English courses on European culture, art and society in your language teaching. final year. Your third year is spent abroad in a country Charlotte where your chosen language is spoken. You can spend Schiphorst • Taught by experienced, practising teachers and this year studying or use the English language teaching teacher trainers. qualification you should have gained at the end of your • Includes teaching practice as an integral part of the second year of study to work as a teacher of English, course. thus gaining invaluable experience in both areas of your chosen joint degree programme. • Gain an in-depth view of language from the learner’s perspective. See the core courses list for details of English language teaching courses; refer to the languages subject entry on page 111 for more information on these courses. 94
  • Environmental science Claire’s Environmental science perspective ‘I chose to study Environmental x Science at Sussex because the x world’s environment is of growing x public concern and I feel that it has x relevance to everyday life. The degree x programme at Sussex provided me x with a chance to study a range of x relevant ecological, atmospheric x and geological topics, as well as the x chemistry behind them. x ‘Over the last two years I’ve gained x Essentials Why study environmental science? a x thorough theoretical knowledge The impact of mankind on the planet is threatening of practical issues. I’ve also been x What environmental science degrees are the earth as never before. Public concern over global climate change, impacts of pollution on human health given the opportunity to experience x there? and wildlife, exploitation of natural resources and loss of laboratory conditions and have x Environmental Science biodiversity will continue to dominate the 21st century. learnt how to use many professional x Environmental Science with Development Studies techniques, which I hope will aid x See also Environmental scientists with a clear understanding of me x in my future career. During the Ecology and conservation (p75), Engineering for society: the natural environmental processes on earth and how programme there have also been x environment and international development (p83) and they have been changed by human impact are vital in several opportunities to participate in x Geography (p99) order to help ensure a sustainable future for our planet. field trips, allowing me to put theory x What A levels do I need? Environmental science is a multidisciplinary subject into x practice. (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications that involves study of both the physical and biological ‘I’ve really enjoyed my study at the x information, see pages 159-162) sciences to ensure a holistic approach to environmental University because of the friendly x issues. Training in an environmental science degree and welcoming atmosphere and the x Typical offer range BBB-BBC programme offers excellent employment prospects and invaluable support of my tutors.’ A levels (or equivalent) must include at least one provides a solid background to a wide range of exciting approved science subject other than mathematics. careers in other areas. Claire Toosey (Please contact the admissions tutor for further information) Why study environmental science at Sussex? • We offer a flexible degree programme with a wide What else do I need? range of options that allows you to tailor your GCSE (or equivalent) in Mathematics and either programme to your specific area of interest. Chemistry or Double Science • Our lecturers were rated excellent in a recent What qualities should I bring? review of teaching quality, and include faculty who Concern for the natural environment and enthusiasm are internationally recognised for their research in for studying it; a strong interest in the environmental chemical pollution, climate change, ecology and sciences and in taking a scientific approach to environmental policy. understanding the threats to our planet; enjoyment of practical work; problem-solving abilities; creative • We have state-of-the-art environmental equipment, thinking; an enquiring mind laboratories and computing facilities and place strong emphasis on small-group teaching. Fees See pages 166-167 for information on fees • We offer a range of fieldwork opportunities including residential field courses in England, Scotland and Katrina’s English language requirements Portugal, and field-based projects in the Ecuadorian career perspective IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the Andes. Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English ‘The degree programme at Sussex set x language requirements, see page 162 • Undergraduates can spend a term abroad studying me x up with the core skills I needed to environmental science subjects in the USA, Canada, work in an environmental discipline. x Foundation year for non-EU students Australia or Sweden. I’ve x now secured a position as an If your qualifications (including English language) do not • The degree programme is accredited by the environmental consultant and use a x yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to Institution of Environmental Sciences, and students range of scientific equipment to carry x the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an are awarded Associate Member status after out x my work. The laboratory classes at international foundation year entry route. See page 30 for details graduating. the x University helped me to familiarise myself with this type of equipment and x How do I find out more? • Sussex has one of the best university campus built up my analytical skills. x For more information on our degree programmes and environments in the UK. Its location in the South ‘I x also found the degree developed our departmental open days, contact the admissions Downs offers rich opportunities to undertake local my x report-writing ability, which is tutor: fieldwork projects. extremely beneficial now as it’s an x E ug.admissions@biology.sussex.ac.uk integral part of my job. Furthermore, x T +44 (0)1273 678511 x skills I gained from having to the F +44 (0)1273 678937 Department of Biology and Environmental Science, present on scientific topics to my class x University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK and x lecturers have come in handy, as www.sussex.ac.uk/biology I x now have to present my findings to clients.’ When can I visit? Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and Katrina Allen 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. Environmental Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors Consultant, or call 01273 876787 ems Sampling seawater during the marine microbial diversity field course, Millport, Scotland 95
  • Core courses Environmental science Year 1 In year 1 you will study the basic processes underpinning the functioning of the physical and biological environment. These include global environmental cycling of waste and materials, environmental issues and policy, pollution of aquatic and terrestrial environments, evolution and ecology. In addition you can choose courses in geological processes, understanding the functioning of natural environments, and freshwater pollution that allow you to develop your specialisms and interests. The emphasis is on practical skills Environmental science students sampling sediments on Lake Erken, Sweden as part of project work during a term abroad with a combination of laboratory fieldwork. In addition, there will be tutorials and other and field work. Opportunities for fieldwork and study abroad Acquisition of practical skills is an essential part of small-group teaching sessions, such as seminars and training in environmental science. Sampling undertaken discussion groups, where you will present your own ideas. Year 2 in the field is often followed up with further analyses In the final year you will carry out a research project on a You will build on skills developed in the laboratory to obtain detailed understanding of topic of your choice. in the first year to deepen your environmental processes. understanding of environmental What will I achieve? processes and to develop You can take a number of residential field courses: • Critical awareness of current environmental problems practical skills in environmental in Portugal, you visit a range of Mediterranean and a thorough understanding of the scientific basis analysis. Core courses include environments and learn about plant and animal (from both a theoretical and a practical point of view) that is necessary to help solve them. geomorphology, environmental adaptations and how invasive species impact on these ecosystems. You also conduct group work on and climatic change, measuring • An appreciation of the diversity of environmental environmental contamination, projects ranging from biodiversity assessment to testing processes and their impacts, ranging from molecular to hypotheses about past environments. In Scotland, methods in ecology and global systems. conservation, marine biology and you sample and analyse seawater to study how marine microbes contribute to the functioning of the marine • Practical skills developed throughout the degree, biotechnology and environmental ecosystem. It is also possible to be involved in field- ranging from techniques for measuring biodiversity economics. Additional course based projects in the Ecuadorian Andes. Projects include in the field to the laboratory analysis of chemical options are available in studies into land use and bird diversity, the population contaminants. conservation, biodiversity and status of the big cat species, the spectacled bear and • The ability to plan, conduct and report on a programme atmospheric chemistry, as well as critically endangered primates. of independent original research, to manage your time residential field courses in Portugal Many courses in the degree programme include a local effectively and to participate in teamwork. and Scotland that enhance fieldwork component; you are taught how to sample laboratory and field-based skills. • Transferable skills in the critical assessment of chemical pollutants in Measuring Contamination, and to information and ideas, in debating contentious sample contaminants in river water in Aquatic Ecology Year 3 issues, and communicating your own ideas and and Pollution. Ecology courses include analysis of animal In the final year you can choose research to others. communities in aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and from a wide range of courses, assessment of vegetation composition. enabling you to tailor your Degrees degree programme towards your You can also spend a term abroad studying at another Environmental Science individual interests or career university, either in the USA, Canada or Sweden. Our BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: F900 plans. Course options include students have studied desert, marine, arctic and This degree will develop your understanding of the Marine Pollution and Impacts, freshwater environments in Arizona, Oregon, Alaska and scientific basis of natural systems and help you analyse Environmental Toxicology, Sweden. the major environmental problems that we currently Mapping Environmental Change, face. The course combines physical, biological, Polar Regions and Environmental What sort of career could I have? chemical, geological, geographical and economic Change, Coastal Processes The practical skills in environmental analysis and aspects of environmental science, and will enable you to fieldwork equip you for a wide range of science-based and Coastal Management, understand the earth as a system and critically assess careers: Paleoenvironments and Human the human impact on it. Graduates from this programme Impact, Forensic Science and • consultancies in environmental monitoring or qualify for entry in to the Institution of Environmental environmental engineering Sciences (the major professional body for Environmental the Legal Process, Conservation Science) as associate members. in Practice, Biodiversity, Animal- • environmental appraisal and risk assessment for Plant Interactions, Environmental the water, chemical or construction industries, the Environmental Science with Development Studies History, Modern Human Evolution. Environment Agency, local government, NHS trusts BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: F850 and numerous non-governmental organisations This degree will appeal particularly if you have an interest In addition, all environmental in issues concerned with the Developing World. It • further training for careers in government or science students conduct a final- combines the natural science core of the Environmental university-based research or for teaching careers in year project that is an important Science degree with courses in development studies. If secondary or further education. and exciting component of the you wish to undertake voluntary work in a less-developed country, this may be possible between years 2 and 3. degree programme. Projects Other important acquired skills in numeracy, communication and presentation have ensured that are conducted in the laboratory In year 1 you take either Colonialism and After or or field under the guidance of many of our graduates have successful careers in Understanding Global Cultures, plus Issues in practising researchers. They marketing or management. Development or Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism. In years provide you with an opportunity to 2 and 3 you choose options in development studies. How will I learn? focus on a research question in Our aim is to help you experience science in a real setting See the core courses list for details of the environmental an area that interests you and to against a backdrop of research. Your tutors are friendly science courses; refer to the development studies use your own initiative to plan and and helpful and want you to ask questions and make subject entry on page 71 for more information on these design your own research. suggestions. You will learn through a combination of courses. lectures, computer workshops, practical classes and 96
  • Film studies Film studies Essentials Why film studies? Film studies is not about film alone, but about the ways What film studies degrees are there? in which we experience cinema, concepts of modernity Film Studies and technology and the way we view stories on the Film Studies and a Language (one from screen. The degree stresses visual representation in our French, German, Italian or Spanish) global society and the place that film and other media have in communicating ideas, attitudes and cultural American Studies and Film Studies (p42) beliefs, both now and in the past. Art History and Film Studies (p48) Drama Studies and Film Studies (p74) In this programme you learn to ‘read’ film, visual images English and Film Studies (p90) and the cinematic experience. You learn to analyse History and Film Studies (p104) and present arguments with a critical awareness of Music and Film Studies (p135) the varied forms that texts and visual images can take. Philosophy and Film Studies (p139) You also explore the important connections between different national institutions and identities and their What A levels do I need? representations in film and visual culture. In addition we (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications stress the important roles played by economic, social information, see pages 159-162) and political institutions in framing the way films are Typical offer range AAB-BBB made, distributed and viewed. For programmes including languages, see page 112 Why film studies at Sussex? for information about entry requirements • Scored 10 out of 10 for job prospects after What qualities should I bring? graduation in the Guardian University Guide, 2007. Enthusiasm; commitment; interest in film and cinema; • Ranked in the top 10 in the UK in the Good University intellectual curiosity; ability to communicate Guide online and in the Times Good University Guide, Fees 2007. See pages 166-167 for information on fees • Achieved 21 out of 24 in the national Quality English language requirements Assurance Agency (QAA) teaching quality assessment. IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the Gary’s • Has a thriving research culture in film studies, media, perspective Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English and cultural studies. language requirements, see page 162 ‘I x began studying film at Sussex as • Excellent facilities including a suite of newly Foundation year for non-EU students refurbished studios and high-specification digital a x part-time student in the Centre If your qualifications (including English language) do not production facilities. for x Continuing Education. With the yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to encouragement of my tutor I decided x the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an • Offers research-led teaching on theoretical, social, to x apply for the full-time degree in Film international foundation year entry route. See page 30 historical, textual, political, creative and practical Studies. x for details approaches to the study of film and a range of other ‘The core courses ensure a wide x media. How do I find out more? understanding of the subject. I’ve x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: What sort of career could I have? also been able to take options that x E ug.admissions@film.sussex.ac.uk • digital media, film or broadcasting have broadened my horizons while x T +44(0)1273 678019 • publishing/communications complementing my study of film. x F +44(0)1273 623246 ‘The University’s staff are very x Media and Film, University of Sussex, Falmer, • public relations supportive and there are a number x Brighton BN1 9SH, UK • journalism of x resources available if difficulties www.sussex.ac.uk/film arise. With the changes in technology x • other non-media professions where critical, When can I visit? analytical and presentational skills are important. over recent years, filmmaking is more x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and accessible, allowing for more diversity x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. How will I learn? and x new approaches to producing Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors Film screenings, lectures, small-group debates and and x viewing. or call 01273 876787 intensive seminars form the basis for your independent ‘The Film Studies degree is great x learning. fun s and thoroughly enjoyable. After graduation I will be looking to find work s What will I achieve? in the media industry – ideally I’d like The programme gives you a thorough grounding in the to work for the British Film Institute.’ kinds of specialist knowledge necessary to enable you to read film critically. You learn to discern the Garry Meyer multiple cinematic ‘codes’ (of costume, lighting, cinematography, etc) through which film works as a form of representation, and explore the varied uses that film-makers have made of the medium. 97
  • Core courses Film studies Year 1 Issues in Film Studies I and II Film Analysis I and II Year 2 Film Theory American Cinema to 1950 Cinema and Nation (choice of two spring and summer term courses) Year 3 Options may include: Class in Popular Film; Contemporary British Cinema; Documentary; Hollywood; Hollywood Comedian Comedy; Media and Music; Media and the Feminine; Media in the Era of Globalisation; New Audience Research; Race and Ethnicity in Popular Film; The Politics of Media Representation and Viewing Women The Duke of York’s Picturehouse in Brighton is one of the oldest cinemas in Britain Degrees Film Studies BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: P300 First-year courses include Issues in Film Studies I and II, which are about cinema in the broadest sense and cover films from many different periods and places. The lectures are accompanied by two seminar-based courses that focus on the techniques and terminology of film analysis and cover important critical approaches to film. In year 2 you look at issues of film theory in greater depth, before moving on to explore a range of cinematic practices, choosing from a variety of national and international cinemas. In the final year you take thematic options from a range of topics and methods. This degree programme allows for individual choices of intellectual direction in a wide range of film and media forms. This is supported by a framework of fundamental training in the professional skills, methods and critical concepts associated with film studies. We do not require prior knowledge of studies in film, and we welcome applicants with varied interests. Film Studies and a Language (one from French, German, Italian or Spanish) BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: PRJ9 This programme combines the study of film with the opportunity to acquire foreign language skills in your chosen language and the chance to spend a year studying abroad. You will be introduced to a diverse range of film making from across the globe and explore a range of cinematic practices, choosing from areas such as Hollywood, British cinema and, most appropriately, European cinema, which offers you the opportunity to combine your language skills with the study of film. See the core courses list for details of film studies courses; refer to the languages subject entry on Our programmes offer a firm page 111 for more information on these courses. foundation in visual literacy, critical debates and film theory by introducing you to a diverse range of film making and viewing across the globe 98
  • Leona’s Geography perspective Geography ‘Opting to study Geography at Sussex x seemed like an obvious choice with x so x much going for it, and now that I’m here it’s exceeding my expectations. x ‘I’ve been incredibly impressed x with both the number and variety of x opportunities that have come my way, x from a field trip to Vietnam to speakers x from the Royal Geographical Society x discussing funds available for research x projects abroad. x Essentials Why geography? ‘Alongside this the University has x Geographers study people and their physical enabled me to gain additional teaching x What BA geography degrees are there? environments and how economic, social and cultural life varies throughout the world. The subject bridges experience through the Ambassadors x Geography (BA) the physical and social sciences and humanities, and Scheme, which involves going into x Geography and a Language (one from French, German, Italian or Spanish) is studied at scales ranging from the local to the global. local schools to promote geography x Geography and Anthropology University-level geography is an exciting and challenging education. x Geography and Development Studies subject that provides unique insights into the character ‘I’m x entirely content studying at Geography and Sociology of our world and its problems, and equips you with wide- Sussex alongside many other keen x ranging and valuable transferable skills. and x interesting students and staff who What BSc geography degrees are there? consistently support, challenge and x Geography (BSc) Why geography at Sussex? make learning an exciting experience.’ Geography with Ecology • Excellence in teaching: geography at Sussex achieved top grades in all categories in the last Leona Purvis What A levels do I need? (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications governmental assessment (2004). information, see pages 159-162) • Excellence in research: our research output is Typical offer ABB-BBB classified by the independent research assessment exercise panel as having both national and For BSc programmes, A/AS levels (or equivalent) must international importance. All of our faculty are include a science subject (Geography is regarded as a research active in their chosen fields of expertise. science) • Flexibility and choice: our degrees are designed to let For programmes including languages, see page 112 you develop your own interests as you progress, the for information about entry requirements choice of subjects increasing with each successive What else do I need? year – and you can mix and match human and GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, grade C physical geography options if you wish. What qualities should I bring? • Unique field-trip opportunities: we place great Intellectual curiosity; open-mindedness; creative importance on the development of practical skills thinking; commitment and, to that end, currently offer one of the most Fees ambitious choice of field-work destinations of any UK See pages 166-167 for information on fees geography department. In recent years, our students have visited Arctic Canada, California, Kenya, English language requirements Morocco, Vietnam, Thailand and the Seychelles. IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English • Great learning environment: our teaching and language requirements, see page 162 research facilities are first rate and in a great location. We believe that this combination makes for Foundation year for non-EU students If your qualifications (including English language) do not a distinctive and stimulating learning environment. Keme’s yet meet our entry requirements for admission direct to What sort of career could I have? career perspective the first year of these degree programmes, we offer an With their broad range of numeric, literary, practical ‘Sussex’s uniquely alternative x international foundation year entry route. See page 30 and resource-management skills, Sussex geographers intellectual agenda was excellent x for details are well-equipped to enter a wide range of careers preparation for working on a x in the private and public sectors. Recent geography How do I find out more? graduates have left Sussex to work in such fields as: challenging TV news programme. x For more information, contact the admissions tutor: The x things our long-suffering tutors E ug.admissions@geography.sussex.ac.uk • overseas development (including aid agencies, tried to instil in us – turning issues x T +44 (0)1273 877289 charities and VSO) on x their heads and analysing them F +44 (0)1273 677196 from unlikely angles – we and our x • Geographical Information Systems (GIS), remote Department of Geography, Chichester 1, editors now battle with on a daily x sensing and cartography University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ, UK basis. Studying Geography was a great x www.sussex.ac.uk/geography • civil service, parliament and local government Trojan horse for me to indulge in pretty x When can I visit? • ecological and environmental consultancy. much whatever academic endeavour x Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and Employers have included Natural England (formerly floated my boat. I really did enjoy my x 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. English Nature), the Environment Agency, and undergraduate time at Sussex.’ Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors various water companies or call 01273 876787 Keme Nzerem • social research and political lobbying Reporter and Presenter, Channel 4 News • urban planning and surveying • marketing, advertising and journalism • accountancy and banking • many of our graduates have gone on to study for higher qualifications (including Masters and PhDs/ DPhils) in a range of vocational and academic disciplines, or embarked on further training to enter the teaching or nursing professions. 99
  • BA core courses Geography Year 1 The Dynamic Earth; Environmental Management and Sustainable Development; Human Geography; Introduction to Geographical Methods and Statistics; Geographies of Development and Inequality; and The Natural Environment Year 2 Cultural Geographies; Culture, Race and Ethnicity; Environmental and Climatic Change; Environmental Perspectives on Development; European and International Migration; Geography Field Class; Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing; Geomorphology; Historical Geographies; Research Skills in Human Geography; and Social Geography. Final year Geography Undergraduate Thesis Geography options from: Coastal Processes and Coastal Management; Contemporary Climatic Change; Contemporary Second-year field class to the Seychelles. As part of European Migration; Cultures of Degrees their two-week visit, students undertake a range of Colonialism; Environment, Ecology conservation and biodiversity project work in a variety of Geography (BA) and Development; Geographies coastal, rainforest and marine habitats BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: L700 of Resistance; Industrial Change This degree provides an integrated study of the and Regional Development; Karst How will I learn? relationships between human societies and cultures Landscapes and Management; At Sussex we deliberately vary the mode of delivery and the earth’s environment, and of differences Labour Geographies and Work of courses so that you experience different learning in cultures, politics, economies, landscapes and Migration; Migration in Japan and styles. Lectures and seminars might be combined with environments across the world. It covers all the main East Asia; Palaeoenvironments workshops, field work, tutorials or practical classes; aspects of human and physical geography, as well as and Human Impact; Polar Regions student-led seminars are features of some courses, as environmental studies. As your degree progresses, you are small-group tutorials. Faculty also make extensive and Environmental Change; can specialise in certain aspects of the discipline, or use of computer facilities, often making slides, audio Rural Change in Britain; Soil take courses that give you a solid grounding in a range of podcasts and other lecture resources available for Properties, Use and Management; topics, skills and approaches to geography. student download from dedicated e-learning course Sustaining Rural Livelihoods websites. Year 1 courses introduce the main issues that form in Developing Countries; and the core of human, physical and environmental Transnationalism and Identity. Similarly, modes of assessment also vary and – geography. They are also designed to introduce you to depending on the course taken – can include learning the intellectual demands of university-level study and If you take geography as part of a diaries, practical reports, in-class tests and small-group to develop the skills needed to deal with theory and presentations, in combination with more conventional joint degree, you spend about half data, and work individually and in groups, including essays and unseen examinations. of your time on each subject. preliminary fieldwork, and to present your work in What will I achieve? various ways. • Knowledge and understanding of modern geography, You also choose complementary course options drawn its main research interests and current issues. from related subjects such as anthropology, cultural • The ability to situate your geographical knowledge in studies, international relations, and development its wider philosophical, social and practical context, studies. These courses give you greater breadth and allowing you to understand the nature of contemporary optionality in your studies. Alternatively, you may wish world problems, such as underdevelopment, ethnic to substitute language skills courses for some course conflict, urban social exclusion, and the global options. warming debate, and the policies designed to deal In year 2 you pursue your own interests, within the with them. context of human (social, cultural and historical) • An understanding of the nature of the relationships geography. The Research Skills courses run through and processes that shape the human and physical the year and prepare you for your field trip (normally characteristics of places and how such places become held during the Easter vacation) and your final-year connected to and differentiated from each other. undergraduate thesis. • Experience of research-project design, field-work In year 3 you specialise in specific areas of geographical skills, data collection and analysis in human, physical study, choosing from the list of options. You also and environmental geography. develop your own individual research project, where you are expected to employ skills and concepts acquired • Skills in written and oral communication, IT (for throughout your degree, and which is assessed through example, the use of GIS), numeracy, cartography and an undergraduate thesis. learning techniques. See the BA core courses list on this page for more • The ability to learn and reflect, abstract and synthesise information. material, reason clearly, judge evidence and evaluate theories. 100
  • BSc core courses Geography Year 1 The Dynamic Earth; Environmental Management and Sustainable Development; Human Geography; Introduction to Geographical Methods and Statistics; Geographies of Development and Inequality; and The Natural Environment Year 2 Research Skills in Physical Geography; Geomorphology; Social Geography; Environmental and Climatic Change; Geography Field Class; Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing; Human Evolution; Wildlife and Habitat Conservation; and Environmental Perspectives on Development. Final year Geography Undergraduate Thesis Geography options from: Coastal Processes and Coastal Management; Contemporary Climatic Change; Contemporary European Migration; Cultures of Colonialism; Environment, Ecology and Development; Geographies of Resistance; Industrial Change Laboratory and field work equip geography students with Geography and a Language (one from and Regional Development; Karst both practical and theoretical skills French, German, Italian or Spanish) Landscapes and Management; BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: LR7Y Labour Geographies and Work Geography (BSc) In this degree you explore the relationships between BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: F801 Migration; Migration in Japan and culture and the environment, with particular emphasis This programme allows you to study for a specialist East Asia; Palaeoenvironments on Europe within a global setting. physical geography degree. It provides an enhanced and Human Impact; Polar Regions Year 1 courses introduce the core areas of geography level of field and laboratory science skills compared and Environmental Change; Rural with other geography degrees. You also acquire an and university-level language skills in your chosen Change in Britain; Soil Properties, understanding of the origins of the earth, and develop language, set within its appropriate European social Use and Management; Sustaining detailed knowledge of earth surface processes and and cultural context. In year 2 you take further courses Rural Livelihoods in Developing human interactions with those processes. from each subject, following your interests in geography Countries; and Transnationalism and developing your language skills. You spend year 3 In year 1, you are introduced to physical, human and and Identity. at a mainland European university studying geography environmental geography. You can also choose from and taking courses relevant to the culture and society of an array of options that concentrate either on the If you take geography with a the host country. In your final year you can draw from a environmental sciences, or the field of ecology and minor subject, you spend about range of geography options and develop ideas relating conservation. Selected human geography options three-quarters of your time on to your geography undergraduate thesis, which requires (social, cultural and historical) are also available. In geography and one quarter on research and presentation skills. In your language addition, you are introduced to geographical methods your minor subject. studies, you continue learning about the language, of data collection. culture and society of your chosen nation. In year 2, you take the more advanced courses of See the BA core courses list on page 100 for details of Geomorphology, Environmental and Climatic Change geography courses; refer to the languages at Sussex and Geographical Information Systems and Remote subject entry on page 111 for more information on Sensing. You will also take Research Skills in Physical these courses. Geography and a field trip (normally overseas), both of which develop your observational, practical, analytical Geography and Anthropology and presentational skills. Your options will continue to BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LL76 develop your interests in the environmental, ecological This degree brings together two disciplines with a strong or conservational fields; you also have the opportunity intellectual link stretching back over 100 years. You to combine these with one or more human geography study relationships between human societies and options. cultures and the earth’s environment, looking at differences in cultures, politics, economies, landscapes In your final year, you specialise in specific areas of and environments across the world. study that build on the topics of interest that you have developed over the previous two years, drawing from Year 1 courses introduce broad theoretical issues that a wide range of specialist geography options. At the form the cores of both anthropology and geography. same time, you will employ skills and concepts acquired In year 2 you take the geography core courses, while throughout your degree to carry out an individual in anthropology you take a set of four core courses research project (supervised by a member of faculty) focusing on power, inequality and identity. Your final that forms the framework for the production of your year allows you to specialise in specific areas of study. undergraduate thesis. Your options in each subject focus on the analysis of society, space, culture and environment; you develop See the BSc core courses list on this page for more your research skills while deepening your specialist information. knowledge. See the BA core courses list on page 100 for details of geography courses; refer to the anthropology subject entry on page 43 for more information on these courses. 101
  • Sam’s Geography perspective ‘Studying for the BA in Geography x at x Sussex has enabled me to get to grips with a diverse range of skills x through a varied selection of courses. x From a thorough base in first-year x Human Geography, through to more x scientific analysis in third-year x Palaeoenvironments and Human x Impact, course flexibility enables you x to x build a rich geographical portfolio. ‘The Department benefits from x faculty who offer expertise on myriad x geographical subdisciplines, reflected x in x the high standard of research they produce. x ‘When conducting my own work, a x significant amount of support was x available in the form of technological x resources, abundant literature and x helpful staff. The Geography Resource x Centre, for example, provided me x with a unique hub for reference x and x facilities while simply being a relaxing place to discuss issues with x colleagues. x ‘Students taking a geography degree x at x Sussex can look forward to a level of x choice and flexibility in their degree programme that nurtures confidence x when looking ahead to post-university x Students on the Vietnam field class gain first-hand experience of mountain geomorphology, land use and careers.’ management near Sapa, close to the Chinese border in northwest Vietnam Sam Mortimore Geography and Development Studies Geography with Ecology BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LL79 BSc (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: F800 In this degree you explore the relationships between This degree programme offers you a combination that geography and development studies, including issues is relevant to the growing challenges of conservation of economic development, cultural change and the and resource management, with specialist training in a environment in a global setting. variety of environmental, developmental and ecological issues. You spend approximately 75 per cent of your Year 1 geography courses introduce you to human, time on geography and 25 per cent on ecology. You physical and environmental geography, while creating combine theoretical insights with field and laboratory a bridge between geography and development skills, with considerable emphasis on applied topics and studies. The first-year development studies courses fieldwork. focus on colonialism and postcolonialism, culture, and development. In year 2 you take further courses The geography courses in year 1 introduce you to from each subject, following your own interests and human, physical and environmental geography. developing your research skills. Your final year allows You also take Darwinian Evolution, Diversity of Life, you to specialise, taking geography options and and Ecological Interactions. special topics in development studies. You deepen In year 2 you take Geomorphology, Environmental and Peter’s your knowledge and skills, and draw on themes Climatic Change, and a suite of courses introducing you career perspective broached in the second year. You also undertake a to contemporary issues in ecology and conservation. geography undergraduate thesis, requiring in-depth You also choose an option in the spring and summer ‘Since graduating with my geography x individual research. terms. The geography field trip develops other skills degree from Sussex I’ve started my x See the BA core courses list on page 100 for details of (eg observation, data collection and analysis, and own company, joined the board of two x geography courses; refer to the development studies presentation). charities, been a senior advisor to the x subject entry on page 71 for more information on these Government, and I’m now a director of x In the final year you select three special options for courses. a x large third-sector organisation. It’s intensive study, two of which must be geography, and Geography and Sociology one of advanced ecology or a conservation option. You been a pretty varied career path, but x BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: LL73 also work on a supervised geography undergraduate the x understanding of the relationship This degree allows you to explore the links between thesis topic of your choice. between people and places that I x these disciplines, as spatial issues have become gained in my time at Sussex provided x See the BSc core courses list on page 101 for details of prominent in sociology and social issues are pertinent me x with the perfect grounding for all geography courses; refer to the environmental science, to geography. of x these vocations – from enterprise ecology and conservation subject entry on page 75 for Year 1 courses introduce you to both sociology and more information on these courses. to politics.’ human, physical and environmental geography. Peter Kyle In year 2 you take further courses from each subject, Director of Strategy following your own interests and learning a range of and Enterprise, research techniques. In your final year you build on Aveco the topics covered in the second year and continue developing your research skills through project work. See the BA core courses list on page 100 for details of geography courses; refer to the sociology subject entry on page 154 for more information on these courses. 102
  • Omar’s History perspective History ‘Studying history at Sussex has been x a x dream come true. After teaching English as a foreign language for a few x years, I decided to enrol on a BA in x the exciting discipline of intellectual x history. Sussex was the natural choice – x not x only is its Department of History internationally renowned, but the x University itself was founded upon x a x different approach to knowledge, emphasising interdisciplinary inquiry. x Essentials Why history? ‘My x courses have been varied and Curiosity about the past and how it has shaped us is part engaging, and the electives system x What history degrees are there? of what makes us human. History provides the means to recover and interpret the past and to understand the most has x allowed me to study English History significant areas of human life in a structured intellectual literature, art history, and French x History and a Language (one from French, German, Italian or Spanish) framework. By studying history, we begin to understand alongside my major. The excellent x History and Anthropology the present and learn how to shape our future. faculty also add to the experience – x History and Film Studies being taught by experts whose x History and Philosophy Why history at Sussex? research defines their fields is a x Contemporary History • History at Sussex has long enjoyed an international real x privilege. There are also plenty Contemporary History and Politics reputation for teaching excellence. of opportunities to get involved in x Contemporary History and Sociology • The Department is particularly noted for the range of the x departmental side of things; Intellectual History themes covered and the distinct approaches offered: I x was student rep in the first year History with a Language (French, German, Italian history, contemporary history and intellectual history and x a humanities faculty mentor or Spanish) (see the core courses list on pages 104-105). in my second. Studying at Sussex x Contemporary History with a Language (French, has x given me not only confidence in • Sussex lecturers are distinguished experts in their German, Italian or Spanish) finding a meaningful career, but more x fields. Areas of research include the history of Intellectual History with a Language (French, German, everyday life; the history of social exclusion and importantly, a better understanding of x Italian or Spanish) inequality; and the history of political thought and our world.’ American Studies and History (p42) political culture. Art History and History (p48) • Sussex is strong in early modern, intellectual, and Omar Mizdaq English and History (p90) contemporary history. Our faculty are specialists in What A levels do I need? British, European, African and south Asian history. (For International Baccalaureate and other qualifications • You approach the past, and those who have information, see pages 159-162) interpreted it, through a wide range of sources. Typical offer range AAB-BBB In addition to scholarly books and articles, these include official manuscripts, film and personal For programmes including languages, see page 112 memoirs. for information about entry requirements • Our Library is well resourced and has holdings that What qualities should I bring? are of special interest to historians, such as the Intellectual curiosity; respect for the past; perseverance unique Mass Observation Archive (see and openness to learning; ability to participate in and www.sussex.ac.uk/library/massobs). There contribute to group working are over 60 other rich manuscript and archive Fees collections, relating mostly to 20th-century history See pages 166-167 for information on fees and culture, including: the New Statesman, Rudyard Kipling, and the Bloomsbury collections (including English language requirements many papers of Leonard and Virginia Woolf). IELTS 6.5 overall and not less than 6.0 in both the • There are various opportunities to study abroad as Listening and Writing sections. For alternative English part of your degree, at universities all over Europe. language requirements, see page 162 Where history is studied alongside a language you How do I find out more? take a four-year programme with a year in the country For more information, contact the Department of your chosen language. coordinator: What sort of career could I have? E ug.admissions@history.sussex.ac.uk Our graduates have gone on to careers in: T +44 (0)1273 678899 Cover of Britain by Mass-Observation, F +44 (0)1273 623246 • radio and television published in 1939 Department of History, University of Sussex, • business and industry Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QN, UK • research of all kinds www.sussex.ac.uk/history • journalism and publishing When can I visit? Our open day dates for 2008 are 14 June and • library work 11 October. We also run regular campus tours. • writing and teaching Please book online at www.sussex.ac.uk/visitors • international organisations or call 01273 876787 • law and finance • politics • public service and social work. Recent destinations of our graduates include: • advertising accounts executive • press and publicity assistant • events organiser • freelance broadcast journalist • investment reviewer. 103
  • How will I learn? History and Film Studies Core courses History courses are predominantly taught by lectures BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VP13 History and weekly seminars, where group discussion, based on This programme combines a solid grounding in historical In years 1 and 2 students taking individual research, gives you the opportunity to interact studies with attention to the ‘reading’ of visual images single honours degrees choose closely with fellow students and tutors. in the context of film and the cinematic experience. complementary course options You will explore the interconnections between drawn from related subjects You will have some opportunities to select course options different national institutions and identities and their such as American studies, to reflect your own particular interests, with the guidance representations in a range of visual media, including anthropology, art history, of tutors. painting, photography and film. In addition to taking development studies, English, In addition to formal exams you are assessed by Cinema Studies: Time and Space, Film Theory, and Film philosophy, politics and sociology, coursework, essays and a research dissertation on a topic Genres, you will have the opportunity in your final year to giving you greater breadth in your of your choice. Our aim is to help you to develop a wide work independently on a dissertation of your choice that develops interests and ideas you will have acquired in studies. range of analytical and research skills and to promote competence in oral communication, as well as writing. your first two years of study. History at Sussex is demanding, but students continue to Year 1 See the core courses list for details of history courses; You take a year-long outline prove their ability to meet our high expectations: in recent refer to the film studies subject entry on page 97 for years some 70 per cent of history students have been course corresponding to your more information on these courses. awarded first- or upper-second-class degrees. degree: History, Contemporary History and Philosophy History and Intellectual History What will I achieve? BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VV15 • A sound knowledge of the history of different societies This degree programme enables students to gain insight All students studying history, and peoples. into the tools and procedures of the historian as well either as a single honours or • An appreciation of the diversity of historical specialisms as those of the philosopher. But there are also many as part of a joint degree, take and approaches. philosophical questions and issues that focus on history. The British Isles and Europe Can a historical treatment of a philosophical problem 1500-1900. The first section • The skills to analyse and reflect on key events, ideas, serve as a contribution to its solution? What do we institutions and practices. concentrates on the period 1500- mean by ‘historical context’? Is there a non-historical 1700 and is designed to explore • An ability to express ideas clearly and logically. or a-historical standpoint from which we can judge or evaluate history? What determines the truth or falsity why this era has been dubbed of our interpretations of history? What, if anything, is ‘early modern’ by looking at events Degrees such as the Reformation and the wrong with historical relativism? Several philosophers History that you will have the opportunity to study were English Revolution, themes such BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: V100 convinced of the central significance of history for as witchcraft, gender and The History degree programme has a broad philosophy. Key courses you might consider taking the family, and concepts of chronological scope from the late middle ages up to include: Hegel; 19th- and 20th-Century European the state. The second section, the present. It is designed to develop an awareness Philosophy; Aesthetics; Social and Political Philosophy; entitled The Making of Modernity, of cultural, social, economic and political change. and Heidegger. covers the period 1700-1945 and While focusing on large-scale transformations and considers the impact of events See the core courses list for details of history courses; emphasising long-term change, it also asks how men such as the Enlightenment, refer to the philosophy subject entry on page 138 for and women thought and felt and how they experienced the French Revolution and the more information on these courses. the constraints and possibilities in their lives. The Industrial Revolution alongside degree combines depth with breadth; it allows for Contemporary History themes such as empire, popular the exploration of different time periods and national BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: V301 histories, and provides opportunities for comparative culture and Victorian sexualities. Understanding the most urgent problems and work and intensive research. Using a variety of exciting developments in today’s world demands an approaches, it develops a disciplined yet flexible way of understanding of history. The study of history can help us All history BA students also take thinking that is indispensable to understanding change to frame appropriate questions in order to make sense two additional courses: in any time, place or context. This degree focuses of, for instance, the scepticism of some British people 1 Historical Controversy, in which more closely on British and European history than the towards the euro and the changing nature of British you undertake a critical reading of Contemporary History degree, but it allows you to take identity; the development of racial and ethnic tensions a key historical text, such as the some options from Contemporary History, as well as in South Africa and India; the breakdown of communist Hammonds’ The Rise of Modern from the Intellectual History programme. states in central and eastern Europe; or why women Industry, Fanon’s The Wretched With the permission of the teaching convenor, history across the globe have engaged in different ways in the of the Earth or Tocqueville’s students may also elect to take a special subject from struggle for social equality. These are just some of the The Ancien Régime and the the contemporary history or intellectual history arrays. many areas explored in contemporary history, a degree Revolution. History students not taking joint degrees also do a that equips you to analyse in depth, and with reference 2 Heretics, Witches and Jews, research dissertation on a topic of their choice, normally to many key regions of the world, the great social, which is concerned with religious relating to the special subject. economic, political and cultural changes of the ‘long’ extremism, immigration, 20th century. History and a Language (one from French, human rights, and the ’clash of German, Italian or Spanish) Contemporary history also introduces you to the variety civilisations’ between east BA (Hons), 4 years UCAS Code: VR19 of approaches from which history can be studied, and west. During the first two years of this degree you combine using techniques drawn from political, social and the history and language courses, and you spend your economic history. In addition, the degree considers third year studying at a university abroad. You return to the range of ideas that influence the ways in which Sussex for the final year, where you study history courses historians interpret the past. All are equally important and language options. if we are to grasp any historical question in its entirety. Contemporary historians are therefore encouraged to See the core courses list for details of history courses; study the histories of as many societies as possible refer to the languages subject entry on page 112 for and to make use of the extensive specialist knowledge more information on these courses. Sussex lecturers have about countries such as Britain, History and Anthropology France, Germany, Spain, the US, South Africa and India. BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VL16 You also do a research dissertation on a topic of your During the first two years of this degree you combine choice, normally relating to the special subject. the core history and anthropology courses. In year 3 you See core courses list for more information about pursue an in-depth study of specialised topics drawn contemporary history core courses. from both areas of study: the history core courses; an Anthropology of Religion or Meaning and Power option; and an option from Special Subjects in Anthropology. See the core courses list for details of history courses; refer to the anthropology subject entry on page 43 for more information on these courses. 104
  • Core courses cont’d History Year 2 Time and Place is concerned with key moments in history since the Renaissance. Options include: 1642 English Civil War 1688 The Glorious Revolution 1789 The Fall of the Bastille 1895 The Murder of Bridget Cleary 1929 Great Depression 1930 Indian Civil Disobedience 1936 The Spanish Civil War 1938 Kristallnacht 1942 Holocaust 1963 Sexual Revolution 1989 Berlin Wall 1994 The New South Africa A Short Period of History focuses on aspects of the historical experience of individual countries over relatively short periods of time. You will choose from options ranging from 20th-century Britain and Europe, to modern Africa and India. ‘Themes’ allows you to make a detailed comparative study of societies, events, and ideas. Current options include Empire and Images, European Fascisms, Film and History, The Sixties and Global Cities, Consumption, Race and Human Difference, An illustration of Brighton from A Voyage Round Great Britain by R Ayton, published in 1814, taken from one of and The Sixties. the University of Sussex Library’s collections of rare books Intellectual historians take The Contemporary History and Politics Texts are not just in the form of books: paintings, music European Enlightenment as their BA (Hons), 3 years UCAS Code: VLC2 and buildings, as well as social structures, can all be short period course and Historians interpreted as texts, which inform historians of the During the first two years of this degree you combine the and the Creation of National core contemporary history and politics courses, while in cultures in which they were created. Social te