Sociology - Open Day presentation

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Sociology - Open Day presentation

  1. 1. Sociology
  2. 2. Sociological Level 4, Semester 1 The Imaginations Foundations of Sociology Level 4, Semester 2 Sociology Pathway Level 5, Semester 1 Theorising the Social World Sociology and the Joint Honours Programme Level 5, Semester 2 Life Coursestudents will take six modules in sociology Sociological Analysis Level 6, Semester 1 (options: e.g. Social Applied Social Science Movements or Familes) students will take twosociology modules at Level 4, Sociological Analysis and the rest are optional Level 6, Semester 2 (options: e.g. Class or Human Rights)
  3. 3. Our half degree teaches you a new way of Sociological seeing the world around you, which can be Imaginations uncomfortable and challenging, but also exciting and liberating. Foundations of Sociology This module introduces you to ‘the sociological imagination’ – the way in which sociologists are Theorising the Social able to locate individual lives within patterns of World social relationships. Sociology and theSociological Debates: Does biology or society shape Life Courseour behaviour? Is society characterised by conflict orconsensus?Sociological Topics: Introduces you to different topics Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Race andthat our staff are researching (incl. cosmetic surgery, Ethnicity or Globalization)teenage parenthood & migration)Seminars: Your opportunity to bring debate and topictogether – Is having cosmetic surgery a personal Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Leisure orchoice? Is ‘mothering’ a purely biological process? Social Movements)
  4. 4. SociologicalSociology emerged as a response to sweeping Imaginations social changes roughly 200-250 years ago The ‘big three’ sociologists Marx, Weber and Foundations of Durkheim developed very different Sociologyunderstandings of what these changes meant. Theorising the Social But who cares? We World explore the extent to which these theories Sociology and the are still useful in Life Course explaining contemporary issues Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Race and like climate change, the Ethnicity or Globalization) decline in community, and globalization. Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Leisure or Social Movements)
  5. 5. There are many sociologists who believe that Sociological the world we live in now is very different to Imaginationsthe one described by the classical sociologists Don’t we live in an increasingly Foundations of Sociology‘individualized’ world in which we are free to choose how we live without any of the constraints of class, gender, race etc? Theorising the Social World How do we build a sense of ‘self’ or Sociology and the Life Course identity in such a world? Why do weturn to self-help books, Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Race and cosmetic surgery or Ethnicity or Globalization) new age religion? Are we really any freer Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Leisure or than before? Social Movements)
  6. 6. Have we moved from being trapped in a Sociological ‘life cycle’ to a more fluid ‘life course’? Imaginations How do we Foundations of Sociology negotiate our experiences of Theorising the Social World childhood, youth, work, Sociology and the Life Course ageing and death? Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Race and Ethnicity or Globalization) Please note that this module might be replaced by an alternative: Sociological Analysis (options: e.g. Leisure or “Mobilization, Movements and Protest” Social Movements)
  7. 7. We aim to give you as much choice as possible in Sociologicaldeciding what you study in your final year, with Imaginationsoptions in Hastings and a wider range in Falmer. Thesetwo modules are your opportunity to explore a topicin more depth, building on all the knowledge you have Foundations ofgained so far. You will have the opportunity to decide Sociologyyour own assignment titles. Theorising the Social Students on the Social World Movements module have chosen to focus on movements as diverse as animal rights, Sociology and the Occupy, Lady Gaga’s ‘A Body Life Course Revolution’, the Syrian uprising, and Fathers 4 Justice (left).Students on the Families Sociological Analysisand Parenting module have (options: e.g. Race and (options: e.g. Social Ethnicity or Globalization) Movements or Familes)looked at representationsof ‘good’ and ‘bad’mothers, non-heterosexual Sociological Analysisfamilies, and the supposed (options: e.g. Class orHuman (options: e.g. Class, Human Rights, Social Movements) Rights)decline of the family
  8. 8. The Sociology Strand of the Common Modules Approaches to How to get the most out of the sociology you are reading and writing. LearningSubject Approaches How to do your own research in the real world. This module includes workshops that give students the opportunity to design, conduct and and Practices analyse their own interviews and questionnaires. Learning through Students will have a choice of working within local organizations in Hastings, or finding their own placements. Many find placements where Practice they can draw on and develop their sociological understandings. Your chance to design your own research project from scratch. CurrentResearch Practices sociology students are working on proposals for research on religion in the Faeroe Isles, the Jeremy Kyle Show, and recreational drugs, for example Dissertation You will spend your final year conducting your own research. This can either be literature-based or involve your own ‘real world’ research (which you are encouraged to do). You will receive close supervision from one of the sociology team. Current sociology dissertation students are exploring Valentine’s Day and how we think about love, Rihanna’s music videos, working class interest in politics, the use of the word ‘Mum’, moral panic about the TV programme Skins, and young women’s views on professional women.
  9. 9. The Sociology Team At the Hastings campus you will mainly be taught by James Ormrod, Neil Curry, Steve Brown and Graham Sharp But you will also have guest lectures by other members of the sociology team based at Falmer,Dr James Ormrod including: Mark Erickson, Mark Bhatti, JayneSociology Pathway Leader Raisborough, Natalie Pitimson, Chris Wyatt,j.s.ormrod@brighton.ac.uk Kanwal Mand, and Visiting Professor Peter Dickens. You can check our school’s central website for more information on all our research interests: www.brighton.ac.uk/sass/contact/academic.phpDr Neil Curryn.curry@brighton.ac.uk
  10. 10. WHAT NEXT? SUBJECT COURSE SESSIONS SEE INDIVIDUAL PROGRAMMES SUBJECT ADVICE DESKS BASEMENT, PRIORY SQUARE ACCOMMODATION/FINANCE/CAREERS ADVICE DESKS BASEMENT PRIORY SQUARE CAMPUS BUILDING TOURS FROM: STUDENT LOUNGE AREAS – HAVELOCK ROAD & PRIORY SQUARE NEED HELP? - PLEASE SEE OUR STUDENT AMBASSADORS IN THE BLUE T-SHIRTS

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