School of applied social science - Open day presentation - Oct 2013

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  • {"27":"The kinds of questions we mentioned just now are the sorts of vital questions we consider in class. But if you become a sociology student with us here at Brighton, you will not be provided with quick answers\nRather we will help you to discover how to think about these issues for yourself – to ask questions behind the questions and therefore start to see how sociology can broaden your mind and help you to look at the world in new ways\nAnd the whole sociology team is research active, what does this mean, well it means that when we are not teaching you, we are researching and publishing in our own areas of specialism and we have a wonderfully broad range of specialisms\n- read specialisms out – these are all topics that we as a team are actively involved in research in\n- and in the third year we run options in our specialisms so you get the change to learn everything we know about our topics! \n- and so, in studying sociology at Brighton, you will be taught by experienced and well published reserachers in some of the most contemporary areas within the discipline\n","5":"Our close relationship with the Community and University Partnership Project gives us access to links with community and voluntary sector organisations across the UK and the world.\nOur courses give students the opportunity to develop skills that are required for a wide variety of careers in the private, public and community/voluntary sector. As well as developing knowledge in specific areas such as crime or social policy, students also gain transferable skills such as critical thinking, analytical abilities and reasoning. \nMost of our undergraduate students have the opportunity to gain practical experience of working within a community of voluntary sector organisation during the second or third year of their degree as part of the Community Participation and Development module.\nOur courses give students the opportunity to develop skills that are required for a wide variety of careers in the private, public and community/voluntary sector. As well as developing knowledge in specific areas such as crime or social policy, students also gain transferable skills such as critical thinking, analytical abilities and reasoning. \nMost of our undergraduate students have the opportunity to gain practical experience of working within a community of voluntary sector organisation during the second or third year of their degree as part of the Community Participation and Development module.\nThe Social Science Policy and Research Centre (SSPARC) has a national reputation for research in areas such as health and social care, crime and community safety, and community development. \nIn the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ninety per cent of the school’s submission was rated as of international quality.\nProfessor Peter Squires, professor of criminology and social policy, is one of the UK’s leading academic experts on gun crime was appointed to sit on one of the panels for the national Research Excellence Framework (REF).\nOur students learn to be independent thinkers because they are taught by independent thinkers\n","33":"Not time to talk about modules and detail of content BUT flavour of our ‘thinking big’ approach to psychology\nWe take big view of psy & thinking about human behaviour, and think in terms of its applications.\nDOMAIN? A way of distinguishing between psychological theories in terms of which factors are assumed to be the most significant in determining behaviour. We consider all important, and you will revisit topics and applications in different modules from different perspectives.\nIntra (within the person – cognition, biology, emotional, psychodynamics): APPLICATION: bio-psychology. Study diet, genes, neurochemical activity, blood sugar levels etc. May be interested in sex differences in biological make-up. Likely to diagnose as medical condition such as ADHD and prescribe drug such as Ritalin and/or changes in diet…. \nInterpersonal (between – some versions of social & group psychology, systems theory, some psychoanlytic & developmental) \nApplication e.g.: may look for causes in various interpersonal relationships within the family; conduct separate interviews. MAY still work with and accept ADHD as a diagnosis, but treat it differently: evaluate its impact on parent-child interactions, sibling relationships, and carer dynamics; and mobilize each family member's resources for change. MAY also challenge individualistic understanding of ADHD as ‘inside’ child. May look at gendered nature of relationships to explain high adhd in boys & take into account other social differnces.\nGroup: e.g. social psychology of group processes. Application e.g.\nMay accept adhd diagnosis but look at processes within groups (class room, family, peers) which promote, encourage, or discourage associated behaviour. \nmay look at the class-room dynamics and apply theories and develop research around those: might look at those dynamics which encourage, marginalise, stigmatise disruptive behaviour (or social influences/pressures to conform which instigate ‘bad behaviour’); and try to discover those which encourage better behaviour. This might mean special class sizes or settings, more integration into group work, attention to gender & other social differences. May also look at dynamics within the family: fst here becomes a group approach. So possibility of adhd emerging within group context, not individ.\nSocietal\nApplication: may look at patterns of class, race and gender in attribution of ADHD. cultural psychology may look at cross-cultural or class differences in child rearing patterns. Not just interested in how these social groupings may contribute to causing ADHD, but also question how they play a role in who gets labelled adhd and why. So not necessarily accepting diagnosis; not just about behaviour of boys but of those involved in percieving, diagnosing, treating, managing adhd within broader social structures. Hence interest in:\nmedicalization of problem behaviours in western cultures, moral panics about young boys in the west, cultural influences on what comes to be defined as normal or deviant, politics and economics of education provision (is it cheaper to medicalise individual kids rather than overhaul whole system?).and of pharmaceutical industry (influence in media, medical profession etc.)\n","29":"Studying sociology equips you with a strong set of analysitcal and research skills that equip you for a broad range of careers, and this is to just name but a few directions that our graduates have gone in in recent years\nSo in choosing to study sociology at brighton, you are walking into a friendly, supportive, innovative and research led department, and you will hopefully walk out a with a brilliant degree and get to do this, but also hopefully with this t-shirt on underneath your gown that looks a little like this! \n","7":"Development of our social work courses and of teaching sessions are undertaken by qualified and registered social work lecturers and include regular contributions from social work practitioners, users of services, carers.\nSocial Work teaching is informed by research being undertaken the School. Current research interests among social work staff include child death, complexity theory and social work practice, mental health social work, resilience, social work theory and practice in international contexts.\nLearning in a research active community means students benefit from input of the latest knowledge informed by research. We undertake a great deal of work with practitioners in relation to social work law and staff are particularly experienced in this area.\nOur social work courses offers joint learning sessions with students from nursing, occupational therapy, midwifery, medicine, education and physiotherapy to help prepare you for practice in integrated, multi-professional teams.\nWe will help you to develop a reflective and critical approach to practice and to the knowledge, research and theory which informs it.\n","2":"The majority of social science courses are taught on the Falmer campus. Falmer is close to the South Downs, five miles from Brighton seafront. \nFalmer railway station is a short walk away, and the campus is well served by buses. \nThere is a library, computer pool rooms, a restaurant, a cafe bar and a small shop on the campus. There are also two halls of residence, both offering a high standard of accommodation. \nThe University of Brighton has invested over £100 million in equipment and building in the last decade and another £100 million is planned for the next.\nWe are committed to cutting our carbon footprint by 50% in 5 years.\nMany of our buildings include environmental features including green roofs.\n","52":"Key Point here – Apart from showing a lively research culture and involvement with local criminal justice agencies, lots of these projects involved opportunities for student involvement: experience in interviewing, research field work, data gathering and analysis - sometimes even getting paid for the work (eg the CCTV, ASB, neighbourhood wardens and fire safety projects)\n","41":"Next slide: Talking of Crime Control… challenge question to the audience - Is crime rising or falling\n","8":"The Social Work degree leads to a generic social work qualification after which you can choose to work in a number of specialisms. For example, with children, families and young people, in services for adults (with older people, people with learning disabilities, hospital settings), with users of mental health services, or as part of a youth offending team.\nThe course involves mandatory practice in approved placements in social care and social work agencies in years 2 and 3. \nWe have close working relationships with statutory social work services and service providers in the private, voluntary and independent sector, and work with them to develop placements across Sussex. Placements have to meet the current regulatory requirements of having experience of different service user groups and the statutory tasks of social work.\nThe placements available vary each year but have to date included: Children and family placements in fostering and adoption , child protection services and Schools ; Adult services/ community care placements and placements in mental health and substance misuse teams\n","3":"We specialise in applied learning. This means that the theories studied within each discipline are used to look at how real problems in the wider world can be overcome. \nOur interdisciplinary approach to learning allows our students to develop a broad knowledge base and a wide variety of transferable skills. \nResearch reflected in our undergraduate modules\nLearning in a research active community means that our students benefit from the input of the latest knowledge informed by research.\n","31":"Psychologists: Work with passionate and dedicated lecturers who are active professionals in their respective fields, researching and publishing their work on a national and international stage. As well as dedicated lecturers in psychology, we are all active psychological researchers, with many books, journal articles and collaborative research projects between us, specialising in cultural, social, critical and counselling psychology, with a shared interest in the interface between psychology and other social science disciplines. We are an experienced, enthusiastic and established team of psychologists, central to the success of the School of Applied Social Sciences, with an active stake in the development of psychology education and research against a backdrop of profound global change.\nPsy literacy: The core skills of a psychology education with us encourage the development of ‘psychological literacy’: the ability to provide insight and be reflective about others’ and your own emotions, behaviour, mental processes and social interactions; and the capacity to apply psychological knowledge and principles in all walks of life from personal relationships to social problems.\n• Establish a wealth of core skills vital to personal growth and employability as well as furthering your knowledge of the subject.\nStudy with Sociology or Criminology – sister disciplines – help provide bigger picture of explanations & understanding of human behaviour\nAccredited by the British Psychological Society\n• Achieve professional accreditation in psychology completion of this degree confers eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS). \nBasis for a career in psychology\nDegrees accredited by the BPS allow graduates to train to become, for example, forensic or occupational psychologists, provided that the minimum standard of qualification of second class honours is achieved. \nAnd more besides: \nThe development of core skills (such as effectual communication, comprehension, teamwork, computer literacy, problem solving, sensitivity to personal and contextual factors, undertaking research, and making critical judgments and evaluations) runs parallel to establishing a substantial knowledge base in psychology and sociology or criminology.\nThese skills will prepare you exceptionally well for a number of careers and many are highly valued by employers. The value of placements lies in the development and enhancement of core skills. \nPsychology graduates work in diverse fields which stretch well beyond the traditional psychological professions, providing expertise in areas such as ergonomics, coaching, conflict management, attitude change, decision making and group work, and skills in carrying out observations, surveys, interviews, and experiments. Proven psychological literacy is a valuable asset.\n","4":"We specialise in applied learning. This means that the theories studied within each discipline are used to look at how real problems in the wider world can be overcome. \nOur interdisciplinary approach to learning allows our students to develop a broad knowledge base and a wide variety of transferable skills. \nResearch reflected in our undergraduate modules\nLearning in a research active community means that our students benefit from the input of the latest knowledge informed by research.\n","32":"You will learn about the range of theoretical perspectives underpinning psychology, landmark and contemporary research,and practical aspects of tried and tested methods. Broad curriculum – biological, cognitive, social, psy res methods, individual differences, history and conceptual issues. \nYou will also learn to think beyond any neat and tidy textbook understanding of whom and what psychology is for.\nHistory: and that has its own intriguing and controversial history. Arguments, fights, accusations, controversial methods & research accepted ‘facts’ we would now consider offensive, crude simply wrong (women shouldn’t think for themselves, quick & easy lobotomies were safe and desirable, eugenics & euthanasia was a good option to stop disabled people from breeding, slavery justified by superior intelligence, homosexuality is an illness) as well as cutting-edge insight and applications which can improve lives (mental health) , help solve real-life problems (prejudice), \ne.g. census description of what we call mental illness. In 1871 (See 1870 Act) the established column about disability also asked if the person was "imbecile or idiot" or "lunatic". The disability column continued until 1911 (not 1921), but the wording was varied in 1891 and 1901.\nThought of as serious, scientific categories then. Now we have the DSM-5: 100s of categories. Progress?\nCutting-edge: BPS encourages us to develop new areas in psy and we take that challenge very seriously – you will be able to study areas such as psy of environmental problems, climate change denial etc.; psy & technology, role of social networking in developing self-identiy etc. We provide an academic environment in which the curious and critical psychologist can develop and flourish. Throughout the course you will be encouraged and expected to engage with psychology literature and research and to deepen your understanding of the personal and social relevance of this lively and contested field of study. At its heart the course will support the development of student’s capacity to understand, apply and reflect upon the past, present and future of psychology, with the academic benefit of studying a related social science discipline alongside.\nYou will approach psychology as a discipline that has enormous contemporary personal and social relevance. You will learn things about human behaviour, about us, you that will confirm common sense, but it can confound it too. Examples…\nThe bigger picture: you will learn that psy can contribute to and learn from other disciplines in addressing the big questions about human existence in complex societies; that psy is about what happens within people, between them, in relation to group and broader social and cultural dynamics. Example is next slide\n"}
  • School of applied social science - Open day presentation - Oct 2013

    1. 1. Why choose applied social science at the University of Brighton? Professor Philip Haynes Head of School
    2. 2. Facilities and campuses in outstanding locations
    3. 3. What is distinctive about our courses? • Applied Learning • Interdisciplinary research led teaching • Courses are developed with local and global connections • Transferable skills Student volunteering for CCHF (Children’s Country Holiday Fund, Hassocks
    4. 4. Interdisciplinary •Wide range of subjects and applications •Joint Honours and Professional Courses •Single honours courses with the full benefits of our applied, and interdisciplinary approaches •http://www.brighton.ac.uk/snm/fle/launch-event.php
    5. 5. Community partnerships and transferable skills •Community and University Partnership Project. •Skills development •Practical experience of working within a community of voluntary sector organisation “It allows students to use their skills and knowledge, see local practice in action and relate this to theory. Students develop their ideas as reflective practitioners. Also, the contacts that some students make can lead to future work upon graduation.” Liz Cunningham Course Leader
    6. 6. Why choose social work at the University of Brighton?
    7. 7. Innovative and relevant • Learning and teaching delivered by qualified and registered social work lecturers with contributions from social work practitioners, users of services, carers. • Social Work teaching is informed by research • Inter-professional learning. • You will develop a reflective and critical approach to practice. • You need the right blend of experience and academic ability
    8. 8. Career-focussed - practice based learning • The Social Work degree leads to a generic social work qualification after which you can choose to work in a number of specialisms. • The course involves mandatory practice in approved placements in social care and social work agencies in years 2 and 3. • We have close working relationships with statutory social work services and service providers in the private, voluntary and independent sector, and work with them to develop placements across Sussex.
    9. 9. Social Policy
    10. 10. Inequality: Is this fair?
    11. 11. Poverty and hunger
    12. 12. Transport and the environment
    13. 13. Housing and wealth
    14. 14. Who pays for it all?
    15. 15. Politics
    16. 16. Our approach Our approach to the study of politics begins with groups and movements that are often regarded as outsiders, together with their ideas, interests and demands and only then moves towards understandings of the formal political system. Themes, which run throughout the course, are the development of a critical understanding of democracy, the issue of access to power and political resources and the unequal distribution of power. Important areas studied will be social movements, environmentalism, issue groups and human 'rights'.
    17. 17. What you study What is Politics?/Politics in Brighton Political Ideas UK Government Comparative Politics Environmental Politics Global Political Architecture
    18. 18. Courses with Politics BA (hons) Politics and Social Policy BA (hons) Politics and Sociology
    19. 19. Career Opportunities Politics graduates are found in a wide range of careers, from management, through journalism, the public sector, campaigning, research and indeed politics, at the local, national and international level. This course will also prepare students for careers working in advocacy groups and governmental and nongovernmental international organisations.
    20. 20. Substance Misuse Interventions in the School of Applied Social Science Skills Theory BA (Hons) Criminology and Substance Misuse Interventions Practice
    21. 21. 1. Skills • Level 4 (Year 1) SS402 Establishing and Maintaining Relationships in the Substance Misuse Treatment Context • Level 5 (Year 2) SS503 Substance Misuse Interventions • Level 6 (Year 3) SS613 Key Working and Care Planning
    22. 22. 2. Theory • Level 4 (Year 1) SS431 Introduction to Theories of Addiction and Substance Use • Level 5 (Year 2) SS528 Critical Analysis (Health and Well Being) • Level 6 (Year 3) • SS612 Level 6 Project
    23. 23. 3. Practice • Level 5 (Year 2) SS522 Placement (Short) • Level 6 (Year 3) SS614 Placement (Extended) National Occupational Standards
    24. 24. Employability
    25. 25. Sociology What is Sociology? Definition: The study of how society is organised, why societies change, and how we experience everyday life.
    26. 26. What caused riots? What impact does your gender, religion or ethnic background have on your life? Does class actually mean anything anymore? Why do we protest? Have You Ever Wondered? How does globalisation impact on you and me? Are societies becoming the How has social media changed the world? Why is plastic surgery so popular? How far does the media impact on our personal lifestyles?
    27. 27. How Will I Be Taught? No quick answers – Our aim is to help you to build up your analytical skills to address these kinds of questions yourself All of the sociology team are research active, with interests across many areas: Families & Parenting OBESITY CHILDHOOD HUMAN RIGHTS Religion DEATH CLIMATE CHANGE SOCIAL MOVEMENTS ENVIRONMENT Lifestyle media THE INTERNET GLOBALISATION
    28. 28. Sociology • Year 1 Foundations, Social Inequalities, Globalisation & Research Methods • Year 2 Contemporary social theory Gender/Life course studies Culture, media & identity Protest and social movements Social Research & Placement • Year 3: options eg o Death; Childhood; Families o Religion; Leisure; Environment o Life-Style Media; the Body o Dissertation (10,000 words)
    29. 29. What do sociology graduates do? You will graduate with a strong set of analytical and research skills that equip you for a broad range of careers, for example: Education, Police, Journalism, Politics, civil service, public relations, research
    30. 30. Introducing Applied Psychology And why study it here?
    31. 31. Applied Psychology at the University of Brighton
    32. 32. Applied Psychology at the University of Brighton
    33. 33. Thinking big, thinking applied Application: explaining why a school child is persistently excluded for aggressive & disruptive behaviour
    34. 34. Criminology
    35. 35. Criminology courses BA (Hons) Law and Criminology BA (Hons) Criminology (Single Subject) BA (Hons) Criminology and Sociology BA (Hons) Criminology and Social Policy BA (Hons) Applied Psychology & Criminology BA (Hons) Substance Misuse Interventions & Criminology
    36. 36. Level One: Welcome to Criminology Criminology In Action From Crime Scene to Court Room An examination of the criminal justice process, policing, evidence handling, Forensic issues, Investigation, police practices, case construction, CPS, Trial and prosecution
    37. 37. Level One Explaining Crime and Criminals An exploration into the ways in which crime is explained and accounted for and applying these accounts to particular offenders and particular crimes rs cke hton ro and of Brig s Mod attle b The
    38. 38. The Great Train Robbery 1963 Explaining Criminality Manchester Shooting: September 2012
    39. 39. Level One: Penal Policy and Offender Management Exploring the work of the criminal justice system – postsentence: including Prison, the prison service and penal policy, rehabilitation and offender management, probation and punishment in the community, services for victims
    40. 40. Level One: Criminological Theory Accounting for the range of ways in which crime has been explained,: classical theories emphasising choice and responsibility, the rise of scientific theories addressing biological, psychological and social causation. Concluding with more contemporary theories – labelling theory, critical realism, and cultural theory
    41. 41. Level Two: [1] Criminology and Crime Control Linking the explanation for crime with the historical effort to design the means of preventing or deterring it: If deterrence is the key how well did the death penalty deter, if social deprivation is an underlying factor how well has social progress curbed crimogenic influences… does surveillance work, can we “design crime out”
    42. 42. 30 Year UK Crime Trend A thirty year low in crime
    43. 43. Level Two: Critical Perspectives on Criminal Justice sociological Influence (class, gender, race and culture) generated critical theories of criminalisation, ‘punitiveness’ and race and gender violence.
    44. 44. Black hands White bars ?
    45. 45. Level Three: [1] Cross-Cultural Criminology Ideas about crime and justice can differ greatly from society to society – from societies where the death penalty is still practiced, to debates about carrying a Gun for self-defence. Similarly, some cultures do not have a notion of domestic violence or they take quite different approaches to drugs or alcohol. Florida Halts Executions After Botched One Lasted 34 Minutes
    46. 46. Level Three: [2] Global Issues: Crime, Power & Harm
    47. 47. Level Three: [3] Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Optional themes based upon key issues and research: potential topics include: Dealing with Powerful offenders; Prison & Prisoners, Policing & Society, Youth Justice, Domestic violence, Offender Management, Victims & Victimology.
    48. 48. Level Three: [4] Contemporary Topics in Crime and Society Optional themes based upon key issues and research: potential topics include: Riots & Protest; Gangs; Gender and Violence; Media, Culture and Criminology; Environmental Crimes.
    49. 49. Criminological Research in the School of Applied Social Science
    50. 50. Criminology Research Projects in the School of Applied Social Sciences  Anti-social behaviour enforcement  Services for victims of domestic violence Arrest Diversion Project  Policing Political Protest Community Fire Safety  Police Interviewing  Community Safety on Housing Estates Young People and Vehicle-taking  Brighton’s Policing Priorities Neighbourhood Wardens  Prison Health Audit  Pupil Misbehaviour in Schools Evaluating the effectiveness of CCTV Policing, communities and Youthful Disorder Homelessness, Begging and Street Drinking Provision of Drug and Alcohol Services
    51. 51. Opportunities for Students Valuable research interviewing experiences on School Projects (previous slide) Year 2: Community Placement Sussex Police : Special Constables, Analyst Support Victim support (and others) volunteering Sussex Pathways (HMP Lewes: young offender mentoring project); mentoring qualification and experience Student Exchange scheme
    52. 52. You don’t have to be a criminologist to come to the Criminology Film Club... Criminology Film Club NEXT FEATURE COPLAND Mayfield 129 Tuesday Oct. 4th 6pm

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