Sass open day october 2012 final
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  • We specialise in applied learning. This means that the theories studied within each discipline are used to look at how real problems in the wider world can be overcome. Our interdisciplinary approach to learning allows our students to develop a broad knowledge base and a wide variety of transferable skills. Research reflected in our undergraduate modules Learning in a research active community means that our students benefit from the input of the latest knowledge informed by research.
  • We specialise in applied learning. This means that the theories studied within each discipline are used to look at how real problems in the wider world can be overcome. Our interdisciplinary approach to learning allows our students to develop a broad knowledge base and a wide variety of transferable skills. Research reflected in our undergraduate modules Learning in a research active community means that our students benefit from the input of the latest knowledge informed by research.
  • Our close relationship with the Community and University Partnership Project gives us access to links with community and voluntary sector organisations across the UK and the world. Our courses give students the opportunity to develop skills that are required for a wide variety of careers in the private, public and community/voluntary sector. As well as developing knowledge in specific areas such as crime or social policy, students also gain transferable skills such as critical thinking, analytical abilities and reasoning. Most of our undergraduate students have the opportunity to gain practical experience of working within a community of voluntary sector organisation during the second or third year of their degree as part of the Community Participation and Development module. Our courses give students the opportunity to develop skills that are required for a wide variety of careers in the private, public and community/voluntary sector. As well as developing knowledge in specific areas such as crime or social policy, students also gain transferable skills such as critical thinking, analytical abilities and reasoning. Most of our undergraduate students have the opportunity to gain practical experience of working within a community of voluntary sector organisation during the second or third year of their degree as part of the Community Participation and Development module. The Social Science Policy and Research Centre (SSPARC) has a national reputation for research in areas such as health and social care, crime and community safety, and community development. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ninety per cent of the school’s submission was rated as of international quality. Professor Peter Squires, professor of criminology and social policy, is one of the UK’s leading academic experts on gun crime was appointed to sit on one of the panels for the national Research Excellence Framework (REF). Our students learn to be independent thinkers because they are taught by independent thinkers
  • Development of our social work courses and of teaching sessions are undertaken by qualified and registered social work lecturers and include regular contributions from social work practitioners, users of services, carers. Social Work teaching is informed by research being undertaken the School. Current research interests among social work staff include child death, complexity theory and social work practice, mental health social work, resilience, social work theory and practice in international contexts. Learning in a research active community means students benefit from input of the latest knowledge informed by research. We undertake a great deal of work with practitioners in relation to social work law and staff are particularly experienced in this area. Our social work courses offers joint learning sessions with students from nursing, occupational therapy, midwifery, medicine, education and physiotherapy to help prepare you for practice in integrated, multi-professional teams. We will help you to develop a reflective and critical approach to practice and to the knowledge, research and theory which informs it.
  • Regulatory functions are planned to move to a renamed Health Professions Council in July 2012. The course is delivered in partnership with local agencies providing social work and caring services (Brighton & Hove City Council, East Sussex County Council, West Sussex County Council), with users of services and with carers. Our social work staff are experienced, qualified and registered social workers who undertake research, as well as being teachers. For example: Dr Chris Warren Adamson has undertaken extensive research into family centres and is researching the application of complexity theory to child care practice. Dr Julia Stroud has undertaken extensive research into child homicide, and is currently researching Community Treatment Orders under the Mental Health Act, as well as researching complexity theory and child care practice also. Jem Price, senior lecturer, is undertaking research on the purpose and transferability of social work in an international context.
  • The Social Work degree leads to a generic social work qualification after which you can choose to work in a number of specialisms. For example, with children, families and young people, in services for adults (with older people, people with learning disabilities, hospital settings), with users of mental health services, or as part of a youth offending team. The course involves mandatory practice in approved placements in social care and social work agencies in years 2 and 3. We have close working relationships with statutory social work services and service providers in the private, voluntary and independent sector, and work with them to develop placements across Sussex. Placements have to meet the current regulatory requirements of having experience of different service user groups and the statutory tasks of social work. The placements available vary each year but have to date included: Children and family placements in fostering and adoption , child protection services and Schools ; Adult services/ community care placements and placements in mental health and substance misuse teams
  • 87% overall student satisfaction rate for social work (2011 National Student Survey) Learning on the course involves the extensive use of actual and simulated case material and problem-based learning helps you prepare for practice. Our students are supported in their learning by regular individual and small group tutorials. All students have a personal tutor. Students meet with their personal tutors individually on a regular basis to discuss academic and practice development. Practice on placements is assessed according to the National Occupational Standards for Social Work , but this will change with developments from the Reform Board. Students have allocated supervisors and assessors on placement, from whom they receive support and supervision.

Transcript

  • 1. Why choose applied social science at theUniversity of Brighton?Professor Philip HaynesHead of School
  • 2. Facilities and campuses in outstanding locations• The majority of social science courses are taught on the Falmer campus. Falmer is close to the South Downs, five miles from Brighton seafront.• Falmer railway station is a short walk away, and the campus is well served by buses.• There is a library, computer pool rooms, a restaurant, a cafe bar and a small shop on the campus. There are also two halls of residence, both offering a high standard of accommodation.• The University of Brighton has invested over £100 million in equipment and building in the last decade and another £100 million is planned for the next.• We are committed to cutting our carbon footprint by 50% in 5 years.• Many of our buildings include environmental features including green roofs.
  • 3. What is distinctive about our courses?• Applied Learning• Interdisciplinary• Courses are developed with the local and global communities• Transferable skills• World standard research
  • 4. Interdisciplinary• Wide range of subjects and applications• Joint Honours and Professional Courses• Development of some single honours courses from 2013-14
  • 5. Community partnerships and transferable skills•Community and University Partnership Project.•Skills development•Practical experience of working within a community of voluntary sectororganisation during the second or third year of their degree.As senior lecturer Liz Cunningham explains, students taking the modulebenefit in a number of ways: “It allows students to use their skills and knowledge, see local practice in action and relate this to theory. Students develop their ideas as reflective practitioners. Also, the contacts that some students make can lead to future work upon graduation.”
  • 6. Research into the curriculum • The Social Science Policy and Research Centre (SSPARC) has a national reputation for research in areas such as health and social care, crime and community safety, and social identity and community development. • In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ninety per cent of the school’s submission was rated as of international quality. • Professor Peter Squires, professor of criminology and social policy, is one of the UK’s leading academic experts on gun crime was appointed to sit on one of the panels for the national Research Excellence Framework (REF). • Researchers make dynamic contributions into teaching • Our students learn to be independent thinkers because they are taught by independent thinkers
  • 7. Excellence in teaching and support• Teaching rated as excellent by external examiners and professional bodies.• NSS (2012) result for teaching on my course was 88% for the undergraduate programme as a whole (The national average was 86)• Academics nominated for Students’ Union Excellence Awards in 2012: ACHIEVEMENT AWARD - The tutor who has helped me to achieve more than I ever thought possible Dr Chris Wyatt, Dr Daren Britt, Dr Dawn Stephen, Dr Denise Martin, Dr Jayne Raisborough, Dr Mark Erickson, Marylynn Fyvie-Gauld, Matt Follett, Neil Curry, Rob Raeburn TEACHING AWARD FOR ACADEMIC ENGAGEMENT - The most engaging lecturer who is exciting, enthusiastic and dynamic, and makes the difficult easy. Dr Carl Walker, Dr Chris Wyatt, Dr Dawn Stephen, Dr James Ormrod, Dr Jayne Raisborough, Dr Kepa Artaraz, Dr Mark Erickson
  • 8. Excellence in Learning and Teaching21st CENTURY TEACHING AWARD - The tutor who makes the most innovativeuse of technology in their teachingDr Dave Harley, Dr Jayne Raisborough, Professor Peter SquiresTHE ‘MASTERMIND OF STUDENT CENTRAL’ AWARD - The lecturer who usesStudent Central to effectively engage students with their learning.Dr Kepa Artaraz, Paul Fox-Strangways, Professor Peter SquiresINSPIRATIONAL TEACHING AWARD - The tutor who has inspired me and setmy imagination and interest on fire.Dr Dawn Stephen, Dr Hannah Frith, Dr James Ormrod, Dr Jayne Raisborough,Dr Kepa Artaraz, Paul Fox-StrangwaysDr Jayne Raisborough deservedly won the special award for OutstandingContribution to the Student Experience having won the Inspirational TeachingAward last year.
  • 9. The Undergraduate ProgrammeDr Dawn StephenAssistant Head of School
  • 10. Courses in the Undergraduate Programme• BA (Hons) Applied Psychology and Criminology• BA (Hons) Applied Psychology and Sociology• BA (Hons) Applied Social Science (Hastings based)• BA (Hons) Criminology*• BA (Hons) Criminology and Social Policy• BA (Hons) Criminology and Sociology• BA (Hons) Criminology and Substance Misuse Interventions*• BA (Hons) Politics and Social Policy• BA (Hons) Politics and Sociology• BA (Hons) Social Science• BA (Hons) Sociology*• BA (Hons) Sociology and Social Policy• BSc (Hons) Social Work * New courses for 2013
  • 11. Typical entry requirements Individual offers may vary A-levels: ABB for Applied Psychology half-degrees, all Criminology courses and Social Work. BBB for remaining courses. Applicants with only two full A-levels or a double award will be considered on an individual basis. International Baccalaureate: 34 points for Applied Psychology half-degrees, all Criminology courses and Social Work. 32 points for remaining courses. QAA-approved access course: acceptable. BTEC – DDM GCSE (minimum grade C): at least three subjects including English language and mathematics or a science. Foundation degree/HND /HNC direct to year 2. For non-native speakers of English: IELTS 6.0 overall, with 6.0 in writing and a minimum of 5.5 in the other elements. Other: relevant professional experience.
  • 12. What we expect from our students• To come with open minds and be prepared to be stretched and challenged• Good time management• Attendance and participation• Reflection on your personal development• Make the most of your time here by participating in the life of the School, University and Students Union• To graduate feeling proud of and confident in your achievements and equipped for the world beyond university
  • 13. What you can expect from usSupport for your development• Personal tutor• Student Support and Guidance Tutor• Learning Groups• Peer Assisted Study Support• Extra-curricular developmental activities, e.g. Social Science Forum Criminology Film Nights Organised tripsEngaging subjects
  • 14. Subject presentations Social Work Applied Psychology Criminology Politics Social Policy Sociology
  • 15. Why choose social work at the Universityof Brighton?
  • 16. Innovative and relevant• Learning and teaching delivered by qualified and registered social work lecturers including contributions from social work practitioners, users of services, carers.• Social Work teaching is informed by research being undertaken the School.• Inter-professional learning.• You will develop a reflective and critical approach to practice.
  • 17. Social Work in a leading professional university• Regulatory functions with the Health Care Professions Council in August 2012.• The course is delivered in partnership with local agencies.• Academic staff are experienced, qualified and registered social workers who undertake research, as well as being teachers. For example:  Dr Chris Warren Adamson has undertaken extensive research into family centres and is researching the application of complexity theory to child care practice.  Dr Julia Stroud has undertaken extensive research into child homicide, and is currently researching Community Treatment Orders under the Mental Health Act, as well as researching complexity theory and child care practice also.  Jem Price, senior lecturer, is undertaking research on the purpose and transferability of social work in an international context.
  • 18. Career-focussed - practice based learning• The Social Work degree leads to a generic social work qualification after which you can choose to work in a number of specialisms.• The course involves mandatory practice in approved placements in social care and social work agencies in years 2 and 3.• We have close working relationships with statutory social work services and service providers in the private, voluntary and independent sector, and work with them to develop placements across Sussex.• The placements available vary each year but have to date included: Children and family placements in fostering and adoption , child protection services and Schools ; Adult services/ community care placements and placements in mental health and substance misuse teams
  • 19. Excellence in teaching and support• 87% overall student satisfaction rate for social work (2011 National Student Survey)• Learning involves actual and simulated case material and problem-based learning.• Regular individual and small group tutorials.• Students meet with their personal tutors individually on a regular basis to discuss academic and practice development.• Practice on placements is assessed according to the National Occupational Standards for Social Work , but this will change with developments from the Reform Board.• Students have allocated supervisors and assessors on placement, from whom they receive support and supervision.
  • 20. Any questions?