Criminology, School of Applied Social Science, University of Brighton - Summer Open Day, June 2014

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Criminology open day presentation, June 2014.

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  • Key Point here – Apart from showing a lively research culture and involvement with local criminal justice agencies, lots of these projects involved opportunities for student involvement: experience in interviewing, research field work, data gathering and analysis - sometimes even getting paid for the work (eg the CCTV, ASB, neighbourhood wardens and fire safety projects)
  • Criminology, School of Applied Social Science, University of Brighton - Summer Open Day, June 2014

    1. 1. Criminology courses and options Professor Peter Squires & Dr. Hannah Thurston
    2. 2. • Law and Criminology BA(Hons) • Criminology BA(Hons) (Single Subject) • Criminology and Sociology BA(Hons) • Criminology and Social Policy BA(Hons) • Applied Psychology & Criminology BA(Hons) • Substance Misuse Interventions & Criminology BA(Hons) Criminology courses available
    3. 3. Level One: Welcome to Criminology - Criminology In Action From Crime Scene to Court Room An examination of the jobs available within the criminal justice process: Policing Courts and the trial Substance misuse Probation Prison officers/governors Working with victims
    4. 4. Level One: Explaining Crime and Criminals An exploration into the ways in which crime is explained and accounted for and applying these accounts to particular offenders and particular crimes.
    5. 5. The Great Train Robbery 1963 Explaining Criminality Manchester Shooting: September 2012
    6. 6. Level One: Penal Policy and Offender Management Exploring the work of the criminal justice system – post-sentence: including Prison, the prison service and penal policy, rehabilitation and offender management, probation and punishment in the community, services for victims
    7. 7. Level One: Criminological Theory Accounting for the range of ways in which crime has been explained, including • Classical theories emphasising choice and responsibility, • Scientific theories addressing biological, psychological & social causation • Contemporary theories – labelling theory, critical realism, and cultural • theory
    8. 8. Level Two: [1] Criminology & Crime Control Linking crime theory with the historical effort to design the means of preventing or deterring it: If social deprivation is an underlying factor how well has social progress curbed criminogenic influences? Does surveillance work? can we “design crime out?” If the criminal is a ‘rational actor’ how can we make crime the ‘irrational choice’?
    9. 9. 30 year UK crime trend A thirty year low in crime
    10. 10. Level Two: [2] Critical Perspectives on Criminal Justice Contemporary criminology has become increasingly influenced by sociological theories focussing upon class, gender, race and culture. In turn these have generated critical theories of criminalisation, ‘punitiveness’ and race and gender violence.
    11. 11. Black hands, ?White bars
    12. 12. Level Three: [1] Cross-Cultural Criminology Ideas about crime and justice can differ greatly from society to society – from societies where the death penalty is still practiced, to debates about carrying a gun for self-defence. Similarly, some cultures do not have a notion of domestic violence or they take quite different approaches to drugs or alcohol. Florida Halts Executions After Botched One Lasted 34 Minutes
    13. 13. Level Three: [2] Global Issues: Crime, Power & Harm Ideas about crime and justice can differ greatly from society to society – from societies where the death penalty is still practiced, to debates about carrying a Gun for self-defence. Similarly, some cultures do not have a notion of domestic violence or they take quite different approaches to drugs or alcohol.
    14. 14. Level Three: [3] Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice Optional themes based upon key issues and research: potential topics include: Prison & Prisoners, US Death Penalty & Punishment Policing & Society, Youth Justice, Domestic violence, Offender Management,
    15. 15. Level Three: [4] Contemporary Topics in Crime & Society Optional themes based upon key issues and research: potential topics include: Riots & Protest; Terrorism and war; Gangs; Crime Media Culture; Environmental Crimes; Sex Offenders Victims & Victimology; Powerful offenders,
    16. 16. Cross Cultural Criminology: The Death Penalty
    17. 17. Criminological Research in the School of Applied Social Science
    18. 18. • Anti-social behaviour enforcement • Services for victims of domestic violence • Policing Political Protest • Police Interviewing • Community Safety on Housing Estates • Brighton’s Policing Priorities • Prison Health Audit • Pupil Misbehaviour in Schools • Evaluating the effectiveness of CCTV • Policing, communities and Youthful Disorder • Arrest Diversion Project • Community Fire Safety • Homelessness, Begging and Street Drinking • Young People and Vehicle- taking • Neighbourhood Wardens • Provision of Drug and Alcohol Services Criminology Research Projects in the School of Applied Social Sciences
    19. 19. Research & Practice Opportunities and Experiences for students • Valuable research interviewing experiences on School Projects (previous slide) • Year 2: Community Placement • Sussex Police : Special Constables, Analyst Support • Victim support (and others) volunteering • Sussex Pathways (HMP Lewes: young offender mentoring project); mentoring qualification and experience • Student Exchange scheme
    20. 20. NEXT FEATURE Mayfield 129 Tuesday Oct. 4th 6pm COPLAND You don’t have to be a criminologist to come to the Criminology Film Club...

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