Research Councils and Support Organizat ions in Southeast ...
                         © International Development Research Centre 2008 The international Development Research Centre (I...
 About the Author  Dr. Randy Spence, Ph.D. Director, Economic and Social Development Affiliates                           ...
  Acknowledgements The author would like to thank everyone who took the time for meetings in Jakarta, Manila, Hanoi, Bangk...
      In Thailand:          Dr. Ammar Siamwalla, Distinguished Scholar, Office of the President, Thailand Development Rese...
  Table of Contents List of Tables ..........................................................................................
 List of Tables  Table 1. Principal research institutions in the countries under study.......................................
 List of Acronyms  A*STAR                 Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore AIT                    As...
 VASS                   Vietnamese Academy of Social Sciences VAST                   Vietnamese Academy of Science and Tec...
     Executive Summary          Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions,     Issues an...
 System issues of most common concern at the sub‐regional or regional level were:     •     innovation in and for the ‘bot...
 Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  A Report on Scienc...
 (organizations  and  individuals).    By  focusing  on  supporting  the  development  of  explicit  and  implicit  S&T po...
 There are key challenges to the development of effective STI policy in developing countries.  The components of tradition...
       1.   What is the configuration of principal research councils in each country, and how do they interact and        ...
     Table 1. Principal research institutions in the countries under study.                     Policy                    ...
     innovation appears to be supported somewhat more in some countries ‐ Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand ‐     than o...
       •   Malaysia ‐ focus and resources are substantial, but perhaps some lack of delivery on big ideas such as         ...
 NIS needs to serve, and support and respond to innovation in the BOP, and it also needs to connect modern and traditional...
 3.         What are the region‐wide common strategic directions where the work of most research            councils inter...
 Program  Area,  including  those  of  the  Asia  Development  Research  Forum  on  financial/crisis  management, aging po...
 There were several similar suggestions for ASEAN as a whole – a regional activity focusing initially on strategy and  bro...
     •     Focus on the BOP is important not only because of the large potential markets for companies, but also          ...
 III.       Country Perspectives  1.         Indonesia 1.1.       Institutions consulted Indonesian Institute of Sciences ...
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration

2,642

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,642
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration

  1. 1.      Research Councils and Support Organizat ions in Southeast Asia: Inst itut ions, Issues and Collaborat ion A Report on Science, Technology and Innovation Systems in Indonesia, Vietnam, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore           International Development Research Centre (IDRC) First prepared: December 2007 Updated: November 2008  Report prepared by Randy Spence, with contribution from colleagues from IDRC and Southeast Asia 
  2. 2.                          © International Development Research Centre 2008 The international Development Research Centre (IDRC) is a Canadian Crown corporation that works in close collaboration with researchers from the developing world in their search for the means to build healthier, more equitable, and more prosperous societies. For inquiries regarding this report, please contact:  IDRC Regional Office for Southeast and East Asia  22 Cross Street #02‐55  South Bridge Court  Singapore 048421  Phone: (+65) 6438‐7877  Fax: (+65) 6438‐4844  Email: asro@idrc.org.sg  Web: www.idrc.org.sg   
  3. 3.  About the Author  Dr. Randy Spence, Ph.D. Director, Economic and Social Development Affiliates  Dr.  Randy  Spence’s  current  assignments  include  ICT  policy  and  regulation,  poverty  and  economic  policy,  human  development  and  capability  initiatives,  intellectual  property  and  innovation  systems.    Between  1990  and  2005,  he  worked  with  the  International  Development  Research  Centre  (IDRC)  of  Canada as  Senior  Program Specialist in  economics  and as Director  of IDRCs  Regional  Office  for  Southeast  and  East  Asia  (ASRO)  in  Singapore.    Prior  to  joining  IDRC,  he  was  a  senior  economist  with  the  Canadian  government  departments  of  External  Affairs,  Finance,  and  Energy,  Mines  and  Resources,  as well as with the Ottawa‐based North‐South Institute.  He has worked on a  long‐range  planning  project  in  Kenya  (World  Bank)  and  as  an  economic  advisor  in  the  Tanzanian  Ministry  of  Planning  (CIDA),  and  has  taught  economics at McMaster and Guelph universities, in Canada.  He has a Ph.D. in  economics from the University of Toronto, Canada.   Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  i International Development Research Centre 2007  
  4. 4.   Acknowledgements The author would like to thank everyone who took the time for meetings in Jakarta, Manila, Hanoi, Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, in particular: In Indonesia:  Mr. Dudi Hidayat, Head, Division for Science and Technology Policy and Development Studies, Indonesian  Institute of Sciences (LIPI)  Mr. Siti Meiningsih, Deputy Head, LIPI  Dr. Sofyan A. Djalil, State Minister, Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (MCIT)  Dr. Sardjoeni Moedjiono, Deputy State Minister, MCIT  Dr. Tatang A. Taufik, Director, Center for Information and Communication Technology   Dr. Derry Pantjadarma, Material Scientist, Bureau of Planning  Dr. Wahono Sumaryono, Deputy Chairman for Agroindustry and Biotechnology  Dr. Ir. R.D. Esti Widjayanti, Head, Division of Functional Food Technology  Dr. Ir. Ugay Sugarmansyah, Director, Center for Innovation Policy  Dr. Totok Hari Wibowo, Researcher in Technology Policy, Agency for the Assessment and Application of  Technology (BPPT)  Dr. Ir. Tusy A. Adibroto, Secretary, National Research Council (DRN)   In Vietnam:    Prof. Do Hoai Nam, President, Vietnamese Academy of Social Sciences (VASS) and Vice Chairman,  National Council for Science and Technology Policy (NCSTP)  Mr. Thach Can, Director‐General, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST)  Mr. Le Thanh Binh, Deputy Director, MOST  Dr. Tran Ngoc Ca, Director of Secretariat, NCSTP, and Deputy Director, National Institute for Science and  Technology Policy and Strategy (NISTPASS)   In Malaysia:    Dr. Lum Keng Yeang, Chief Scientist, CABI Southeast and East Asia Regional Centre   Dato Seri Dr Salleh Mohd Nor, Vice President and Fellow, Malaysia Academy of Sciences (ASM), and  Executive Director, The TropBio Group   In the Philippines:    Dr. Reynaldo V. Ebora, Executive Director, Philippine Council for Advanced Science and Technology  Research and Development (PCASTRD)   Dr. Fortuna T. de la Peña, Undersecretary, Department of Science & Technology (DOST)  Dr. Nap P. Hernandez, Acting Executive Director, National Research Council of the Philippines (NRCP)  Dr Salvador G. Tan, Chief Science Research Specialist, Research Assistance Division, NRCP  Dr. Antonio G. M. La Viña, Dean, Ateneo School of Government, Ateneo de Manila University   In Singapore:    Dr. T.S. Gopi Rethinaraj, Assistant Professor, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy (LKYSPP), National  University Of Singapore  Mr. Teoh Yong Sea, Deputy Managing Director, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)  Mr. Andrew Fun, Head, International Relations, Planning & International Relations, A*STAR  Ms. Cynthia Lim Ai Lan, Senior Officer, Corporate Affairs, A*STAR   Prof. Paul S. Teng, Dean, Graduate Programs and Research, National Institute of Education, Nanyang  Technological University (NTU) Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  ii International Development Research Centre 2007  
  5. 5.    In Thailand:    Dr. Ammar Siamwalla, Distinguished Scholar, Office of the President, Thailand Development Research  Institute Foundation (TDRI)  Dr. Yongyuth Yuthavong, Minister, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST)  Dr. Sirirurg Songsivilai, Assistant President, International Cooperation Department, National Science &  Technology Development Agency (NSTDA)  Mr. Simon Grimley, Consultant, International Cooperation Department, NSTDA  Ms. Chanthana Manowong, International Cooperation Officer, International Cooperation Department,  NSTDA  Dr. Jingjai Hanchanlash, Board Member, NSTDA  Dr. Chachanat Thebtaranonth, Vice President, NSTDA, and Director, Technology Management Center  Prof. Piyawat Boon‐Long, Director, Thailand Research Fund (TRF)  Prof. Vicharn Panich, Special Advisor (and former President), TRF  Dr. Supreda Adulyanon, Director Health Promotion and Primary Risk Reduction, Thai Health Promotion  Foundation (THPF)  Prof. Said Irandoust, President, Asian Institute of Technology (AIT)  Prof. Sudip K. Rakshit, Vice President – Research, AIT  Dr. Supachai Lorlowhakarn, Director, National Innovation Agency (NIA)  Mr. Wyn Ellis, International Affairs Manager, NIA Special thanks are also due to IDRC colleagues in Ottawa and in the Regional Offices in Singapore and New Delhi, in particular:  Dr. Richard Fuchs, Regional Director, Regional Office for Southeast and East Asia (ASRO)  Dr. Ellie Osir, Senior Program Specialist (ASRO), who provided valuable input into the report.  Dr. Maria Ng, Senior Program Specialist, and Jacqueline Loh, Senior Research Officer, ASRO, who  attended some of the country meetings.  Dr. Richard Isnor, Director, Innovation, Policy and Science Programme Area (IPS)  Dr. Stephen McGurk, Regional Director, Regional Office for South Asia (SARO)  Dr. Shadrach Basheerhamad, Programme Officer (SARO)  Ms. Joyce Tan, Executive Assistant and Ms. Tan Say Yin, Office Administrator (HR & GA) (ASRO), whose  arrangements and always excellent administration made the study and meetings possible.  Ms. Vivien Chiam (Partnership and Communications Manager), Ms. Shirley Pong (Regional Program  Assistant) and Ms. Marcia Chandra (Consultant), ASRO, who helped with editing and finalization of this  updated report.  Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  iii International Development Research Centre 2007  
  6. 6.   Table of Contents List of Tables ................................................................................................................................................................................  List of Boxes .................................................................................................................................................................................  List of Acronyms ...........................................................................................................................................................................   Executive Summary .....................................................................................................................................................................   I. Introduction: Science, Technology and Innovation Frameworks, and Aims of this Initiative ..................................................1II. Summary of Study and Consultation Findings .................................................................................................................... 4 1. What is the configuration of principal research councils in each country, and how do they interact and  collaborate? ................................................................................................................................................................ 4 2. What are key new issues and strategies in S&T, innovation systems and ICTs? ......................................................7 3. What are the region‐wide common strategic directions where the work of most research councils intersects? ..... 9 4. How can IDRC improve its work with research councils?....................................................................................... 9 5. Results of the Singapore Meeting, Sept 10‐11, 2007 ............................................................................................ 11III. Country Perspectives ....................................................................................................................................................... 13 1. Indonesia............................................................................................................................................................ 13 1.1. Institutions consulted .............................................................................................................. 13 1.2. Institutions and coordination ................................................................................................... 13 1.3. Science, technology and innovation agenda.............................................................................15 1.4. Regional and international collaboration..................................................................................16 2. Vietnam .............................................................................................................................................................16 2.1. Institutions consulted ..............................................................................................................16 2.2. Institutions and coordination ................................................................................................... 17 2.3. Science, technology and innovation agenda............................................................................. 17 2.4. Regional and international collaboration..................................................................................18 3. Philippines..........................................................................................................................................................19 3.1. Institutions consulted ..............................................................................................................19 3.2.      Institutions and coordination ....................................................................................................19 3.3. Science, technology and innovation agenda............................................................................ 22 3.4. Regional and international collaboration..................................................................................23 4. Thailand .............................................................................................................................................................23 4.1. Institutions consulted ..............................................................................................................23 4.2. Institutions and coordination .................................................................................................. 24 4.3. Science, technology and innovation agenda.............................................................................27 4.4. Regional and international collaboration................................................................................. 28 5. Singapore.......................................................................................................................................................... 28 5.1.      Institutions consulted............................................................................................................... 28 5.2. Institutions and coordination .................................................................................................. 29 5.3. Science, technology and innovation agenda............................................................................ 29 5.4. Regional and international collaboration..................................................................................32 6. Malaysia .............................................................................................................................................................32 6.1. Institutions consulted ..............................................................................................................32 6.2. Institutions and coordination ................................................................................................... 33 6.3. Science, technology and innovation agenda.............................................................................34 6.4. Regional and international collaboration..................................................................................35 Annex A. Regional Councils and Research Organizations............................................................................................36Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration    International Development Research Centre 2007  
  7. 7.  List of Tables  Table 1. Principal research institutions in the countries under study.....................................................................................5Table 2. Innovation systems in six ASEAN countries. .......................................................................................................... 6 List of Boxes  Box 1. Terminology used in this report.............................................................................................................................. I‐1Box 2. System and technology issues of most common concern at the sub‐regional or regional level..............................II‐10Box 3. Organization of STI institutions within the Indonesia Ministry of Research and Technology (RISTEK) ..III‐14Box 4. Overview of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), Philippines. ....................................................III‐21Box 5. Organization of the Thailand Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST). ........................................................ III‐24Box 6. Organization Chart for Thai National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA). ..............................25Box 7. Overview of the National Innovation Agency (NIA), Thailand.............................................................................. III‐26Box 8. Chart of Singapore Government R&D sector institutions, including funding. .......................................................III‐30Box 9. A*Star Organization Chart ................................................................................................................................. III‐31Box 10. Malaysia Government S&T Institutions ............................................................................................................. III‐33Box 11. Thematic priorities for S&T funds in Malaysia ....................................................................................................III‐34Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration    International Development Research Centre 2007  
  8. 8.  List of Acronyms  A*STAR  Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore AIT  Asian Institute of Technology APEC  Asia‐Pacific Economic Cooperation ASEAN  Association of Southeast Asian Nations ASM  Malaysia Academy of Sciences ASRO  IDRC Regional Office for Southeast and East Asia ASTNET  ASEAN Science and Technology Network BOP  Bottom of the pyramid BPPT  Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology, Indonesia CIDA  Canadian International Development Agency CIEM  Central Institute of Economic Management, Vietnam COST  ASEAN Committee on Science and Technology DOST  Department of Science and Technology, Philippines DRD  Regional Research Council, Indonesia DRN  National Research Council, Indonesia EEPSEA  IDRC Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia ENRM  IDRC Environment and Natural Resource Management Program Area EU  European Union GM  Genetically modified ICT  Information and communication technology IDRC  International Development Research Centre IP  Internet Protocol IPR  Intellectual property rights IPS  IDRC Innovation, Policy and Science Program Area ISEAS  Institute of Southeast Asian Studies ISTWG  APEC Industrial Science & Technology Working Group ITDB   ITS  IDRC Innovation, Technology and Society Program Initiative LIPI  Indonesian Institute of Sciences MOST  Ministry of Science and Technology, Vietnam MOST  Ministry of Science and Technology, Thailand MOSTE  Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, Vietnam (former) MOSTI  Ministry of Science, Technology & Innovation, Malaysia MPT  Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications NCE  National Council for Education, Vietnam NCSTP  National Council for Science and Technology Policy, Vietnam NGO  Non‐government organization NIA  National Innovation Agency, Thailand NIS  National innovation systems NISTPASS  National Institute for Science and Technology Policy and Strategy, Vietnam NITC  National Information Technology Council, Malaysia NRCP  National Research Council of the Philippines NRCT  National Research Council of Thailand NRF  National Research Foundation, Singapore NSTDA  National Science & Technology Development Agency, Thailand PAN  IDRC Pan‐Asia Networking Program Initiative PCASTRD  Philippine Council for Advanced Science and Technology Research and Development R&D  Research and development RIEC  Research, Innovation and Enterprise Council, Singapore RISTEK  Ministry of Research and Technology, Indonesia S&T  science and technology STI  Science, technology and innovation SARO  IDRC Regional Office for South Asia SEP  Social and Economic Policy Program Area, IDRC SME  Small and medium‐sized enterprise TRF  Thailand Research Fund TWAS  Third World Academy of Sciences Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration    International Development Research Centre 2007  
  9. 9.  VASS  Vietnamese Academy of Social Sciences VAST  Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology WTO  World Trade Organization Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  i International Development Research Centre 2007  
  10. 10.   Executive Summary    Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions,  Issues and Collaboration    A Report on Science, Technology and Innovation Systems in Indonesia, Vietnam,  Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore  This  report  documents  desk  research  on  innovation  systems  and  meetings  in  2007  with  senior  people  in  science  and  technology  (S&T)  ministries  and  agencies,  and  universities  in  Indonesia,  Vietnam,  Philippines,  Thailand,  Malaysia  and  Singapore.  Chapter  I  begins  with  an  introduction  to  the  science,  technology  and  innovation (STI) concepts and frameworks, and identifies the objectives of this study.  Chapter II summarizes  and  highlights  findings  from  the  study  and  consultations,  including  providing  a  review  of  principal  research  councils and how they interact and collaborate, and lists key new issues and strategies for STI systems (system  issues  and  technology/application  issues)  identifying  region‐wide  common  strategic  directions  where  most  research  councils  intersect.    The  chapter  concludes  with  summarizing  how  IDRC  can  improve  its  work  with  research  councils  in  the  region,  including  highlighting  main  recommendations  of  a  meeting  of  experts  and  policy makers in Singapore.  Chapter III provides a detailed summary for each country including highlights of  meeting discussions, an institutional survey, an outline of the national STI agenda, and a look at regional and  international collaboration activities.   As  summarized  in  this  report,  the  innovation  systems  in  the  six  countries  are  at  quite  different  stages  of  development  and  institutional  configurations  also  vary  considerably.    The  following  table  outlines  the  institutional organization in each country:   Policy  Funding  R&D/Innovation  Advisory Indonesia  Ministry of Research &  RISTEK  RISTEK institutes (i.e.  National Research  Technology (RISTEK)  LIPI, BPPT)  Council (DRN) Philippines  Dept. of Science & Technology  DOST  DOST  NRCP  (DOST)  Councils  R&D institutes  National Research Council (NRCP; basic  research) Vietnam  National Council for Science &  MOST  MOST centres &  Vietnamese Academy of  Technology Policy (NCSTP)  institutes  Science & Technology  (VAST)  Mnistry of Science &  Technology (MOST) Thailand  Ministry of Science &  National Science & Technology  NSTDA centres  NRCT  Technology (MOST)  Development Agency (NSTDA)  National Innovation Agency  Thailand Research Fund (TRF)  (NIA)  National Research Council (NRCT)  NIA Malaysia  Ministry of Science, Technology  MOSTI  MOSTI departments &  Malaysia Academy of  & Innovation (MOSTI)  agencies  Sciences (ASM)  Prime Minister’s Office Singapore  Research, Innovation and  Agency for Science, Technology & Research  A*STAR councils &  National Academy of  Enterprise Council (RIEC)  (A*STAR)  institutes  Sciences (SNAS)  National Research Foundation  NRF  Government, private  (NRF)  companies, universities  Economic Development Board (EDB)  Academic Research Fund (ACRF)    Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration     International Development Research Centre 2007   
  11. 11.  System issues of most common concern at the sub‐regional or regional level were:  • innovation in and for the ‘bottom of the pyramid’ (BOP);  • coordination among government institutions;  • low research and development (R&D), and innovative culture in industry;  • university roles, incentives and incubators;  • Internet Protocol (IP) management and services;  • private‐research‐public institutional linkages;   • innovation financing and venture capital;  • international linkages and collaboration; and  • fostering a culture of innovation in society.  Technologies most underlined included the following:  • information and communication technology (ICT) access, costs, usage/services;  • new and alternative energies, including biofuels;  • agricultural biotechnologies;   • medical biotechnologies and new medicines;  • water management (many kinds);  • global warming and climate change; and  • nanotechnology.  There was broad agreement at the Singapore meeting on the idea of forming an informal and flexible network of  national  councils  with  institutional  backup,  which  would  engage  in  state‐of‐the‐art  reviews  of  innovation systems,  and  documenting  experience  and  successes.    The  underlying,  if  not  exclusive,  theme  would  be innovation in and for the BOP.  Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  i International Development Research Centre 2007  
  12. 12.  Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  A Report on Science, Technology and Innovation Systems in Indonesia, Vietnam, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore I. Introduction: Science, Technology and Innovation Frameworks, and Aims of this  Initiative There  is  a  lot  of  recent  and  current  thinking,  research  and  experimentation  on  national  innovation  systems (NIS), which include the science and technology research and innovation institutions of the market, non‐profit and  public  sectors.    How  these  develop  and  interact,  where  they  are  most  needed  and  valuable,  and  how national  approaches  differ,  are  important  areas  of  knowledge  for  those  involved.    With  a  growing  relative importance of innovation  in and for the ‘bottom of the pyramid’ (BOP) in many countries, how can systems work to support modern and grassroots innovation and synergy among sectors and communities? These  are  some  of  the  questions  that  motivated IDRC’s  Regional  Office  for  Southeast  and  East  Asia  Box 1. Terminology used in this report. (ASRO)  and  its  Innovation,  Policy  and  Science  (IPS)  Innovation – for the purposes of the ITS program Program  Area  to  initiate  a  study  of  NIS  in  six  initiative, innovation is defined as the use of new ideas, Association  of  Southeast  Asian  Nations  (ASEAN)  technologies or ways of doing things, in a place where (or countries in 2007.  An initial literature and desk study  by people for whom) they have not been used before. was  produced  by  Randy  Spence,  and  was  followed  Science and technology (S&T) – the term science and by meetings with policy makers and other thinkers in  technology, as well as scientific and technical knowledge, each country.  These colleagues then came together  refers to the full range of social, natural, medical and life in  Singapore  on  September  10  and  11,  2007,  at  the  sciences, as well as physical and engineering disciplines. Institute  of  Southeast  Asian  Studies  (ISEAS),  to  Policy‐relevant research – The term “policy‐relevant” is discuss the issues and findings of the study, and, as a  used here to refer to the range of possible actions that result,  decided  to  pursue  some  further  areas  of  could be generated with respect to the organization,  behaviour and action of numerous organizations or collaboration  in  national  innovation  policies  and  individual actors implicated in innovation, science and systems.  technology, including government agencies, private  sector firms, entrepreneurs, associations, non‐IPS  works  through  its  Innovation,  Technology  and  government and civil society organizations, universities, Society  (ITS)  Program  Initiative,  whose  prospectus  legal institutions, international donor organizations, etc. situates  the  study,  starting  with  the  terminology  Source: ITS Prospectus, IDRC 2005, see footnote 1. presented  in  Box  1  and  including  the  following    1  excerpt :  The rationale for the new ITS program initiative is driven by a set of inter‐related challenges  that developing countries continue to face with respect to science, technology and society  including:  achieving  effective  interactions  between  key  actors  in  innovation  systems;  creating and applying more effective and inter‐linked science, technology and innovation  (STI) policy frameworks, and instrument choices; reducing stakeholder marginalization and  inequity  in  STI  policy  decision  making;  and,  narrowing  technological  access  and  learning  gaps in relation to more developed countries. As  part  of  its  programming  strategy,  ITS  supports  research  activities  along  three  research  themes  or  entry points: 1) innovation system actors; 2) science and technology (S&T) policies; and, 3) impacts and inclusion.  These themes  interact  with  each  other  in  ways  that  can  help  empower  developing  countries  to  more  effectively harness STI to address their development challenges.  The starting point is to improve understanding of and strengthen  the  capacity,  roles,  functions  and  linkages  of  developing  country  innovation  system  actors                                                                                  1   Innovation, Technology and Society Program Initiative Prospectus 2006‐2011, can be viewed online on IDRC’s website: http://www.idrc.ca/en/ev‐104936‐201‐1‐DO_TOPIC.html. Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  1 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  13. 13.  (organizations  and  individuals).    By  focusing  on  supporting  the  development  of  explicit  and  implicit  S&T policies, the program helps to frame the enabling policy environment for innovation and innovation systems.  Finally,  research  on  impacts  and  inclusion  will  address  issues  related  to  improving  social  equity  within innovation systems and bring a stronger range of social considerations to bear in STI decision‐making. Paterson  et  al.  (2003) 2   define  a  system  of  innovation  as  “a  set  of  functioning  institutions,  organizations  and policies  which  interact  constructively  in  the  pursuit  of  a  common  set  of  social  and  economic  goals  and objectives,  and  which  use  the  introduction  of  innovations  as  the  key  promoter  of  change.”    Analyses  of innovation  systems  tend  to  focus  on  organizational  and  institutional  components,  network  interactions  and relationships,  and  socio‐cultural  dimensions  (practices,  rules  and  laws),  as  well  as  supporting  policies.  Interactions  between  the  actors  and  organizations  that  comprise  innovation  systems  can  be  technical, commercial,  legal,  social  and  financial,  inasmuch  as  the  goals  of  such  interactions  are  the  development, protection,  financing  or  regulation  of  S&T  to  enhance  sustainable  forms  of  development.    Analyses  of stakeholders  and  functions  have  permitted  rapid  assessment,  comparison  and  design  of  supportive  policy interventions.  Innovation system ‘mapping’ efforts have also yielded useful analytical information accessible to policy makers and other actors in the system. The transition experiences of some Asian economies (e.g. South Korea and Taiwan), from relative poverty to prosperity in the 1970‐80s, are often used to illustrate how S&T can lead to development.  The key lesson from these  countries  lies  in  the  order  and  timing  of  different  types  of  S&T  activities  (and  the  related  set  of institutional adjustments and policy instruments they put in place).  Initially, all of these countries focused on importing scientific knowledge and technology from abroad; this was followed by efforts to copy and master it,  and,  finally,  to  make  incremental  improvements  through  applied  research  and  improved  design engineering.    Government  investment  in  primary,  secondary,  technical  and  tertiary  education,  as  well  as industrial  policies  involving  support  for  nascent  industries  followed  by  timed  entry  into  global  markets,  are other important and implicit S&T policies that contributed to their economic success. It is now recognized that working with (and reworking) existing knowledge, rather than simply generating new  3knowledge through research, is a predominant activity in innovation.   Research can help identify if and where this is occurring in developing countries as well as identify opportunities for such reworking of knowledge to occur more naturally. Importantly, effective innovation is not only a question of bringing about better connections between existing organizations and actors (e.g. between knowledge producers and knowledge users), it is also a matter of the suitability  and  orientation  of  existing  innovation  actors  (individuals,  organizations  and  their  ideas),  social‐institutional  behaviours  (norms  and  laws),  policy  frameworks,  and  policy  instrument  choices.    The  business system is of particular importance in these studies since this is where most knowledge is translated into goods and  services  and  where  economic  wealth  is  mainly  created.    Companies  and  other  business  actors  (e.g. farmers, traders and entrepreneurs) are, therefore, among the most important elements in innovation systems and increasingly so as levels of development rise. It  is  essential  to  emphasize  that  the actors  comprising  innovation  systems  are  not limited  to  scientific  elites working  in research organizations.  People in banks, in companies, on farms, in business associations and in non‐government civil society organizations also contribute extensively to innovation; for example, they may contribute  tacit  knowledge  that  comes  from  the  application  of  their  technical  skills,  advice  and  experience, while  researchers  working  in  formal  research‐based  organizations  supply  codified  knowledge  in  the  form  of scientific papers, data and reports.  Non‐experts also have an important role to play in determining acceptable levels  of  social  risk  related  to  the  adoption  or  development  of  new  technologies,  or  in  generating  the  social demand for political leadership in support of STI.                                                                                  2  Paterson, A., Adam, R., Mullin, J., 2003. The relevance of the national system of innovation approach to mainstreaming science and technology for development in NEPAD and the AU. Draft Working Paper for the Preparatory Meeting of the First NEPAD Conference of Ministers and Presidential Advisers responsible for Science and Technology, Nairobi, 13‐15 October. 3  Arnold, E., Bell, M., 2001, Some New Ideas about Research for Development, in Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Partnership at the Leading Edge: A Danish Vision for Knowledge, Research and Development. Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  2 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  14. 14.  There are key challenges to the development of effective STI policy in developing countries.  The components of traditional and modern knowledge streams in developing countries are often poorly linked and traditional knowledge activities are usually disconnected from the formal organization of education and training.  More open and participatory modes of S&T decision making can create intense debates between groups who hold different viewpoints and values, or who have different tolerances for risk and willingness to accept change. Another dilemma is the frequent disconnect between efforts to foster innovation and those aimed at reducing social inequities. 4   As noted earlier, investing in S&T capacity alone often does not solve deep‐rooted problems related to poverty in developing countries and can sometimes aggravate it.  The need for policy‐relevant and action  research  oriented  towards  the  social  responsiveness  of  innovation  systems  (i.e.  the  ability  to  link innovation  and  social  policy  objectives)  has  thus  become  increasingly  more  apparent.    In  the  case  of developing countries, these needs are particularly acute as society and decision makers grapple with the social, legal, ethical, political and economic implications of so‐called transformative technologies (biotechnology and genetic engineering, nanotechnology, and information and communication technologies [ICTs]). 5 In discussions about IPS and ITS, IDRC’s Board and Management enquired about the extent to which IDRC had directly  supported  and  collaborated  with  research  councils  and  research  support/funding  agencies  in developing  countries  and  regions,  and  whether  closer  consultation  and  collaboration  might  lead  to improvements in IDRC support and other strategic partnerships.  An initial study of IDRC projects in Southeast Asia from 1990 to the present indicated that:  • IDRC has worked mostly with specific institutions and networks ‐ of about 200 projects in Southeast  Asia, about 20 were undertaken primarily with national research councils, foundations, S&T ministries  and their main research agencies;    • these 20 projects are concentrated in a few large and/or sustained undertakings including ICT  development in Philippines and Vietnam, science and technology policy development in Vietnam,  socioeconomic impacts of avian influenza (regional), Cambodia Development Research Forum, and,  economic and environmental management in Vietnam; and   • through its project and program work, IDRC has good regular contacts with many of the research  support organizations in the region. Following the results of the study, meetings were arranged with senior policy makers and experienced thinkers  6and  practitioners  in  Jakarta,  Manila,  Kuala  Lumpur,  Singapore,  Bangkok  and  Hanoi.     Twelve  of  these colleagues then came together at ISEAS in Singapore on September 10‐11, 2007, to meet with IDRC President Maureen  O’Neil,  IPS  Director  Richard  Isnor  and  ASRO  Director  Richard  Fuchs,  as  well  as  Randy  Spence  and other IDRC colleagues.  The findings of these consultations and related study are presented in the following section. II. Summary of Study and Consultation Findings The main questions posed for the study and explored during meetings were the following:                                                                                  4  Sutz, J., Arocena, R., 2006.  Integrating innovation policies and social policies: a strategy to embed science and technology into development processes.  Paper prepared for IDRC Innovation Technology and Society Prospectus. 5  S&T policy in recent years has often placed emphasis on a small set of high profile technologies in which current advances are particularly rapid and which are identified as especially “dynamic, pervasive or generic.”  Bell, 2006, has noted that over‐attention on these applications in developing countries may distract attention from other important forms of STI policy, capacity and investment efforts that may be more centrally important for, and perhaps far more pervasive in, large parts of society in poorer countries. (Bell, M. 2006. Background Discussion Paper for the L‐20 workshop. Paper prepared for Maastricht L‐20 meeting on S&T for Development, March 8, Maastricht, NL.) 6  During the discussions in September 2007, Laos and Cambodia were also included in the territory being examined. Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  3 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  15. 15.   1. What is the configuration of principal research councils in each country, and how do they interact and  collaborate?  2. What are the key new issues and strategies in S&T, innovation systems and ICTs?  3. What are the region‐wide common strategic directions where the work of most research councils  intersects?  4. How can IDRC improve its work with research councils? ‘Councils’ refer to government and related public institutions that support research and innovation, primarily ministries of STI, boards, councils, academies, foundations, institutes, centres and a few others.  They differ in the extent to which they focus on four main functions: policy, conducting research and innovation, carrying out research  and  innovation,  and  advising  governments.    While  there  are  many  definitions  of  innovation,  this report  uses  the  one  noted  above  in  Box  1  and  is  generally  understood  to  mean  “bringing  knowledge  and invention into commercial use or otherwise into application in society.”  1.  What is the configuration of principal research councils in each country, and how do they  interact and collaborate? Configurations of principal research institutions vary considerably across countries. 7   In terms of capacity and coordination  of  institutions,  and  focus  on  innovation,  countries  (ranked  in  ascending  order)  are:  Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore.  Indonesia and Philippines, with different visions and issues,  remain  relatively  resource  poor.    Vietnam  is  catching  up  with  Thailand,  and  Thailand  is  close  to Malaysia, the latter of which is both ambitious in vision and high in accomplishments.  Singapore tops the list with  internationally  respected  capacities  based  on  some  decades  of  both  mobilizing  savings  and  investing heavily  in  education,  research,  development  and  innovation.    Table  1  provides  an  institutional  overview  for  8each country.  The dominant actors in most countries – in policy development, funding and undertaking R&D, and, in some cases,  innovation  ‐  are  the  S&T  ministries.   In  all  countries,  line  ministries  are  also  important  in  funding  and sector  priority  setting.    Some  countries  have  established  coordinating  bodies  –  e.g.  National  Council  for Science  and  Technology  Policy  (NCSTP)  in  Vietnam,  Prime  Minister’s  Office  in  Malaysia,  the  Research, Innovation  and  Enterprise  Council  (RIEC)  and  the  National  Research  Foundation  (NRF)  in  Singapore.  Coordination/coherence is discussed as a major problem in Indonesia, and, to a lesser but significant extent, in the other four countries (excluding Singapore).  Reasons differ and are elaborated later in this report. The concept of innovation is rooted in the top echelons of the systems of each country.  Malaysia and Thailand have recently institutionalized this within the Ministry of Science, Technology & Innovation (MOSTI) and the National  Innovation  Agency  (NIA),  respectively.    In  Singapore,  innovation  thinking  is  quite  integrated throughout the system and is now beginning to be taught widely at secondary and primary school levels.  In most countries, the spread of this ‘culture’ in public research institutions, universities, private enterprise and society is still fairly early, however, is being addressed with (rapidly) growing priority and funding.                                                                                  7  See Chapter 3 for a detailed institutional summary of each country. 8  The table leaves aside, for the moment, all the line agencies, including education, health and industry on the government side, and businesses, universities and others in the private market and non‐profit sectors. Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  4 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  16. 16.   Table 1. Principal research institutions in the countries under study.  Policy  Funding  R&D/Innovation  Advisory  Indonesia  Ministry of Research &  RISTEK  RISTEK institutes (i.e.  National Research  Technology (RISTEK)  LIPI, BPPT)  Council (DRN)  Philippines  Dept. of Science &  DOST  DOST  NRCP  Technology (DOST)  Councils  R&D institutes  National Research Council  (NRCP; basic research)  Vietnam  National Council for  MOST  MOST centres &  Vietnamese Academy  Science & Technology  institutes  of Science &  Policy (NCSTP)  Technology (VAST)  Mnistry of Science &  Technology (MOST)  Thailand  Ministry of Science &  National Science &  NSTDA centres  NRCT  Technology (MOST)  Technology Development  Agency (NSTDA)  National Innovation  Agency (NIA)  Thailand Research Fund (TRF)  National Research Council  (NRCT)  NIA  Malaysia  Ministry of Science,  MOSTI  MOSTI departments &  Malaysia Academy of  Technology & Innovation  agencies  Sciences (ASM)  (MOSTI)  Prime Minister’s Office  Singapore  Research, Innovation and  Agency for Science,  A*STAR councils &  National Academy of  Enterprise Council (RIEC)  Technology & Research  institutes  Sciences (SNAS)  (A*STAR)  National Research  Government, private  Foundation (NRF)  NRF  companies, universities  Economic Development  Board (EDB)  Academic Research Fund  (ACRF) Although the picture is gradually changing (many contrary examples notwithstanding), it is typical for public research  institutions  and  universities  to  undertake  research  with  little  attention  and  connection  to commercialization.    Companies,  both  domestic  and  multinational,  typically  buy  technologies  from  abroad (again, with notable exceptions and changing trends).  Reasons provided relate to comfort with the status quo, lack  of  incentives  and  motivation  in  publicly‐funded  government  and  university/academic  institutions, tradition and culture, and education.  Most countries report major shortfalls in sufficient numbers of scientists and engineers; some of the discussions with national colleagues, however, suggested that solving deployment problems,  including  building  linkages  among  institutions  and  scientists  engaged  in  innovation,  was  as important. There is also much attention to and evidence of substantial innovation ‐ in agriculture, services, and small and medium‐sized  enterprises  (SMEs)  ‐  at  the  BOP  in  all  countries;  the  development  of  uses  and  services  (i.e. financial)  based  on  mobile  phones  is  just  one  example  of  some  revolutionary  changes  occurring.    Local Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  5 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  17. 17.   innovation appears to be supported somewhat more in some countries ‐ Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand ‐  than others, perhaps due in part to decentralized government and S&T institutions.  The advisory national research councils and academies all have a role in promoting science.  Few have much  influence as advisory bodies ‐ the recent exception being Indonesia ‐ or as funding agencies ‐ the exceptions  being the National Research Council of the Philippines (NRCP) which  funds basic research, and the National  Research Council of Thailand (NRCT) which has a significant budget.  Indonesia is notable for having regional  councils and has plans to complete, strengthen and network them.  The  overall picture  is  one of  movement  from  S&T‐driven  systems  to  innovation‐driven  systems ‐  fairly  early  and gradual in Indonesia and the Philippines, somewhat more advanced and picking up speed in Vietnam and  Thailand, relatively advanced in Malaysia, and very advanced in Singapore.  Challenges appear to vary considerably among countries in terms of the key aspects of the innovation system  most in need of attention.  One of the frequent suggestions from discussants was a comparative mapping of  the  innovation  systems  of  the  countries,  identifying  strengths,  weaknesses,  priorities  and  consequent  investments.  A very impressionistic picture, based on the information able to be collected from the desk study  and meetings (which was insufficient), is provided in Table 2.  The systems in Laos and Cambodia, not included  in the table, were described as very underdeveloped, even in more traditional S&T terms; more capacity was  attributed to Cambodian universities, but more focus in government policy and attention to Laos. Table 2. Innovation systems in six ASEAN countries.   Indonesia  Philippines  Vietnam  Thailand  Malaysia  Singapore Research facilities  X  X  X  (x)  (x)   Scientists  X  X  X  (x)     Incubators & services  X  X  X  X  X   SME/business culture  X  X  X  X  X   Legal/IP infrastructure  X  (x)  X  (x)  (x)   Financing & venture capital  X  (x)  X  (x)     Platform technologies  X  X  X  (x)     Culture/awareness  X  X  X  X  X  (x) International linkages  X  X  X  (x)  X   Policy & coordination  X  X  (x)  (x)  (x)  (x)    Although  it  is  difficult  to  draw  conclusions,  it  is  worth  noting  some  challenges  for  each  country  that  were  indentified at the meetings:  • Indonesia ‐ lack of coordination among agencies related to broader management practices in  government.  • Philippines ‐ mobilization and political support, which have just recently received a major boost  through increased funding for postgraduate degrees and Department of Science and Technology  (DOST) facilities.  • Vietnam ‐ the whole system is mobilized, however, lacks depth and experience in almost every area;  training and knowledge acquisition are proceeding rapidly.  • Thailand ‐ in contrast to Vietnam, depth and resources are substantial, but mobilization and focus on  innovation is relatively recent and challenging, both politically and culturally.  Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  6  International Development Research Centre 2007   
  18. 18.   • Malaysia ‐ focus and resources are substantial, but perhaps some lack of delivery on big ideas such as  the multimedia super‐corridor and Bio Valley, although the ideas were very big and the progress  strong.  • Singapore ‐ coordination might still be an issue by Singapore standards, but ‘Fusionopolis’ may put an  end to that. One  could  also  posit  some  pair‐wise  similarities,  at  different  levels  of  resources  and  capacities,  between: Indonesia and Malaysia; Philippines and Thailand; and, Vietnam and Singapore.  2.  What are key new issues and strategies in S&T, innovation systems and ICTs? The  new  and  priority  strategies  and  issues  identified  throughout  the  discussions  can  be  divided  into  two categories: 1) those relating to aspects of innovation systems and policies; and, 2) those relating to particular technology applications.  The most frequently mentioned ‘drivers’ for both types of strategies were the need to  maintain  and  increase  competitiveness,  and  related  World  Trade  Organization  (WTO)  and  regional  trade compliance.  Also prominent were considerations of equity and poverty reduction, and the need for innovation in and for the BOP.  In Southeast Asia, where these objectives conflict, competitiveness and growth become particularly  strong  drivers,  and  conflicts  tend  to  be  addressed  by  ongoing  redesign  and  development  of innovation  systems  to  serve  all  parts  of  the  economy  and  society,  with  success  at  this  being  gradual  and uneven.  ♦ System issues All  countries  expressed  a  general  concern  and  priority  for  better  understanding  their  innovation  system, comparing it with those of advanced countries and those of their neighbours, and identifying in detail the main problems and how to resolve them.  In this context, all pointed to the need to develop, test and implement better policy‐oriented innovation indicators and survey methods. On the industry side, government and university discussants indicated a general lack of R&D and innovation culture for most countries, and a comfort with relying on imported technology.  Associated with this was a lack of  productive  connections  between  industry,  and  academic  and  public  research  institutions,  in  both  modern and more traditional sectors. On the government side, coordination was raised as an important issue, in terms of both top‐level policy and institutional  structures,  and  communication  among  clusters  of  researchers  and  innovators,  and  the development of ‘open methods of coordination.’ On more specific ‘public’ aspects of innovation systems, two issues stood out:  • Internet Protocol (IP) management, both in terms of broad debates and the micro‐level of IP services for  companies, SMEs, public sector and university researchers, and how these services can be effectively  provided where needed with emphasized strategies being forward thinking and engaging with country  IP authorities; and,  • institutional linkages, particularly for universities, where key questions focus on how to motivate both  university and public sector researchers to innovate, and how to provide the services (including IP) they  need (e.g. through incubators and research technology centres). Innovation in and for the BOP was a frequent topic of discussion and area of interest for learning from other regions or countries.  Both ‘bottom up’ and ‘top down’ successes were evident, a few of which are summarized in  the  country  perspectives  presented  in  chapter  III.    Connecting  innovation  support  systems,  usually  quite oriented  to  the  modern  sector,  to  traditional  sectors  and  poorer  communities  was  frequently  emphasized  ‐ particularly with respect to agriculture and resource sectors, and rural infrastructure and services.  In short, a Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  7 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  19. 19.  NIS needs to serve, and support and respond to innovation in the BOP, and it also needs to connect modern and traditional production and innovation activities. Other  system  issues  frequently  raised  include:  increasing  the  supply  of  scientists  and  engineers;  upgrading research  facilities;  innovation  financing  and  venture  capital;  international  linkages  and  collaboration;  and, fostering a culture of innovation in private enterprise and society as a whole.  ♦ Technology/application issues Platform  technologies  were  raised  as  issues  across  all  countries,  with  ICT  and  biotechnology  the  most prominent by far.  ICT priorities varied quite widely across countries and particular areas mentioned included:  • regulation and cost reduction;  • infrastructure;  • human resources development;  • universal access (models);  • software legalization and open source;  • language localization;  • e‐government;  • e‐learning;  • mobility and mew media; and    • wireless technologies. New  and  alternative  energies  were  also  raised  in  most  discussions,  particularly  biofuels  (bioethanol  and biodiesel).    Most  countries  are  very  actively  engaged  in  biofuels  development.    Issues  include:  adverse biodiversity and food production costs and impacts; cross‐border contract farming; using crops (jatropha) that grow on marginal lands; and, the prospects for (much) more efficient and low‐cost conversion technologies in the near future.  ‘Doing it right’ was suggested as the overall priority. Agricultural biotechnologies remain a major priority, particularly genetically modified (GM) crops, but also a range  of  other  technologies.    Biosafety  management,  and  risk  assessment  methods  and  processes  were frequently mentioned, mostly described as relatively well advanced but needing ongoing implementation and management research for new crops and technologies. Medical biotechnologies and new medicines were important, and included development of the knowledge and R&D base, and IP management ‐ including compulsory licensing and related trade. Water management was also a key issue, with the priorities being drought resistant crops; urban conservation; water  cleaning  and  recycling;  aquifer  and  watershed  management;  and,  desalination.    New  approaches  and technologies were emphasized in terms of innovation systems research. Global warming and climate change were, for the most part, seen in terms of particular mitigation approaches (e.g. new and alternative energies and reforestation) and adaptation strategies (e.g. water management and disaster  preparedness  and  management).    Several  discussions  suggested  a  need  for  more  comprehensive study of adaptation and mitigation strategies, particularly new and prospective technologies. Nanotechnology came up in many conversations with suggestions for further study in applications, and related health, safety and security concerns.  International nanotechnology development and management networks, supported by IDRC and others, might play a role here.  Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  8 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  20. 20.  3.  What are the region‐wide common strategic directions where the work of most research  councils intersects? During the discussions, two types of common strategic issues arose:  • common priorities, for which councils saw merit in cross‐country collaboration for purposes of learning,  and sharing knowledge and experience; and  • shared priorities, for which councils saw the absolute need to work together to solve the problems in  question. The  former  group  was,  by  far,  the  most  dominant.    A  short  summary  of  common  priority  systems  and technology issues was given above; there is considerable bilateral cooperation in the region on these issues.  Thailand is particularly well organized in providing technical support and training, and Singapore and Malaysia are  seen  as  major  sources  of  training.    Other  regional  powers  ‐  including  Japan,  Korea  and  China  ‐  are collaborating in various ways in national and regional ASEAN STI. Among regional institutions, the ASEAN Committee on Science and Technology (COST) was highlighted for providing an effective platform for networking and sharing of experience, as well as some research support.  The  Third  World  Academy  of  Sciences  (TWAS)  was  also  described  as  important  for  networking;  currently chaired  by  China,  it  networks  national  science  academies,  helps  build  their  confidence  and  could  be  an important  source  of  collaboration  for  IDRC  and  partners.    The  recently  announced  Malaysian‐based International Centre for South‐South Cooperation in Science, Technology and Innovation (ISTIC) was flagged for  future  attention,  and  some  regional‐based  institutions,  such  as  the  Asian  Institute  of  Technology  (AIT), were identified as sources of expertise, networking and training across a range of issues and technologies. Avian  influenza  is  one  example  of  an  issue  for  which  cross‐country  collaboration  is  essential  for  purposes  of reaching solutions.  Only a few others were identified, including:  • climate change, where some aspects ‐ e.g. negotiation of targets – and perhaps specific issues ‐  e.g.  cross‐border contract farming of biofuels stocks ‐ need collaboration, while other mitigation and  adaptation strategies benefit from shared experience but are essentially ‘national’ in terms of policy  and action;  • haze from burning of forests, which is a major concern in Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand requiring  9 discussion and collective action;  and  • disaster preparedness, where the ‘upstream’ elements of early warning systems, particularly for  tsunamis, have substantial economies of scale resulting from collective action, while the domestic and  ‘last mile’ components seem to dictate mainly domestic solutions.  4.  How can IDRC improve its work with research councils? As noted above, this study included a survey of IDRC projects with Southeast Asia councils over the past 10 years.    Over  this  period,  there  have  been  relatively  few  projects  on  S&T,  innovation  and  ICTs  undertaken directly with national STI support institutions.  The main exceptions are the S&T policy projects and the recent collaborative  regional  program  on  avian  influenza  undertaken  with  the  former  Vietnam  Ministry  of  Science, Technology and Environment (MOSTE).  There are a few other examples in ICT4D projects in Vietnam (with the Ministry of Science and Technology [MOST], and Institute of Information Technology) and the Philippines (with the Department of Science and Technology [DOST], and the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development).    There  were  also  a  few  relevant  Environment  and  Natural  Resource  Management  (ENRM) Program projects  in  Vietnam  and  the  Philippines,  and several  more  in the  Social  and  Economic  Policy  (SEP)                                                                                  9  IDRC’ Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA) supported effective policy research in the 1990s on the costs of haze and the benefits of mitigating action. Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  9 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  21. 21.  Program  Area,  including  those  of  the  Asia  Development  Research  Forum  on  financial/crisis  management, aging populations and other themes. As a result of the discussions, three geographic approaches were identified: country, sub‐regional and regional.  ♦ Country level approaches Several  specific  projects  were  suggested  (all  are  now  in  different  stages  of  exploration  and  development) including:  • networking of the regional centres of Indonesia’s National Research Council (DRN);  • a small grants program on climate change and alternative energies; and  • developing and piloting better indicators and comparative mapping of country innovation systems. Some countries, particularly Indonesia, expressed their priority for a national and sub‐national focus for STI, as well  as  related  coordination  issues  involving  networking  and  capacity  development  internally.    Others,  to varying  degrees,  gave  more  priority  to  forms  of  regional  and  international  cooperation  ‐  bilateral  and multilateral.   Box 2. System and technology issues of most common concern at the sub‐regional or regional level.    System issues:  Technology issues:  • coordination among government institutions   • ICT access, costs, usage/services  • innovation in and for the BOP  • new and alternative energies  • low R&D and innovative culture in industry  including biofuels  • university roles, incentives, incubators  • agricultural biotechnologies   • IP management and services  • medical biotechnologies and new  • private‐research‐public institutional linkages  medicines  • innovation financing and venture capital  • water management, various  • international linkages and collaboration  • global warming and climate  • fostering a culture of innovation in society  change  • nanotechnology              ♦ Sub‐regional approaches Institutions in Thailand and Vietnam are interested and experienced in working together, as well as with Laos and  Cambodia,  where  cooperation  would  include  provision  of  some  resources.    There  is  a  suggestion  for  an initial focus on strategic and system issues, perhaps starting with a good mapping and assessment of ASEAN country  innovation  systems,  and  assembly  of  information  and  indicators  useful  for  policy  makers  on  an  10ongoing basis.    ♦ Regional approaches                                                                                  10  An example is the regular assessment of telecommunications regulatory environment indicators in Asia by LIRNEasia: http://www.lirneasia.net/    Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  10 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  22. 22.  There were several similar suggestions for ASEAN as a whole – a regional activity focusing initially on strategy and  broad system  issues,  and  initiating  more  specific  system  or  technology  collaborations  over  time.    Box 2 lists the system and technology issues of most common concerns identified earlier.  5.  Results of the Singapore Meeting, Sept 10‐11, 2007 During the country‐level discussions, several people suggested that IDRC and participants use the meeting in Singapore to sketch the elements of a program of collaboration on innovation systems ‐ objectives, initial time frame,  resources  and  activities.   The  meeting participants  would  form a  core  steering group  to help  identify and  develop  collaborative  activities.    Some  initial  activity  might  start  quickly  ‐  for  example,  on  mapping innovation systems, and perhaps on innovation surveys and/or indicators.  Collaboration might focus early on strategic thinking about innovation systems, and supporting policy makers and policy development through a range  of  agreed  research,  knowledge  and  networking  services/initiatives.    A  suggestion  was  made  to  focus from  the  start  on  local  innovation  and  the  linkages  (research,  business,  etc.)  between  local  and  modern systems. A later and perhaps larger meeting could develop activities on more specific aspects of innovation systems – system  or  technology  application  –  and  consider  models  or  options  for  program/project  management  and  11administration.  Participating country councils could provide counterpart contributions;  this could be used to generate  additional  resources  and  collaboration  internationally  with  donors,  corporations  and  their foundations, and national research councils in Canada and the North.  Such a mechanism should connect with regional institutions such as ASEAN COST. The  discussions  in  Singapore  proceeded  partly  along  these  lines, and  set  out  further  views,  experiences  and suggestions, all of which are summarized in the following paragraphs:  • Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines face similar problems with old structures and  thinking in government, universities and the private sector.  These are complex and adaptive systems,  with some aspects needing to die to generate others.  Sharing of international and regional country  experiences, particularly successes, would be very valuable to those managing the development of  innovation in these systems.    • Countries have a lot of baggage with respect to governments, private sectors, academics and  communities getting together; regional approaches can be easier and more effective in leading the  way.  A network of councils, essentially a network of networks, could add value if it were a flexible,  incremental and learning mechanism.  IDRC would be a good facilitator given its engagement globally  with innovation systems and its history of community‐based support.   • More conceptual clarity is needed about innovation and the BOP.  There is a tendency to associate  innovation systems with the elite, and for a ‘them vs. us’ view to prevail whereas all agree inclusiveness  and a ‘we’ perspective are needed.  Changing the mindset of policy makers and others is important,  and comparative assessment of innovation at the BOP in ASEAN and in more advanced systems is a  12 high priority.  In this context, the experience of LIRNEasia  is valuable in surveying ICT demand, usage  and innovation at the BOP, and using that knowledge to influence ICT policy and regulation on one  side and business models for providing mobile phones and a growing array of services on the other. 13                                                                                   11  Several national S&T ministries and agencies expressed willingness to cover national costs, and one country also said it could provide additional support for Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.  Training support from Singapore and Malaysia was also frequently referred to as valuable. 12  LIRNEasia is a regional ICT policy and regulation capacity building organization active across the Asia‐Pacific: www.lirneasia.net.  13  See for example “Teleuse at the Bottom of the Pyramid’ http://www.lirneasia.net/projects/current‐projects/bop‐teleuse/ and ‘Empowering rural communities through ICT policy and research’ http://www.lirneasia.net/. Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  11 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  23. 23.   • Focus on the BOP is important not only because of the large potential markets for companies, but also  to advance inclusive and participatory development strategies.  Examples regarding biotechnology  include development of drought resistant crops, maintenance of soil fertility, environmental  remediation and vaccines for neglected diseases.   • Examples were given of innovation by farmers and others where there was the opportunity to think,  experiment and capture knowledge from outside their immediate system; facilitators in academic,  public and non‐government organizations (NGOs) typically play key roles in initiating and assisting  these processes.  Empowering is a better concept than helping.   • Consistent implementation of policy agendas is a problem in most countries, as are the best means of  devolving innovation system development and management in decentralized systems of government  (particularly in Indonesia and the Philippines).  The ways in which devolution serves innovation in and  for the BOP are not yet clear.   • Ways of assessing or evaluating policies and programs need attention; indicators are important, and  there is extensive literature and experience to draw on.  Indicators of the performance of innovation‐ related policy need work, rather or more than the state of the STI system.  An example from the ICT  field is the Telecom Regulatory Environment (TRE) system of indicators developed by LIRNEasia, a  rapid regular country peer assessment of the main elements of good regulation – market entry, access  14 to spectrum, interconnection, tariff/price regulation, anti‐competitive practice and universal service.    • All countries are striving to develop entrepreneurship among researchers through many means  including curricula at tertiary and secondary levels; comparisons of approaches and experiences would  be valuable. There  was  broad  agreement  on  the  idea  of  an  informal  and  flexible  network  of  councils  with  institutional backing, state of the art reviews of innovation systems, documentation of experiences and successes, and an underlying but not exclusive theme of innovation in and for the BOP.  Expert researchers would be engaged to undertake key studies and the aim of the network would be to support the development of innovation systems in the region.  It is potentially a very productive approach to begin with developing a network of policy makers and proceeding to filling their priority knowledge gaps.  The Innovation Systems Research Network in Canada might  be  helpful  as  a  model,  as  well  as  in  terms  of  networking  and  knowledge  sharing.    It  would  also  be important  to  engage  with  business  and  NGO  groups,  as  well  as  many  related  initiatives  –  for  example, Grassroots  Innovation  (UNESCO)  and  the  Science  and  Technology  Policy  Asian  Network  (STEPAN).    IDRC could  facilitate  the  initial  years  of  the  network,  beginning  with  resources  and  a  mechanism  for  comparative scanning of innovation systems.                                                                                   14  For a summary presentation, see Telecom Regulatory Environment 2006: http://www.lirneasia.net/wp‐content/uploads/2007/06/pakistan_tre.pdf  Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  12 International Development Research Centre 2007  
  24. 24.  III. Country Perspectives  1. Indonesia 1.1. Institutions consulted Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI):  • Division for S&T Policy and Development Studies  • Center for S&T Development Studies  Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (including the Minister) Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT):  • Center for Information and Communication Technology  • Bureau of Planning  • Division of Agroindustry and Biotechnology  • Division of Functional Food Technology 1.2. Institutions and coordination The STI institutions are, in formal terms, centralized under the Ministry of Research and Technology (RISTEK) (see Box 3). 15 RISTEK, the parent ministry, sets policy and coordinates.  The research agencies under RISTEK include LIPI, which  is  slightly  more  oriented  towards  science  and  upstream  research,  and  BPPT,  which  is  more  oriented towards development, engineering and operation.  BPPT – with 24 Centres and an equal number of labs ‐ has many  modes,  essentially  services,  provided  at  its  discretion,  or  in  collaboration  with  national/regional/local governments, industries and SMEs. The  National  Research  Council  (DRN)  is  an  advisory  council  to  RISTEK  and  produced  the  National  Research Agenda of 2006 through internal consultation with its 80+ members (prominent scientists and representatives of academia, research and industry), Regional Research Councils (DRD; of which a total of 33 are planned and 15  now  exist)  and  resource  persons,  as  well  as  consultative  workshops  with  academia,  other  research institutions and industry.  The Agenda priorities (identified in Box 3) stem from national development plans. DRN is now mapping existing research in the country, starting with national public institutions, and proceeding to regional and local public and private institutions; copies of the initial mapping (listing short and long term activities of agencies, research titles, spending, human resources and outputs) were shared with IDRC.  During the meeting, assistance from IDRC in networking the DRN and regional DRD was raised as an idea.  District research  councils  were  also  discussed  as  a  possibility  as  they  are  bottom‐up  (with  local  discussions  and agreements) unlike their more top‐down national and regional counterparts; of 400 districts, however, there are now only four district research councils.                                                                                   15  For  information on the organization of RISTEK, please refer to the website: http://www.ristek.go.id/english/organization.html Research Councils and Support Organizations in Southeast Asia: Institutions, Issues and Collaboration  13 International Development Research Centre 2007  

×