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Project Launch Documentation Project Launch Documentation Document Transcript

  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 JANUARY 2012 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT COMPLEX AUDITORIUM ATENEO DE MANILA UNIVERSITY, LOYOLA HEIGHTS, QUEZON CITY
  • Catalyzing New Mobility inCities:The Case of Metro ManilaProject Launch31 January 2012Social Development Complex, Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights Quezon City
  • Table of ContentsExecutive Summary I. Opening Program A. Welcome Remarks by Dean Antonio La Viña, ASoG II. Overview of the Innovations at the Base of the Pyramid in Southeast Asia Program (iBoP Asia) III. Presentation of iBoP’s Key Projects A. Universities and Councils Network on Innovation for Inclusive Development in Southeast Asia (UNID-SEA) B. Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities Project: Finding NewMo in Metro Manila IV. iBoP Asia Website: iFind NewMo V. Mapping for Inclusive Mobility: Pinpointing Transport Terminals and Hubs VI. Search for New Mobility Business Models in Metro Manila VII. Sharing the New Mobility Agenda A. Search for New Mobility Opportunities in AdMU B. New Mobility Initiatives of the MMDA C. Responding to New Mobility Challenges in QC D. SMART Program and New Mobility Initiatives of the University of Michigan VIII. Open Forum IX. Updates/ Insights from the Rockefeller Foundation X. Understanding the Challenges and Opportunities in New Mobility A. How responsive is Metro Manila ’s Public Transport System to the Needs of the Poor and Vulnerable Sectors? Insights from a Mobility Mapping Case Study of Metro Manila B. Case Studies on the Mobility Characteristics, Cost and Issues of the Poor and Vulnerable Groups C. A Preliminary Inventory and Typology of Enterprise Models for Inclusive Mobility in Metro Manila: Of, By, and For the Poor and Vulnerable XI. Open Forum XII. SMART Mapping Uncharted Connection Points in Metro Manila: The Participatory Mapping Workshop Approach and Process i
  • XIII. Annexes A. List of participants for Project Launch B. Moving Metro Manila – Eagle Eyes by Dean Tony La Viña C. Overview of the Innovations at the Base of the Pyramid in Southeast Asia Program (iBoP Asia) Presentation slides D. Universities and Councils Network on Innovation for Inclusive Development in Southeast Asia (UNID-SEA) Presentation slides E. Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities Project: Finding NewMo in Metro Manila Presentation slides F. Mapping for Inclusive Mobility: Pinpointing Transport Terminals and Hubs Presentation slides G. Search for New Mobility Business Models in Metro Manila Presentation slides H. New Mobility Initiatives of the MMDA Presentation slides I. Responding to New Mobility Challenges in QC Presentation slides J. SMART Program and New Mobility Initiatives of the University of Michigan Presentation slides K. Updates/ Insights from the Rockefeller Foundation Presentation slides L. How responsive is Metro Manila ’s Public Transport System to the Needs of the Poor and Vulnerable Sectors? Insights from a Mobility Mapping Case Study of Metro Manila Presentation slides M. Case Studies on the Mobility Characteristics, Cost and Issues of the Poor and Vulnerable Groups Presentation slides N. A Preliminary Inventory and Typology of Enterprise Models for Inclusive Mobility in Metro Manila: Of, By, and For the Poor and Vulnerable Presentation slides O. Photo Documentation ii
  • List of AcronymsADB - Asian Development BankAdMU - Ateneo de Manila UniversityASoG - Ateneo School of GovernmentAUVs - Asian Utility VehiclesBoP - Base of the PyramidBRT - Bus Rapid TransitCOA - Commission on AuditDOE - Department of EnergyDOTC - Department of Transportation and CommunicationDPWH - Department of Public Works and HighwaysE-trike - electric tricycleFGD - focus group discussionGIS - Geographic Information SystemGK - Gawad KalingaiBoP Asia - Innovations at the Base of the Pyramid in Asia ProgramIID - Innovation for Inclusive DevelopmentIMMAP - Internet and Mobile Marketing Association of the PhilippinesIT - Information TechnologyKII - key informant interviewLED - Light Emitting DiodesLGUs - Local Government UnitsLTFRB - Land Transport and Franchising Regulatory BoardMIS - Management Information SystemMM - Metro ManilaMM-PIBAS - Mega Manila Provincial Integrated Bus Axis SystemMMDA - Metropolitan Manila Development AuthorityMRT - Metrorail TransitMV - motor vehicleNewMo - New MobilityNGO - Non-Government OrganizationPT - Public transport/ public transportationPUJ - Public Utility JeepneyPUVs - Public Utility VehiclesPWDs - Persons with Disabilities iii
  • QC - Quezon CityRnD - Research and DevelopmentSE - Social EnterpriseSEA - Southeast AsiaTAN - Transparency and Accountability NetworkTODA - Tricycle Operators and Drivers AssociationUNIID - Universities and Councils Network on Innovation for Inclusive DevelopmentUP-NCTS - University of the Philippines National Center for Transportation StudiesUS - United States iv
  • Executive SummaryA total of 41 various organizations and 104 individuals working on transportation inMetro Manila attended the project launch held last 31 January 2012 at the SocialDevelopment Complex Auditorium of the Ateneo de Manila University attended thelaunching of the “Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: the Case of Metro Manila” project.With support from the Rockefeller Foundation, this undertaking was organized by theInnovations at the Base of the Pyramid in Asia (iBoP Asia) Program of the Ateneo Schoolof Government.The aim of the launch is for the stakeholders to look at the big picture and see howorganization and infrastructure are connected and how these can make the difference. Itis a paradigm shift of looking at how people really move and how one can make adifference. It is strong on having options that includes walking and cycling. The projecthopes to ignite the goal of sustaining a conversation among stakeholders on howcitizens can be empowered to shape the patterns of mobility and access in Metro Manilato be more inclusive. It is expected that the Metro Manila stakeholders, are motivated toactively contribute to their own enhanced mobility by taking advantage of theconstituency-awareness, -building, and -mobilizing opportunities presented at theproject launch.The earlier insights of the iBoP Program were people say no to innovation because ofthe price they had to pay for making change happen and that universities are not gearedtoward the promotion of innovation because they are too divided into multi-disciplinarysilos thus, could not fuse themselves together.With the initial results of commissioned researches in New Mobility project, thefollowing were some of the understanding of those on the ground about innovation: 1)that the community was being census and may be asked to move out from their place;and 2) the project might lead to improvements that might attract informal settlers fromother areas. These two experiences on the ground made the project team realize that thecommunity is afraid of progress and that the burden of understanding is with the projectpeople and not that of those in the base of the pyramid.Some important highlights of the New Mobility project include: 1. New Mobility Forum/Workshop/Lecture Series that serves as a venue for people to habitually share information, ideas, insights, and initiatives for taking action at a community level and increase advocates for mobility and access to transportation in Metro Manila. 2. The project has a research component that seeks to explore the impact of the current public transport system especially the poor and the vulnerable population of Metro Manila by mapping the current public transport system and understanding the mobility patterns, cost and issues of the poor and the vulnerable groups. 3. The search for New Mobility Business Models: New Mobility Social Enterprise and Social Innovations Award where the project will accept related initiatives, concept, ideas and solutions specifically addressing mobility problems in Metro Manila.
  • 4. iFind New Mobility webpage in the iBoP website that features everything or anything related to new mobility including blog entries, links to other websites, latest news on mobility and an update of project’s activities. 5. Mapping for inclusive mobility: pinpointing public transport terminals and hubs using the hi-touch and hi-tech methods can improve the quality of information through a collaborative process. These also increases awareness among stakeholders, expand useful data available data for decision makers while enabling much broader spectrum of citizens to actively participate in citizen science in their own communities and to contribute their collective opinions and decisions. Hopefully these methods would increase efficiency to the generation of data and reduce costs while creating a community of people building on existing platforms. The information generated will be available on-line, not proprietary, and should start discussion streams on the state and improvements of the transport system in Metro Manila.Other partners and stakeholders also shared their respective new mobility agenda asfollows: 1. The Ateneo de Manila University presented by the University President, Fr. Jose Ramon Villarin, shared its vision of making the campus a sustainably mobile campus and its hopes of making it a carless campus. He also shared that there are plans for pedestrianizing the campus and starts including talks on mobility especially with students specializing on environment 2. The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority Chairman Francis Tolentino presented all their projects that address new mobility issues in Metro Manila. Some of their key projects include: construction of bicycle lanes from Remedios Circle to Intramuros, construction of pedestrian friendly foot bridge to be piloted in Sucat, elevated loading and unloading bus bays, motorcycle lanes along EDSA, LED Message Boards, Mega Manila Provincial Integrated Bus Axis System, Vehicle Tagging, Metro Manila Traffic Navigator, and the EDSA makeover project. He also noted the h importance of utilizing the esteros for transport purposes. 3. The local government of Quezon City presented by Retired Brig. Gen. Elmo San Diego, Head of the Department of Public Order and Safety of Quezon City, shared the electric tricycles (e-trike) program in cooperation with the Department of Energy and Asian Development Bank. It is a rent-to-own nationwide program designed jointly by LGUs, DOE, ADB and government financing. The basic requirement is to trade conventional tricycle with e-trikes. He also shared the Open Katipunan (OK) project that they planned to implement with Ateneo. Ultimately, the goal of project OK is to reduce cars traversing along Katipunan in half.Some of the issues/concerns raised by the participants were the following: 1. The framing of the poor and vulnerable: The use of the terms “poor” and “vulnerable” versus “commuter” or “general public”. Whereas, “poor” is an economic condition while “vulnerability” is a physical and social condition. The poor and vulnerable should not be separated from the general public but be coiled into one term: “commuters”.
  • 2. The operation of electric tricycles and how it improves mobility:Such as the cost of operation, what to do with the electronic waste generated in using lead acid for operation. 3. The issues on making cities more walkable such as safety, health and monitoring.:Most of the mobility innovations are centered on vehicles despite the fact that walking is considered to be the most important mode of transport especially for the poor. Health-wise, make cities more walkable by also not endangering the health of the citizens. 4. The idea of citizen or community involvement:Bringing action down to the barangay level might yield quicker and: better result than relying on government alone. The proper mind shift is that innovation is not always the government’s role. If the community can do something, they must act on it. Advocate for social accountability. 5. The mapping components and its accessibility When mapping out transport hubs and terminals, consider the flood zone areas, sitios and barangays rather than street names and the vulnerable sectors like the senior citizens and persons with disabilities. In terms of accessibility, a discussion on all levels of access to information from gathering of data to publishing. Printed copies of the maps compared to posting on the internet may be more practical and are much acceptable to people.In order to understand the challenges and opportunities of new mobility in MetroManila, preliminary data of the three commissioned case studies were presented. Forthe mapping study, which tackles the question, how mapping can be used to respond tothe needs of the poor and vulnerable, Dr. Jun Castro presented both in numerical andvisual form partial mapping of the public terminals in North EDSA. In the study onmobility characteristics, costs and issues of the poor and vulnerable groups, Mr.Randolph Carreon showed photo documentation of their data gathering and generalfindings in Purok Centro, Matandang Balara, Quezon City. The data showed that peopleprimarily leave their house to go to work and school. Of the estimated total of 20,000trips per day, aside from walking, the top 2 transport modes used are PUJ and tricycle.Generally, the people said they would walk if they could. The perceived primary mobilityproblem of the Purok Centro Matandang Balara community was high transport cost,which they thought they could resolve by raising their income. Lastly, the Ateneo Centerfor Social Entrepreneurship represented by Ms. Tieza Santos, is commissioned to look atexisting transport/ mobility related social entrepreneurship opportunities in thetransport sector presented a summary of pretest data gathering and recurring themesand variables. Two recurring platforms were raised in terms of ICT access: mobile andInternet. Based on the preliminary survey results, data showed that in terms ofaffordability, these consumers are able to afford more information coming from mobiletechnology and Internet. In terms of information services, they invest too much ontransport cost than service feature. In terms of willingness to pay, they are willing to payaround PhP7. Majority have difficulty in availing healthcare services and the finding ofemployment but the primary issue is not in terms of inaccessibility directly but more interms of actual cost of goods due to lack of employment. 77% attribute their difficultytowards the cost of availing of these goods and services. The recurring themes that cameup were: 1) sustainable transportation related to sustainable targets and sustainablelegislation for transportation and land coordination policies/ designs, inter and intra-agency collaboration approach, agency prioritization and allocation process; 2) Energyefficiency, probably because of increasing oil prices and environmental healthconsideration.
  • Ms. Susan Zielienski, Managing Director of the SMART Center University of Michigangave an overview of the SMART program and shared some of the new mobilityinitiatives of the University of Michigan. She encouraged everyone to think ofaccessibility (meeting needs) rather than mobility as the goal to open up a range of newoptions for innovation, including IT. She highlighted that we all live in a world wheretransportation is equated to cars hence, improving transportation means improvingcars. People are culturally connected to their cars that everything else becomesextraneous. People assume that transportation is necessary, that cars are necessary,therefore to improve on transportation, we must improve on cars. She asserted that lifewould be much better if we have more choices and not just simply choose to have a car.
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 I. Welcome Remarks Dr. Antonio La Viña, Dean, Ateneo School of Government The project launch of Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities in Metro Manila held in the Social Development Complex Auditorium inside Ateneo de Manila University started at around 9:00 a.m. with Ms. Marie Cddyqa Jaya Rogel of the Ateneo School of Government (ASoG) leading the Invocation and National Anthem. She welcomed the various participants representing different transport organizations in the event. She then called Dr. Antonio La Viña, Dean of the ASoG, to give the welcome remarks. Dean La Viña welcomed the participants (See Annex A for list of participants) to the event and to the Ateneo de Manila University campus. He said that most of the things he had to say could be found in his column entry at The Manila Standard entitled New Mobility and Moving Metro Manila. He felt that moving Metro Manila was probably more important or equally important than what the country was facing in the judicial arena1 at that time. In his column article New Mobility, (See Annex B) he said that dealing with transportation in Metro Manila and getting it right is important for prosperity and in dealing with poverty. A mapping activity that aims to bring together stakeholders to the table and have a real good conversation about options with respect to transportation and a goal of making the people more mobile can be a good start. Making sure that the poor are not excluded in these conversations and decisions are also valuable in dealing with poverty. He ended by wishing everyone a fruitful discussion and a good day. II. Overview of the Innovations at the Base of the Pyramid in Southeast Asia Program (iBoP Asia) Dr. Segundo Joaquin Romero, Director, iBoP Asia Program Ms. Rogel introduced Dr. Segundo Joaquin Romero to present the iBoP Asia Program of the ASoG. (See Annex C for his presentation slides) Dr. Romero started by defining the base of the pyramid that started the iBoP concept. In his presentation of the world economic pyramid, base of the pyramid (BoP) was defined as people with annual per capita income of less than US $1,500.00. The iBoP uses the word “base” rather than “bottom” to refer to these people because bottom sounds too starved. He presented various data that further illustrates the base of the pyramid. The iBoP puts emphasis on their belief that low income does not mean no income and1 Impeachment trial of Supreme Court Chief Justice Renato Corona 1
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012suggests a range of opportunities for market-based approaches to better meet theirneeds and empower their entry into the formal economy. What the iBoP is trying todo is to come up with a business model - similar to the New Mobility Project- thatfocuses on the use of public social enterprises to cater to the need of the poor andthe vulnerable. The program started in 2007 with Dean La Viña spearheading the unique way ofputting together various disciplines and deploys them to engage BoP communities.The program’s stakeholders include the government, private sector, non-government and international sectors that work to engage the BoP sector inSoutheast Asia (SEA). ASoG houses the program and has existing partneruniversities in Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam and now plans to move to Cambodiaas well. SEA countries are very dynamic moving towards greater innovation. However,iBoP is concerned that the innovation policies in SEA is more focused on economicand industrial development and less on poverty alleviation. European countriesused serve as great models for innovation but increasing innovation capacity inThailand, Singapore and Malaysia are now being aspired by other with transportbeing one of the major needs of the people. The iBoP currently pursues a two-track program or two major projects, theUniversities and Councils in Innovations for Inclusive Development in SEA and NewMobility in Metro Manila. Dr. Romero also said that while the program is alreadythree years old, its people are new so relatively, iBoP is a new program with newpeople. He also shared their early insights on innovation starting with a story of a LosBaños farmer during Masagana ’99. This farmer was able to produce 100 kabans perhectare through innovation but soon as he got his harvest, everyone went to ask fora share of his yield. Incidentally, he had to continue giving even when he was at alost. The following year this farmer said no to innovation. He also shared anotherstory that happened to their conversation with the community at Purok Centro. Atthe end of the workshop, the people raised two concerns: 1) that they were beingcensus and may be asked to move out from their place; and 2) the project might leadto improvements that might attract informal settlers from other areas. These twoexperiences on the ground made them realize that the community is afraid ofprogress and that the burden of understanding is with the project people and notthat of those in the BoP. Second insight was that universities are not geared toward the promotion ofinnovation because they are too divided into multi-disciplinary silos thus, could notfuse themselves together. Dr. Romero encouraged everyone to participate in whatASoG is currently doing and deploy together to promote innovation. He emphasizedthat iBoP is about mind shift, not improve BoP directly but help create a mind shiftin the government and NGO sector. 2
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012III. Presentation of iBoP Asia’s Key Projects A. Universities and Councils Network on Innovation for Inclusive Development in Southeast Asia (UNID-SEA) Ms. Mary Grace Santos, Project Manager, UNIID-SEA Ms. Mary Grace Santos was introduced next to present the UNIID-SEA project of iBoP Asia. (See Annex D) It is a partnership project between the National Research Council of the Philippines and Canada International Research Center. To put the project in context, Ms. Santos said that SEA experiences show spectacular growth in poverty reduction over the last three decades; however there is a big trade off for this development as inequality is also rising. She also mentioned that the Philippines have the highest gini coefficient2 in SEA. She said that we are in the field of innovation where innovation is defined as the development of technology, products and systems that aim at making things easier and improve the standard of living. But in reality, innovation process tends to exclude the poor and the social challenges they face in the innovation targets, which further exacerbates poverty and inequality. Social justice, equality and human rights are not deeply embedded in innovation found in SEA. These innovations are mostly economic and industrial in nature. Human development are not really used or prioritized so social development is just secondary to economic, technological and industrial development in innovation policies. iBoP with UNIID-SEA advocates for a new perspective on innovation and development through IID. IID is understood as innovation that reduces poverty and enables many groups of people especially the poor and vulnerable to participate in decision making, create and actualize opportunities and share the benefits of development. In a nutshell, it is like democratizing development with innovation being knowledge and skill driven; the project will engage the key agents that facilitate the production, diffusion and application of knowledge for innovation in various fields: universities and research councils. It is innovation for all and by all. UNIID-SEA is a 3-year initiative (2012-2015). The idea was conceived by iBoP Asia of ASoG and IDRC to first facilitate universities and research councils’ reinvention. Reinvention means to rethink, reorient, and retool to be capable intermediaries of innovation. For Universities, it is in teaching, research and extension and for research councils it is in priority/ agenda–setting, grant making with different minds coming together, and policy making. Second, the project seeks to facilitate the establishment of formal partnership and collaboration between universities and councils, which seeks to foster innovation research to reform social policy. Thirdly, the project aims to develop champions and nurture partnerships by2 Standard measure of equality in the world. Gini Coefficient: 0 representing perfect equality and 1representing maximum inequality. Gini coefficients of SEA -- Singapore: 42.5; Philippines: 44;Vietnam: 34.4; Malaysia: 37.9; Indonesia: 34.3 (Source: Securing the Present, Sharing the Future:World Bank East Asia and Pacific Economic Update 2011) 3
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012forming a network and eventually connect to a global movement namely: UNIIDSouth Africa, Latin America and South Asia. In the long term, the project aspires tofoster multi-disciplinary, multi-stakeholder and multi-level (national, regional andglobal) approaches, mechanisms and partnerships towards IID. The project will be working with one university each from Thailand, Indonesiaand Vietnam with ASoG being the lead university and project implementer in thePhilippines, in partnership with corresponding research councils for the next threeyears. Ms. Santos also presented a quick run through of the activities the project will gothrough or its components: a. Knowledge and capacity building (multi-disciplinary course module, Social Innovation Lab, capacity building workshop for champions); b. Research support; c. Link to policy; and d. Network building She invited everyone to the project launching this Aprilthat will bring inrepresentatives from all universities and councils ASoG will be working with. In theend, she encouraged everyone to engage and participate as they develop the project.B. Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities Project: Finding New Mobility in Metro Manila Dr. Marie Danielle Guillen, Manager, Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities Project Dr. Guillen was called to present the new project being launched on that day. (See Annex E) She started with the background and purpose of the project, which focuses on the use of new mobility as a lens in search of more sustainable and innovative solutions in the urban public transport system in Metro Manila, in particular, ensuring that the needs of the poor and vulnerable are met. Wanting to engage the participants, she asked them what they meant by mobility and how each managed to get to the event that day. Then she went through defining the concepts involved: Mobility – both the ability of a person (including the goods that the community needs) to travel todestinations of choice and the amount of movement and time necessary to do so. Transportation – the movement of people, animals and goods from one locationto another. The field is divided into infrastructure, vehicle and operations. New mobility in this project refers to an initiative that is multi-disciplinary,multi-sector, top-bottom, bottom-up approaches like social enterprise innovationsin mobility addressing a socially inclusive transport sector. Multi-disciplinary meansthat everyone is part of the transportation sector. She then recounted a story 10years ago when she met a Japanese who inspired her to write a thesis on pedicabswhile her friend worked on cycling attitudes in the University of the Philippines. 4
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012This meeting led to an understanding on the attitude to cycle. Basically the studyshows that built it and they will come. She highlighted that it took UP 7 years for thesystem to have a car-free oval an infrastructure that would promote cycling. This New Mobility project is looking at improving the transport sector. It tries toincorporate the dimension of sustainability in transportation such as social equity,economic, financial, health, ecology, physical environment, air quality, noise andclimate change and not just focusing on traffic. This is based on the premise that ascomplexity increases, the notion that a single solution to solve transportationchallenge also decreases and the need to look at the big picture. So there is a needfor everyone to be engaged in the call for new mobility and be catalyst, try to findways to solve these issues. Dr. Guillen then moved into differentiating some stakeholders involved in theNew Mobility project such as engineers, urban planners and IT developers. Shementioned that everyone seems to do something to address the transport issues butare not linked. There is a need to connect the dots and find out how each can linktogether. The project aims to develop a new platform, resource center and enabler ofinnovation for purposes of governance ensuring socially inclusive mobility in theregion. It also seeks to utilize and complement existing studies by initiating a metro-wide conversation among stakeholders to introduce new mobility and find out howthe stakeholders envision the future of transport system in Metro Manila. Finding New Mobility in Metro Manila essentially means taking myriad stepsthat leads to a paradigm shift by:  Looking at the big picture;  Focusing on people’s needs and wants especially that of the urban poor and the vulnerable groups; and  Evolution of transport as attention turned to energy efficient mobility models, shared transport schemes and community owned transport. The project holds the Finding New Mobility Forum series called Let’s Talk NewMobility. These series serves as a venue for people to habitually share information,ideas, insights, and initiatives for taking action at a community level and increaseadvocates for mobility and access to transportation in Metro Manila. She informedeveryone that a similar forum was held last October 2011 hosted by Ayala. She alsoshared that they conducted validation workshops with the urban poor communityincluding tricycle operators and drivers association (TODA) to introduce the conceptof New Mobility and noticed that people got a bit worried but eventually relaxedwhen they learned that this initiative is meant to focus on the people She furthershared that when they went on field, the community representatives shared thatthey have no problem with road expansion but they were afraid that the NewMobility project would dislocate them from their home. This misconception aboutthe project was corrected and the importance of road sharing for people as a way offixing things was emphasized. The goal of this forum series is to sustain aconversation among these stakeholders on how citizens can be empowered to shapethe patterns of mobility and access in Metro Manila to be more inclusive. Anoverriding aim is to promote other forms of public transport such as biking andwalking. These forum series want to highlight the fact that government is doing itsbest to improve our transportation system and everyone needs a paradigm shift. She 5
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 mentioned that in our country people often use cars as incentive as we move up the economic ladder but in other countries they use public transport as incentive. The project has a research aspect that seeks to explore how the current public transport system affects the poor and the vulnerable populations of Metro Manila by mapping the current public transport system and understanding the mobility patterns, cost and issues of the poor and the vulnerable groups. Aside from learning all the issues, seeking new or emerging entrepreneurial or livelihood opportunities responsive to their mobility needs, Dr. Guillen reminded everyone that they do have a role to play. New Mobility also seeks to engage the general public. This activity aims to build a community of people wanting to create a platform or build on available platform to improve information generated in maps for seamless multi-modal connections. This is expected to benefit not only the poor and the vulnerable groups but the general public as well. The development of a mapping concept is needed to see the connectivity. The project also has the search for New Mobility Business Models: New Mobility Social Enterprise and Social Innovations Award, which has the following objectives:  To surface enterprising solutions to solve social mobility problems;  To engage different stakeholders in solving pressing mobility problems in the megacity especially that of the poor and the vulnerable sector; and  To document existing social enterprises in the transport sector and generate innovative ideas that address mobility problems and needs. Then as prelude to the next speaker, Dr. Guillen said that the project basically attempts to generate inquiries, present more information, tickle the interest, insights of the people, initiatives, innovations and interconnections.IV. iBoP Asia Website: iFind New Mobility Mr. Andre Quintos, Web and Networking Coordinator, iBoP Asia Mr. Quintos presented the iBoP Asia website (www.ibopasia.net) most specifically the new mobility section named iFind New Mobility. He started identifying the sections of the iBoP website home page with the header being a photo that illustrates the problem on new mobility. He said that the purpose of the New Mobility page on the site is to be a portal for everything related to new mobility. In the site you can find local and international content containing articles, blog posts and links to other websites. When users visit the website, they could immediately see the scope of what the website covers. iFind New Mobility is a blog where you can find anything related to new mobility. Latest news on new mobility can be found there. The sidebar on the right has links to other websites that help a typical commuter get around the metro, i.e. commuting in Metro Manila, MMDA, Metro Manila direction and ParaSaTabi.com. These links 6
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 can help commuters go from one place to another. The news and information page talks about the new mobility project and other project related events. Project Activity page would describe the activities of the project and explain what is happening. The Events page contains anything that happened in the past and has yet to happen. Mr. Quintos reported that he is working on a twitter feed to promote all the articles found in the website to the social networking site Twitter. Videos would be uploaded also on the New Mobility Watch page. The picture galleries of past events could also be found in the site, for example, the team’s recent visit to GK Village in Payatas. He informed everyone that the existing site is just the beginning and that data are being collected and placed online. He envisions the site to be more useful to people in the future by including a transportation map in real time using available open applications. He shared their plan of adding New Mobility Marketplace where people can post anything transport related they want to sell such as transport for sale, biofuel etc. Another possibility is to have a contest to get everyone engaged and hopefully help people learn about new mobility.V. Mapping for Inclusive Mobility: Pinpointing Transport Terminals and Hubs Mr. Lorenzo Cordova, Jr. Research Associate, iBoP Asia In order to understand mobility, Mr. Cordova deemed it necessary for all to look at three things: 1) the different modes of transportation 2) the factors affecting public transport and 3) planning and advocacy. (See Annex F) From a perspective of a commuter, he presented the need to pinpoint the public transportation terminals and hubs and their connection using a map to increase mobility. The following were the key concepts of his presentation:  Modes of public transport  Public transport (PT) hubs  PT terminals  Informal transport hubs/terminals  Engaging stakeholders in mapping He started by showing photos of the diverse modes of public transportation and said that each plays a major role in mobility especially of the poor and can either compete or play a complementary role to other forms of PT. He showed more photos of public transport hubs and multi-modal transport terminal in Metro Manila. Photos of PT terminals, mostly found in secondary roads, were also shown. Informal PT terminals/ hubs were defined as areas that are public or privately owned, used by motorized and non-motorized PT vehicles as terminals, but have no clear legal 7
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012provision and/or local government ordinances that support its existence. However,in reality, these informal PT terminals are often the source of living for the poor andvulnerable. Why is it necessary to pinpoint PT terminals and hubs? One reason presented byMr. Cordova was the complexity and diversity transportation modes. Second is thegrowing number of unaccounted PT terminals and hubs that hinders the walkabilityand sometimes obstruct the flow of transport. Third, its existence is not a secret butthe country lacks readily available and accessible information where they are.Fourth, LGUs and other government agencies lack capability to produce up-to-datemap and last but not the least, mapping requires much time and resources. In commuting in Metro Manila, do we think of connection points? What are ourchoices and are they efficient? These questions were presented as the rationale whywe need to map transport terminals and hubs in Metro Manila. They are crucial inorder to assess the mobility problems and opportunities in Metro Manila and toimprove information generated in maps for seamless multi-modal interconnectionsthat would benefit not only the poor and the vulnerable groups but the generalpublic as well. The goal of mapping was to build a community of people wanting tocreate that platform or build on available platform. He showed a mapping example of something they did in his GIS class to map thetricycle terminals in Barangay Bagong Silang, Caloocan City. The violet dots,representing the terminals, were all over the map (see Annex F, slide number 10).According to the local tricycle regulatory unit in Caloocan, they said that the thereshould be at least one terminal per one TODA but the map showed many tricycleterminals located near each other. In his study, he found out that too muchtransportation terminals and supply causes too much violence in the barangay. Thesecond map he showed (see Annex F, slide number 11) illustrates that most of theterminals use up space for pedestrians and sidewalks thus reduces the walkability ofthe barangay. This situation is not unique in Bagong Silang and can be foundanywhere in Metro Manila, thus the need for proper mobility mapping.Mapping for inclusive mobility needs three major components:  Individuals and organizations as contributors  Intermediation platform – “enabler”  Users Mobility mapping can either be done using “hi-tech” or “hi-touch” methods. Hi-tech uses available open platform from the internet like google map or open street,while hi-touch will be the one used on the New Mobility mapping workshop usingthe University of Michigan-SMART Centre approach the following day. Hi-touchmethod involves seven or more people in a group mapping and noting connectionsand locations of specific terminals. He showed a listing of several existing web-basedplatforms that can be utilized to map the terminals. Possible information fromstakeholders would include:  Mode of public transport  Location of terminal/ hub  Name of TODA, JODA, PODA etc.  Number of members 8
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012  Destinations/ routes  Time of operation  Facilities and services available in the terminals/ hubs He gave a quick conceptual framework of how the project intends to map mobility. They wanted to form a community; utilize different platforms such as the Internet, mobile and hi-touch method; map out applications; and validate and hopefully be published online as a resource for the mobility of community. The project aims to improve the quality of information through a collaborative process, increase awareness among stakeholders, expand useful data available data for decision makers while enabling much broader spectrum of citizens to actively participate in citizen science in their own communities and to contribute their collective opinions and decisions. Hopefully the “hi-touch” method would increase efficiency to the generation of data and reduce costs. Generally, the project aims to empower a community of people that want to create or build on existing platforms. The community of empowered people will be producing data at the same time consuming them hence naming them “Prosumers”. He informed everyone present that the maps generated will be made available on- line as a community resource and should be able to generate discussion among stakeholders to improve state and improvement of the transport system in Metro Manila. He reminded everyone that mapping is an evolving activity so new approaches may become available over time. Finally, he said that everyone is welcome to give suggestions on how to improve their project.VI. Search for New Mobility Business Models in Metro Manila Ms. Jessica Dator-Bercilla, Senior Research Associate, iBoP Asia Ms. Dator-Bercilla started by asking who among the participants have tried walking and using public transport. She then asked whether the people from the audience ever thought that this experience of walking and/or using public transport would get better. She asked the audience whether any of them have written down or implemented their dream. She noted that many Filipinos lost the capacity to experiment and innovate soon after colonization. The psychology of Filipinos noted that Filipinos are too used to borrowing ideas or solutions from others (countries) that we forget to dream enough to experiment. But under the New Mobility project, this notion would be dissolved. A new business model search would be made open to all for their transport dreams to turn into reality. First she presented was the Social Innovation Initiative/ Concept Awards. (See Annex G) This opportunity is for those who have not written their idea on how to make urban centers more mobile. The project will accept concept, ideas and solutions specifically addressing mobility problems in Metro Manila. Essentially this is a solution-seeking initiative. The project is looking for innovative ideas under these four categories borrowed from the 4Ps of Innovation by John Besseant and Joe Tidd of the Humanitarian Fund: 9
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 1. Product Innovation – new mode of transport 2. Process innovation –new way of being mobile 3. Position innovation –new form of mobility 4. Paradigm innovation The next was the Best New Mobility Social Enterprise Award. In searching fora new business model, the project team decided to focus on social enterprisespecifically for the transport sector that address new mobility problems especiallythat of the poor and vulnerable. Entries must reflect sound management, should beproperly documented and reflect a social enterprise (SE) that meets multiple bottomlines. SE uniquely uses the capabilities of different stakeholders as leverage todeliver goods and services in the area of mobility to meet multiple bottom lines. Itcan target the following or even more bottom lines:  Surplus or profit generation, where profit is reinvested for the gain of the stakeholders and further pursuing the social objective  Environmental health  Preservation of cultural integrity and diversity  Capacity development or empowerment of a sector or community simultaneously improving their quality of life.  Climate change Below were examples of probable entries around the globe Ms. Dator-Bercillapresented:  Cargo bike of Worldbike  Mini-Bus Operation, Day Care Transport, Special Education Needs Transport by the HCT Group in UK.  Agency Community transport Model and Transport Asset Management Riders for health  Non-emergency Medical transport by Tranmedic  Mobility Scooter by Rugged Tree She also mentioned that the entries should be existing projects meeting thefollowing common criteria:  Clear identification of mobility issues being addressed especially with those of the urban poor and vulnerable groups;  Employ approaches that incorporate principles of sustainability in transportation that address issues in ecology, social equity, health, finance and economy, air quality, noise, climate; and  Clear identification of challenges being addressed and of success indicators Lastly, she presented the schedule. After the project is launched, formal calls fornomination would be open at mid February and run through March 2012. ACommittee deliberation follows around April-May 2012 and the winners can benominated to present at the Rio Entrepreneurship Summit in May –June 2012.Before she left, she directed questions to Dr. Guillen. 10
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012VII. Sharing the New Mobility Agenda A. Search for New Mobility Opportunities in the AdMU Fr. Jose Ramon Villarin, S.J., President, Ateneo de Manila University When the forum resumed after launch, Ms. Rogel introduced Fr. Villarin to share his thoughts on the new mobility opportunities in AdMU. He happily recalled the time when he used to walk from Dela Strada Church, 2 km away, to Ateneo in high school. The school did not have too many buildings then in 1970s and walking is something that the people like doing. But now as the school President for 18,000 students, the Challenge is making Ateneo a sustainably mobile campus. He shared that there are plans for pedestrianizing the campus. Currently, there are around 2,000 cars that park inside the campus and occupy 7.5 hectares of prime real estate and cost several billion pesos. What he sees and hopes for the campus is for it to become a carless campus. He looks forward to the New Mobility project because aside from helping others and the city, which he grew up in and learned to love, the project will also help the campus. He also hopes that the innovative ideas would not simply be shelved and be replicated and adopted by other campuses in the country. He shared that majority of the ideas will depend on how lands are allocated. Before he left, he welcomed everyone to the campus and wished for the project to succeed. He also emphasized that AdMU, contrary to what is perceived by many, is not an elitist school. He proudly claimed that they form their students to look beyond the campus and include the marginalized people. B. New Mobility Initiatives of the MMDA Hon. Francis Tolentino, Chair, MMDA Chairman Tolentino started with a photo from the Balikatan exercise, a general being carried on the back of another man. He said that this photo illustrates the situation of transport mobility in our country where people are indolent walkers. More than the concept of pedestrianization, he deemed it necessary to find out why there is a need to motorize. He expressed his thought that this project should also look into why Filipinos are not pedestrian citizens. He then moved to presenting the new mobility initiatives of the MMDA. He announced a proposed skybridge project that would utilize esteros to address hopefully address mobility issues. He hopes that this would open the minds of urban planners, policy makers, local legislators and city 11
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012engineers that it is about time they utilize esteros for transport purposes. Heproposed a shift in outlook for esteros as source of crimes, disease, flood, urbandecay etc. He stressed the importance of esteros to renew Metro Manila similar toSeoul, Korea; Bangkok, Thailand and Macau. He said that they intended to publicizethe Skybridge project in the next weeks. For the New Mobility initiative, he agreedthat everyone must free himself or herself from the tendency to see Metro Manila asroads and bridges and see that it is made of human beings. He found it veryappropriate to include the poor and marginalized sectors in the project. He then moved to presenting the following future and current projects of MMDA(See Annex H): 1. Plan to have bicycle lanes from Remedios Circle to Intramuros 2. Construction of pedestrian-friendly footbridges: These footbridges aim to avoid conflict between motor vehicles and pedestrians by providing safe movement at intersections in selected locations. Instead of using the usual road or pedestrian lane, the MMDA created footbridges as an alternative and safer way to go to the other side of the road. The MMDA will be taking the design and construction of footbridges in a whole new level. The new design to be constructed in Sucat and funded by the DPWH, will include man-lifts, which can accommodate up to six persons in any given time. With this design, persons with disabilities (PWD) will be able to traverse the other side of the road safely and more conveniently. 3. Elevated loading and unloading bus bays: The bays aim to eliminate the practice of indiscriminate embarking and disembarking of bus passengers in non-designated areas. The agency is proposing to implement the elevated loading and unloading bays, similar to what is being implemented in Jakarta, Indonesia. Bus bay will have an elevated platform approximately one meter from the carriageways. Likewise, bus floors will be customized to align with the boarding platform. Bus bays will be modified to ensure the convenience and safety of passengers by providing roofs, seats and proper ventilation, among others. Ramps will also be provided for the elderly and the PWDs. There is now a Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) resolution signed regarding this so Chairman Tolentino was certain that this would be implemented. Hand in hand with this initiative is MMDA’s push for bus drivers to receive fixed salaries to prevent them from hoarding passengers. A single ticketing system of traffic violations across Metro Manila which aims for a centralized database of traffic violations is also expected to run by March. 4. Motorcycle lanes: For Chairman Tolentino, this is the best indication that Filipino drivers can be disciplined. Motorcycles have steadily proliferated in the metropolis and they contribute to traffic congestion. Given the limited training of motorcycle drivers at the onset, they can endanger road users’ safety. In response, MMDA designated non-exclusive motorcycle lanes or “blue lanes” along Commonwealth Avenue in Quezon City (QC) and Macapagal Avenue in Pasay City. This will be expanded to include EDSA starting February 14, 2012. Since its implementation in Commonwealth and Macapagal Avenue, there was a significant reduction of accidents in the mentioned thoroughfares. Chairman Tolentino hopes that this will pave way 12
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 for bicycle lanes, and that with the right infrastructure, support and mindset, this can be accomplished.5. LED Message Board: MMDA will be installing light emitting diodes message boards in major roads in Metro Manila to provide traffic advisories as well as road safety reminders to guide road users. An example of this is the led message advisory along EDSA Main Avenue, Southbound.6. Mega Manila Provincial Integrated Bus Axis System: MMDA is embarking on The Mega Manila Provincial Integrated Bus Axis System (MM-PIBAS) which aims to improve traffic conditions by prohibiting provincial buses from plying the major thoroughfares of Metro Manila, minimizing public bus transport congestion, eliminating vehicle-pedestrian conflict and promoting faster mobility. This will be done by providing central terminals in the north, east, south and southeast for provincial buses coming from those corridors. The MM-PIBAS shall be patterned from existing centralized bus terminals in other countries. Looking at airports as models, the MM-PIBAS is envisioned to be a terminal building complex with large area to accommodate many buses, park and ride facilities, dedicated space, which allows the mobility of passengers and convenience of cargoes and suitable location accessible to other modes of transportation. The idea is to consolidate the 85 existing provincial bus terminals with 60 bus companies operating approximately 7,368 buses into 4 common terminals (North, East, South and South East). Chair Tolentino announced that President Aquino will be releasing an Executive Order in February directing MMDA and DOTC to start working on this. Hence, Chairman Tolentino’s quick trip to Seoul the following day with DOTC officials to specifically look at the operation of their bus terminals. He strongly believed that this would be President Aquino’s pet project so it is likely that this would be operational at the end of the year.7. Vehicle Tagging: MMDA’s vehicle tagging scheme involves the permanent painting of license plate details of public utility vehicles (PUVS) on all sides of the vehicle and roof. Each type of PUV has a distinct colored background with prescribed measurements for the text and background. This was partially implemented on city buses starting last August 15 and on AUVs on December 12 last year. The scheme has helped in tracking and apprehending vehicles that have committed traffic offenses and city buses operating outside of their franchised routes. It has also diminished the unlawful practice of bus operators swapping plate numbers and the number of hit- and-run incidents committed by reckless bus drivers. This initiative came from the transport sector. This is part of the government’s public private partnership and has no cost to the government.8. Metro Manila Traffic Navigator: A major public-private partnership initiative of MMDA in coordination with TV 5. An online media service providing updated traffic situations in 9 major thoroughfares, EDSA included. Using this system, passengers and motorists are being empowered to make well- informed decisions taking alternative/less-congested routes. This service can be accessed by any web browser-enabled device at http://mmdatraffic.interaksyon.com and may be downloaded to smartphones and tablets for free. The TV 5-MMDA traffic navigator was awarded the bronze Boomerang award for innovation by the Internet and Mobile Marketing Association of the Philippines (IMMAP) last August 18, 2011 and 13
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 the I.T. award of the year. This award symbolizes the power of combining technology and public service to bring real positive change. Chairman Tolentino wanted to ask the developers to make the program more visual and include intersections at real time. 9. EDSA makeover project: MMDA is partnering with the private sector in transforming EDSA into a traffic discipline zone, making it a motorist/ commuter and pedestrian–friendly thoroughfare. Other components of this activity are landscaping and greening, beautification, installation of adequate lighting along EDSA using energy efficient light emitting diodes (LED) technology especially on sidewalks, tunnels and footbridges to avoid proliferation of bad elements and installation of CCTVs, upgrading of street signs and maintenance of foot bridges. MMDA is looking at Mongkok and Suanlum in Bangkok as models. 10. Estero Bridge Part II: This is an activity that aims to clean two esteros at a day. MMDA said this is challenging not because of the amount of trash but because of the people who want to be relocated. These people do not want to live in the estero de Concordia example. MMDA’s difficulty was how to transfer the people when government resources are limited. Chairman Tolentino called for everyone to change the way they look at cities as not just buildings but with people. Also change their perspective on esteros as areas of opportunities and harness the talents of the people living there. In the same manner, he called for people to look at transport in Metro Manila. At the end, he said he is looking forward to the results of the studies commissioned by the project to improve Metro Manila transport not just this year but in the years to come.C. Responding to New Mobility Challenges of Quezon City Retired Brig. Gen. Elmo San Diego, Head, Department of Public Order and Safety Quezon City General San Diego reported that QuezonCity is one of the biggest cities that occupies1/4th of Metro Manila. It has a population of 3million with half belonging to the poor. QC isalso one of the richest cities throughout thecountry and the richest in Metro Manila basedon the latest COA report. With suchcharacteristics, it attracts business investorsand also informal settlements. The biggestchallenge for the city is the increasing numberof informal vendors and how to eliminate them.QC’s response to mobility challenges is how tocoordinate with other agencies to support theirprograms. General San Diego also shared project Open Katipunan (OK) that they planned toimplement with Ateneo. The Ateneo community consists of grade school and highschool parents, students and student council members who meet every month todiscuss traffic and other problems along Katipunan. Ultimately, the goal of projectOK is to reduce cars traversing along Katipunan by 50% 14
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 Then he moved on to share their latest mobility program, the electric tricycles.(See Annex I) To set the context, he said that tricycles are the most preferred andmost convenient motor vehicle used by the marginalized sector in QC. At the onset,e-trike was a traffic initiative that reduces carbon emission within the campus butthe students wanted it to ply along Katipunan. The City Council deemed it dangerousbut they supported the idea nonetheless. In partnership with the Department ofEnergy (DOE), QC was chosen as a pilot area to run e-trikes under the generousfunding of Asian Development Bank (ADB). The bank allotted US$ 40 Million for32,000 e-tricycle units. It is a rent-to-own nationwide program designed jointly byLGUs, DOE, ADB and government financing. The basic requirement is to tradeconventional tricycle with e-trikes. General San Diego showed photo samples of e-trikes that are actually used indifferent parts of the Philippines like Palawan and Mandaluyong. He mentioned thatthe initial design of the e-trike in QC failed because the units were underpoweredand could not handle the slopes of Payatas. QC was chosen as a pilot area becausethey have the most number of registered tricycles with 5,000 plying as “colorum”. Inthis regard, QC issued a moratorium in tricycle registration because of the number ofunregistered units plying the road. There were several changes proposed for QC’s e-trike program. This includes thefollowing: 1) The use of Lithium-ion battery rather than lead. Lithium-ion is lightweight; its lifetime is more than 5 years, and saves space inside the unit. 2) The construction of several charging stations all over QC. 3) The use of a more powerful engine that can run the slopes of Payatas. 4) The use of a fiberglass body to endure harsh weather conditions. He also presented advantages in using e-trikes which include the following: 1) Fuel savings of about P200 from the regular income of drivers and estimated US$ 185 million per year. 2) Aboost in the manufacturing industry since all parts are made locally. Manufacturers intended to participate in the bidding of ADB. 3) An advocacy for cleaner air by avoiding carbon emissions that amounts to 400,000 tons per year. 4) Helping in the development of cities outside Metro Manila by donating retrofitted conventional tricycle units that would be traded in for e-trikes. 5) A bigger potential income for drivers since they save on buying fuel. Also part of the proposal made with DOE and ADB is the gradual phase out ofpetrol-fed tricycles. This would entail provision of incentives such as preferentialfranchise or route for e-trike users and/or exemption from number coding scheme.The city government is also gearing up for e-trike related business. The project hopes to complete e-trike units delivered to LGUs with a standard 3-year warrantee. For QC, they will start distributing 2,000 units this year and 5,000every year until 2016 for a total of 22,000 e-trike units. By 2016, ADB expects tocomplete the distribution and operation of 100,000 e-trikes throughout MetroManila, QC included. Several provinces in the north like Cabanatuan, Palawan, Davao,and Mindanao are also beneficiaries of the ADB program. 15
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 The program is running in Mandaluyong already. General San Diego showed data on the management and operation of their e-trikes and the result was quite encouraging. He showed a simple comparison between a standard trike and e-trike in terms of fuel savings, economic savings etc. E-trike costs more than a standard tricycle (P200,000) because of its battery but when it comes to road space, 2 conventional trikes = 1 e-trike. E-trike also carries 6-8 people while conventional carries only 3-4. Gross income of drivers on a daily basis amounts to P800 for a conventional tricycle and P1,600 for an e-trike. D. SMART Program and New Mobility Initiatives of the University of Michigan Ms. Susan Zielenski, Managing Director, SMART Center University of Michigan Ms. Zielinski informed the audience that the New Mobility project of iBoP Asia is a sister study in SMART Centre also which also got itssupport from the Rockefeller Foundation. They share the same sister community in catalyzing new mobility in cities. She explained that the following day, participants would experience SMART mapping. The three things the new mobility project aspires are:  Connecting the dots: For livability, sustainability, equity  Moving money: Innovation, access, jobs, enterprises Moving minds: New way of looking at transport and cities. She presented existing labs in the different parts of the world and their partners and sponsors. (See Annex J) She posed a question: “Why did the chicken cross the road?” and got diverse answers from the audience. But she said chickens do cross the road for the sake of moving. They do it in order to go to the other side of the road. She encouraged everyone to think of accessibility (meeting needs) rather than mobility as the goal to open up a range of new options for innovation, including IT. For example, making trips shorter and more efficient through IT enhanced integrated mobility, but also through eliminating trips through IT enhanced land use and urban design, and even more immediate, replacing trips altogether with IT such as tele-work, tele-shopping, tele-banking, tele-education etc. Mobility is not only about moving people. Mobility is transportation capacity expansion, land use planning and travel demand management. We all live in a world where transportation is equated to cars hence, improving transportation means improving cars. She noted that people are culturally connected to their cars that everything else becomes extraneous. She presented words that describe this connection: “captive” and “transportation disadvantaged” where captive means having no choice while transportation disadvantaged is when anyone who has no access to a car becomes poor and because he/ she has to ride a bus. In this association, people assume that transportation is necessary. Therefore, cars are necessary; therefore to improve on transportation, we improve on cars and that is why car companies make car improvements a lot. She asserted that life would be much better if we have more choices and not just simply choose to have a car. She also dissected the words typically associated with transportation and mobility, which she felt, must be changed to something more exciting and true: 16
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012  Captive – means forced  Transportation Disadvantaged  Alternative Modes– seems like the “alternative” will never make it. Sounds like second choice.  Public transport cost versus investment  Transportation demand management – sounds constraining and associated with sacrifice  Sidewalks - sounds not too prioritized as the they refer to the side of something  Road closing versus openings  Car use reduction versus more options She wanted everyone to transform the notion that transportation is flat. There are actually more connected choices in new mobility. This transformation of paradigm from monolithic to multi-faceted and connected is a foundation for a major emerging industry. The new paradigm she proposed was based on the tons of innovation going on around the world. Mobility is about moving people, moving goods and moving less. This is highly evident in the greater desire of young people these days with IT than cars thus, IT is not just about moving people but also about moving goods and moving less. She advised that when implementation seems difficult as to which should be done first, she told the audience to do it all at the same time. Then she commended the event because it gets people together. She emphasized the importance of connectivity and optimization of all kinds, which can be seen by mapping. In mapping, a new mobility grid can be revealed by identifying and overlaying everything. Implementation is like a human body system, a system that needs all parts, big and small to run. One would never ask which is better or force the choice between the heart, lungs and pituitary gland because they are all necessary. It goes the same for transportation. Focus must be given more on increasing, optimizing and enhancing the connectivity of the current options. In new mobility, there is huge economic activity, saving money, creating jobs, and revitalizing local economy. She ended with a hope that a lot of entries will come from the Philippines in the SMART Mobility enterPrize. This is an award for entrepreneurial ventures in sustainable transportation created by University of Michigan’s SMART initiative and with support from the Rockefeller Foundation. The entries should demonstrate innovative and replicable solutions to local and global transportation challenges, up and running, legal and can come from anywhere from the world.VIII. Open Forum After lunch, Ms. Rogel opened the floor to questions, comments and suggestions. The participants were requested to approach the microphones in the aisle, state their name and organization before speaking. QUESTIONS/ COMMENTS ANSWERS/ RESPONSES Concerns from Elvira Medina, President of National Center for Commuter Safety and Protection: a) On the use of e-tricycle. Electricity is 1) Engr. June Yasol, General Manager 17
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 QUESTIONS/ COMMENTS ANSWERS/ RESPONSESstill generated from fossil fuel and what of JAYAREC: The units are notabout the horrendous electronic waste powered by lead acid but Lithium iongenerated in using lead acid to operate battery. It has 3-year warranty and 5the units? For her these should be years life cycle with performanceaddressed. tested to last 10 years. Indirect use of fossil fuel through charging asMr. Bharat Bongu(Intellicap): compared to use of gasoline. Drivers could also earn more by saving moneyWhat are the costs 5-years down the on gasoline.line for e-trikes? 2) Benjie dela Peña: Personally not in favor of solutions that only look at technology but transport mobility needs all the help it can get. One thing that e-vehicles can do is it moves up the question of source of fuel higher up the chain. If you move it up higher the chain, it is easier to change the system. It does not matter with the driver the source of fuel as long as it gets its electricity. It is easier at the platform to change the source of power.b) Ms. Medina also commented on the Benjie dela Peña: The issues of theframing of the poor and vulnerable. The poor and vulnerable are not onlyuse of the term poor and vulnerable about transportation. The expressionversus use of general public. “Poor” is of what is poverty also changes froman economic condition while situation to situation. In the US there is“vulnerability” is a physical and social an infrastructure gap, people who livecondition. The poor and vulnerable near mass transit lines can afford toshould not be separated from the use cars and go to offices using theirgeneral public but be coiled into one car whereas poor have no access toterm: “commuters”. In the BoP, the public transport stations thus theybiggest sector is commuters. Many of need to buy cars but have no means tothe poor are economically active but do so. The terms “poor” andhave limited opportunities and they use “vulnerable” works well for thepublic transport. Quality of life revolves Rockefeller foundation. It caters toaround the term “commuter”. particular interest of the issues of people who do not have adequate housing and opportunities in livelihood.Bert Fabian, CAI-Asia:Fully supports the forum but needscontinuing discussion. There is greatopportunity in the fact that PresidentAquino, MMDA Chairman Tolentino andAdMU President Fr. Villarin are formerclassmates to have these discussions. Itlooks like there is still an inconsistency 18
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 QUESTIONS/ COMMENTS ANSWERS/ RESPONSESin the concept of mobility especiallysince most of the major projects arestill centered on vehicles and not onpeople. Government can or mustcampaign for better public transportthat is on time and convenient. Butoverall, he believes that it is high timeto have this kind of discussion on newmobility so he emphasized that thisorganization CAI Asia commits to theproject.Engr. June Yasol, General Manager ofJAYAREC:When talking about catalyzing new Dr. Segundo Romero: In catalyzingmobility in cities, are you referring new mobility in cities the key word ismore on RnD or is there application for mind shift. How do you break thegrants (e.g. invest on e-trike pilot paradigm of the poor to somehowprojects). There is a need to have solid accept the imposition of car owners toground for mobility and not just ideas be on the same boat? The project does not aspire to give commuters a better transportation system but the project offers them up to the possibility of what can be done. Start with very small things like having a pool of knowledge and come up with a map on informal transport hubs to be shared to everyone. The project is trying to motivate the target beneficiaries to help themselves. Other countries already have maps available and if we do not start soon, our country might be left with bad handed down technology by our neighbors. It is a contest with them also in improving our transportation mobility faster than they do. In this regard, the New Mobility forum is targeted to happen every month with different stakeholders.Dr. Kardi Teknomo from Ateneo:One of the most important mode of Dr. Segundo Romero: This is where hi–transportation is walking especially for touch mapping effort might help.the poor. Unfortunately, most of the People looking at maps and identifyinnovations were more on vehicles sidewalks, blockages etc. opportunity,such as e-trike or e-jeep. Walking needs facilities that work and those that dono facilities but needs monitoring. The not. Once identified, what can besystem of monitoring does not happen. done? Is there something for theReporting and feedback from the barangay captain to do? What about 19
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 QUESTIONS/ COMMENTS ANSWERS/ RESPONSEScommunity is needed. the Head of the association? It becomes actionable because information becomes tangible. Bringing the action down to the barangay might yield quicker and better result than relying on government alone to take action. The proper mind shift is that it is not always the government or MMDA’s role. If the community can do something, they must act on it. Advocate for social accountability.Mr. Alberto Suansing, Executive Directorof Philippine Global Road SafetyPartnership - Philippines:Hope springs eternal. He mentioned Dr. Danielle Guillen: This project is notthat various studies and talks about only RnD, it is about complementingtransport and mobility exist but he was and reaching out. She told the storyglad to have this forum to raise about TODAs not knowing where theproblems and come up with solutions. other terminals are as a clear exampleThese transportation mobility issues of the need to complement publichad been talked about but problems transport service. The project aims toarise due to neglect. The Government introduce the idea of complementingwas not really able to focus on public each other work to be efficient andtransportation. He shared about have the connection. The project alsodispatching nightmare in buses and his emphasized on IT and the promotionthoughts on how improving the salaries of transportation planning. It is a top-of bus drivers may not fly because the down and bottom-up initiative wherecurrent system is still weak. The talking with policy makers happens atoperators in our country still focus on the same time as rounding up newtheir business and not public service. business models and innovativeHe believes that fare increase to cope solutions at the community levelwith fuel increase is not the answer totransport problems rather optimizingthe use of roads. He also said that thereis politics in terminals. Then he raisedthe issue on safety of commuters.Nevertheless, he was glad that mobilityis now being looked into. There are somany solutions that can be applied. Thegood thing is that this project has socialaspect. He expressed his skepticism onMMDA’s UVVRP, which will not work inthe long run because it only increasesthe volume of vehicles. Most people buyanother car just to avoid the UVVRP.The country has been compared toSingapore a lot but Singaporecompared to the Philippines has a veryrespectable public transport system. 20
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 QUESTIONS/ COMMENTS ANSWERS/ RESPONSES Karmi Palafox from Philippine Institute of Environmental Planner and Palafox Associates: Susan Zielinski: Traffic congestion and a) The drawback in some of the mobility are not different problems. mobility designs came from the The question is how do you send the way urban planners conceptualize right signal? What are we them. They think as if all are car communicating about? It is more users important or necessary to know what kind of city we want to live in rather b) Is there congestion charging in the than think of congestion etc. What project? kind of transportation combination? c) Framing of poor and vulnerable. If progress is desired, involve the private sector. However, are they willing to do things for the poor and vulnerable? She suggested not using words that may turn off the private sector in marketing. Dr. Hussein Lidasan, Transportation Science Society of the Philippines: Supports this activity and committed to help in any way they can. The ultimate goal is to minimize the movement of vehicles but not the movement of people. But it is not just about mobility per se but also access. Economic measure is the dream of every transport planner. Economic measure means, people who are willing to pay will pay higher but they will be expecting an efficient transport system. In terms of information, people appreciated and understand better visual explanations rather than numerical. The bottom line is to see what is doable. Look at how you can connect the people through the transport system. This forum was a start and hoped to continue and improve or alleviate the cancers of transportation. He wanted to hear how to improve quality of life without compromising the environment.IX. Updates/ Insights from the Rockefeller Foundation 21
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 Mr. Benjamin dela Peña, Associate Director, Urban Development The Rockefeller Foundation Mr. dela Peña recounted his story or experience in walking and commuting in QC before. For him, he agrees to what Danielle said earlier, Metro Manila is transportation rich especially in the poor areas. However, there is a windshield bias by the policy makers and decision makers and people always see traffic as the main problem. His presentation centered on the seven needs of transportation (See Annex K): 1. Takes us where we want to go 2. It takes us when we want to go 3. It is a good use of our time 4. It is a good use of our money5. It respects us with the level of safety, comfort, and amenity it provides6. We can trust it7. It gives us freedom to change our plans Sometimes a shift in paradigm involves a change in jargon like calling the TrafficManagement Unit of MMDA to Transportation Management Unit. He emphasizedconnections as very important in transportation and the poor and vulnerable as themost affected. People who think about mass transit always think about speed. Theexperience in mass transit is speed is not as important as frequency. Emphasis was also given to transportation sharing or allowing people to walk.Some say Filipinos are lazy walkers but they do not realize that it is because facilitiesare not available for people to walk on. When it comes to transportation, cars arestill the priority when it should be the people. A clear illustration are the steelbarriers in EDSA preventing people from hitting cars, denying people to move in theway of cars. The good news is that the complications do not just happen in the Philippines.Other countries experience drawbacks so as they find solutions, the country canlearn and we can share the experience. He said that there is hope starting with conversations. It is not fair to put it all inthe hands of the government and believe that they will solve the problem. Thegovernment has to deal with electoral issue (the official’s terms) and budget cycle.However, the government should also have a clear vision and not just presentingsolutions to problems. He ended with a quote by Jan Gehi from Making Cities for People: “To be a lively, attractive, safe and sustainable city, (a city) must be sweet to its pedestrians, sweet to its cyclists.” There is a movement of a shared longing. 22
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012X. Understanding the Challenges and Opportunities in New Mobility A. How responsive is Metro Manila’s Public Transport System to the Needs of the Poor and Vulnerable Sectors? Insights from a Mobility Mapping Case Study of Metro Manila Dr. Jun Castro This is one of the three commissioned studies of iBoP about mapping. It tackles the question, how mapping can be used to respond to the needs of the poor and vulnerable. The study uses Geographic Information System (GIS) as tool similar to google earth. GIS has been used in a number of planning studies to organize large volume of information. There are limited studies in linking mapping, public transport and the poor/ vulnerable. The following are the research project goals (See Annex L):  Use of GIS, identify, map and assess PT supply (modes, routes and facilities)  Identify gaps in the data sets or barriers to access these data sets  Assess the mobility of the urban poor and vulnerable sector in relation to transport supply  Identify transport-related improvements in infra and services that will benefit urban poor communities in the case study areas This research will run until March 2012. It will use primary data collection, identify alternative mapping techniques, develop a database of public transport hubs and map out public transport networks. The expected output is a documentation of process for generating, encoding, storing, sharing and displaying user-friendly maps of public transport hubs/ terminals using a GIS database. The methodological framework starts with a review of data followed by database development where the team will be asking existing private database, use crowd-sourcing, field surveys and validation. Next is to do spatial analysis using GIS overlaying transportation and its relationship with informal settlements will come after. Last step will be publishing the result. In their initial review of data, they looked at some of the database of MMDA such as studies on informal settlements, which involve a map of informal settlers in Metro Manila. As part of the database development, the team will use the SMART mapping technique, validation and photo documentation. The team started its field survey with the informal pedicab terminal in Agham Road. They tried taking photo documentation of the area but a man blocked their camera. Once data is available, they will transfer it to an open source map like google earth to visualize the location of the terminals. After which, it will be converted to GIS format. The gist of the study is the spatial analysis to see how the data sets relate together. Proximity analysis or buffering will be used that involves creation of areas around a geographical entity based on measurement of distance. 23
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 The goal of the research is to come up with a transit map, including pedestrianwalkways. Study areas identified were North Edsa - Agham Road, Matandang Balara,and in Payatas where urban poor communities are concentrated. He also presentedsome preliminary results both in numerical and visual form where he showedpartial mapping of the public terminals in North EDSA. Network analysis will bedone once the network of terminals is in place. Mapping could be used as a tool toidentify improvements in public transport system. He emphasized the importance ofconverting the result to GIS format and the conduct spatial analysis and apply toprograms.B. Case Studies on the Mobility Characteristics, Cost and Issues of the Poor and Vulnerable Groups Mr. Randolph Carreon The study aims to understand the mobility characteristics, costs and issues ofthe poor and vulnerable. (See Annex M) Specifically it aims to:  Establish the travel demand patterns of the poor and vulnerable groups;  Look qualitatively into the efficiency of the public transport system vis-à-vis the needs of the poor and the vulnerable groups;  Estimate the cost of mobility of the poor;  Estimate the actual and desired cost of transport of those within the vulnerable groups; and  Examine other non–quantifiable costs, if any, incurred by the vulnerable groups Mr. Carreon defined first the poor and vulnerable using income as basis. They defined them as those living within the colonies of informal settlers. Theselected study areas in QC were Purok Centro in Barangay Old Balara, Agham Roadand GK Village in Payatas. The first one (Purok Centro) was chosen because it isalong Katipunan and has been affected by the C-5 extension project. Second (AghamRoad) was chosen because of its proximity to transport terminals and GK Village inPayatas because of the reforms made by GK present in the community. After doingall three, there will be inter-area analysis. Vulnerable groups were defined to includePWDs, senior citizens, women, children. The research woull also consider thoseworking in the business process outsourcing firms whose office hours are irregular. The team of Mr. Carreon started with data gathering using household interviews.Public consultations were done to evaluate and validate the results of the interviews.Individual interviews, key informant interviews and focus group discussions wouldbe conducted for the vulnerable groups. The primary data would also be supportedby secondary data collection. As project update, Mr. Carreon said that they are nowdoing public consultation and that their data gathering would run from February toMarch 2012. He also presented the photo documentation of their data gathering and generalfindings in Purok Centro. The data showed that people primarily leave their house togo to work and school. Of the estimated total of 20,000 trips per day, aside fromwalking, the top 2 transport modes used are PUJ, and tricycle. Generally, the peoplesaid they would walk if they could walk. 24
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 He presented numerical representation of average annual income and expensesdivided into those who are renting and those who are not. The data were further subdivided into those with motor vehicles (MV), mostly 2 wheeled, and those withoutvehicles. Notable result was that it was still a rational choice for the community toinvest on two-wheel MV. The perceived primary mobility problem the communitysaw was high transport cost while the rest share the same percentage (travel time,traffic congestion, availability of public transport vehicles, crowded public transportvehicles). The proposed solutions, still from Purok Centro, were all economic relatedsuch as work for additional income. Walking came out as their last resort.C. A Preliminary Inventory and Typology of Enterprise Models for Inclusive Mobility in Metro Manila: Of, By, and For the Poor and Vulnerable Ms. Tieza Mica Santos As introduction, Ms. Santos compared the transport mobility designs in our country similar as those of fashion victims. In most cases we see flyovers that somehow do not fit the actual needs of the people. The country tends to copy transport systems and designs of other countries not knowing that some of the designs do not fit in the context of Philippine mobility. She said that in adapting new mobility designs, the country has to consider policy, logistics, feasibility, economics and social aspects. (See Annex N) Commissioned to look at existing transport/ mobility related socialentrepreneurship opportunities in the transport sector, they are also looking atsustainable innovative ideas and business models on new mobility and transport-related that have high potential for scale and replication, benefiting the poor andvulnerable sector and looking at the market barriers and enablers in terms of policy,economic and socio-cultural and lastly help in the creation of new platform, resourcecenter and enabler of innovation. The research focuses on commercial and enterprise component of the transportand new mobility sector. Key variables would be barriers and enablers. In terms ofmethodology, they combined qualitative and quantitative. Focusing on 3 areas mentioned by Mr. Carreon earlier, their output will alsoinclude a template or a modeling featuring social entrepreneurship as a newmobility solution. They are specifically tasked to come up with:  Mobility challenges of the poor and vulnerable  Existing mobility business models  Emerging new mobility business models  Social enterprise opportunities for the mobility transport sector She presented the research questions they will use. The primary considerationsfor emerging new mobility sector she highlighted were:  Efficient (time to get to point A to point B)  Cost 25
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012  Environmental  Convenience and Safety  Human-centered design principle Design thinking model will be used rather than the usual linear model design.Design thinking calls for more holistic and dynamic disciplinary approach tounderstand the problems. Instead of step by step process, it will look are how eachkey variable correlate to each other. This will show how new business models willemerge. Human-Centered Design (HCD) will help you hear the needs ofconstituents in new ways, create innovative solutions to meet these needs, anddeliver solutions with sustainability in mind. Data gathering uses the qualitative method by secondary data analysis and RRL,FGD, KII and community consultation. Quantitative method would also be usedthrough survey and area sampling. Social Entrepreneurship is defined as an activity, as an approach or methodologyand as a business model. Social enterprises are categorized by nature, social aimsand outcomes, and in terms of leadership and sectoral-base. The study team treatsinnovation both as a process and as an outcome.Barriers and enablers will look at:  Policy – standards and regulatory mechanisms  Economic – market model and supply-demand correlation  Socio-cultural – important deals with human ecology, cultural, anthropology, patterns of behavior, social context She presented a summary of pretest data gathering and the recurring themes orvariables from the poor and vulnerable consisting of cost, length of travel, traveltime, and access to basic goods and services in terms of cost of the goods. The teamtried to capture the various products and services that can be attached to transport/mobility. They also looked at how the community access information. Two recurringplatforms were raised in terms of ICT access: mobile and Internet. In terms ofaffordability, these consumers are able to afford more information coming frommobile technology and Internet. In terms of information services, they invest toomuch on transport cost than service feature. In terms of willingness to pay, they arewilling to pay around P7. Majority have difficulty in availing healthcare services andfinding employment but the primary issue is not in terms of inaccessibility directlybut more in terms of actual cost of goods due to lack of employment. 77% attributetheir difficulty towards the cost of availing of these goods and services. In theprocess of RRL, the recurring themes that came up were: 1) sustainabletransportation related to sustainable targets and sustainable legislation fortransportation and land coordination policies/ designs, inter and intra-agencycollaboration approach, agency prioritization and allocation process; 2) Energyefficiency, probably because of increasing oil prices and environmental healthconsideration. In addition are: multi modal mobility, multi-stakeholder approach,human patterns of movement, predictability of movement of goods and people andminimizing costs. In terms of barriers and enablers, they searched policy, economicsand socio-cultural in literature. The recurring challenge in terms of policy was mostof our regulatory frameworks are uncoordinated, fragmented, unsustainable and donot offer support for the development of sustainable pro-poor mobility structures.In terms of economics, current economic incentives are mostly private sector biased; 26
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 mobility models are designed not to cater to human needs but for profit. Lastly, in terms of socio-cultural, urban development and transport system designs in Metro Manila are out of sync with patterns of settlement, human ecology, consumer behaviors, and unsustainable land and resource planning. Lastly, she presented a graphic representation of their main point, how the mobility designs are not in sync with the way people move. . The main goal of this New Mobility SE search through a human-centered design process is to understand the minds of the people and how goods and services should be delivered sustainably to cater the needs of the vulnerable. The study wants to understand how policy makers, urban planners and transport specialists envision the way cities are built, how transport systems are developed, how we think and re-think the way we construct Metro Manila. Understand first what do we make out of our cities and why has Metro Manila evolved into what it is today before going to the drawing boards and conduct urban planning. She reminded everyone the need to look at what is viable and feasible in designing mobility infrastructures. Look also at what is desirable and what caters to the actual needs of the people. It is often seen that the transportation systems shape the way people build their cities, but tend to neglect that it is human patterns of behavior and cultural activities that are at the center of how urban development should be designed. As Metro Manila reaches to a point of exponential growth, human needs dramatically change simultaneously with it. She wanted all to ensure that things fit like a puzzle and that city and mobility infrastructures are built central to human progress. Otherwise the country will continue to become fashion victims.XI. Open Forum QUESTIONS/ COMMENTS ANSWERS/ RESPONSES Benjie dela Peña: Acknowledged Randolph Carreon: key is to provide a representatives from Intellecap better public transport system (Manish Shankar and Bharat Bongu) who are also grantees of the Rockefeller Foundation. How do you solve people who say it is cheaper to buy 2-wheel MVs than commute or use public transport? Some considerations from Niña Zialcita of People Power Institute: a) Goal is to promote walking, goal of mobility really is to make cities more walkable in the sense that you are not endangering your lungs, breathing in toxic air etc. b) When mapping out transport hubs and terminals, please also consider flood zone areas. When we speak of the poor and vulnerable, everyone is vulnerable in flooding. It is safer 27
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 to ride a pedicab than ride vehicles during flood. c) Consider also senior citizens and PWDs in mapping out the hubs. What will be the convenient options for them? d) Examine the option of not moving at all and not just moving around. Conduct dialogues to encourage carpooling and telecoms. Give incentives for carpooling and encourage people to conduct business online more and discourage 3-hour long meetings. Look for alternative modes of working that donot involve moving and open up additional avenues to do things and give options than having to travel. e) Once the mapping is available online, please share it with us. There are available similar mapping activities but for different goals or collaboration.Comments from Sheila Napalang fromUP-NCTS:a) Agree on inclusive transport that areaccessible to everyone includingwomen and PWDsb) Informed everyone that the NationalGovernment has adopted anEnvironmentally Sustainable TransportFramework. She suggested looking atthis framework and discovering how tomainstream this. There are manypolicies available out there but makingit more digestible is important as wellas making it accessible to people whowill be using this.c) Access to the maps. If maps are 1) Benjie dela Peña: Maps on theavailable only in the internet, it may not internet are in open data formatbe very useful. Printed copies may be meaning any machine can read the datamore practical to be posted on and interpret. He gave the example ofbarangay halls and are much acceptable Kibera in Africa, created by citizensto people. She provided an example on using GPS data. The idea, similar to thetheir study in Cebu where taxi drivers open street map concept, was to take theare willing to pay more to get info on data and turn it into a platform thattraffic areas and where to get people can build things on in a form thatpassengers. people use like text messaging. 28
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 2) Dr. Segundo Romero: He aspires to come up with large maps to be put up in public places. But in order to do this, there is a need to gather information first and translate the information to a form that can be easily understood by the public. Next is to print them out in different sections to be given to the private sector and be placed in big ad spaces like the ones found in SM Malls. However, to be able to do this properly, collection of data was deemed to be most crucial. d) Poor and vulnerable framing problem because poor may not be vulnerable and vice versa. What they need is access to information to have choices. We make the decision based on the information available to us. Some know but sometimes they do not have a choice. Information is power e) What are necessary to be included in the map? There may be confusion in terms of name: barangay, sitio. Recommended to use big landmarks rather than street names.XII. SMART Mapping Uncharted Connection Points in Metro Manila: The Participatory Mapping Workshop Approach and Process Ms. Susan Zielinski, Managing Director, SMART Centre University of Michigan Ms. Zielinski directly pointed out the core of this mapping exercise, which is how to customize and select people to map on and people to map with. This exercise brings together people that provide better representation of citizens or the community and not just planners. This evolved in a 4-step program. It starts by bringing together the private sector, small entrepreneurs, NGOs, planners, government from a wider range (e.g. social services, innovation, IT, economic development, tourism, finance, marketing). They all need to come together and understand that the need for mapping is the first step. Mapping essentially to create a tool, which people can dissect. Usually people talk about what is not working but in mapping, people need to see it the other way by identifying what works great and positive and exciting. Instead of presenting negatives, present them as challenges that will be solved. During the exercise, participants must build on what is there, preload all the different modes of transportation, overlay everything (tricycles, airports, boats, PUJs etc.) and look at connections. Eventually the exercise will reveal a mobility grid. Next, participants must identify where they can pilot their ideas. It is just a matter of identifying what you want to accomplish. It hopefully aims to raise economic opportunities by identifying opportunities for economic development. She asked for a shift in mobility language to a more positive outlook. She also deemed it important to create a vision and multiple ideas in order for the 29
  • Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch 31 January 2012 mapping exercise to work. This interactive exercise ultimately builds communities and when hooked up with GIS, it tells a story to policy makers.XIII. The Way Forward for the New Mobility Project: Building a New Mobility Constituency Dr. Segundo Joaquin Romero, Director, iBoP Asia Program Dr. Romero was keen to see stakeholders interested in getting this project forward. ASoG through iBoP Asia offers a series of forum by people can habitually discuss new mobility. The event we are having is a large forum. The Project will be conducting several medium, small and large fora over the next several months to pursue this discussion. He informed everyone of a mapping project using SMART mapping framework and on-line platform as well as coordinating work. He was certain that stakeholders are out there just waiting to be organized. He hoped to bring in more people than the usual and be able to use the convening power of the academe. The event ended at around 4:00 pm with everyone invited to attend the pilot New Mobility Mapping Workshop led by University of Michigan-SMART Centre the following day. 30
  • ANNEX A List of Participants
  • ANNEX B Eagle Eyes Articles
  • Annex B____________________________________________________________________________________New mobility1Last week I began a new series of columns on thetransportation challenges of Metro Manila, proposing achange of paradigm from understanding our currentproblem to be one from traffic to a transportation, or betterstill a mobility, perspective. When I sent that first column toFr. Jett Villarin SJ, president of the Ateneo de Manila, hereminded me to also propose solutions to the problems Iexposed. That is exactly what I do in today’s column, written again with the researchcollaboration of Christian Laluna and the Innovations for the Base of the Pyramid teamof the Ateneo School of Government which is implementing with the Metro ManilaDevelopment Authority a Rockefeller Foundation-sponsored project on Manila’stransportation challenges. In this column, I propose an overall vision for solving ourtransportation challenges, a vision defined by a concept I introduced last week, that of“new mobility.”New mobility’s convenience and reliability is rooted in a simple phrase used by SusanZielinski of University of Michigan’s Sustainable Mobility and Accessibility Research andTransformation: “More choices, more connected choices.” Breaking it down, Zielinskidescribes new mobility as “open source, multi-modal, multi-service, IT-enhanced userfocused, socially equitable, aesthetic livable whole systems transportation.” It combinesinnovative transportation and communication technology with smart urban planning,human-friendly engineering and design, and an emphasis on social equity, so that thepoor, the handicapped, the young, and the old (and yes, the rich, too!) can get anywherein the metro for work and play, even without a motor vehicle of their own. The realgame changer, according to Zielinski, is what turns “public transport” into “urbanmobility”: modality and seamlessness. It’s connecting all the mobility options of themetro—cars and bikes, buses and trains, modes and services and technologies, publicand private—into a smooth-flow network that anyone can use, so that there’s no placein the city that you cannot get even without a single occupancy vehicle.The technology of this future already exists today, thanks to the innovative drive ofcities similar to Metro Manila, plagued by their own mobility woes, but refusing tosurrender to them. Bus Rapid Transit, known also as Busways, for example, waspioneered by the Brazilian city of Curitiba in 1974, but has seen wide adoption (Zelinskidescribes it as “gone viral”). BRT uses full-time bus-exclusive lanes to practically turnbuses into trains: a continuous, flowing service much like the LRT/MRT, but without theheavy construction and investment costs of city rail systems.I have seen the effectiveness of a BRT system as I have used it in Jakarta where theTransJakarta Busway is designed on the simple concept of building elevated platforms(operating as bus stations) where passengers get on and off the buses. Other placeswhere BRT has successfully been introduced include Bogota (Colombia), Guangzhou(China), Istanbul (Turkey), Sao Paolo (Brazil), Mexico City, Seoul (South Korea),Adelaide (Australia), Los Angeles (California, USA), and Portland (Oregon, USA). TheTransmilenio BRT in Bogota carries more passengers than 95 percent of the metro(subway or light rail) systems in the world and they built Phase 1, all 41 kilometers, injust 8 months. In Metro Manila, the best roads to pilot a BRT system are C-5 (already in1http://www.manilastandardtoday.com/insideOpinion.htm?f=2011/november/8/tonylavina.isx&d=2011/november/8
  • Annex B____________________________________________________________________________________the plans of MMDA) and Commonwealth Avenue where BRT would be a much faster andcheaper solution to the planned Light Rail Transit line for that roadway. Indeed, aworld-class BRT service can be built faster with full roll-out counted in months, not years, forjust a third of the cost of fixed rail transit.Another emerging urban transport technology or practice is “fractional use” wherepeople, instead of owning their own vehicle, can instead rent a personal-use vehicle forany amount of time for the day. For example, Zipcar (www.zipcar.com) in the UnitedStates offers standard fuel or hybrid-engine and electric cars for rent to servicemembers. It’s like time-sharing for cars. Thanks to economies of scale through fractionaluse, members thus enjoy lower mobility costs than if they had to own and maintain theirown vehicle. France and a few countries in Western Europe are experimenting withpeer-to-peer car sharing, where anyone can share their car and get paid for the use. Yetcars need not be the only product offered: fractional use has also been used withbicycles (both human-powered and electric) or rickshaws, which are perfect for gettingaround an area like the Makati or Ortigas Central Business Districts, without taking uptoo much parking and road space. There are many very successful bike sharing systemsaround the world, including Paris’ Velib; Washington D.C.’s Capitol Bikeshare; MexicoCity’s Ecobici and Montreal’s Bixi. Nearer to home, Guangzhou’s bikeshare is integratedwith its BRT and metro systems and you use the same fare card to pay for either. India iscontemplating a roll-out of bike-sharing services as part of massive national investmentin urban infrastructure.These transportation systems should be smartly networked, and also take advantage ofnew technologies or other infrastructure, to increase their convenience and ease of usefor the general public. Zipcar, for example, uses apps installed on iPhones as part of itsservice. In China, you can also shop and pay for other services using the Yan ChengTongvalue card. Here in the Philippines, SM movie houses are taking advantage ofcellphone-swiping to claim cinema seats, and a similar service was once offered on theMRT. An entrepreneur can easily take advantage of Metro Manila’s telecommunicationsand Internet infrastructure to enable a fractional ownership mobility service for use byanyone from Ayala Alabang to Tondo.Lets imagine what can happen with new mobility. Take anyone of my law students (Iteach in the University of the Philippines College of Law in Quezon City, Ateneo School ofLaw in Makati, De La Salle College of Law in Manila) living in Alabang, who has her owncar but hates the traffic jams along C-5, Edsa or South Super Highway. Instead of drivingall the way to Quezon City, Makati or Manila, she could take the South LuzonExpressway (SLEX) to a convenient multimodal transportation hub in SLEX that hasbeen constructed to network mobility options. She can park her car at a garage in thishub (or use a web-enabled, real-time ridesharing program like www.goloco.comorwww.pickuppal.com), and take the C-5 BRT, EDSA MRT or TAFT LRT which connects toother options for her ultimate destination. Of course, it would even be better, if at somepoint, we are able to connect this hub through bicycle lanes that bring my studentdirectly from and to her home - and even better still, at the end of the BRT/MRT/LRTlines, such bicycle options also exist.This vision of the future for Metro Manila, enabled by new mobility, shows how goodpolicy and smart thinking that brings together public efforts, private-sector innovationand social entrepreneurship can address our transportation crisis. The Ateneo School ofGovernment hopes to move this along in January 2012 when we convene a mappingexercise with stakeholders and launch the new mobility program with MMDA. Inworking together, we secure our mobility future and renew our city.
  • Annex B____________________________________________________________________________________Moving Metro Manila - Eagle Eyes by Tony La ViñaDate posted: 2012-02-01 14:59:48With this column, I resume the series on the transportation challenges of Metro Manila. Istarted the series last October written with the assistance of colleague Christian Laluna,If readers recall, I emphasized in the first two columns of the series the importance tore-frame what we are facing in our metropolis, moving away from a traffic paradigm toseeing the challenge from one of transportation and mobility.This is an opportune time to raise transportation issues once again given the positivedevelopments last week in the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority, led byChairman Francis Tolentino, which finally got all the local governments in the region toagree to a unified traffic ticketing system.Today also, in its Loyola Campus, the Ateneo School of Government is formally launchingthe New Mobility SMART (Sustainable Mobility and Accessibility, Research, andTransformation) Mapping Activity, an opportunity to invite Metro Manila to sit downtogether and rethink how we get about our cities, between our homes and ourdestinations, and begin the transformation of our megacity from its present gridlock to avision of mobility for all: Equitable, economical, environment-friendly, and efficient. It ispart of ASoG’s efforts to unlock the full potential of Metro Manila, of its infrastructure,and of its people―especially the urban poor.It is acknowledged that the poor depend on publicly available mobility options morethan the rich for employment, security, health, socialization, and leisure purposes. It ishow they get to work, school, other family and friends, and meet their own needs anddevelopmental goals. Without public transport, notes an Overseas DevelopmentInstitute report on the subject, the poor are cut off from economic opportunities, deniedsocial services like health and education, and even stripped of their voice in the publicarena, because they cannot freely gather to exchange ideas and assert their rights andinterest in the political sphere. Indeed, there is an overriding interest of the state toimprove mobility for its citizenry, because it can improve economic efficiency andreduce poverty.Not all transportation development initiatives help the poor, though. In fact, the poorare often the first to suffer from transportation infrastructure development. Buildingmore roads alone doesn’t necessarily help the poor because it emphasizes a priority oncar ownership, which Metro Manila’s urban poor cannot, or can barely, afford. Moreover,the right-of-way needed to construct these roads all too often run through urban poorcommunities, displacing them from their homes, and often times without relocation toan area of their convenience.The poor do have alternative options for getting around the city other than private carsor public transport. Bicycles have become an increasing sight on roads all in the Metromostly used by security guards and construction workers but there are no specific lanesdedicated for them except in Marikina, a laudable foresight for the city. Bikers have toshare the same road space as vehicles, with detrimental safety effects. Worse yet, mostdrivers act as though they feel entitled to the road, and consider bikers a nuisance to berid of―not a mobility-friendly attitude among those lucky enough to own their ownvehicle. In addition, those who are lucky enough to be in walking distance of their
  • Annex B____________________________________________________________________________________destinations usually do not have good pedestrian facilities.Gender and age also play a role in patterns of mobility, and the corresponding mobilityprice. Studies show that women are often household managers and caregivers forchildren or the elderly, and their trips are more frequent and irregular than the 9-5,work-to-home commute of the average breadwinner. This means that they have highermobility costs, measured either by bus/jeep fares or gasoline budgets. Children, theelderly, and the handicapped often require assistance to use public transportation―thesteep steps and elevated doors of buses, for example, prevent the use of wheelchairs,and make the use of crutches and walking sticks a difficult, even painful chore.Overcrowding these buses during rush hour only adds to the undeserved burden of theinfirm and elderly.Finally, as is in the nature of poverty, it is the poor who are the most vulnerable toshocks and dislocations to the transport network. We see this every time heavy rainsdrench Manila, or a transport strike erupts. Often running on a tight budget, when thebuses or jeeps become unavailable on a given route due to flood or strike, commutersmight not have enough money for pricier options such as point-to-point and route-FXtaxis, or to take alternate, operating routes. Also, increasing gas, toll, and commodityprices often drive bus and jeep fares up, impinging further on limited wallets.While we have discussed transportation and poverty as it affects the poor from thedemand side, we cannot ignore the supply side of the equation. The employees of buscompanies are nearly always of the same social and economic strata as their passengers,while jeepney and tricycle drivers either own their vehicle or drive on behalf of theowner, usually a relative. In either case, these people are also dependent on thetransport industry, but with an added twist: as the pressures of population, economy,technology, and politics transform Metro Manila mobility, these drivers and operatorswill see the basis of their income change as well. They may be resistant to the addedcosts of new initiatives, like improvements to engines, or making their vehicleshandicapped-friendly, especially when they feel it will come out of their pockets. Fearinga negative impact to their jobs or their incomes, they would form the basis of any inertiaagainst changes to the transport sector.We must be therefore fair: any changes proposed for Metro Manila bus, jeepney, andtricycle services should also benefit the drivers and operators who depend on thisindustry for their income. It does not take rocket science to get this done. Later in theseseries, I will make specific proposals about what could be done.This is the challenge to policy-makers and other stakeholders of urban mobility: Wehave to expand the options available for mobility, introduce new methods of gettingaround the Metro, and make them safe, economical, and easy-to-use for themarginalized: the poor, the old, women and children, and the handicapped. Even as wedo this, we have to ensure that those who work in the transport sector can finddependable income and social security from their line of work. And it can only be donewhen everyone, driver and commuter, policy-maker and citizen alike, can raise theirvoice and join hands in the same arena.This is what Ateneo School of Government’s New Mobility initiative is all about. With thesupport of the Rockefeller Foundation and in partnership with the MMDA, New Mobility(we nickname it NeMo) is about making the business of mobility work: sustainably,efficiently, and economically. We need the right incentives: on the demand side, forflexible personal mobility through multiple options, and economic convenience and easeof use; on the supply side, for sustainable income, disciplined driving, an emphasis on
  • Annex B____________________________________________________________________________________the need of the customer-commuter for reliable transit options, and openness to reform,improvement, and innovation. Through NeMo, we hope to contribute to thetransformation of Metro Manila into a megacity truly on the move.
  • ANNEX C The iBoP Asia Program
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launching Ateneo de Manila University January 31, 2012 with generous support from The iBoP Program Segundo Eclar Romero, PhD Director, iBoP Program Ateneo School of Government 1
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 The iBoP Concept “Innovations at the Base of the Pyramid” in Southeast Asia (iBoP Asia) Two Concepts of BOP • A socio-economic designation for the 4-5 billion individuals that live primarily in developing countries and whose annual per capita incomes fall below $1,500 (in PPP terms); and • An emerging field of business strategy that focuses on products, services, and enterprises to serve people throughout the base of the worlds income pyramid. • Both concepts are also often referred to as the “Base” or "Bottom of the Pyramid" or the "BoP". • -- http://www.brinq.com/resources/bop 2
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 • Above the BoP are the MoP (Middle of the Pyramid: annual incomes between $3,000 and $10,000) and ToP (Top of the Pyramid: incomes above $10,000 per year). Examples of ToP populations would include much of the U.S., Europe, and the economic elite throughout the world, while examples of the MoP would include poorer people in developed nations as well as the rising middle class in the developing world. • -- http://www.brinq.com/resources/bop The Base of the Pyramid (BOP) • A 5 trillion dollar, 4 billion person market with significant unmet needs • 4 billion low-income people – the majority of the worlds population – constitute the base of the economic pyramid (BoP). They live in relative poverty with an annual income below $3,000 and have significant needs resulting from, or impacting, climate change, the digital divide, malnutrition, hunger, health, poor sanitation or access to water. • Todays individualistic approach is collectively inefficient and, together with the dependency on donations, leaves the BoP fallow. • Low-income does not mean no income. Together, they have substantial purchasing power and represent a $5 trillionglobal consumer market[1], suggesting a range opportunities for market-based approaches to better meet their needs and empower their entry into the formal economy. 3
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 iBoP Stakeholders • Engage government, private sector, non-government, and international sectors: redirect, catalyze, and synchronize the creative energies • Engage the poor and vulnerable sectors in Southeast Asia towards their own development • The Program was established in 2007 with Dean Antonio La Vina as concurrently its first Director SEA countries • The region is moving towards regional integration (ASEAN 2015) as many SEA countries have attained high economic growth trajectories • Increased innovation capacity in in Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand drive this economic growth and other countries aspire to jumpstart their own innovation systems. 4
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 • Innovation policy in Southeast Asia, however, is more focused on economic and industrial development and less on poverty alleviation and inclusive development. • As economic growth increases, inequality also increases and the poor and vulnerable suffer unequal access to resources, basic services, and employment opportunities. Innovations for Inclusive Development • Innovations must be purposively geared towards inclusive development. • “Innovations for inclusive development” (IID) is understood as “innovation that reduces poverty and enables as many groups of people, especially the poor and vulnerable, to participate in decision-making, create and actualize opportunities, and share the benefits of development.” 5
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 The iBoP Asia Program currently pursues a two track program • Universities and Councils in Innovations for Inclusive Development in Southeast Asia • New Mobility in Metro Manila Early Insights • Los Banos farmer, Purok Centro community • Telecom – 97% with celfones and save time but … • Need to innovate and reinvent intermediaries, including governments and universities) • iBoP is about mindshift 6
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Other Program Areas of Concern • The iBoP Asia Program is a new program. • It aims to seek other opportunities and pathways for promoting inclusive development, including mobility, by enlarging its project portfolio by seeking new partners and new pathways towards inclusive development. The iBoP Team • Within the Ateneo School of Government, the iBoP Program belongs to the “Poverty” Key Practice Area, with Assistant Dean Mary Jean Caleda as focal person. • The Director of the iBoP Program is Dr Segundo E Romero. The Program Resource Group (that provides support at Program as well as joint support for the projects) consists of Ms Jessica Bercilla, Senior Research Associate, Ms Cddqa Rogel, Communications Associate, Mr Andre Quintos, Web and System Administrator, and Kristian Torres, Project Associate. 7
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 iBoP Project Teams • The UNIID-SEA Project Manager is Ms Grace Santos, assisted by Ms. Lilac Caspe. • The New Mobility Project Manager is Dr Danielle Guillen, assisted by Mr Lorenzo Cordova Jr, Research Associate. • The iBoP Asia Team is a multidisciplinary team that works with various centers in Ateneo such as the Ateneo Innovation Center and the Ateneo Center for Social Enterprise, various private sector, non-governmental organizations, and international organizations. Volunteers, OJT, Dissertation, Thesis-writers, Practicum Students • The iBoP Team encourages students, volunteers, senior citizens, and other citizens to participate in its programs and activities. The iBoP Team is committed to providing opportunities for service, learning, and fulfillment to its stakeholders and partners. 8
  • ANNEX DUniversities and Councils Network forInnovation for Inclusive Development in Southeast Asia
  • 3/5/2012 Universities and Councils Network for Innovation for Inclusive Development in Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA)REGIONAL CONTEXT: SOUTHEASTASIA Spectacular economic growth and increased poverty reduction over the last 3 decades. Rising inequality (Gini coefficients of SEA countries: .34 – .44) 1
  • 3/5/2012REGIONAL CONTEXT:INNOVATION and DEVELOPMENTThe innovation trajectory that led to rapid growth in SEA(most evident in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand) has tendedto exclude the poor and the social challenges that theyface, which exacerbates poverty and inequality. REGIONAL CONTEXT: INNOVATION and DEVELOPMENT  Social justice, equality and human rights are not deeply embedded in innovation systems and social/ political structures.  Development = economic, industrial growth; social development only secondary. Photo from www.sxc.hu 2
  • 3/5/2012A NEW PERSPECTIVE:INNOVATION FOR INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT(IID) IID is understood as “innovation that reduces poverty and enables as many groups of people, especially the poor and vulnerable, to participate in decision-making, create and actualize opportunities, and share the benefits of development.” Innovation for all, by all. UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA) was conceived by the Innovation at the Base of the Pyramid in Asia (iBoP Asia) Program of the Ateneo School of Government and IDRC to:  Facilitate university and research council reinvention for IID by integrating IID in the core missions of teaching, research and extension (university), and priority setting, grant making and policy making (councils).  Establish formal and sustainable partnerships and collaborations between SEA universities and research councils, to foster innovation research that links to/ informs social policy.  Form the UNIID-SEA Network of universities and councils, and connect to other UNIID networks (South Africa, Latin America, South Asia). 3
  • 3/5/2012 UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA), in the longterm, aims to foster Multidisciplinary, multi-stakeholder and multi-level (national, regional, global) approaches, mechanisms and partnerships towards IID. UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA) Identified partners and core network members UNIVERSITIES COUNCILS Ateneo de Manila University (PHL) National Research Council of the School of Science and Engineering and Philippines (LEAD ORG) School of Government (LEAD ORG) National Research Council of Chulalongkorn University (THL) Thailand Department of Urban and Regional Planning Dewan Riset Nasional-Indonesia and Graduate School of Technology and Innovation Management National Council for S&T Policy Institut Teknologi Bandung (IND) - Vietnam School of Architecture, Planning and Public Policy Hanoi University of Science and Technology (VNM) Faculty of Economics and Management 4
  • 3/5/2012 UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA) Network structure UNIID-LA, UNIID-South Africa, UNIID-South Asia HUST ITB NRCT ASoG Technical Committee NRCP DRN UNIID-SEA Project Chula AdMU NRCVCONNECTIONS: a) Intra- and inter- SUPPORTED BY:university Regional knowledge-building and b) Intra- and inter-council Information sharing platforms. c) Universities-Councils UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA) Key components/ activities for 2012-2015 Knowledge- and Capacity-building IID Research Support - Baseline study of SEA - IID Research Awards for universities and councils - Multidisciplinary IID Course Universities Module and Open Courseware - Innovation Challenge with dev’t and piloting Engineers Without Borders- - Social Innovation Lab (TBC) Australia (in the pipeline) - IID Conferences with faculty & students Link to Policy - IID Workshops with Network-building Councils - UNIID-SEA and UNIID - University-Council linkage Global Consortium (i.e. harmonizing R&I agendas; policy research collab) - IID Agenda for ASEAN 2015 5
  • 3/5/2012 UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA) Work Program for 2012 YEAR 1 Major Project Activities Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Baseline study of universities and universities in SE Asia Dev’t of web portal (UNIIDSEA.ibopasia.net) Project launch and Planning Workshop with partners (APRIL 2012) Dev’t of IID Course Module and Open Courseware IID Research Awards for Universities Workshop with Councils UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA) Project Team National Research Council of the PhilippinesDr. Segundo Joaquin Romero Dr. Cecilia ReyesProgram Director, ASoG-iBoP Asia Executive Director, NRCPProgram Project Manager – Council ComponentMary Grace Santos Carmen MorenoProject Manager – University Component Project Associate – CouncilLilac Caspe ComponentResearch AssociateMarie Cddyqa Jaya RogelCommunications Associate Dr. Ellie Osir Senior Program Specialist Southeast and East Asia Program 6
  • 3/5/2012 UNIID-Southeast Asia (UNIID-SEA) Visit our web portal: www.ibopasia.net Contact us: Dr. Doy Romero: doyromero@yahoo.comGrace Santos: mgpalaciosantos@yahoo.comTrunklines: +632 426 6001 local 4639 or 4646 Telefax: +632 929 70 35 7
  • ANNEX ECatalyzing New Mobility in Cities Project: Finding New Mobility in Metro Manila
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Background and Purpose • The Search focuses on the use of New Mobility as a lens in search of more Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: sustainable and innovative solutions in the Finding NewMo in Metro Manila urban public transport system in Metro Project Launch Manila, in particular, ensuring that the needs of the poor and the vulnerable are met. SDC Auditorium, Social Development Complex, Ateneo de Manila University January 31, 2012 with generous support from Some concepts New Mobility Mobility – is both the ability of a person (including the goods that the community needs) to travel to • an initiative that is multi-disciplinary, multi-sector, top- destinations of choice and the amount of movement bottom, bottom-up approaches like social enterprise and time necessary to do so. innovations in mobility addressing a socially inclusive transport sector Transportation- is the movement of people, animals and goods from one location to another. The field is • incorporates the dimensions of sustainability in divided into infrastructure, vehicle and operations. transportation such as social equity, economic, financial, health, ecology, physical environment, air quality, noise and climate change • based on the premise that as complexity increases, the notion that a single solution to solve transportation challenges decreases An engineer may envision solutions that include infrastructure or fuel but may not link them enough to urban design, policy and Goals & Objectives community behaviour. An urban planner may develop • To develop a new platform, resource centre, and ground-breaking approach to land enabler of innovation for purposes of governance use and urban design without ensuring socially inclusive mobility in the region. paying much attention to new services like car-sharing, bike sharing etc. • to utilizeand complement existing studies by initiating a metro-wide conversation among stakeholders to introduce New Mobility and An IT developer may come up find out how the stakeholders envision the with unique system to fare future of transport system in Metro Manila. payment, journey planning or traffic mgt. but may not spend time on linking to land use policies. 1
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Finding “NewMo” (New Mobility) in Objectives Metro Manila •to determine through research the impact and cost of essentially means taking myriad steps that all the current public transport system on the poor and the lead to a paradigm shift— vulnerable sector of the society (including BPOs) • by looking at the big picture • to identify new or emerging entrepreneurial or •focusing on people’s needs and wants especially livelihood opportunities in the transport sector that of the urban poor and the vulnerable responsive to the needs of the poor and the vulnerable groups sector •evolution of transport as attention turned to energy efficient mobility models, shared transport schemes and community owned transport. NewMo Forum Series : Let’s Talk NewMo NewMo Forum Series : Let’s Talk NewMo • isa venue for people to habitually meet to •GOAL : to sustain a conversation among these share information, ideas, insights, and stakeholders about how citizens can be empowered initiatives for taking action at the community to shape the patterns of mobility and access in level and increase the advocates of better Metro Manila to be more inclusive mobility and access to transportation in Metro Manila-especially for ordinary Manileña, the •CHALLENGE: to promote non-motorized transport (NMT) such as walking and biking, public transport poor, and the vulnerable. (paratransit, buses, BRTs and trains), elimination of unnecessary travel through the smart use of traditional and cyber communications Researching NewMo in Metro Manila Engaging the General Public for NewMo Through research, the Project will Mapping for Inclusive Mobility: Pinpointing Transport •explore how the current public transport system Hubs and Terminals affects the poor and vulnerable populations of Metro Manila by mapping the current public transport -this activity aims to build a community of people system; wanting to create a platform or build on available platform to improve information generated in maps for •Understand the mobility patterns, cost and issues of seamless multi-modal connections would benefit not the poor and the vulnerable groups; only the poor and the vulnerable groups but the •Seek new or emerging entrepreneurial or livelihood general public opportunities responsive to their mobility needs. 2
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Search for “NeMo” Business Models: iNewMo “NeMo” Social Enterprise and Social Innovations Awards 1.inquiries •To surface enterprising solutions to solve social mobility 2.information problems 3.interest • To engage different stakeholders in solving pressing mobility problems in the megacity especially that of the 4.insights poor and the vulnerable sector 5.initiatives •To document existing social enterprises in the transport sector and generate innovative ideas that address mobility 6.innovations problems and needs. 7.interconnections Thank you! Please contact: Marie Danielle V. Guillen, PhD. Manager Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project iBoP Asia Program Ateneo School of Government Telefax: 9297035 Email: NewMobility.Ph@gmail.com 3
  • ANNEX F Mapping for Inclusive Mobility:Pinpointing Transport Terminals and Hubs
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 MAPPING FOR INCLUSIVE MOBILITY: Pinpointing Transport Terminals and Hubs LORENZO V. CORDOVA, JR. EnP Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launch SDC Hall, Social Development Complex, Ateneo De Manila University January 31, 2012 with generous support from KEY CONCEPTS Modes of Public Transportation Public Transport Hubs Public Transport Terminals Informal Transport Terminals Engaging stakeholders in mapping 1
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Modes of Public Transportation in Metro Manila Each plays major role in mobility especially of the poor and can either compete or play complementary role to other forms of public transportation Public Transport Hubs 2
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Public Transport Terminals Informal Public Transport Terminals/ Hubs Areas that are public or privately owned used by motorized and non-motorized public transportation vehicles as terminals, but have no clear legal provision and or local government ordinances that support its existence. 3
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Pinpointing Public Transport Terminals and Hubs Metro Manila have complex and diverse transportation modes. Unaccounted public transport terminals and hubs. We know they exist, but we lack readily available and accessible information where they are. Lack of capability of LGUs and other government agencies to produce up-to-date maps Mapping requires much time and resources. Commuting in the Metro Connection points? Choices? Efficiency? 4
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 MAPPING FOR INCLUSIVE MOBILITY Locating and mapping transport terminals are crucial in order to assess the mobility problems and opportunities in Metro Manila. Improving information generated in maps for seamless multi- modal interconnections would benefit not only the poor and the vulnerable groups but the general public. Build a community of people wanting to create that platform or build on available platform. Terminals (tricycle, jeepney, and bus) in Brgy. Bagong Silang, Caloocan City Tricycle terminals are located in many areas in the Barangay. Bus uses vacant lot and roads as terminal. The jeepney also uses the roadsides, vacant lots and rotonda as terminals 5
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Findings: • Excess of tricycle terminals (using walkability distance from HLURB of 200m) • Tricycle terminals are either on the streets or shares space with pedestrian sidewalks MAPPING FOR INCLUSIVE MOBILITY Individuals and organizations as contributors Intermediation platform – “enabler” Users 6
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 MOBILITY MAPPING – HI-TECH AND HI-TOUCH METHODS • Some applications of ICT and existing web-based platforms: Openstreetmap Google Map Maker SeeClickFix Cyclopath Waze Interaksyon.com & MMDA 7
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 POSSIBLE INFORMATION FROM STAKEHOLDERS • Mode of public transportation (tricycle, pedicab, jeepney etc.) • Location of terminal/ hub • Name of TODA, JODA, PODA etc. • Number of members • Destinations/ Routes • Time of operation • Facilities and services available in the terminals/ hubs MAPPING FOR INCLUSIVE MOBILITY 8
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 MAPPING FOR INCLUSIVE MOBILITY • Locating and mapping these hubs and terminals will improve the quality of information through collaborative public process. • Increase awareness among stakeholders of mobility in Metro Manila especially the users of public transportation. • Expand useful data available data for decision- makers while enabling much broader spectrum of citizens to actively participate in citizen science in their own communities, and to contribute their collective opinions and decisions. • This method increase efficiency to the generation of data and reduce costs. MAPPING FOR INCLUSIVE MOBILITY • A community of people wanted to create or build on existing platforms (“Prosumers”); •Maps generated will be made available on-line - a community resource and not proprietary in nature; • Should be able to generate discussion streams on the state and improvements of the transport system of Metro Manila. • This is an evolving activity – new approaches may become available over time 9
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 THANK YOU! 10
  • ANNEX G Search for New MobilityBusiness Models in Metro Manila
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila New Business Model Search with generous support from Best “NeMo” Social Innovation Concept Awards • The entries in New Mobility social innovations concepts/ideas and solutions should be inclusive and at the same time responsive to selected mobility problem(s). The process is solution-seeking task. 1
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 What Innovation? • Product innovation’ – ideas on changes in the things (products/services) addressing mobility issues • Process innovation’ – ideas on changes in the ways in which mobility products and services are created or delivered • Position innovation’ – ideas on changes in the context in which the new mobility products/services are framed and communicated • Paradigm innovation’ – changes in the underlying mental models that address new mobility issues Adapted from 4Ps of Innovation by John Besseant and Joe Tidd Humanitarian Innovation Fund Best “NeMo” Social Enterprise Awards • The entries in best existing or emerging social enterprise in the transportation sector should be responding to selected new mobility problem(s) ,especially that of the poor and vulnerable • The entries must reflect sound management and should be properly documented 2
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Specific Criteria for the Social Enterprise Awards • Must be a social enterprise • Must have a specific a business model addressing New Mobility concerns in transportation of the poor and vulnerable Specific Criteria for the Social Enterprise Awards • Must have a business model where capabilities of the business, public and citizen sector are leveraged to deliver needed goods and services to marginalized populations such as the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) with the achievement of multiple bottomlines as the end goal. 3
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Specific Criteria for the Social Enterprise Awards The multiple bottom lines of the business model include (but are not limited to): • Surplus or profit generation, where profit is reinvested for the gain of the stakeholders and further pursuing the social objective • Environmental health • Preservation of cultural integrity and diversity • Capacitation or empowerment of a sector or community simultaneously improving their quality of life Example: Cargo bikes of WorldBike 4
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Mini-Bus Operation, Day Care Transport, Special Education Needs Transport by the HCT Group in UK Agency Community Transport Model and Transport Asset Management Riders for Health 5
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Non-emergency Medical Transport by Tranmedic Example: Mobility Scooter by Rugged Tree 6
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Common Criteria Presentation • Clear identification of mobility issues being addressed especially with those of the urban poor and the vulnerable groups • Employ approaches that incorporate principles of sustainability in transportation that address issues in ecology, social equity, health, finance and economy, air quality, noise, climate • Clear identification of challenges being addressed and of success indicators Schedule • Launch : January 2012 • Formal Calls for Nomination for: mid Feb-Mar 2012 • Committee deliberation: April 2012 • Possibility for Presentation to Rio Entrepreneurship Summit: May 2012 7
  • ANNEX HNew Mobility Initiatives of the MMDA
  • NEW MOBILITY INITIATIVES IN METRO MANILA ATTY. FRANCIS N. TOLENTINO MMDA Chairman CURRENT PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS 1
  • 1600 X 1400 CARLIFT 6 PAX CAPACITY WITHOUT WHEELCHAIR 5 PAX CAPACITY WITH WHEELCHAIR FICEM BOARD CLADDING GI SHEET ROOF SKYLIGHT ROOFING ALUMINUM LOUVERS ROOF PLANTERS 900 mm DOOR OPENINGFICEM BOARD CLADDING • 1 meter high elevated platform • Automatic bus bay boarding gate and door with short range sensors • Customized bus floors aligned with the boarding platform • Manually operated ramps for the elderly and PWDs • CCTV cameras and alarms 2
  • • Macapagal Avenue• Commonwealth Avenue• EDSA (February 14, 2012)Provides Traffic Advisories and Road Safety reminders to guide road users EDSA Main Avenue (South Bound) 3
  • Consolidates the 85 existing provincial bus terminals with 60 bus companies operating approximately 7,368 buses into 4 common terminals (North, East, South and South East) NORTH CORRIDOR EAST CORRIDOR SOUTH EAST CORRIDOR SOUTH CORRIDOR 4
  • 5
  • Maraming Salamat 6
  • ANNEX IResponding to New Mobility Challenges in Quezon City
  • 3/5/2012 INTRODUCTION OFELECTRIC TRICYCLE IN QUEZON CITY 1
  • 3/5/2012 E-TRIKE PROGRAM OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY1. DOE is pushing for the shifting to a more sustainable and indigenous sources of fuel.2. DOE is partnering with LGUs to formulate a program to be able to help cities/municipalities acquire/adopt electric tricycles which  will benefit tricycle drivers who are earning below the minimum wage  will bring economic benefits from fuel savings or avoided cost on imported oil  will have potential positive impact on the environment which will also bring positive impact on the health of the people3. The “E-trike Rent-to-Own Program,” will be designed jointly by the LGUs, DOE, ADB and a government financing institution to be implemented nationwide. DOE PROPOSED LGU E -TRIKE RENT-TO-OWN PROGRAM E-Trike Lessor/Bank LGU Remits payment to DPOS-TRU GFI on agreed terms E-TRIKE PMO LGU - Coop E-TRIKE Pays E-TRIKE RENT DRIVERS daily for the duration of the loan 2
  • 3/5/2012 E-TRIKE DESIGNS WITH DIFFERENT SPECIFICATIONS The E-Trike Program is a sub- program under the Fuel Sustainable Transport Program (FSTP) of the Dept. of Energy POTENTIAL DEMAND FOR THE ENTRY OF E-TRIKE IN METRO MANILA No. of TC Franchise in NCR, 2011 Manila 2,535 Quezon City 24,684Mandaluyong 3,833 Marikina 3,159 Pasig 8,445 San Juan 506 No. of TC Caloocan 14,750 Franchise, Malabon 6,460 NCR 2011 Navotas 1,850 Valenzuela 4,419 Pasay 3,103 98,028 Makati 4,262 Las Pinas 4,821 Paranaque 4,787 Muntinlupa 4,510 Taguig 4,404 Pateros 1,500 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 3
  • 3/5/2012 DEPT. OF ENERGY’S PROPOSED INITIAL LIST OF POLICIES/REGULATIONS/ORDINANCES FOR IMPLEMENTATION BY LOCAL GOV’T UNITS1. Gradual phase-out of petrol-fed tricycles2. Provision of incentives for E-Trike3. Preferential franchise/route for E-Trikes4. Exemption from number coding scheme5. Readiness to set-up E-Trike related businesses6. Others Pilot Test ) (ELECTRIC TRICYCLES -T OR E RIKES 20 E-TRIKES (LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES) 10 Tricycles 10 Tricycles • Price of e-Trike (more than $1,000) • Full charge range 40-50 km • Full charge range 80-100 km • 3 kWh battery (B units) • 6 kWh battery (A units) • Will use public street charging • Overnight 8-hour charge at home • Fast charging in about 30 min 4
  • 3/5/2012Battery Choices Lead AcidPilot Test $800 Life: 200 charges 140 kg slow-charge only 72% lighter Lithium Ion $1,500 Life: 2,000 charges 40 kg slow and fast-charge DAILY FUEL SAVINGS (DESKTOP STUDY ASSUMPTIONS)Base Case: E-Trike: for every 100 kmAssumptions: Assumptions: about 20 km per kWh20 km per Liter5 liters for 100 km50 Peso per liter P200 5 kWh for 100 km 10 Peso per kWh>$5 or Peso 250 >$1 or Peso 50 5
  • 3/5/2012 RANGE RESULTS (“CONTINUOUS" RUNNING USING LITHIUM ION BATTERIES)B4: 62.21 km 3 KWh battery B7: 41.89 km 3 KWh battery A2: 90.33 km 6 KWh battery A1: 72.53 km 6 KWh battery Antipolo – Test Drive 6
  • 3/5/2012TRANSFORMATION The project is about creating a new local industry and local employment AND Promotion of a healthful and balanced ecologyTRANSFORMATION THROUGH ENERGY EFFICIENT ELECTRICVEHICLE SYSTEMS – DELIVERING AN END-TO-ENDINFRASTRUCTURE SOLUTION100,000 electric tricyclesCost $400.0 million Electricity DemandSavings: $185 million per year (peak-time charging)(500,000 liters/ day  $500,000 / day) Demand: 6-60 MW peakAvoided CO2 emissions Energy: 300,000 MWh• 400,000 tons per year Emissions: 160,000 tons 7
  • 3/5/2012OUTPUT OF THE PROJECT Complete e-Trike units delivered to LGUs with standard 3-year warrantee Battery supply, installation, leasing and support infrastructure established Efficient motor supply chain created Public Charging stations installed in selected areasTARGETS (MINIMUM)By December 2012, at least: 2 reputable motor suppliers; 2 internationally reputable battery suppliers; By December 2013, at least: 6 e-Trikes suppliers with • 3 internationally reputable service support; and battery suppliers; and 7,000 e-Trikes operating • 15,000 e-Trikes operatingBy December 2014, at least: By December 2016, at least:• 500 locally made charging • 100,000 e-Trikes operating stations installed; and• 50,000 e-Trikes operating 8
  • 3/5/2012 MANAGEMENT OF THE OPERATION OF COMPLETELY BUILT ELECTRIC TRICYCLES DONATED BY ADB TO MANDALUYONG CITY KEY STAKEHOLDERS COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES OF THE USE OF E-TRIKE COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL1. The Asian Development Bank TRICYCLE AS RECOGNIZED BY THE CITY OF As The Donor/Source Of MANDALUYONG Financing2. Mandaluyong City As The 1. It is environment-friendly alternative. Operator 2. It is relatively more spacious.3. Selected Individual Driver- beneficiaries 3. Does not require changing of oil.4. Passsengers 4. Use of E-trikes is expected to be cheaper. 5. It is expected to increase the environmental awareness in the city. 6. It is expected to significantly lessen air and noise pollution. 7. Has available strategic charging stations. 9
  • 3/5/2012 COMPLETELY-BUILT E-TRIKE UNIT DONATED BY THE ADB DRIVERS AREA/FRONT LITHIUM-ION 3 KILOWATT MOTOR PANEL BATTERY SIMPLE COMPARISON BETWEEN A STANDARD TRICYCLE AND E-TRIKE AREAS OF COMPARISON CONVENTIONAL TRIKE ELECTRIC TRIKEACQUISITION COST P 80,000.00 cash or P 200,000.00 P 175,000.00 installment for (approximately) 3-5 yearsNO. OF PASSENGERS 3-4 people 6-8 people max @ P 7.50/passenger @ P 7.50/passengerEXPECTED LIFE 7 years will full Battery LifeIN YEARS maintenance 5.5 years/11 yearsCOST OF FUEL* P 250.00/8 hours/day or P 45.00/6-8 hours/day or(8-10 HOURS) P 7,500.00/month or P 1,350.00/month or P 90,000.00/year P 16,200.00/yearBOUNDARY COST P 150.00 P 150.00POTENTIAL GROSS P 800.00 (approx.) P 1,600.00 (approx.)INCOME/DAYPOTENTIAL NET P 400.00 (approximate) P 1,405.00 approximateINCOME/DAY** (P 146,000.00 per year) (P 512,825.00/year)* An E-Trike user may be able to save P 205.00/day or P 6,150.00/month or P73,800.00/year , which for regular tricycle drivers normally spend more for gasoline** Less fuel/electric expenses and boundary cost. Tricycles Operational/Repair Expenses are not included 10
  • 3/5/2012 SUGGESTED E-TRIKE ACQUISITION-LIVELIHOOD PROGRAM (RENT-TO-OWN-PROGRAM) by Mandaluyong City OPERATIONS BOUNDARY (In 8 hours/day) Option 1 Option 2 P 150.00 per day P 350.00 per dayIn 30 Days / Month 4 years 1.5 yearsOperationsIn 24 Days / Month 5 years 2 years(6 days a week) In 30 days operation, E-Trike drivers will own the unit in 4 years for P 150.00 per day boundary/payment (Option 1) or 1.5 years for P 350.00 per day boundary/payment (Option 2). In 24 days operation, E-Trike drivers will own the unit in 5 years for P 150.00 per day boundary/payment (Option 1) or 2 years for P 350.00 per day boundary/payment (Option 2).QUEZON CITY DESIGN ELECTRIC TRICYCLE 11
  • 3/5/2012 THE POSSIBLE WAY OF THE ENTRY OF E-TRIKES IN QUEZON CITY TO BE ABSORBED BY THE TRICYCLE SECTOR IS THROUGH REPLACEMENT/SUBSTITUTION REPLACEMENT/SUBSTITUTION of existing gasoline-fed tricycles with franchises with COMPLETELY-BUILT ELECTRIC TRICYCLE UNITS is open to any of the following conditions:  Old and dilapidated 2-stroke and 4-stroke tricycle units  Individual Franchise Holders who are willing to replace their existing tricycle unit/s with electric tricycle/s  Selection of PILOT TODAs for the Initial Implementation of the “Rent-to-Own Program “ Number of Number of Tricycle Tricycle Association Unit With Franchise District I 29 4,736 District II-A (NDC) 38 6,150 District II-B (Main) 30 7,295 District III 19 2,668 District IV 34 3,835 Total 150 24,684 OPTIONS ON THE PROPOSED ACQUISITION OF E-TRIKE UNITS AND DISPOSAL OF OLD WITHDRAWN UNITS1. Acquisition of E-trike units through financing options.2. Trade-in of old tricycles with franchise for a new E-trike vehicles.  The old tricycle unit shall be bought by the City Government and the amount shall serve as downpayment for the E-Trike.  The City Government shall exercise all options in the disposal of the old tricycle units to recover the amount.  The old tricycle units bought by the City Government may be donated to provincial municipalities where the beneficiaries are farmers who may use the unit to transport their farm goods to the market.  The old tricycle units bought by the City Government may be donated to Sister Cities for their utility use.3. Surrender of sidecar of tricycle unit with franchise for a new E-Trike vehicle.  All withdrawn For-Hire units must be converted into a single motorcycle unit through an undertaking. The sidecars are to be surrendered and assessed by the City Government for its depreciated value and may serve as down payment for the electric tricycle.  Withdrawn tricycle units which are converted into single unit as private classification shall no longer be fitted with sidecar and should not operate as For-Hire unit. 12
  • 3/5/20121. Gradual replacement and phase out of old petrol powered tricycles in five (5) years time.  Pursuant to the Philippine Clean Air Act, the Quezon City Government plans to convert all gasoline-powered For-Hire tricycle units operating in the City into Electric Tricycles by 2016 through a legislative measure.  In line with the replacement to E-Trike is the withdrawal of all gasoline-powered tricycle units from all TODAs in Quezon City.  No tricycle unit shall be allowed to operate as For-Hire in the City except electric tricycles.2. Legislative measures should be formulated on the entry of and the promotion and sustainability of E-trikes in Quezon City. THANK YOU! 13
  • ANNEX JSMART Program and New Mobility Initiatives of the University of Michigan
  • 3/5/2012 1. CONNECTING THE DOTS (for livability, sustainability, equity) 2. MOVING MONEY (innovation, access, jobs, enterprises) 3. MOVING MINDS (new way of looking at transport & cities) Susan Zielinski, SMART, University of Michigan. January 30, 2012, Manila PhilippinesLIVING LABS:BangaloreBeijingCape TownChennaiCochinDetroit RegionFairfaxLos AngelesManilaMexico CityMysticPasadenaPortlandSeattleShanghaiWashington DCLisbon / Coimbra / Portoetc…Connecting the Dots; Moving Money; Moving MindsRESEARCH, EDUCATION, TECH TRANSFER: ACCELERATE IMPLEMENTATION 1
  • 3/5/2012 PARTNERS & SPONSORS: National Science Foundation Center for South Asian Studies Transportation Research Board Rockefeller Foundation Mott Foundation FIA Foundation Alcoa Foundation Ford Motor (redefining) US Environmental Protection Agency Cisco Systems IBM Federal Highway Administration U.S. Department of Education CEO’s for Cities City Connect Chennai Confederation of Indian Industry etc…Why DID the chicken Cross the Road? 2
  • 3/5/2012 PURPOSE: Meet Needs - ACCESSIBILITY Live Love Work Play Other? Mobility* Technology * Proximity (a la Texas Transportation Mobility Institute)Transportation Land- Travel Capacity Use Demand Expansion Planning Management 3
  • 3/5/2012 (North America-wide comparative study) New Innovation Opportunitites Accessibility ENDS MEANS: New Mobility Mobility Proximity ConnectivityBELLY OF THE BEAST ---- Transportation = Cars(everything else it extraneous) 4
  • 3/5/2012 Organ Donation Pledge I, ____________ (full name) wish to pledge the following organs ________________________ should I die as a result of this presentation. Date_______ Signature _____________________. Date_______ Signature of witness _____________.In case you should die as a result of this presentation, please keepthis completed organ donor form in your wallet. “CAPTIVE” “Transportation Disadvantaged” 5
  • 3/5/2012Transportation = cars(assuming transportation is necessary)Therefore: CARS ARE NECESSARY THEREFORE: to improve on transportation… ??? 6
  • 3/5/2012 LANGUAGE • Captive • Transportation Disadvantaged • Alternative modes (women alternative men) • Public transport cost (vs. investment) • TDM (sacrifice) • “Side” walks • Road closings (vs. openings) • Car use reduction (vs more options) Qualities of New Mobility: …Like the Ideal Life’s Partner … Multi-talented  Sexy Clean  Innovative Connected  Saves money Integrated  Socially equitable Smart  Service-oriented Tech savvy  Creates jobs Sophisticated  Caters to your needs Confers status Convenient  Accessible to all  Other? 7
  • 3/5/2012 … as Thomas Friedman might say … TRANSPORTATION IS FLAT OPEN SOURCE, MULTI-MODAL, MULTI-SERVICE, IT ENHANCED USER FOCUSED, SOCIALLY EQUITABLE, AESTHETIC LIVABLE WHOLE SYSTEMS TRANSPORTATION TRANSLATION: More Choices; More Connected Choices (New Mobility) EMERGING GLOBAL NEW MOBILITY INDUSTRY TO SUPPLY IT The current value of New Mobility markets can be measured in the billions of dollars.”Building a New Mobility Industry Cluster in the the Toronto Region” (MTE & ICF) RESULT: Almost all transport has at least an urban componentCONTEXT: URBANIZATIONFrom 50% - 2/3 by 2025; 81% in US;90 % world economyComing years: At least 35 cities more than 10 million 8
  • 3/5/2012DRIVERS 9
  • 3/5/2012 BRT went viral -- worldwide More than 83 Over 40 in North America aloneZIPCAR: Wheels When YouNeed Them services FRACTIONAL USE: AUTO RICKSHAWS, TAXIS & COMMUNAL CABS, INTERMEDIATE VEHICLES, CARSHARE, BIKE SHARE, SOCIAL NETWORKING, SLUGGING 10
  • 3/5/2012 new technology wayfinding; shared use; fare payment; traffic management; security etc.Design & newinfrastructure 11
  • 3/5/2012New modes / modal enhancements 12
  • 3/5/2012moving peoplemoving goodsmoving less 13
  • 3/5/2012 VEOLIA Video CONNECTIVITY/OPTIMIZATIO CONNECTIVITY / OPTIMIZATION N (both energy & time) • spatial * • spatial / physical • service (use vs. own)• technological (wayfind; fare pay; traffic manage; security)• economic (revitalize; save $; create jobs; boost business) • institutional & policy (public private innovation) • cultural / psychological (moving minds) 14
  • 3/5/2012 GAME CHANGE: SEAMLESSLY CONNECTED OPTIONS LEAPFROG: Straight to Next Generation Whole Systems Design & Build - spatial connectivity supported by New Technologies and PPI NEW MOBILITY GRID: More Choices, More Connected The Next Infrastructure; The Next Industry Cluster Transportation Meetings0:00 1:40 1:50 2:00Agenda: WHAT IS NOT WORKING Solutions Laundry List Quick attempts at prioritization Adjourn Attendees: Usual Suspects 15
  • 3/5/2012A heart? A lung? Pituitary gland? Your choiceWhat is better? What is the silver bullet?I only use my heart I’m too rich and powerful to use my capillaries 16
  • 3/5/2012 CONNECTIVITY/OPTIMIZATION IS THE NEW SILVER BULLET ROLLING OUT THE GRID: 4 STEPS (public-private innovation)1. CONVENING – The Crucial & Often Under-Rated First Step (not just the usual suspects – public private innovation2. MAPPING – An Engaging and Tangible Catalyst for Action3. PILOTING & ROLL-OUT – Start with Hologram for Wider Spread Roll- Out4. MOVING MINDS – Speak a new language (Rumi, Philip K. Dick)5. NETWORK (SMART network – “twinning” for shared genius) 17
  • 3/5/2012CONVENINGMAPPING andPILOTING Washington, DC Ann Arbor, Michigan 18
  • 3/5/2012 CHENNAI: Linking design, value capture, cycles, auto rickshaws, pedestrians, local business & new technologies (e.g. Mapunity, Cisco, Ashok, thru CII) COCHIN (quiet leapfrog)Links train, metro, bus, ferry, auto, taxi, parking, 2 wheelers & cyclesLinked to commercial, entertainment, tourism, lifestyle70% of people need not enter city (larger hubs gateways to grid of smaller hubs)Transform economy & lifestyleSustainable – supported by real estate elements 19
  • 3/5/2012 Mexico CityCAPE TOWN – entrepreneurial ventures, way-finding,workplaces, public-private innovation, moving minds 20
  • 3/5/2012MovingMindsDid Philip K. Dick predict or shape the future? SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS: CHANGES THE GAME Connects Mode Service Product Technology Design  Door to Door (feeds trunk, focused on user)  Scalable / incremental / ALL YESES / induces demand  For all shapes & sizes of communities & regions  Short term / long term (not land use / policy dependent)  Appealing (design, cool status) & Safe & Equitable  Resilient & Robust (to climate / geopolitical challenges)  Business, Innovation, Job Opportunities (New Mobility Industry Cluster Multi-Billion $) 21
  • 3/5/2012 NEW MOBILITY ECONOMIC BENEFITS Saves Money Creates Jobs Boosts Business Revitalizes Local Economy TELECOMMUNICATIONS & WIRELESS CLEAN ENERGY E- BUSINESS & NEW MEDIA TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGYFINANCIAL SERVICES, TOURISM BAN KING & INVESTMENT NEW MOBILITY & RETAIL INDUSTRY TRANSPORTATION GEOMATICS OPERATIONS & SERVICES REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION, GOODS MOVEMENT PLANNING & & SUPPLY CHAIN OPERATIONS INTELLIGENT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS 22
  • 3/5/2012 23
  • 3/5/2012 NEW ROLES (AND OPPORTUNTIES) PUBLIC SECTOR – incentives to connectivity / systems convening beyond the usual players / implementing, integrative frameworks / platforms to boost innovation & implementation. MOBILIZATION PRIVATE SECTOR – public-private innovation (action affects policy), new products, marketing New Mobility culture PUBLIC PRIVATE INNOVATION ACADEME – new models / tech transfer based on real world contexts, understanding & advancing solutions (not just problems). ACCELERATING IMPLEMENTATION NGO’s – informing / new approaches, partnering, engaging constituencies / implementing METRO MANILA What Dots Are Already Connected? What dots can be easily connected? What needs to be added (locally and system wide)? What benefits can be reaped? Social, ecological economic? Who else should be at the table?What policies, business models, marketing approaches can help address the challenges? When does the fun start? 24
  • 3/5/2012 THE TRANSFORMATION BEGINS: STEP 1: NAME THE DOTS. ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE 1 minute each • Your Name • Your effort / group• The thing you’re most proud, happy, excited, hopeful about • One other person / group you’d bring to the table SMART CONNECTIONS: • http://um-smart.org/blog or email me susanz@umich.edu • Living Labs (in pilot communities & regions) & NETWORK • Primer (Connecting & Transforming)• Global Learning Community (education & capacity building)• SMART Exchange collaborative tool -- smartumich.ning.com • Business network • Research collaborative • Regular gatherings / summits of the “systems” network 25
  • ANNEX KUpdates/ Insights from the Rockefeller Foundation
  • 3/5/2012 Why did the chicken cross the road? Why do we need transportation anyway? Seven Needs1. It takes us where we want to go2. It takes us when we want to go3. It is a good use of our time4. It is a good use of our money5. It respects us with the level of safety, comfort and amenity it provides6. We can trust it7. It gives us the freedom to change our plansAdapted from Jarrett Walker’s “Seven Demands of Transit” in Human Transit: How clearer thinkingabout Public Transit can Enrich our Communities and Our Lives, Island Press, 2011. 1
  • 3/5/2012To be a “lively, attractive, safe and sustainable city, [a city] must besweet to its pedestrians, sweet to its cyclists.” Jan Gehl: Making Cities for People 2
  • ANNEX L How responsive is Metro Manila ’sPublic Transport System to the Needs of the Poor and Vulnerable Sectors? Insights from a Mobility Mapping Case Study of Metro Manila
  • 3/5/2012 How Mapping of the Public Transportation System can Respond to the Needs of the Poor and Vulnerable Sectors JUN T. CASTRO, Dr. Eng. 31 JANUARY 2012INTRODUCTION 3 Keywords: Mapping + Public Transport + Poor/Vulnerable Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping greatly enhances any planning study. Its graphical map-based interface, enhances data management and input capabilities. Several studies have used GIS for public transport planning, as well as urban poor community planning But limited studies on relationship of public transport and poor communities using mapping techniques 1
  • 3/5/2012RESEARCH PROJECT GOALS Using GIS, identify, map and assess public transportation supply (modes, routes & facilities) Identify gaps in the data sets or barriers to access these data sets Assess the mobility of the urban poor and vulnerable sector in relation to transport supply Identify transport-related improvements in infrastructure and services that will benefit urban poor communities in the case study areasTASKS AND ACTIVITIES Conduct secondary and primary data gathering Identify and formulate alternative mapping strategies for primary data collection Develop database of public transport hubs (i.e. bus, FX/GT Express, PUJs, tricycles), public transport and pedestrian networks Identify transport hubs (formal and informal) connecting urban poor communities in the study areas Map out public transit networks in the study areas 2
  • 3/5/2012EXPECTED OUTPUT Documentation of process for generating, encoding, storing, sharing, and displaying user-friendly maps of public transport hubs/terminals:  Using internet, i.e. open source mapping  Using GIS  Using interactive platforms GIS Database generated Decision maps to meet the needs of poor/vulnerable sectors in the case study areasMETHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKReview of Database Spatial Publishing ofData Development Analysis Results • Existing • Buffering/Proxi • PT hub maps• PT Supply database mity analysis • PT network• PT Demand • Crowd-sourcing • Overlay analysis maps• Informal • Field surveys • Network • Pedestrian Settlements • Questionnaire analysis walkways • Validation, etc. • Decision maps 3
  • 3/5/2012REVIEW OF DATA Spatial mapping on public transport and pedestrian infrastructure (PT hubs (nodes), PT routes (links), Pedestrian facilities)  MMUTIS (Metro Manila Urban Transport Integration Study), JICA (1999)  MMUTSI (Metro Manila Urban Transport System Information), JICA (2005)  MMPTS (Mega Manila Public Transport Study), JICA (2007)  MMPTPSS (Mega Manila Public Transport Planning Support System Study), JICA (2012) Informal settlements  Urban Poverty Morphology Project, Manila Observatory and Urban Research Consortium (2000)DATABASE DEVELOPMENT CROWD-SOURCING/SMART MAPPING Discussed/To be discussed by: Mr. JayR Cordova in the AM session, and Ms. Susan Zielinski in the PM session 4
  • 3/5/2012 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT VALIDATION OF COLLECTED PHOTO DOCUMENTATION DATA THROUGH FIELD SURVEY DATABASE DEVELOPMENT GIS MAPPING effective way to visualize data and perform spatial analysis to identify relationships between map layers. validated data are digitized or converted into GIS data format (e.g., kmz to shp) 5
  • 3/5/2012 SPATIAL ANALYSIS  Proximity Analysis/Buffering  involves creation of areas around a geographical entity based on a measurement of distance  Overlay analysis  map layers are combined to form a new layer that provides new information derived from the attributes of the input layers  Maps are the basis of both spatial and non-spatial decision- making PUBLISHING TO OPEN SOURCE MAPS Validated datasets to be published to open source maps (e.g. openstreet map, google earth map, etc.) 6
  • 3/5/2012 SAMPLE TRANSIT MAP STUDY AREA  Metro Manila to map out Public Transport terminals andNORTH EDSA/AGHAM MATANDANG BALARA PAYATAS routes  Crowd-sourcing activity  Existing database from past studies (i.e., MMUTIS, MMPTS, MMPTPSS)  Quezon City for case studies of poor/vulnerable communities 7
  • 3/5/2012SOME PRELIMINARY RESULTSNUMBER OF TERMINALS AND ROUTES FOR BUSES (1983/1996) MODES ITEM SERVICE AREA 1983 1996 1996/1983 BUS No. of MM Intracity 197 150 0.76 Routes No. of Inside MM 121 35 0.29 Terminals Estimated MM Intracity 5,900 12,900 2.19 No. of Operating UnitsSource: 1983 JUMSUT & 1996 MMUTISSOME PRELIMINARY RESULTSNUMBER OF TERMINALS AND ROUTES FOR JEEPNEYS (1983/1996) MODES ITEM SERVICE 1983 1996 1996/1983 AREA JEEPNEY No. of MM Intracity 780 490 0.66 Routes No. of Inside MM 184 210 1.14 Terminals Estimated MM Intracity 35,000 69,700 1.96 No. of Operating UnitsSource: 1983 JUMSUT & 1996 MMUTIS 8
  • 3/5/2012 SOME PRELIMINARY RESULTS NUMBER OF TERMINALS AND UNITS FOR TRICYCLES (1983/1996) MODES ITEM SERVICE 1983 1996 1996/1983 AREA TRICYCLE No. of Inside MM 276 640 2.32 Terminals Estimated MM Intracity 17,000 60,700 3.57 No. of Operating Units Source: 1983 JUMSUT & 1996 MMUTISSOME PRELIMINARY RESULTSJEEPNEY AND TRICYCLE TERMINALSSource: JICA 1999 MMUTIS 9
  • 3/5/2012SOME PRELIMINARY RESULTSTRICYCLE TERMINALS IN QUEZON CITYTotal Number of TODAs = 150 District 1 = 29 District 2 = 68 District 3 = 19 District 4 = 34No. of Units with Franchise District 1 = 4,727 District 2 = 13,542 District 3 = 2,668 District 4 = 3,863Source: Quezon City LGUSOME PRELIMINARY RESULTSPARTIAL MAPPING OF PT TERMINALS IN NORTH EDSA AREA Informal settlement 10
  • 3/5/2012 CONCLUDING REMARKS Database and mapping can be useful in responding to the needs of the poor and the vulnerable groups GIS can be used as a tool to identify improvements in PT system  Database development (using traditional and appropriate technology in data collection)  Conversion of database to GIS (digitization, data conversion, etc.)  Spatial analysis  Application to planning (e.g., PT and pedestrian improvements, etc.)  Whether poor is well served by PT system and pedestrian networks  Whether transportation levels of service is above acceptable levels, etc.  Decision maps to help planners and general public  Seamless pedestrian walkway maps, PT service maps, etc. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION Jun T. Castro, Dr. Eng. Associate Professor UP School of Urban and Regional Planning nujortsac@gmail.com 11
  • ANNEX MCase Studies on the Mobility Characteristics, Cost and Issues of the Poor and Vulnerable Groups
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila Project Launching Ateneo de Manila University January 31, 2012 with generous support from Case Studies on the Mobility Characteristics, Costs, and Issues of the Poor and Vulnerable Groups Randolph D. Carreon, MATP, BSEcon Transport Economist 1
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Objectives of the Study • The Study aims : – to understand the MOBILITY CHARACTERISTICS, COSTS AND ISSUES of the poor and vulnerable groups. • Specifically, the Study aims to: – establish the travel demand patterns of the poor and vulnerable groups; – look qualitatively into the efficiency of the public transport system vis-à-vis the needs of the poor and the vulnerable groups; – estimate the cost of mobility of the poor; – estimate the actual and desired cost of transport of those within the vulnerable groups; and – examine other non–quantifiable costs, if any, incurred by the vulnerable groups Who are the Poor and the Vulnerable Groups? For purposes of this Study: – The “Poor” are those living within “colonies” of informal settlers. • Three (3) informal settler colonies in Quezon City as case study areas: a. Purok Centro, Barangay Old Balara b. Along Agham Road (North Triangle) c. GK Village in Barangay Payatas – The “Vulnerable Groups” will include (i) PWDs, (ii) Senior Citizens, (iii) Women and Children, and (iv) Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) workers. 2
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Data Gathering Methodology • Household interviews in the three (3) informal settlement areas. Approximately 100 HH respondents per area. • The initial findings, based on the interviews, will be validated during a Small Group Validation Workshop (Public Consultation) in each of the area. • Individual interviews will be conducted with BPO workers. • Individual Interviews, Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) and Focused Group Discussions (FGDs) will be conducted with the other vulnerable groups. • Secondary data will also be collected. Project Update Activity Inclusive Dates Inception Meeting 27 October 2011 Preparatory Works Nov - Dec 2011 Coordination with the Mid – January 2012 to Case Study Areas present HH Interviews 14 – 20 January 2012 Public Consultation 27 January 2012 Project Launch (including 31 January 2012 Presentation of Initial Findings) Other Data Gathering Feb – Mid March 2012 Activities Completion of Analyses Feb – March 2012 Final Report End – March 2012 3
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 PROJECT ACTIVITIES AND INITIAL FINDINGS Household Interviews Public Consultation 4
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 General Findings • No of HH in Purok Centro, Brgy Old Balara: 414 • Average HH Size: 4.78 (say 5) • No of “From Home” Trips per Day: approx 1,000 • No of Total Person–Trips per Day: approx 20,800 Trip Purpose of “From Home” trips Modal Split (all person–trips) Walk 31.10% Own Bicycle 0.62% NMPT 0.16% 40% 34.37% Tricycle 19.13% 35% 31.10% 30% PUJeep 34.37% 25% 19.13% 20% FX 0.62% 15% 10% 8.09% 3.89% PUBus 8.09% 5% 0.62% 0.16% 0.62% 1.56% 0.16% 0.31% 0% Mass Transit 1.56% Private Vehicle 3.89% Taxi 0.16% School Service 0.31% 5
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Average Annual Income and Expenses With Rent No Rent With MV Without MV With MV Without MV Food 105,850.00 79,102.05 104,633.33 91,144.33 Rent and Utilities 102,700.71 49,835.31 45,933.85 41,680.65 Communication 6,067.74 8,162.01 14,796.54 6,871.30 Education 3,392.63 10,897.05 33,280.51 25,422.63 Medical Care 3,590.73 3,860.82 16,897.63 14,323.00 Recreation and Vices 14,369.23 13,741.70 31,763.08 7,183.10 Transport 16,897.59 21,905.56 31,541.11 25,753.70 Others 34,815.38 23,345.72 22,849.94 15,314.00 Total Annual Expenses 287,684.00 210,850.21 301,695.98 227,692.71 Average Annual Income 271,040.00 203,138.11 269,002.80 167,261.10 % of TC to AAI 6.23% 10.78% 11.73% 15.40% % of TC to Total Expenses 5.87% 10.39% 10.45% 11.31% Share of Transport Cost to Total Annual Expenses 350.00 300.00 250.00 Thousands 200.00 150.00 100.00 50.00 0.00 With Rent - With MV With Rent - Without MV No Rent - With MV No Rent - Without MV Transport Food Rent and Utilities Communication Education Medical Care Recreation and Vices Others 6
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Breakdown of Annual Transport Cost With Rent No Rent With MV Without MV With MV Without MV Fuel (Own MV) 6,083.33 0.00 7,735.19 0.00 Registration and Maintenance(Own MV) 8,040.92 0.00 8,169.92 0.00 Fare (To Work) 2,773.33 10,905.56 8,996.00 14,430.00 Fare (To School) 0.00 4,500.00 6,640.00 7,857.03 Fare (To Market) 0.00 6,500.00 0.00 3,466.67 Total 16,897.59 21,905.56 31,541.11 25,753.70 Major Non-Monetary Cost: Safety 7
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Perceived Primary traffic availability of Mobility long travel congestion public 3% transport Problems time 2% vehicles 2% crowded public high transport vehicles transport 2% cost 91% Proposed Solutions (from Purok Centro) 1 work for additional income 2 lower fare 3 increase salary 4 walk Other Recommended Solutions: • Cooperation of motorists • limit number of passengers to vehicles seating capacity • private vehicle reduction • provide efficient transport 8
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Thank You 9
  • ANNEX NA Preliminary Inventory and Typology of Enterprise Models for Inclusive Mobility in Metro Manila: Of, By, and For the Poor and Vulnerable
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Catalyzing New Mobility in Cities: The Case of Metro Manila By: Ateneo Center for Social Entrepreneurship (ACSEnt) SDC Hall, Social Development Complex Ateneo de Manila University January 31, 2012 with generous support from Fashion Victim 1
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Research Goals & Objectives • Mobility challenges of the poor and vulnerable sectors; • Existing (emerging) transport / mobility related social enterprise opportunities in the transport sector; • Sustainable innovative ideas and business models on new mobility and transport-related social enterprises – high potential for scale and replication, prescribed new mobility features, benefitting the poor and the vulnerable sectors; • Prescribe features of new mobility social enterprise models and incentive programs; • Market barriers and enablers : o Policy o Economics o Socio-Cultural • New platform, resource centre and enabler of innovation for a socially inclusive mobility in the region starting with Metro Manila with generous support from Scope • Focus – Commercial and enterprise component of the transport and new mobility sector • Key variables and indicators for output delivery – Barriers – Enablers • Methodology – Qualitative – Quantitative • Related Literature – Case studies and reports – Journals – Others • Output: expected output / “input” process from the framework with generous support from 2
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Limitations • Case Study: Metro Manila – Sampling: Quezon City Area (with high- density urban poor population and vulnerable sector), near major transport hubs • Output – Templating and modelling, features of social enterprise new mobility – Not concrete business models – crowd sourcing with generous support from Expected Outputs • Mobility challenges of the poor and vulnerable • Existing mobility models • Emerging new mobility models – social enterprises • Social enterprise opportunities for the mobility (transport) sector that will purposively benefit the poor and vulnerable with generous support from 3
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Research Questions 1. What are the mobility challenges of the poor and the vulnerable sectors? 2. What are the existing mobility models? 3. What are the new mobility business innovations/approaches (including service models) that most effectively benefit the poor and vulnerable? 4. What are the barriers and enablers to implementation, replication and scaling up mobility innovations with generous support from Primary Considerations • Considerations for emerging new mobility sector: - Efficiency (time to get from point A to point B) - Cost (vulnerable/poor-friendly transport fare) - Environmental - Convenience and Safety - Human-centered design principle • Proximate demands and supply for new mobility mechanisms • Mechanisms, infrastructures, systems that can support the various needs and requirements of the new mobility consumers • Features of the new mobility system that will be convenient and helpful to the consumers • Incentives, principles, barriers and enablers with generous support from 4
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Linear Design Thinking 5
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Design *INPUT PROCESS *OUTPUT HUMAN-CENTERED Innovation Platform, Resource DESIGN PROCESS Enabler Center, *THROUGHPUT (DELIVERY) PROCESS BARRIERS / ENABLERS Design Possibilities Capacity Dev’t & Implementation Vulnerable Approaches SE Models/ Custom-fit sector- Design friendly mobility infrastructure design Monitoring and Sustainability Measures *OUTCOME Methodology • Data Gathering – Multimethodology: Mixed Approach Design (MADS) • Primary data gathering – Quantitative • Survey • Area sampling – Qualitative • Secondary data analysis and review of related literature • Focused group discussion • Interview with key informants • Community consultation • Validation and analysis – Triangulation methodology – Hybrid data gathering methodology: Human-centered Design (quanti-quali cross-validation approach) with generous support from 6
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Operational Variables & Definitions • Business model  depicts the rationale of how organizations identify key strategic variables and measures  blueprint for the organization’s business strategy  architecture of the organization that includes the core aspect of the business with generous support from Operational Variables & Definitions • Social entrepreneurship As an activity: the activities in which organizations engage to achieve socially-beneficial and inclusive objectives and pursue the mission through sustainable resource mobilization strategies with generous support from 7
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Operational Variables & Definitions • Social entrepreneurship As an approach/methodology: an innovative and system-changing approach in solving pervasive social problems through sustainable entrepreneurial practices with generous support from Operational Variables & Definitions • Social entrepreneurship As a business model: a business model where capabilities of the business, public and citizen sector are leveraged to deliver needed goods and services to marginalized populations such as the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) with the achievement of multiple bottomlines as the end goal. with generous support from 8
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Operational Variables & Definitions • Social enterprise In general: Social enterprises are organizations that engage in social-mission driven initiatives to address pervasive social problems and close this gap through an innovative, system- changing and wide-scale approaches. These are organizations that are involved in activities whose main stakeholders are the marginalized sector and come up with sustainable resource- mobilization strategies to achieve multiple bottomline goals. with generous support from Operational Variables & Definitions • Social enterprise By nature: Social enterprises can be identified as organizations whose social mission is consciously embedded within its structure, governance and core aspect of the business. The social gain is not just an “auxiliary” activity (such as CSR or community outreach missions) of the entire business operation, but rather embedded as integral to its business model and strategy with generous support from 9
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Operational Variables & Definitions • Social enterprise By social aims and outcomes: Social enterprises explicitly attempt to close the gap by providing innovative solutions to pervasive social problems that the public, private and traditional citizen-sector failed to address. with generous support from Operational Variables & Definitions • Social enterprise By stakeholder-focus: Social enterprises are organizations that are mainly focused on the marginalized sector such as those in the bottom of the pyramid (BoP), physically disadvantage, and so on, and create opportunities where these stakeholders are the primary consumers, market drivers or leadership base of the organization itself. with generous support from 10
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Operational Variables & Definitions • Social enterprise By leadership and sectoral-base: Social enterprises are led by individuals, groups or communities that are not main actors within the public or corporate sector. However, this particular social enterprise typology must not be misconstrued with its definition in terms of legal status. Social enterprises can be led by private individuals or groups as well as the citizen sector who have started the organizations as independent from government agencies and the traditional corporate business units. with generous support from Operational Variables & Definitions • Innovation As a process: innovation is the process by which unconventional ideas or ways of doing things are translated or created to achieve revolutionary systems-change As an outcome: is the result or by-product of a process that offers new systems, infrastructures and processes of doing things with generous support from 11
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Operational Variables & Definitions • Barriers / Enablers 1. Policy: standards and regulatory mechanisms 2. Economic: market model, supply-demand 3. Socio-cultural: human ecology, cultural anthropology, patterns of behavior, social context with generous support from Pre-test Data Gathering with generous support from 12
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Preliminary Findings • Key Mobility Challenges of the Poor and Vulnerable – Cost – Length of travel – Travel time – Challenges in terms of access to basic goods and services are not due to lack of transport modes, but in terms of the cost of goods itself (indirect influence due to cost of transport) with generous support from Preliminary Findings • Supply-demand study on transport/mobility products and services ICT Access Affordability with generous support from 13
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Preliminary Findings • Supply-demand study on transport/mobility products and services Information services Rank Information Average 1 Cost 1.96 • Most important information considered by travelers is the 2 Length of Time 2.75 cost of transportation. 3 Available Transportation 2.78 • Least considered is the service features available. 4 Direction 3.16 5 Safety Features 4.04 • Willingness to pay: average 6 Distance 4.22 price = Php 6.65 7 Others 5 8 Travel Route 6.16 with generous support from 9 Service Features 6.25 Preliminary Findings • Supply-demand study on transport/mobility products and services • Majority have difficulty in Frequency Percentage availing of healthcare (n = Services Difficult Easy Difficult Easy 20, 64.52%) and finding Food 9 22 29.03 70.97 employment (n = 18, Healthcare 20 11 64.52 35.48 58.06%). Clothing 12 19 38.71 61.29 • Primary issue: not in terms Employment 18 13 58.06 41.94 of inaccessibility directly Government Services 15 16 48.39 51.61 related to transport, but Sanitation 7 24 22.58 77.42 more in terms of actual cost Water 7 24 22.58 77.42 of goods Others 31 0.00 100.00 with generous support from 14
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Preliminary Findings Frequency Percentage Reasons Yes No Yes No • 24 (77.42%) Distance 13 18 41.94 58.06 attribute their Price (to costly to difficulty towards travel) 14 17 45.16 54.84 the cost of availing of these goods and Price (to costly to avail) 24 7 77.42 22.58 services. Access 12 19 38.71 61.29 Others 31 0.00 100.00 with generous support from Preliminary Findings • Existing and Emerging Mobility Models and Case Studies Recurring themes and features: • Sustainable transportation – sustainable targets – sustainable legislation for transportation and land coordination policies/ designs, inter and intra-agency collaboration approach, agency prioritization and allocation process • Energy efficient with generous support from 15
  • Ateneo School of Government 3/5/2012 Preliminary Findings • Existing and Emerging Mobility Models and Case Studies Recurring themes and features: • Multi-modal mobility • Multi-stakeholder approach • Human patterns of movement • Predictability of movement of goods and people • Minimizing cost with generous support from Preliminary Findings • Barriers and Enablers – Policy: uncoordinated, fragmented, unsustainable policy and regulatory frameworks do not offer support for the development of sustainable pro-poor mobility structures – Economics: current economic incentives are mostly private- sector biased, mobility models are designed not to cater to human needs but for achievement of bottomline profit – Socio-cultural: urban development and transport system designs in MM are out of sync with patterns of settlement, human ecology, consumer behaviors, unsustainable land and resource planning with generous support from 16
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