The Project TeamDr. Antonio La VinaProject AdviserDr. Jean CaledaProject AdviserDr. Segundo E. Romero,Project DirectorDr. ...
  1	  I N F O R M A L 	   C I T Y 	   D I A L O G U E S 	  The	  2040	  Urban	  Challenge	  in	  Metro	  Manila	  Futures	...
  2	  	  Table	  of	  Contents	  List	  of	  Acronyms	  .....................................................................
  3	  Group	  Critiquing	  Outputs	  ........................................................................................
  4	  	  List	  of	  Acronyms	  	  AdMU	   Ateneo	  de	  Manila	  University	  ASoG	   Ateneo	  School	  of	  Governmet	  ...
  5	  	  Executive	  Summary	  	  	  	  The	  two-­‐day	  workshop	  entitled	  Informal	  City	  Dialogues:	  The	  2040	...
  6	  service	  sector	  while	  some,	  including	  the	  elderly,	  still	  work	  for	  the	  formal	  industry	  secto...
  7	  The	  following	  day,	  the	  participants	  shared	  their	  reflections	  on	  how	  they	  appreciated	  the	  v...
  8	  Inclusive	  Futures	  Mapping	  Workshop	  Day	  1	  5	  MARCH	  2013	  Opening	  Program	  	  	  The	  program	  fo...
  9	  He	  recognized	  the	  difficulty	  in	  facing	  the	  problems	  and	  pressures	  that	  Metro	  Manila	  is	  f...
  10	  place	  where	  he	  lived	  had	  no	  toilet	  and	  bathroom	  and	  had	  illegal	  electrical	  connections.	 ...
  11	  <<	  Assistant	  Dean	  Dr.	  Caleda	  giving	  the	  participants	  an	  overview	  about	  the	  Informal	  City	...
  12	  Dr.	  Romero	  giving	  an	  overview	  about	  the	  Inclusive	  Futures	  Mapping	  Workshop	  in	  Metro	  Manil...
  13	  	  Dr.	  Romero	  emphasized	  that	  all	  have	  a	  say	  in	  the	  future.	  How	  each	  of	  them	  acts	  w...
  14	  	   	  	  Photo	  1	  Talk	  Show	  Part	  1	  (L-­‐R:	  Ms.	  Jessica	  Bercilla	  Teofilo	  "Tofin"	  Morado,	  L...
  15	  Marina	  Toribio,	  78	  yrs.	  old,	  resident	  of	  Brgy.	  Manggahan,	  Pasig	  City	  Lucila	  Monforte,	  75	...
  16	  Antonio	  Javier,	  64	  yrs.	  old,	  resident	  of	  San	  Mateo,	  Rizal	  Pedro	  Cadab,	  59	  yrs.	  old,	  S...
  17	  Lucy	  de	  Guzman,	  resident	  of	  Brgy.	  Doña	  Imelda,	  Quezon	  City	  There	  are	  those	  who	  believe	...
  18	  Mylene	  Pagakpak,	  18	  yrs.	  old,	  resident	  of	  Brgy.	  Estero	  de	  San	  Miguel	  Nancy	  Berion,	  41	 ...
  19	  government	  to	  include	  the	  marginalized	  and	  vulnerable	  sectors	  in	  gender	  and	  development	  pla...
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT
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Inclusive Futures Mapping Documentation DRAFT

  1. 1. The Project TeamDr. Antonio La VinaProject AdviserDr. Jean CaledaProject AdviserDr. Segundo E. Romero,Project DirectorDr. Marie Danielle V. Guillen,Project ManagerMs. Aurma ManlangitCo-FacilitatorMs. Jessica-Dator Bercilla,Senior Research AssociateMr. Lorenzo Cordova Jr.,Research AssociateMs. Althea Muriel L. Pineda,Project AssociateSupport Staff:Ms. Creselda Doble,Technical Writer/ DocumentorMs. Cody CavestanyMain DocumentorMr. Herbert NavascaPhoto/Video DocumentorMr. Andre Immanuel QuintosPhoto/Video Documentor andSocial Media AdministratorMs. Joan Therese Domingo,Project AssociateMs. Aletheia Kerygma Valenciano,Project AssociateMr. Richard Antonio,Student AssistantMs. Charmaine Tobes,Student AssistantMr. Dhenmark Valera,Student AssistantMs. Alaina Villegas,Student Assistant  Informal  City  Dialogues:  The  2040  Urban  Challenge  in  Metro  Manila    Inclusive  Futures  Mapping    Documentation  Report  March  5-­‐6,  2013    Conference Room 5, ISO BuildingAteneo de Manila UniversityLoyola Heights, Quezon CityInnovation at the Base of the Pyramid in Asia ProgramAteneo School of GovernmentCopyright © 2013
  2. 2.   1  I N F O R M A L   C I T Y   D I A L O G U E S  The  2040  Urban  Challenge  in  Metro  Manila  Futures  Mapping  Workshop    Conference  Room  5,  ISO  Building    Ateneo  de  Manila  University    Loyola  Heights,  Quezon  City      March  5-­‐6,  2013    
  3. 3.   2    Table  of  Contents  List  of  Acronyms  ................................................................................................................  4  Executive  Summary  ...........................................................................................................  5  Inclusive  Futures  Mapping  Workshop  Day  1  ......................................................................  8  Opening  Program  ...............................................................................................................................................  8  Opening  Remarks  ..............................................................................................................................................  8  Inspirational  Message  .....................................................................................................................................  9  Introduction  of  the  Participants  ...............................................................................................................  10  Introduction  of  Project  Steering  Committee  Members  &  Staff  ....................................................  11  Overview  of  the  Informal  City  Dialogue  Project  .............................................................................  111  Overview  of  the  Inclusive  City  Dialogue  Inclusive  Futures  Mapping  Workshop  in  Metro  Manila  ...........................................................................................................................................................................  12  Metro  Manila:  Then  and  Now,  Perspectives  from  the  Communities  ........................................  13  Talk  Show  Part  One:  In  the  Eyes  of  the  Elderly  ..................................................................................  13  Talk  Show  Part  Two:  In  the  Eyes  of  the  Youth  ....................................................................................  17  Open  Forum  .......................................................................................................................................................  19  Synthesis  .............................................................................................................................................................  20  Workshop  1:  Factors  Changing  The  Way  People  Live  In  Metro  Manila  ..................................  20  Physical  ................................................................................................................................................................  21  Physical-­‐Environmental  ...............................................................................................................................  21  Environmental  ..................................................................................................................................................  21  Social  .....................................................................................................................................................................  21  Economic  .............................................................................................................................................................  22  Institutional  .......................................................................................................................................................  22  Workshop  2:  Highly  Important  and  Uncertain  Factors  ..................................................................  23  Workshop  3:  Combination  of  Drivers  ....................................................................................................  26  Summary  and  Integration  ...........................................................................................................................  28  Inclusive  Futures  Mapping  Day  2  .....................................................................................  29    Recap  ....................................................................................................................................................................  30  Reflections  from  the  Participants  ............................................................................................................  31  Workshop  4:  Building  Metro  Manila  Scenarios  .................................................................................  32  Workshop  Outputs:  Building  the  Scenarios  .........................................................................................  34  Scenario  4:  “Run  Samson  Run”  .........................................................................................................................  34  Scenario  3:  “Maghintay  ka  Lamang”  ...............................................................................................................  35  Scenario  2:  “Hawak  Kamay”  ..............................................................................................................................  37  Scenario  1:  “Kanlungan”  ......................................................................................................................................  38  Workshop  5:  Completing  Metro  Manila  Scenarios  ...........................................................................  39  Workshop  Outputs:  .........................................................................................................................................  39  Scenario  4:  “Run  Samson  Run”  .........................................................................................................................  39  Scenario  3:  “Maghintay  ka  Lamang”  ...............................................................................................................  40  Scenario  2:  “Hawak  Kamay”  ..............................................................................................................................  40  Scenario  1:  “Kanlungan”  ......................................................................................................................................  41  
  4. 4.   3  Group  Critiquing  Outputs  ............................................................................................................................  41  Scenario  4:  “Run  Samson  Run”  .........................................................................................................................  41  Scenario  3:  “Maghintay  ka  Lamang”  ...............................................................................................................  41  Scenario  2:  “Hawak  Kamay”  ..............................................................................................................................  41    Scenario  1:  “Kanlungan”  ......................................................................................................................................  42  Lessons  Learned  ..............................................................................................................................................  44  Workshop  6:  Scenario  Timeline  ...........................................................................................  ……………...44  Workshop  6  Results:  ......................................................................................................................................  44  Scenario  4:  “Run  Samson  Run”  .........................................................................................................................  44  Scenario  3:  “Maghintay  ka  Lamang”  ...............................................................................................................  45  Scenario  2:  “Hawak  Kamay”  ..............................................................................................................................  45  Scenario  1:  “Kanlungan”  ......................................................................................................................................  46  Reflections  from  Participants  ....................................................................................................................  48  Response  from  Partners  ...............................................................................................................................  48  Closing  Remarks  ..............................................................................................................................................  49  Distribution  of  Certificates  ..........................................................................................................................  49    
  5. 5.   4    List  of  Acronyms    AdMU   Ateneo  de  Manila  University  ASoG   Ateneo  School  of  Governmet  AusAID   Australian  Government’s  Overseas  Aid  Program  BPO   Business  Process  Outsourcing  CAMANAVA   Caloocan,  Malabon,  Navotas,  Valenzuela  CENRO   City  Environment  and  Natural  Resources  Office  CSO   Civil  Society  Organizations  DILG   Department  of  Interior  and  Local  Government  DPWH   Department  of  Public  Works  and  Highways  DSWD   Department  of  Social  Welfare  and  Development  DTI   Department  of  Trade  and  Industry  EDSA   Epifanio  Delos  Santos  Avenue  GDP   Gross  Domestic  Product  HLURB   Housing  and  Land  Use  Regulatory  Board  HUDCC   Housing  and  Urban  Development  Coordinating  Council  ICD   Informal  City  Dialogues  ICT   Information  and  Communication  Technology  IFS   Informal  Settlements/  Sector  LGU   Local  Government  Unit  LRT   Light  Rail  Transit  MM   Metro  Manila  MMDA   Metropolitan  Manila  Development  Authority  MRT   Metro  Rail  Transit  NGO   Non-­‐government  Organizations  NHA   National  Housing  Authority  OFW   Overseas  Filipino  Workers    PETA   Philippine  Educational  Theater  Association  PWDs   Persons  with  disabilities  RH   Reproductive  Health  SPED   Special  Education  STDs   Sexually  Transmitted  Diseases  TV   Television  USAID   United  Stated  Agency  for  International  Development    
  6. 6.   5    Executive  Summary        The  two-­‐day  workshop  entitled  Informal  City  Dialogues:  The  2040  Urban  Challenge  in  Metro  Manila  Inclusive  Futures  Mapping  Workshop,  held  at  Conference  Room  5,  ISO  Building,  Ateneo  de  Manila  University  Loyola  Heights  Quezon  City  last  March  5-­‐6,  2013,  was  attended  by  a  total  of  97  individuals,  representing  different  sectors  of  the  society  coming  from  37  various  organizations.  About  50%  of  the  participants  came  from  the  community,  15%  from  the  government  (national  at  local)  while  the  remaining  25%  was  from  the  private  sector,   media,   NGOs   at   CSOs.   With   support   from   the   Rockefeller   Foundation   and   it’s   sub  grantee  Forum  for  the  Future  (FFF),  this  event  was  organized  by  its  implementing  partner  Ateneo  School  of  Government  under  the  Innovations  at  the  Base  of  the  Pyramid  in  Southeast  Asia  (iBoP  Asia)  Program.    The  Rockefeller  Foundation  has  launched  the  Centennial  Urban  Challenge  for  the  21st  Century  Project  formally  referred  to  as  “Informal  City  Dialogues:  The  2040  Challenge”  that  aims   to   examine   the   formal   and   informal   structures   within   cities,   understand   the  relationship   between   the   formal   and   informal,   and   envision   a   future   for   these   cities.   Six  cities   have   been   selected,   including   Metro   Manila   in   the   Philippines.   Thus,   one   of   the  objectives   of   this   workshop   is   to   enable   the   participants   to   appreciate   the   process   of  envisioning  the  future  through  shared  narratives.  .    The  program  formally  started  with  an  opening  remarks  of  Dr.  Antonio  La  Viña,  Dean  of  the  School  of  Government,  and  an  inspirational  message  from  Fr.  Jett  Villarin,  President  of  Ateneo  de  Manila  University.  Both  of  them  recognized  the  importance  of  planning  towards  a  better   Metro   Manila.   They   both   believed   that   looking   as   far   ahead   as   2040   can   be   a   big  challenge   especially   if   the   planners   are   not   equipped   with   ideas   about   the   future.  Nevertheless,  they  were  optimistic  on  what  planning  could  do.  They  noted  that  if  planning,  dreaming,  and  execution  are  done  together,  then  it  could  be  done.  They  also  recognized  the  importance  of  examining  one’s  role  or  part  in  the  fulfillment  of  the  plans  along  with  their  individual  responsibility  to  one  another  and  the  country.    A   Talk   Show   segment   entitled,   Metro   Manila   Then   and   Now   featured   a   video  documentary   on   the   Pearl   of   the   Orient   set   back   in   the   early   1900s.     A   talk   show   with  representatives  from  elderly  living  in  five  (5)  selected  communities  in  Metro  Manila  shortly  followed  the  video  presentation.  Another  short  video  clip  highligting  the  evolution  of  Metro  Manila  through  the  years  was  shown  which  was  immediately  followed  by  a  talk  show  with  the  younger  generation.  Some  of  the  highlights  of  this  segment  include  findings  about  the  huge  percentage  of  migrants  in  Metro  Manila  coming  from  various  places  in  Luzon,  Visayas  and  Mindanao.  Meanwhile,  the  elderly  revealed  that  the  number  of  high-­‐rise  buildings  back    then  was  not  that  big  since  majority  of  lands  were  agriculturally  utilized,  with  few  budding  central  business  districts  and  industrial  areas  in  some  areas.  Some  said  that  they  reside  in  danger  zones  because  that  was  all  they  could  afford.  The  profound  understanding  of  what  informal  means  was  evident  in  the  interviews  with  representatives  of  the  young  and  the  elderly.  They  all  wished  to  convey  the  message  that  they  all  play  a  significant  role  in  the  society.  Though  many  of  them  are  usually  volunteers,  a  big  percentage  belong  to  the  social  
  7. 7.   6  service  sector  while  some,  including  the  elderly,  still  work  for  the  formal  industry  sector  (e.g.  construction  worker,  home  service  type  of  job,  sales  clerk  in  malls,  etc)    The  participants  mentioned  their  desire  to  own  a  house  and  for  housing  projects  to  be  in  tune  with  their  practical  needs.  There  should  be  inclusive  elements  such  as  livelihood  and  planning   should   be   seen   in   a   holistic   way   and   with   proper   system   in   place.   They   also  strongly  argue  that  government  plans  should  prioritize  the  poor  and  marginalized  and  not  mainly  focused  on  gaining  profit.    Furthermore,  they  complained  about  their  problems  within  their  sector.  There  are  those  who  sell  and  rent  out  rights  of  lands  that  are  not  theirs.  In  planning,  they  recognized  the  crucial  role  of  the  census  or  such  surveys  in  government  decision-­‐making  as  this  will  help  in  knowing  the  capacity  of  the  informal  settlers  to  pay  for  housing.  They  acknowledged  that  their  group  should  start  providing  the  government  proper  information.  They  also  saw  the  important   role   of   arts   such   as   Philippine   Educational   Theater   Association   (PETA)   in  highlighting  their  importance  in  the  society  and  the  other  possible  things  that  they  could  contribute.    It  was  also  noted  that  there  were  government  offices  both  from  the  national  and  local  that   wishes   to   have   “in-­‐city   development”1  as   in   the   case   of   Mandaluyong   who   granted  informal   settlers   additional   funds   to   build   homes   as   well   as   other   basic   services   such   as  health  centers,  schools,  and  markets.      Some   of   the   pressing   points   raised   were   the   need   to   be   truly   socially   inclusive   in  planning   and   to   ensure   that   the   process   is   participatory.   The   following   questions   were  raised;  what  is  the  proper  planning  process  and  project  implementation?  What  is  the  right  mechanism   for   participation?   They   saw   that   there   were   many   different   levels   of  participation  and  technologies  available  for  use.  They  believe  that  it  is  crucial  to  determine  the   correct   combination   and   be   able   to   respond   to   the   following   inquiries:   technology   of  listening   or   participation?   How   does   one   monitor   the   level   of   participation?   They   also  reiterated   that   informal   settlers   should   not   be   seen   as   an   eyesore   but   rather   partners   in  development.   They   should   always   be   included   in   decision-­‐making   and   solution   seeking  process   and   be   given   a   chance   to   achieve   their   desires   to   improve   their   situation   in   life.  Gender  and  development  issues  as  well  as  corresponding  perspectives  were  also  raised  as  an  important  factor  in  development.      The  first  workshop  identified  the  reasons  for  change  in  Metro  Manila.  There  were  more  than   80   drivers   of   change   identified,   selected   and   categorized   into   different   themes:  physical,  environmental,  social,  economic  and  institutional.  The  participants  were  able  to  identify  top  11  reasons  for  change  and  these  were  ranked  according  to  those  which  future  are   believe   to   be   certain   or   uncertain.   There   was   a   long   discussion   on   the   proper  combination   of   drivers   of   change   but   in   the   end   the   two   selected   drivers   were:   urban  planning   and   development   as   the   first   driver   while   the   second   driver   was   population  growth.                                                                                                                                1  A  type  of  housing  development  that  does  not  require  informal  settlers  to  transfer  to  another  place.  Instead  the  local  government  ensures  progress  in  a  particular  area  within  the  city  where  the  informal  settlers  could  legally  stay.    
  8. 8.   7  The  following  day,  the  participants  shared  their  reflections  on  how  they  appreciated  the  value  of  having  a  genuine  participatory  process  in  surfacing  the  issues  and  problems.  They  also   saw   their   contribution   and   the   barriers   they   face   towards   achieving   their   vision   of  Metro   Manila   in   2040.   There   was   also   a   little   apprehension   to   some   who   have   been   to  similar   workshops   or   dialogues   with   nothing   concrete   happening   about   their   situation.  Aside   from   being   given   an   opportunity   to   participate   in   dialogues,   they   believe   that  sensitivity  to  one  anothers  opinion,  regardless  of  the  sector  they  belong,  is  indeed  a  critical  and  significant  factor  in  peoples  participation.      A   matrix   of   the   two   identified   drivers:   population   growth   and   effectiveness   in   urban  planning   and   development,   both   given   a   high   and   low   setting,   created   four   unique  scenarios:        1. Slow  growth  of  population  and  effective  urban  planning  and  development  2. Rapid  growth  of  population  and  effective  urban  planning  and  development  3. Slow  growth  of  population  and  ineffective  urban  planning  and  development  4. Rapid  growth  of  population  and  ineffective  urban  planning  and  development    The   participants   thought   of   various   circumstances   across   different   horizons   and  determined  what  the  everyday  stories  of  their  particular  scenario  were.  After  they  agreed  with  the  face,  icons  and  characterization  of  their  scenarios,  they  were  instructed  to  make  a  futures   wheel   on   the   implications   of   that   particular   scenario   in   Metro   Manila,   and   later  figured  out  the  relationship  of  each  circumstance,  the  participants  determined  which  could  happen  in  2020,  2030  or  2040.    Mr.  Benjamin  dela  Peña  of  the  Rockefeller  Foundation  shared  his  insights  in  planning.  He   believes   that   the   mistake   of   plans   is   not   because   they   are   wrong   plans   or   they   went  through  a  wrong  process  but  because  the  plans  are  not  revisited.  A  good  plan  should  always  reflect  the  needs  of  the  poor.  Mr.  Jacob  Park  of  Forum  for  the  Future  shared  that  people  were  able  to  experience  a  new  kind  of  conversation  in  this  workshop  and  perhaps,  were  also  able  to  learn  the  act  of  proper  listening.  He  believes  that  these  are  absolutely  critical  in  solving  problems  and  what  has  been  accomplished  in  this  workshop  can  be  considered  a  great  success.  However,  there  was  an  agreement  that  it  is  not  all  about  planning  but  also  about   implementation.   He   also   encouraged   everyone   to   come   together   for   another  workshop  in  April  and  talk  about  what  kind  of  innovations  they  could  all  create  to  build  a  future  that  they  want      Mr.  Benedict  Balderrama  closed  the  program  by  saying  that  the  essence  of  having  an  inclusive  city  is  having  space  for  everyone  where  participation  by  all  sectors  is  appreciated.  The  workshop  was  a  glimpse  or  practice  of  the  kind  of  participation  that  an  inclusive  city  dreams   about.   Everyone   has   hope   for   a   systematic,   sustainable,   progressive   and   more  participative  future.  He  said  that  gradually,  all  should  practice  correlating,  listening,  helping,  and  participating  with  and  among  one  another  to  achieve  an  inclusive  city.  This  workshop  called  for  all  to  participate  and  engage  and  with  this,  he  sees  Metro  Manila’s  future.  
  9. 9.   8  Inclusive  Futures  Mapping  Workshop  Day  1  5  MARCH  2013  Opening  Program      The  program  formally  started  with  the  singing  of  the  National  Anthem  followed  by  an  Invocation  entitled  Pananagutan  (Accountability)  led  by  the  master  of  ceremony,  Mr.  Jay-­‐R  Cordova.    Opening  Remarks    DR.  ANTONIO  G.M.  LA  VIÑA  Dean,  Ateneo  School  of  Government    Dr.   La   Viña   greeted   everyone   a   wonderful   morning   and   welcomed   them   to   the  workshop.  He  expressed  his  satisfaction  in  seeing  the  participants’  willingness  to  join  and  participate   in   the   two-­‐day   informal   city   dialogue   envisioning   Metro   Manila   in   2040.   He  complimented   the   invocation   entitled   Pananagutan   (Accountability),   as   this   may   be   the  main  emphasis  of  the  dialogue  for  the  day.  He  reminded  everyone  about  the  significance  of  inclusivity  in  which  no  one  should  be  excluded  in  envisioning  the  future  of  Metro  Manila  in  2040.      He   thanked   representatives  from   all   sectors   present   in   the  workshop:  the  government,  private  sector,   academe,   non-­‐government  organizations   and   informal  communities   in   Metro   Manila.   He  also  acknowledged  the  presence  of  the   members   of   the   Project  Steering   Committee   particularly  Mr.   Benjie   de   la   Peña,   a   Filipino  based  in  New  York  and  working  for  the   Rockefeller   Foundation,   and  Mr.  Jacob  Park  representing  Forum  for  the  Future.      He  informed  everyone  that  the  dialogue  and  visioning  exercise  is  not  only  being  done  in  Metro   Manila   but   also   in   five   other   cities   around   the   world   namely   Chennai   in   India,  Bangkok   in   Thailand,   Nairobi   in   Kenya,   Accra   in   Ghana   and   Lima   in   Peru.   He   stated   that  Metro  Manila’s  case  is  special  as  Metro  Manila  is  faced  with  many  challenges  and  pressures  with  a  lot  of  uncertainties.  However,  in  order  to  envision  what  Metro  Manila  should  look  like  in  2040,  everyone  had  to  understand  the  present-­‐day  drivers  of  development  and  find  ways  to  interpret  the  future.      Dean  of  Ateneo  School  of  Government  Dr.  Antonio  G.M.  La  Viña  in  his  Opening  Remarks  
  10. 10.   9  He  recognized  the  difficulty  in  facing  the  problems  and  pressures  that  Metro  Manila  is  facing,  but  with  assurance  that  as  long  as  everyone  understands  the  present  well,  all  can  move  forward  to  the  future.  Inclusivity  is  crucial  in  the  process  of  finding  solutions.  As  an  example,  he  mentioned  how  the  Philippines  continue  to  become  wealthy  with  only  a  few  people   who   benefit   (the   elite).   This   tremendous   wealth   is   not   being   distributed   to   the  people.   This   reflects   how   Filipinos   plan   for   their   cities.   He   was   excited   to   see   everyone  present  in  the  dialogue  for  it  means  involving  everyone  in  the  planning  process.  Being  part  of  the  United  Nations  process  called  the  Millenium  Ecosystems  Assessment  ten  years  ago,  he   is   a   firm   believer   of   futures   mapping   exercise   in   trying   to   pin   down   the   drivers   for  change  and  envisioning  to  plan  better.  He  hopes  that  everyone  will  learn  in  the  process  and  that  all  would  be  open  to  listen  to  what  each  other  has  to  say  especially  since  they  all  come  from  various  sectors  with  diverse  thrusts  and  lessons  brought  by  individual  experiences.    Lastly,  he  thanked  everyone  and  hoped  for  all  to  stay  with  them  in  the  next  two  days  and  hopefully  come  up  with  something  good  and  useful.    Inspirational  Message  FR.  JOSE  RAMON  T.  VILLARIN,  SJ  President,  Ateneo  de  Manila  University    Fr.  Villarin  greeted  everyone  a  great  morning  and  wondered  how  many  of  them  in  the  room  would  still  be  alive  in  2040.  He  shared  that  Madam  Auring2  was  the  first  that  came  to  his  mind  when  he  was  asked  to  speak  about  futures  mapping.  But  the  type  of  futures  mapping   referred   to   in   this   workshop   requires  determining  what  each  of  them  sees,  how  they  see  and  the   lens   used   in   looking   at   the   future.   The   mapping  exercise   also   demands   them   to   look   as   far   ahead   as  2040  but  gave  assurance  that  it  is  possible.  He  noted  that  all  they  had  to  do  was  to  look  within  themselves  and  find  their  dreams,  values,  and  desires.        He   shared   his   personal   story   about   his   stay   in  Navotas 3  in   2002.   He   recalled   how   compact   and  informal  Navotas  as  a  place  was  and  quickly  realized  that   it   would   be   difficult   for   him   to   live   there.     The                                                                                                                            2  A  known  fortune  teller  in  the  Philippines.      3  Navotas  is  a  1st  class  city  in  Metro  Manila,  Philippines.  The  city  occupies  a  narrow  strip  of  land  along   the   eastern   shores   of   Manila   Bay.   Navotas   is   considered   to   be   a   very   important   fishing  community  with  70%  of  its  population  deriving  their  livelihood  directly  or  indirectly  from  fishing  and   its   related   industries   like   fish   trading,   fish   net   mending,   and   fish   producing   having   marginal  percentage  of  inter-­‐Island  fish  producers.  Navotas  is  part  of  the  informal  subregion  of  Metro  Manila  called  CAMANAVA.  This  sub  region,  aside  from  Navotas,  includes  the  cities  of  Caloocan,  Malabon  and  Valenzuela.  Navotas  is  perceived  to  be  prone  to  flood  especially  during  the  rainy  season  and  during  high  tide,  but  the  national  and  local  government  are  trying  to  alleviate  the  problem.  Pollution  and  overpopulation   are   other   problems   that   the   government   is   trying   to   solve.   source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Navotas  Fr.  Villarin,  President  of  the  Ateneo  de  Manila  University,  delivering  his  inspirational  message  before  the  workshop  participants.  
  11. 11.   10  place  where  he  lived  had  no  toilet  and  bathroom  and  had  illegal  electrical  connections.  He  remembered   how   the   people   would   have   a   code   for   the   electricity   providers   who   often  come  in  the  area  to  check  on  and  apprehend  illegal  electrical  connections.  He  recounted  the  simple  ways  of  the  people  living  there  particularly  his  generous  host,  being  a  food  vendor  whose  day  starts  at  4:00  in  the  morning  to  go  the  market  and  buy  the  things  she  need.  At  5:00  am  she  starts  preparing  then  at  8:00  am  starts  selling.  The  following  day,  she  will  use  the  money  she  got  from  her  sales  the  previous  day  to  start  the  day  all  over  again.  Then  at  night,  they  would  all  watch  telenovelas  before  they  go  to  bed.  One  time  he  asked  his  host  if  they  could  watch  an  Ateneo-­‐La  Salle  basketball  game  but  the  family  had  no  clue  what  it  was  he  wanted.  It  dawned  on  Fr.  Villarin  that  Navotas  was  a  different  world  that  had  nothing  to  do   with   luxury   such   as   the   collegiate   basketball   game   he   wanted   to   see.   He   noted   the  keyword   in   this   story   was   inclusion,   which   literally   meant   not   being   left   out   and   being  involved.      In  planning,  dreaming  and  in  seeing  the  future,  all  should  be  included.  But  in  reality,  many  are  missed  in  prosperity  and  in  the  economy.  As  an  example,  he  mentioned  a  news  article   he   recently   read   that   40   of   the   most   affluent   families   on   the   Forbes   wealth   list  accounted  for  76%  of  the  countrys  gross  domestic  product  growth  (GDP).4  The  wealth  of  the  nation  is  held  by  only  a  select  few.  The  Philippines  is  not  really  a  poor  country.  In  fact,  the  country’s  GDP  is  9  trillion  pesos  or  200  billion  dollars,  a  lot  of  resources  that  excludes  many.      In  envisioning  the  future,  one  must  look  at  his  or  her  dreams  and  be  aware  of  their  own  looking  glass.  He  invited  everyone  to  also  look  into  the  lens  that  others  are  looking  into.  Coming  from  different  sectors,  each  have  their  own  biases,  but  he  calls  for  everyone  to  be  open.  In  the  end,  Fr.  Villarin  saw  this  futures  mapping  as  a  discernment  exercise  in  which  one  has  to  scan  and  weigh  what  the  Lord  wants  using  their  feeling.  He  believes  that  the  Lord  dislikes   exclusivity   as   evident   by   his   Lenten   stories   about   His   linkage   with   sinners.   He  invited  everyone  to  be  cognizant  and  be  aware  of  who  they  are,  Sons  of  God.  He  asks  all  to  be  truly  the  Sons  of  God  and  embrace  the  good  and  renounce  the  prejudiced.      Mr.   Cordova   thanked   Fr.   Villarin   for   the   very   insightful   and   inspiring   message.   He  encouraged  everyone  to  use  this  as  guide  for  the  2-­‐day  workshop  in  planning,  dreaming,  and  executing  their  desires  for  themselves,  families,  community,  and  country.    Introduction  of  the  Participants      Mr.  Cordova   called   out   the   sector   and   organizations   present   in   today’s   workshop.   He  requested   the   following   to   rise   as   they   hear   their   sector   or   organization   called   to  acknowledge  their  presence:    • Welfare  ville,  Addition  Hills,  Mandaluyong  City  • Barangay  Donya  Imelda,  Quezon  City  • Estero  de  San  Miguel,  Manila  • Manggahan,  Pasig  City  • Barangay  Sto.  Niño,  Marikina  City                                                                                                                            4  source:  http://business.inquirer.net/110413/philippines-­‐elite-­‐swallow-­‐countrys-­‐new-­‐wealth  
  12. 12.   11  <<  Assistant  Dean  Dr.  Caleda  giving  the  participants  an  overview  about  the  Informal  City  Dialogues  Project  • National   Government   Agencies:   DILG,   DTI,   DSWD,   MMDA,   HLURB,   Urban   Poor  Associates  • LGUs  • Private  sector  • CSOs  and  NGOs  Introduction  of  Project  Steering  Committee  Members  &  Staff    In  the  same  manner,  he  also  requested  the  members  of  the  project  steering  committee  and  project  team  to  rise  and  be  identified.      He  started  with  the  project  steering  committee  composed  of  six  members  representing  various   stakeholders   who   provide   direction,   advice,   and   guides   in   the   project  implementation.      • Ms.  Tina  Velasco,  MMDA,  representing  the  government    • Ms.  Antonio  Yulo  Loyzaga,  Manila  Observatory,  representing  science  • Mr.   Benedict   Valderama,   Chairman,   Partnership   of   Philippine   Support   Service  Agencies,  Inc.  representing  the  urban  poor    • Mr.  Carlos  Rufino,  Urban  Land  Institute  representing  the  Private  Sector  • Dr.   Emma   Borio,   Department   of   Sociology   and   Anthropology,   representing   the  Academe  • Dr.  Mary  Jean  Caleda,  ASoG,  Ex-­‐officio  member  He   also   acknowledge   the   project   team   led   by   Dr.   Antonio   La   Viña   and   Dr.   Mary   Jean  Caleda  with  the  following  as  members:      Project  Director:  Dr.  Segundo  Romero  Project  Manager:  Dr.  Danielle  Guillen  Co-­‐facilitator:  Ms.  Aurma  Manlangit  Senior  Research  Associate:  Ms.  Jessica  Dator  Bercilla  Project  Associate:  Ms.  Althea  Pineda  Research  Associate:  Mr.  Jay-­‐R  Cordova  Researchers  and  Interns:  Ms.  Criselda  Doble,  Charmaine  Tobes,  Dhenmark  Valera,    Alaina  Villegas  Overview  of  the  Informal  City  Dialogue  Project    DR.  MARY  JEAN  CALEDA  Assistant  Dean,  Ateneo  School  of  Government      2013   marks   the   Rockefeller   Foundation’s  centennial  year  with  the  theme:  “Innovation  for  the  Next  100  years”.  The  informal  city  dialogues  (ICD)  is  part  of  its  centennial  year  activities.      In   partnership   with   other   organizations   in   five  cities   of   developing   countries,   the   Forum   for   the  Future   manages   the   informal   city   dialogues.  
  13. 13.   12  Dr.  Romero  giving  an  overview  about  the  Inclusive  Futures  Mapping  Workshop  in  Metro  Manila  Informal   City   Dialogue   is   a   global,   multi-­‐stakeholder  project  that  has  series  of  discussion  about  the  future  of  a  city  and  the  role  of  the  various  sectors  in  shaping  its  development.  The  dialogue  involves  a  diverse  group  of  citizens  from  various  sectors  including  public,  private,  civic,  industry,  CSOs  and  vulnerable  groups  namely  persons  with  disabilities,  women,  youth  and  senior  citizens.  This  group  talks  about  scenarios  of  what  life  in  their  city  could  be  like  in  2040.      The   informal   dialogues   have   three   major   activities.   The   first   activity   is   the   inclusive  futures  mapping,  the  one  happening  today,  which  started  when  the  project  team  visited  the  five   chosen   areas   in   Metro   Manila   and   conducted   the   pre-­‐community   inclusive   mapping  workshop.  The  second  activity  is  the  planning  workshop,  set  to  happen  sometime  in  April,  which  will  determine  the  innovations  that  can  be  proposed  to  help  the  city  achieve  a  more  inclusive   and   resilient   future.   The   third   major   activity   is   the   centennial   challenge   grant  wherein  the  cities  from  the  six  developing  countries  would  compete  for  the  best  innovation  project  that  could  be  funded  by  the  Rockefeller  Foundation.  Portions  of  the  total  1  million  dollars  grant  would  be  given  to  cities  with  the  most  innovative  proposal.      The   inclusive   city   dialogue   was   further   explained   to   the   participants   through   a   short  audiovisual  presentation.    Overview  of  the  Inclusive  City  Dialogue  Inclusive  Futures  Mapping  Workshop  in  Metro  Manila    DR.  SEGUNDO  ROMERO  Director,  Innovations  at  the  Base  of  the  Pyramid    Dr.  Romero  expressed  his  delight  to  see  a  room  full  of  eager  and   willing   participants.   He   said   that   everyone   was   there   to  invest  on  two  important  days  of  special  discourse,  which  talks  about  the  future  of  Metro  Manila.  This  was  an  unusual  event  where  various  stakeholders  including  the  government,  private  sector,   and   community   members   would   sit   down   and   talk  about   the   future   of   the   entire   Metro   Manila.   He   encouraged  everyone  present  to  make  the  most  out  of  this  rare  occasion.      He   wanted   all   the   participants   to   keep   in   mind   a   crucial  point  of  view  in  the  duration  of  the  workshop  or  dialogue:  “the  present   is   a   future   of   yesterday”.   2040   seems   to   be   too   far  ahead  from  2013  but  in  1986,  exactly  twenty-­‐seven  years  ago,  2013   was   a   year   that   none   of   them   could   have   imagined.   He  posed  a  question,  where  do  the  participants  see  themselves  in  2040?      Inclusive   future   is   their   dream.   It   is   a   type   of   future   that   fosters   interface   between  formal   and   informal   citizens   and   the   rich   and   poor.   It   is   a   future   of   strong   and   resilient  cities.  But  in  order  to  see  through  this  future,  they  need  to  start  with  what  they  have  now  and  what  motivates  them.  Dealing  with  the  current  situation  entitles  them  to  dream  about  the   future.   This   certain   planning   for   the   future   calls   for   the   participants   to   unravel   what  drives  Metro  Manila.  In  this  complex  world,  there  is  a  need  to  tie  the  past  with  the  future.    
  14. 14.   13    Dr.  Romero  emphasized  that  all  have  a  say  in  the  future.  How  each  of  them  acts  would  shape   or   define   the   future.   He   also   presented   the   different   types   of   futures.   A   possible  future  is  something  that  might  happen.  Plausible  is  something  that  could  happen.  It  is  not  likely   to   happen   but   it   could   happen.   Probable   is   something   that   is   expected   to   happen  while   preferable   is   something   that   they   want   to   happen.   In   scenario   building,   what   one  wants   to   happen   is   not   the   same   as   what   could   possibly   happen   thus   the   need   to   be  prepared.   This   workshop   demands   grasping   the   envelope   of   uncertainty.   It   is   pivotal   to  imagine  those  that  one  could  not  even  imagine  happening.    He  presented  an  illustration  of  the  type  of  future  for  targeting.  He  encouraged  everyone  to   visualize   things   that   can   probably   happen.   He   provided   this   example:   there   was   a  scientific   study   about   Metro   Manila   that   if   a   7.2   earthquake   magnitude,   approximately  50,000  people  will  die  and  there  will  be  fire  across.  This  example  is  unlikely  to  happen  but  it  is  possible  and  requires  a  great  deal  of  preparation.  This  two-­‐day  workshop  is  rarely  done  but   should   be   taken   note   of   because   many   will   benefit   from   this   kind   of   activity.   He  explained   that  part   of   the   process,   was   for   project   team   to   gathers   data   and   information  from  the  participants  at  the  same  time,  share  it  with  the  community.    He  moved  into  presenting  the  workshop  flow.  The  workshop  started  with  the  opening  program  followed  by  a  talk  show  about  Metro  Manila  of  the  past  and  the  present  where  selected   community   members   shared   their   experiences   in   Metro   Manila.   It   was   followed  shortly   by   the   identification   of   the   most   important   and   significant   drivers   of   change   in  Metro  Manila.  The  identified  drivers  were  organized  in  two  cluster:  those  that  are  certain  to  happen  and  those  that  are  not.  The  workshop  was  designed  to  put  more  focus  on  the  drivers  of  change  that  are  indefinite  for  this  needs  more  preparation  that  those  which  are  sure  to  happen.   Then   the   group   looked   into   the   combinations   of   the   top   two   unlikely   to   happen  drivers   to   produce   four   different   scenarios.   The   following   day,   the   group   created   stories  based  on  the  various  scenarios  presented  and  reviewed  in  the  plenary  hall.  These  scenarios  were   identified   as   those   consistent,   robust   and   distinct.   In   the   next   workshop   in   April,  everyone  will  again  convene  to  determine  relevant  points  that  will  answer  the  questions:  what  will  be  done  with  these  scenarios?  Which  scenario  do  they  want  to  have  in  the  future  and   how   would   they   get   there?   The   event   in   April   will   be   dubbed   as   the   innovations  planning  that  would  specify  what  could  be  done  to  achieve  a  Metro  Manila  they  all  dream  about.   Once   done,   the   communities   will   submit   a   proposal   to   Rockefeller   Foundation’s  urban  challenge  grant,  for  possible  funding  of  their  proposed  innovations.      These   activities   need   the   involvement   of   all   stakeholders   especially   the   community  whose  voices  are  often  unheard.  Lastly,  Dr.  Romero  stressed  the  significance  of  collective  planning  in  the  process.  After  this  everyone  paused  for  a  coffee  break  and  s  photo  session.    Metro  Manila:  Then  and  Now,  Perspectives  from  the  Communities    MS.  JESSICA  DATOR  BERCILLA  AND  DR.  DANIELLE  GUILLEN    This   segment   started   with   a   video   documentary   of   the   "Pearl   of   the   Orient"   as  introduced  by  the  segment  hosts,  Ms.  Bercilla  (Jec)  and  Dr.  Guillen  (Danes).        Talk  Show  Part  One:  In  the  Eyes  of  the  Elderly  
  15. 15.   14        Photo  1  Talk  Show  Part  1  (L-­‐R:  Ms.  Jessica  Bercilla  Teofilo  "Tofin"  Morado,  Lucila,  Marina  Turibio,  Antonio  Javier,  Dr.  Danielle  Guillen  and  Pedro  Cadab)      The   first   part   of   the   talk   show   featured   the   stories   of   the   elderly   members   of   the  community,   how   they   struggled   to   live   in   Metro   Manila,   their   way   of   life,   and   how   they  coped  with  the  changes  in  the  Metro  and  within  their  respective  communities.  The  selected  participants  shared  their  dreams,  aspirations,  and  grievances  as  to  why  for  so  long  a  time,  no  one  has  ever  defended  their  right  to  live  in  Metro  Manila,  and  no  one  looked  at  their  order  of  living.  They  also  shared  a  longing  to  thrive  and  improve  but  at  the  same  time  asked  whether  they  still  have  hope  for  a  brighter  future.  Before  they  began,  the  selected  senior  participants  were  asked  to  introduce  themselves  by  stating  their  name,  age,  place  of  origin  and  area  of  residence.      Teofilo  Morado,    63  years  old,  lives  in  Manggahan  Pasig  City,  was  here  in  Manila    since  1973  Lucila  Monforte,  75  years  old,  originally  from  Iloilo,  lives  in  Donya  Imelda    Quezon  City,  was  here  in  Manila  since  1963  Marina  Turibio,  78  years  old,  lives  in  Manggahan  Pasig  City  Antonio  Javier,  64  years  old,  originally  from  Antique,  lives  in  San  Mateo,  Rizal  Pedro  Cadab,  59  years  old,  original  from  Masbate,  lives  in  San  Mateo,  Rizal    After  the  introductions,  each  was  asked  to  share  and  describe  what  Metro  Manila  was  when  they  first  arrived.      Lucila  recollected  Donya  Imelda,  Quezon  City  used  to  be  a  meadow.  When  she  arrived  in  Metro  Manila,  she  fondly  recalled  participating  in  folk  dances  similar  to  the  ones  shown  in  the  opening  video.  She  has  been  a  community  volunteer  since  1984  but  it  was  only  during  
  16. 16.   15  Marina  Toribio,  78  yrs.  old,  resident  of  Brgy.  Manggahan,  Pasig  City  Lucila  Monforte,  75  yrs  old,  resident  of  Brgy.  Doña  Imelda,  QC  Teofilo  Morado,  63  yrs.old,  resident  of  Brgy.  Manggahan,  Pasig  City  2007  or  2008  when  she  started  receiving  subsidy  for  the  community  work  she  does.  She  clearly  recalled  that  the  houses  built  back  then  were   all   nipa   huts   and   there   were   all   cottages.   There   were   no  buildings   and   the   entire   barangay   of   Donya   Imelda   was   grassland.  Their  area  was  so  rural  that  carabaos  and  children  bathe  in  the  area  where   their   houses   are   now   built.   Since   the   place   was   full   of   tall  cogon   grass,   it   was   also   notorious   as   dumping   ground   for   murder  victims.   She   noted   that   when   Kapitan   Liksi   became   the   barangay  captain,   the   place   gradually   improved   and   consequently,   informal  settlers  were  asked  to  move  out  from  the  place.  Meralco,  a  private  electric   power   distributor,   owned   the   place   where   they   currently  live.        Meanwhile,   Marina   shared   how   she   vividly   remembers   their   place   in   Pasig   City   as   a  vegetable   field   located   near   the   river.   The   primary   livelihood   back   then   was   farming  although,  few  factories  such  as  United  Tobacco  already  existed.  The  men  back  then  were  mostly  divers  excavating  sand  from  under  the  river  and  then  sell  them  for  a  living.  Beside  the   river,   was   a   vegetable   field.   Soon   after,   people   from  different  areas  started  migrating  to  their  place,  Manggahan,  and   occupied   the   place.   When   the   government   started   the  Manggahan   floodway   project,   more   buildings   and   factories  emerged  forcing  some  residents  to  move  out  from  the  area.  The   National   Housing   Authority,   awarded   some   of   the  government   lands   to   a   few   settlers,   but   those   who   had  nowhere  to  go  decided  to  group  together  to  get  a  share  of  the  land   they   settled   in.   Thirty-­‐six   (36)   square   meters   were  awarded  to  each  of  them  and  Marina’s  family  was  one  of  the  fortunate   beneficiaries.   She   also   shared   how   her   parents  struggled   just   to   get   them   to   finish   school.   Aling   Marina  currently  teaches  elementary  levels  1  and  2.      Tofin  shared  the  origin  of  the  term  paglusob  and  pagsalakay  (siege  and  invade)  by  the  citizens   in   their   community   known   as   Ninoy   Aquino   Pilot   Community   (NAPICO).   He   also  told  the  story  of  how  their  place  in  Pasig  City  was  called  Manggahan.  In  1986,  there  was  a  group  of  men  drinking  alcohol  who  ran  out  of  “tapas”.  When  they  saw  the  vegetable  field,  they  harvested  some  of  the  vegetables  and  use  them  as  tapas.  They  took  advantage  of  the  fact   that   no   one   looked   after   the   vegetable  field   and   the   political   chaos   happening   back  them  and  divided  the  land  among  themselves.  They   used   straws   to   establish   boundaries.  After  a  few  weeks,  the  government  found  out  what  these  men  had  done  and  tried  to  reclaim  the  land  but  the  people  who  established  claims  stood  firm.  They  argued  that  they  needed  the  land   to   grow   vegetables,   hence   the   name  Tanimang  Bayan  (People’s  Field).  It  was  in  this  context   that   the   street   names   were   named  after   vegetables.   But   the   people   had   hidden  agenda  and  eventually  built  their  homes  in  the  people’s   field   supposedly   used   only   for  
  17. 17.   16  Antonio  Javier,  64  yrs.  old,  resident  of  San  Mateo,  Rizal  Pedro  Cadab,  59  yrs.  old,  San  Mateo,  Rizal  planting.  The  government  realizes  then  that  the  people  would  never  leave  the  place  so  in  partnership  with  the  National  Housing  Authority,  they  developed  housing  projects  for  the  people.  He  also  recalled  that  in  1973,  there  were  only  a  few  houses  along  Amang  Rodriguez  Avenue   but   plenty   of   Mango   trees,   thus   the   place   was   called   Manggahan  or  Mango  Orchard.  He  also  remembered  that  during  the  rainy  season,   the   road   would   be   flooded   with   water   coming  from  the  river  and  the  nearby  field.  Eventually,  when  the  city  proper  developed  and  along  with  it  sources  of  income  and  livelihood  grew,  many  migrated  to  Manggahan.  Since  then,   people   started   flocking   in   Manggahan   until   houses  replaced  the  Mango  trees.      The  family  of  Antonio  or  Tonyo  lives  beside  the  river  because  this  was  all  he  could  afford.  He  is  aware  that  they  live   in   a   danger   zone   area   but   they   cannot   do   anything  about   it   because   their   income   is   not   enough   to   transfer   to   a   safer  place.   However,   he   never   loses   hope   and   he   believes  that   given   a   chance   they   could   still   improve   their  current  situation.  He  said  he  is  just  waiting  for  the  right  project   for   poor   people   like   him   who   live   in   danger  zones.  When  Dr.  Romero  came  to  their  place,  his  hopes  went   up.   He   said   he   felt   like   he   have   found   a   partner  who   understands   what   their   situation   and   what   they  are  going  through.  He  said  he  was  just  waiting  for  the  government  to  help  them.          Mang  Pedro  recollected  how  his  aunt  brought  him  to  Manila  in  1970  as  her  helper.  Then  in  1974,  his  uncle  from  Masbate  came  to  Manila  and  made  him  work  as  construction  worker.  In  1985,  he  got  into  Ortigas  and  Company,   which   was   about   a   kilometer   away   walk  from  EDSA.  Because  of  this,  he  joined  the  People  Power  Revolution  as  a  bystander  hoping  to  see  positive  changes  in  the  Philippines.  It  was  in  Metro  Manila  where  he  started  a  family.  He  also  shared  his  own  family’s  experience  of  transferring  from  different  LGUs  and  renting  and  buying  off  land  from  a  fellow  informal  settler.        It   was   notable   how   the   community   members   regard   themselves   as   squatters   or  informal  settlers.  When  asked  how  the  two  terms  differ  from  each  other,  they  all  agreed  that  the   term   informal   settler   was   just   a   glamorized   version   of   a   squatter.   They   defined  squatters  as  those  who  have  no  capacity  to  buy  (a  piece  of)  land  or  rent  a  house  that  they  build  their  own  homes  in  a  vacant  lot  not  rightfully  owned  by  them  where  they  can  dwell  for  free.   They   defined   squatters   as   people   found   in   a   place   with   no   order   or   a   disorganized  place,   living   in   an   illegally   built   shanty,   living   in   a   land   that   is   not   theirs   and   without  permission.  Informal  comes  from  the  fact  that  their  way  of  living  is  frequently  disturbed  by  being  asked  to  move  out.      The  participants  coming  from  the  informal  sector  also  have  varied  opinions  as  to  how  to  deal   with   their   situation.   Some   say   it   depends   on   the   person   and   on   the   kind   of   local  government  they  are  in.  Some  are  fortunate  to  have  a  local  government  who  understands  their   situation   and   prioritizes   them   by   having   programs   and   projects   that   benefits   them.  
  18. 18.   17  Lucy  de  Guzman,  resident  of  Brgy.  Doña  Imelda,  Quezon  City  There  are  those  who  believe  that  people  should  not  force  themselves  in  Metro  Manila  where  space   is   a   problem.   Some   even   said   that   they   should   not   rely   on   help   given   by   the  government   and   they   should   do   their   share   in   uplifting   their   status.   To   some   of   the  participants,   living   in   a   land   that   has   been   vacant   for   a   long   time   is   acceptable   while   for  those  living  in  danger  zones,  they  wanted  to  get  out  of  their  perilous  lifestyle.        Most   shared   the   opinion   that   despite   working   hard   to   improve   their   situation,   they  could  only  do  so  much  and  most  of  the  time  their  resources  still  end  up  inadequate.  Most  of  them  strive  to  make  ends  meet  and  are  willing  to  adjust  or  work  with  the  demands  of  the  world  but  are  limited  by  their  capacity  to  pay.      They  all  yearned  to  be  given  a  right  to  own  or  settle  in  abandoned  and/or  empty  lots  in  Metro  Manila.  A  few  of  their  wishes  include  a  generously  wealthy  person  buying  off  a  piece  land  to  be  distributed  to  them  or  build  a  housing  project  for  them.  Those  who  grew  up  in  the  place  where  they  currently  reside  would  not  want  to  be  transferred  to  another  place  so  they  suggested   a   tenement   to   be   built   for   them.   Some   just   wanted   a   secure   place   to   live  regardless  where  they  will  be  taken  but  some  also  do  not  want  to  be  moved  from  where  they   are   now.   They   do   not   want   a   high-­‐end   or   middle   class   residential   area,   but   just   an  orderly  place  to  settle  in.  All  of  them  were  also  willing  to  pay  rent  or  lease  as  long  as  they  will  be  placed  in  a  secure,  safe  a  location  and  a  guarantee  that  they  will  never  be  displaced.    Talk  Show  Part  Two:  In  the  Eyes  of  the  Youth    The   second   part   of   the   show   started   with   an   audiovisual   presentation   showing   the  transformation  of  Metro  Manila  from1940s  to  the  present.  This  time  the  younger  generation  raised   their   concerns   and   grievances   regarding   their   present   situation.   This   second   part  featured  the  selected  younger  generation  of  the  community  as  represented  by:      Lucy  de  Guzman,  resides  in  Donya  Imelda;    Myelene  Pagakpak,  18  years  old,  originally  from  Samar,  resides  in  Estero  de  San    Miguel;    Nancy  Berion,  41  years  old,  born  in  Pasig  but  now  resides  in  Mandaluyong;    Dennis  Policarpio,  40  years  old,  born  and  still  resides  in  Welfare  ville;  and      Quin  Cruz,  2nd  term  barangay  councilor  from  Manggahan  Pasig  City    To   start   the   discussion,   the   hosts   asked   the   participants   to  describe  their  situation  in  their  current  place  of  residence.    Lucy  began  by  a  rundown  of  her  family’s  nomadic  lifestyle.  She  grew  up  in  a  simple  family,  always  renting  and  moving  from  one  informal  settlement  to  another.  She  was  proud  that  despite  their  living  condition,  her  father  raised  her  and  her  six  siblings  well.  Her  main   issue   was   housing   and   she   is   wishing   that   the   government  would   include   people   like   them   in   their   priority   programs   and  projects.  She  contends  that  the  government  should  have  great  consideration  on  them  when  deciding   what   to   do   with   large   parcels   of   land   that   they   own.   She   expressed   her   strong  objection  to  the  current  trend  that  instead  of  allocating  to  the  needy,  the  government  sells  
  19. 19.   18  Mylene  Pagakpak,  18  yrs.  old,  resident  of  Brgy.  Estero  de  San  Miguel  Nancy  Berion,  41  yrs.old,  resident  of  Welfareville,  Brgy.  Addition  Hills,  Mandaluyong  City  Quin  Cruz,  2nd  term  barangay  councilor  from  Manggahan  Pasig  City    Quin  Cruz,  2nd  term  barangay  councilor  from  Manggahan  Pasig  City    the  land  to  rich  people  and  earns  profit  from  it.  She  thinks  that  this  is   not   fair   for   them   who   could   not   even   afford   rent   in   a   decent  place.      Dennis  was  born  and  raised  in  the  place  he  currently  resides  in.  He   remembered   that   Welfare   Ville   used  to   be   called   Boystown   and   it   being   free  from   houses.   Houses   started   to   emerge  when  it  became  a  relocation  site  for  fire  victims   until   informal   settlers   slowly  flocked   in.  Welfare   ville   is  a   property   of   the   local   government.  The   local   government   of  Mandaluyong  wanted  to  develop  welfare  ville  to  make  it  a  livable  place   for   its   current   residents.   The   residents   of   welfare   ville  owned  the  rights  to  the  land  however,  it  has  not  been  awarded  to  them  yet  because  it  still  has  to  go  through  a  bidding  process.      Myelene,   broke   down   to   tears   as   she   recalled  why   her   family   moved   in   to   Metro   Manila   from  Samar.   She   narrated   that   after   she   lost   her   father,   her  mother  decided  to  move  to  Metro  Manila  to  start  anew.  She  told   the   interviewer   that   she’s   a   member   of   Philippine  Educational   Theater   Association   (PETA),   a   group   of  creative  and  critical  young  artist-­‐teacher-­‐cultural  workers  that   fosters   both   personal   fulfillment  and   social   transformation. 5    According   to   her   their   group  aims  to  exhibit,  particularly  to  the  affluent  members  of  the  society  their   living   conditions   in   settlement   areas   and   conveyed   their  desire  to  own  a  house.      Nancy  belongs  to  the  few  groups  of  informal  settlers  with  an  accommodating   local   government.   Their   LGU   plans   to   develop  their  current  location  to  accommodate  their  needs  and  committed  to  provide  money  to  build  them  a  new  home.        Councilor  Quin  said  that  the  main  problem  of  their  barangay  is  the  lack  of  space.  Their  local  government  has  housing  projects  for  them  such  as  medium  rise  buildings  to  deal  with  the  space  issue  but  in  his  opinion,  this  still  was  not  enough.  The  government  has  yet  to  address  their  other  needs.   They   still   have   problems   with   safety,   sanitation,   and   health.   He   wanted   the  government’s   planning   perspective   to   change   from   immediate   to   long-­‐term   to   consider  their  other  social  needs.        As   an   advocate   for   gender   and   development,   he   also   suggested   the   need   for   a  revolutionary   training   that   would   change   the   mindset   of   the   people   from   the   local                                                                                                                            5  Source:  http://petatheater.com/about-­‐peta/  
  20. 20.   19  government  to  include  the  marginalized  and  vulnerable  sectors  in  gender  and  development  planning.      Dennis  stressed  the  importance  of  taking  Census6  seriously  so  the  government  would  have  baseline  as  to  how  much  the  people  are  willing  and  able  to  pay  to  own  a  house.  He  believes  that  from  there,  the  government  would  be  able  to  develop  proper  housing  projects  that  the  poor  can  afford.    Just  like  their  senior  counterparts,  the  much  younger  members  of  the  informal  settlers  community  were  also  willing  to  pay  for  their  homes  so  long  as  they  are  guaranteed  never  to  be   displaced   and   that   their   location   be   improved   according   to   their   needs.   Their   wishes  include  the  fulfillment  of  a  medium  rise  building  that  would  relocate  those   living   in   danger   zones.   This   fulfillment   includes   a   non-­‐politicized  process  of  selecting  the  beneficiaries  giving  precedence  to  those  who  have  been  residing  in  the  area  for  some  time.  Ultimately,  they  pushed  for  social  inclusion  in  government  decision  making  and  planning.    Open  Forum    Question   of   a   LGU   employee,   CENRO   of   Pasig   City   to  Councilor   Quin   Cruz:   In   what   sense   is   the   housing   project   of   the  local  government  for  the  informal  settlers  in  Pasig  not  enough?  Pasig  City   has   a   Local   Inter-­‐Agency   Committee   composed   of   NHA,   HUDC,   PCUB   and   the  Commission  on  Human  Rights  which  sought  to  address  the  problems  faced  by  the  informal  communities  near  the  river  and  other  areas  in  Pasig.  They  follow  a  process  that  listens  to  the  needs  of  the  communities.      Response   from   Councilor   Quin   Cruz:   Participation   forms   a   big   part   in   the   planning  process.  He  mentioned  how  for  25  years  he  witnessed  the  barangay  assembly  changed  from  purely  participatory  to  being  pseudo  participatory  merely  done  in  compliance  to  the  DILG  mandate   without   a   proper   monitoring   mechanism   in   place.   Barangay   assembly   used   to  follow  a  parliamentary  procedure  providing  a  venue  for  free  discussion  where  people  can  freely  propose.  He  felt  that  there  is  a  need  to  apply  the  true  essence  of  participatory  with  proper  mechanisms  to  monitor  people’s  participation  in  place.      Captain   Filomena   Singko   shared   the   bottom   up   planning   approach   in   Estero   de   San  Miguel.  She  agreed  that  true  people’s  participation  is  essential  in  planning  especially  since  based  on  experience,  most  form  of  participation  is  for  compliance  only  where  the  barangay  captain   will   select   among   the   members   of   the   community   who   will   sit   in   the   planning  process.   The   names   would   be   submitted   to   DILG   and   those   selected   would   receive   the  mandated   honoraria.   Dialogues   are   not   dialogue   in   the   truest   sense   of   the   word   instead  become   an   orientation   of   the   proposed   changes   or   plans.     Conversations   are   turned   into  orientation  as  to  where  the  community  will  be  taken  and  what  will  happen  to  them  without  even   consulting   them.   All   development   should   have   social   inclusion.   Informal   settlers  should   also   not   be   seen   as   an   eye   sore   but   rather   partners   in   development.   In   a   truly  participatory   setting,   informal   settlers   are   part   of   the   solution   seeking   process.   A   true  dialogue   should   listen   to   both   parties   and   look   at   solutions   that   are   amenable   to   both.                                                                                                                            6  From  Wikipedia:  A  census  is  the  procedure  of  systematically  acquiring  and  recording  information  about  the  members  of  a  given  population.  source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census  

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