Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 20
NamorisoaPresident, Ankilimanintsy II villageAs the president of this village it is my role to motivate the parents to    ...
0918 Every school day,       two parents from the       community take it in turn       to cook rice and lentils       for...
0935 ‘Slow down!’ the                                       teacher always tells us.                                      ...
0942 Recess              Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 24
Helene RamanantenasoaPedagogic Counsellor, Ambovombe districtBefore, parents in Ambovombe district were not interested in ...
But even if they did this, these parents have no idea how to          help, everyone inevitably agrees to build the school...
1210 I walk home with my friends. While we walkwe talk about what we are going to do when weget home.Maka:         I am go...
1335 Setting off for the field
1742 Homework                Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 32
When I grow up, I want to be...            Liatinatae                       Maka                             Soabinagoe   ...
Fisaoratsoa   Manatenasoa                   Manjoa midwife      a teacher                a policeman                      ...
Manjo and generations of children following him need acomplete primary education if they are to have a chanceto achieve th...
For further information contactUNICEF MadagascarMaison commune des Nations UniesZone Galaxy AndraharoAntananarivo 101Madag...
Manjo's Story Part II
Manjo's Story Part II
Manjo's Story Part II
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Manjo's Story Part II

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Read more about Manjo, a young boy from Madagascar, and meet his family and teacher in this photo journal documenting his experiences in school. (part II)

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Manjo's Story Part II

  1. 1. Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 20
  2. 2. NamorisoaPresident, Ankilimanintsy II villageAs the president of this village it is my role to motivate the parents to know, the way they carry themselves and how they keep themselvessend their children to school. Sending children to school is important clean — they are motivated to send the others.for the development of our village and our district. When we built Ankilimanintsy II school the parents were motivated Before we were in the dark. Our minds were closed. But now most to help. There was no school in the village and each family — if theyparents are convinced that education is very important. It used to be had enough money — contributed ten pieces of wood. The classroomthat the culture of our area emphasized the importance of cattle: is small, but we cannot a ord to build another. This is one of the mainCattle were important and all of the children were sent out to watch reasons that this is an incomplete cycle school. The other is the lack ofthem. But that has changed. In recent years many cattle have been a second teacher.stolen and the environment is drier than it used to be. Now there are I know all about not being able to complete your education. Mynot enough cattle. parents stopped me going to school when I was in grade four. Some of Most of the parents in this village never went to school. But now my classmates continued and now they are living and working outsidethat there are fewer cattle they see that it is important to send their the country as doctors and in other jobs. I may be the Village Presidentchildren to school, so that they learn other things. They see that this is and the most educated man in this village, but when I see what mynecessary — that their children can open their minds to receive new friends achieved it makes me sad. If I had been able to continue Ithings from the world, and when they grow up they can have a job. might have done so much more. There are still some who resist; some who still want to send their This is why I push children to go to school — my children and thechildren out with the cattle. They think ‘If I have ve children, I can children of this village. This is why we worked together to build thishave one help with the cooking, one keep the cows, one stay with the school. But now when I see children like Manjo repeating the samesmall children and the other two can go to school.’ class again and again, I see my own situation and I feel sad all over But other parents are changing their thinking. They are thinking again. I worry that they may not have the opportunity to continue‘One will manage the cattle and the other four will go to school.’ When their studies. It is because of Manjo and the others like him that weparents see changes in their school-going children — in what they keep ghting to have grade three here. Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 21
  3. 3. 0918 Every school day, two parents from the community take it in turn to cook rice and lentils for us. 0930 I bring the dishes to the canteen and they serve the food.Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 22
  4. 4. 0935 ‘Slow down!’ the teacher always tells us. ‘Don’t eat so fast!’0933 Some of the water we bring toschool is used for washing our handsbefore we eat. Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 23
  5. 5. 0942 Recess Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 24
  6. 6. Helene RamanantenasoaPedagogic Counsellor, Ambovombe districtBefore, parents in Ambovombe district were not interested in sending The second reason for the large number of incomplete schools istheir children to school. When UNICEF started work in this district in that there are not enough teachers. This situation is easier to resolve. If1994 there were only 70 schools. Now there are 239. there is someone in the village who has completed grade nine or ten, It is good that so many parents want to send their children to they can be recruited and trained.school. The problem is that the government doesn’t have the funds to The problem with incomplete cycle schools is that children onlybuild all of the classrooms that are needed. So this job is falling to the complete a few grades and then they are stuck. If you only get anparents; they can’t wait for the government if they want their children education through grade two or three, there is a risk that you will fallto go to school. So, in communities like this one, they organize back again into illiteracy. There are studies that say that you need athemselves and build a school so that their children are not left out. minimum of a fth grade education in order to retain literacy. Of the 236 primary schools in this district, 119 are incomplete. We want to see these children move ahead with their education.There are two main reasons for this. First, and most important, there One solution to this is doing more of what is already being done:are not enough classrooms. In this area building materials are scarce organizing the community to build the schools. The parents wouldand costly. They can’t make bricks here. Cement is available in town, buy what materials they can. And if, for example, they can’t a ord tobut it is expensive and hard to transport to remote areas. Also, there is buy cement, they can go to the mayor of the community and ask himvery little water here. How can you make cement without water? if he will participate by buying cement, and go to the districtWood is scarce and expensive because the forests have been education chief to ask if he will give part of the roof if he can. In otherdestroyed. This is why the parents can only a ord to build a small words, they organize themselves and negotiate the economics withinclassroom. the community. Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 26
  7. 7. But even if they did this, these parents have no idea how to help, everyone inevitably agrees to build the school because they areorganize and manage those who would construct the school. If we aware of the bene ts it will bring. This means that even if it costs themcan teach them how to do this, they can proceed on their own. But time or money, they will participate willingly because they understandeven then, the schools will need to be renewed or rebuilt every year why they are doing it. Without this — if you only dictate to them —or two, depending on the weather. So another idea is to ask organi- they will not be motivated. That is why the CPRS is so important.zations like UNICEF to help us build durable schools — schools that In the future I would like UNICEF to help us to improve the qualitywould not require parents to build or renew them. of education in Madagascar. Children need to know more than We have been working with UNICEF for 15 years now. In that time, reading, writing, calculating and speaking French. They need life skills.they have introduced some valuable systems to encourage Their parents should see that there is a di erence if children go tocommunity participation. The CPRS or ‘contract for school success’ is school. Children should acquire some knowledge, some competenciesthe biggest bene t of our collaboration. The CPRS encourages the that help them in their lives. They should also learn some activitiesparticipation of all the community members — parents, local that will help them to nd employment when they nish school.authorities, the district education chief, teachers and children — in I would like to see one other thing happen — and I hope UNICEForder to promote education. can help with this: I would like to situate junior secondary schools This starts even before they build a school. The community has a nearer to primary schools. To go to primary school children walk, onmeeting and the stakeholders discuss the problems of education in average, three to four kms each way. To go to secondary schools theytheir community. When everyone understands the problems children often walk as far as 10-15 kms. More children could continue theirwill face if they don’t go to school, and know what they can do to education if schools were not so far away. Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 28
  8. 8. 1210 I walk home with my friends. While we walkwe talk about what we are going to do when weget home.Maka: I am going to watch the cows.Fisaorantsoa: I will help my mother cook.Liatinatae: I have to collect firewood.Manjo: I am going to help my mother in the field and then do my homework. Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 29
  9. 9. 1335 Setting off for the field
  10. 10. 1742 Homework Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 32
  11. 11. When I grow up, I want to be... Liatinatae Maka Soabinagoe a teacher a district education officer a teacher Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 33
  12. 12. Fisaoratsoa Manatenasoa Manjoa midwife a teacher a policeman Schools for Madagascar Making the grade 34
  13. 13. Manjo and generations of children following him need acomplete primary education if they are to have a chanceto achieve their dreams.With your help, by 2013 UNICEF Madagascar will complete180 incomplete cycle schools.This is part of a larger UNICEF initiative to complete morethan 1200 child-friendly schools in Madagascar by 2013.By equipping them with the amenities, staff and materialsneeded to provide a quality education, UNICEF will have adirect impact on more than 125,000 children by 2013, andon many more in the generations to come.
  14. 14. For further information contactUNICEF MadagascarMaison commune des Nations UniesZone Galaxy AndraharoAntananarivo 101MadagascarTel : 261 20 23 300 92/93/04antananarivo@unicef.orgwww.unicef.orgPhotography, words & design: Kelley Lynchwww.kelleyslynch.com

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