TransMonEE 2013

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What is TransMonEE - A database capturing a vast range of in-formation on social and economic issues relevant to the situation and wellbeing of children, adolescents and women in 28 countries of Central and Eastern Europe, Commonwealth of Independent States and the European Union.

The database represents a useful tool for governments, civil soci-ety organizations, donors and academia to better orient their decisions, policies, programmes and agendas. The database is up-dated every year thanks to the collaboration of national statistical offices (NSOs). The published data are only a selection of the larger amount of indicators annually collected.

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TransMonEE 2013

  1. 1. TransMonEE 2013 database Key Features
  2. 2. 1. A child's right to a supportive and caring family environment 2. A child's right to access to justice 3. A child's right to early learning 4. A child's right to inclusive quality education 5. A child's right to be born free of HIV 6. A child's right to health: 'A promise renewed‘ 7. A young child's right to comprehensive well-being 8. A child's right to social protection 9. A child's right to protection from the risks of disasters: reducing vulnerability 10. An adolescent's right to a second chance Regional Knowledge and Leadership Agenda
  3. 3. 1. A child's right to a supportive and caring family environment
  4. 4. More than 170,000 children were left without parental care in 2011 in 19 countries, half of them in the Russian Federation* and almost half girls. More than 60% of children left without parental care in Azerbaijan and Tajikistan were boys. Disaggregated data are not available in all countries.
  5. 5. Children are left without parental care due to different reasons. While in Hungary it is predominantly due to temporary inability of parents to care for the child, in the Russian Federation and Belarus it is deprivation of parental rights. Abandonment of children is more common in Montenegro and Kazakhstan.
  6. 6. Evidence suggests that in some countries disability is one of the main reasons for a child to be left without parental care. Close to 90% of children in Serbia and 60% of children in the Czech Republic who were left without parental care had a disability.
  7. 7. In the absence of prevalence data on disability, the only available data for planning of inclusive policy interventions is “registered number of children with disability”. Bulgaria has one of the largest numbers of newly registered people with disabilities in the region. The proportion of children among the newly registered as disabled is close to 30% in Azerbaijan and Kyrgyzstan. Disaggregated data are not available in all countries.
  8. 8. Not many countries have records on the type of care solutions for children left without parental care. Among countries, where data are available, placement in residential care is more common in Armenia and Tajikistan. About 15% of children in Georgia and Kazakhstan left without parental care were adopted in 2011.
  9. 9. More than 1.4 million children in 26 countries were in formal care in 2011. Half of these children are in the Russian Federation. The ratio of children in residential care to those in family-type care is still high in some countries. A positive change in this ratio over the last decade is particularly noticeable in Bulgaria. The overall rate of children in formal care decreased in Latvia, Belarus, Romania, Estonia, Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina between 2002 and 2011.
  10. 10. The rate of children in residential care is highest in Kazakhstan, Lithuania and the Czech Republic and lowest in Albania, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Georgia. The proportion of children with disabilities in residential care is close to 70% in Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The proportion of boys in residential care is higher than that of girls in all countries with disaggregated data.
  11. 11. Equitable reforms: the number of children with disabilities should decline at least at the same rate as the total number of children in residential care. In Serbia, the proportion of children with disabilities in residential care decreased from 66% to 48%. Source: UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS, TransMonEE 2013 Database (www.transmonee.org) . Trend in total number of children in residential care and number of children with disabilities in public residential care, Serbia, 2000-2011
  12. 12. Equitable reforms: In Slovakia, the number of children with disabilities in residential care decreased at much higher speed in the recent years than the total number of children. Source: UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS, TransMonEE 2013 Database (www.transmonee.org) . Trend in total number of children in residential care and number of children with disabilities in public residential care, Slovakia, 2000-2011
  13. 13. Equitable reforms: In the Czech Republic, for the first time in the last 10 years the proportion of children with disabilities came down below 50% in 2010. Until then there had not been any tangible change in the last 10 years. Source: UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS, TransMonEE 2013 Database (www.transmonee.org) . Trend in number and rate of total number of children in residential care and children with disabilities in public residential care, Czech Republic, 2000-2011
  14. 14. Equitable reforms: In Belarus, the number of children with and without disabilities in residential care reduced by more than twice since 2000. Source: UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS, TransMonEE 2013 Database (www.transmonee.org) . Trend in total number of children in residential care and number of children with disabilities in public residential care, Belarus, 2000-2011
  15. 15. Inequitable reforms: A number of countries show no, negative or minimal progress in reducing the rate of children with disabilities in residential care as compared to all children. Source: UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS, TransMonEE 2013 Database (www.transmonee.org) . Trend in total number of children in residential care and number of children with disabilities in public residential care in selected countries, 2000-2011, cont.
  16. 16. Out of the total number of children having left public residential care , the proportion who were re-integrated to their families or placed in family type care varied from 16% in Kyrgyzstan to 79% in Slovenia. On average 27% left residential care alone.
  17. 17. Death rates in residential care are considerably higher than national averages in countries that collect this information.
  18. 18. 2. A child's right to access to justice
  19. 19. Only a small percentage of convicted children committed violent crimes. Yet, in most countries, children who committed non-violent crimes are sentenced to penal institutions which indicates that deprivation of liberty is not used as a last resort.
  20. 20. 5. A child's right to be born free of HIV
  21. 21. The numbers of new HIV infections are particularly alarming in the Russian Federation and Ukraine. More than 80,000 people were newly infected in 2011 in these two countries alone. Ukraine has seen a three-fold increase in new cases over the last decade.
  22. 22. 6. A child's right to health: 'A promise renewed'
  23. 23. Infants of very young mothers are at higher risk of being born with a low birth weight. In all countries where data are available, except Georgia, children of under-age mothers are born with low weight.
  24. 24. 7. A young child's right to comprehensive well- being
  25. 25. An increasing number of countries now track the number of young children in residential care, including infant homes. Increased monitoring of the magnitude, trends and causes of placement is expected to contribute to positive policy changes in the lives of this very vulnerable group of children.
  26. 26. There has been uneven progress in terms of decreasing the number of very young children in residential care.
  27. 27. 8. A child's right to social protection
  28. 28. Spending on social benefits for families and children is below 15% of total social protection spending in countries where data is available. European Union countries have the highest shares. The Republic of Moldova and Kyrgyzstan demonstrate that investing in social protection for families and children does not require high levels of economic development.
  29. 29. Over half of CEE/CIS countries spend less than the regional and OECD averages on education.
  30. 30. 10. An adolescent's right to a second chance
  31. 31. Fewer women under 20 give birth compared to 10 years ago, with the exception of Albania, Kyrgyzstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan. Fertility rates among 15-19 year old women in these countries, as well as in Romania and Bulgaria are over 30 per 1,000 live births.
  32. 32. More than half of young people in Serbia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Bosnia and Herzegovina were unemployed in 2011.
  33. 33. Suicide rates among males are extremely high, above 20 per 100,000 male population in Kazakhstan and the Russian Federation.
  34. 34. Demography and Gender
  35. 35. Between 2002 and 2012, old-age dependency increased in many countries, by 6 % on average in the region, whereas 10 countries saw a decrease, the highest being in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan (above 20%).
  36. 36. The proportion of child population is the highest in Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, mostly due to higher fertility rates. On average, children represent 20% of the population in CEE/CIS.
  37. 37. There is a remarkable correlation between GDP per capita and female life expectancy. However, with the exception of Slovenia, all other countries are still far below the average life expectancy for OECD countries.
  38. 38. There is no correlation between GDP per capita and male life expectancy. Kazakhstan, the Russian Federation and Belarus have extremely low male life expectancy rates. The difference between the male life expectancy in these countries and the OECD average is more than 12 years. The average for the CEE/CIS countries is 70 years.
  39. 39. Overall, average live expectancy at birth in CEE/CIS has been increasing; however, the gap with OECD countries is not closing.
  40. 40. The ratio of child population under 15 to adult population (15-59 years) has decreased further in all countries over the last decade – by 16% on average. This decrease was 30% or higher in Albania, Armenia and the Republic of Moldova.
  41. 41. Compared to 2000, only in Tajikistan was the child population higher in 2012 than in 2000. In contrast, in Albania the child population in 2012 was below 60% of what it was in 2000.
  42. 42. Birth rates in some countries have begun to increase again. Since 2000 the number of young children increased in 16 countries - the largest increase was observed in Kazakhstan (about 50%).
  43. 43. For further information: Visit www.transmonee.org or Contact Siraj Mahmudlu at smahmudlu@unicef.org. TransMonEE CONTINUES TO MONITOR THE SITUATION IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE AND COMMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES.

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