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This manual provides a selection of workshops developed by the Centre for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution. The main goal of these workshops is to enable interaction, respect and collaboration ...

This manual provides a selection of workshops developed by the Centre for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution. The main goal of these workshops is to enable interaction, respect and collaboration among children – members of different ethnic groups, as well as to offer a model for
extracurricular multicultural activities which could be implemented in the schools across the country.
This goal is realized through structured and guided one-hour workshops, which are attended by a balanced number of children from different language/ethnic/cultural backgrounds.

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Multicultural workshops Multicultural workshops Document Transcript

  • A selection of MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPSfor primary and secondary schools
  • This manual was prepared by Center for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution, Skopje.Creators: Renata Dedova, Safet Balazi, Saso N. Alusevski and Filipina Negrievska,under supervision of Violeta Petroska-Beshka................... .....................................The views expressed in this manual are those of the authors and do not necessarilyreflect the policies or views of UNICEF.December, 2010This Manual has been technically and financially supportedby UNICEF, as part of the UN programme for strengtheningthe inter-ethnic dialogue and collaboration, financed by theSpanish Government through the MDG-F.
  • This manual provides a selection of workshops developed by the Centre for Human Rights andConflict Resolution. The main goal of these workshops is to enable interaction, respect andcollaboration among children – members of different ethnic groups, as well as to offer a model forextracurricular multicultural activities which could be implemented in the schools across the country.This goal is realized through structured and guided one-hour workshops, which are attended by abalanced number of children from different language/ethnic/cultural backgrounds. The workshops are implemented in the context of the broader UN Joint Programme on “Enhancinginter-ethnic dialogue and cooperation” as part of which UNICEF is supporting the Ministry ofEducation and Science and the Bureau for Education Development in enhancing multiculturalismin education. The approach is based on the boarder Child-friendly school concept which in thecountry includes six dimensions (inclusiveness, effectiveness, safe, healthy and protectiveenvironment, gender equality, participation and multiculturalism). In 2008, with UNICEF support,the Bureau for Education Development used the CFS standards and principles as a basis to developthe concept and curricula for primary education. The concept now includes goals related tomulticulturalism and extracurricular activities. In this regard, the workshops provide model ofactivities to implement these goals. In total fifty-eight workshops have been created and most of them have already been piloted withstudents from monolingual, bilingual, trilingual schools, or from schools with a large percentage ofstudents whose language of instruction is not their mother tongue. In the phase of creation andpiloting of the program, the workshops were attended by children from diverse ethnic/culturalbackgrounds from seven primary and five secondary schools in different municipalities. Most ofthe schools have instruction in more than one language of instruction, which means that they areattended by students who belong to at least the Macedonian or the Albanian ethnic community.Several of the schools are monolingual, but in the course of implementation the programme, eachschool with one language of instruction cooperates with corresponding school with other languageof instruction within the same municipality. The one exception is a primary school where theinstruction is conducted in Macedonian, but is attended by a large percentage of students who areethnically/culturally different from the majority of students in the school (mostly Roma). The workshops have been grouped into six age categories: 1. age cycle: 6, 7 and 8 years old,2. age cycle: 9 and 10 years old, 3. age cycle: 11 and 12 years old, 4. age cycle: 13 and 14 years old,5. age cycle: I and II year in high school, and 6. age cycle: III and IV year in high school. Withineach age category, the workshops include an introduction, multicultural and project/derived activities,with the aim to contribute to decreasing of ethnic prejudices and increasing of mutual respect,through interpersonal and intercultural acquaintance and joint work. The work in the workshops isbased on the principle of equality of the different ethnicities and cultures, which is achieved bybalancing the number of participants coming from the different ethnic/cultural communities. Theworkshops are facilitated by two facilitators, who assist the children in addressing diverse contentby using various participatory methods of work. In multilingual schools, the implementation isconducted bilingually: in Macedonian and in Albanian, while all the materials distributed to thestudents are prepared in both languages, and everything that is being said and created during theworkshop must be said or interpreted into both languages.
  • CONTENTS: INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS 3Workshop I.1.2: We are group 4I age cycle (6, 7 and 8 years old)Workshop II.1.2: We are group 7II age cycle (9 and 10 years old)Workshop III.1.1: Getting to know each other 13III age cycle (11 and 12 years old)Workshop IV.1.1: Getting to know each other 16IV age cycle (13 and 14 years old)Workshop V.1.2: We are group 19V age cycle (15 and 16 years old)Workshop VI.1.3: Rules of the group 21VI age cycle (17 and 18 years old) MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS 24Workshop I.2.1: How do you say red in another language 25I age cycle (6, 7 and 8 years old)Workshop II.2.1: Baklava and sarma 27II age cycle (9 and 10 years old)Workshop III.2.1: Visiting… 29III age cycle (11 and 12 years old)Workshop IV.2.1: Music, instruments and folk dances 31IV age cycle (13 and 14 years old)Workshop V.2.2: Tephons and Piphons or Ripons and Tephons 34V age cycle (15 and 16 years old)Workshop VI.2.2: Questions and answers 37VI age cycle (17 and 18 years old) PROJECT WORKSHOPS 41 V age cycle (15 and 16 years old)Workshop V.3.1: Scanning the school 42Workshop V.3.2: Scanning the school 49Workshop V.3.3: Ideas for change 51
  • INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS Goal: ·Establishing interpersonal communication with members of “other” ethnic communitiesMANUAL FOR MULTICULTURAL ACTIVITIES 3
  • I AGE CYCLE (6, 7 AND 8 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP I.1.2: WE ARE A GROUP Objectives: ·Forming a group – developing the feeling of belonging to the group, independently of the belonging to a concrete ethnic community ·Encouraging collaboration among the group members INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS ·Encouraging the participants to reach group decisions about issues of mutual interest Materials: ·handout for facilitators: Products ·paper – prewritten with “Hello” in the languages spoken in the group ·poster – as many sheets as there are groups ·flipchart paper ·markers ·crayons – as many sets as there are groups ·tape ·scissors ·CD player Introductory activity: All participants sit in a circle. One by one, each participant first claps their hands and then says their name. Then, when a signal is sent, the other group members stand upat the same time, clap their hands and repeat the name of the participant.........................Afterwards, sheets of paper prewritten with “Hello” in the languages spoken in the group are putup on the board. Everybody stands in a circle. Upon a given signal, everybody utters one of thegreetings written in different languages. This is repeated several times, in order to give theparticipants an opportunity to learn a greeting/greetings in a non-mother tongue..........................Then, one participant starts by saying “Hello” in one of the languages, which was previouslypracticed, to the person next to them, utters the persons name and shakes hands with them. Thenext person continues by responding to the previous participant with the same greeting that theyreceived by uttering their name and continues with choosing a greeting in a different languagefrom the one that was previously used, utters the name of the next participant and shakes theirhand and this continues until all participants have taken the role of the one who greets and the onewho responds to a greeting. Main activity: The participants are divided into groups of six to eight persons. They are shown what the final products of this activity should look like (handout for facilitators: Products).Afterwards, each group agrees which of the three products they would like to make and announcesit to the facilitators, who then on the spot draw the shape (according to the choice of the group)which is the basis for the final product:•A tree with branches only•A butterfly with no wings•A sun with no rays. 4
  • Then the participants of each group should finish the shapes so they look like the final products byleaving handprints with the help of the facilitators, and then color the drawing with crayons, so thebranches get leaves, the butterfly gets wings, and the sun – rays................................................Then, the products from each group are compiled and a collective poster is made. It is announcedthat the poster is a joint work of the whole group and all the products are looked at................Then, an attempt is made to find a name which will represent the whole group. That can be a newand unusual name which no one has heard before, or could be a known name. The participantsgive suggestions, and all facilitators without discussion quickly illustrate them with very simple INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPSdrawings on flipchart paper. When the suggestions are exhausted, the participants are asked toindividually say which name they like best, and the facilitators put a straight line next to eachchosen name for each vote. In the end, the votes are collected and the name of the group isannounced. If there are two or more names with the same number or with a close number of votes,all those names are accepted by combining them or adding them together...................After the name has been chosen, the facilitators illustrate and write it in big letters on flipchartpaper in the languages spoken in the group, utter the name clearly in front of the whole group andacknowledge the membership of each participant in it. In the end, the facilitators say that thepaper with the name of the whole group shall be taken to each workshop and shall be put ina visible place before its start................. ..................................................................... Wrap-up activity: All participants dance to music (played using a CD player or sung by the facilitators). When the music stops, each one needs to “hug” someone who is closest to them. Then,the music continues again and at the next stop, four or five participants should “hug” at the sametime. This step of the game is repeated several times. In the end, when the music stops, allparticipants should make a big “hug” all at once. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.What from todays activities did you like the most? 3.What did you learn? 5
  • Handout for facilitators: Products INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS 6
  • II AGE CYCLE (9 AND 10 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP II.1.2: WE ARE A GROUP Objectives: ·Getting to know the members of the group ·Forming a group – developing the feeling of belonging to the group, independently of the belonging to a concrete ethnic community INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS ·Encouraging collaboration among the group members ·Encouraging the participants to reach group decisions about issues of mutual interest Materials: ·handout for participants: Self-portrait – one for each participant ·poster ·flipchart paper ·crayons – many sets ·markers ·scissors – as many pairs as there are participants ·tape ·glue – as many tubes as half of the total number of participants ·board and chalk Introductory activity: All participants stand in a circle and one of the facilitators starts by saying their name and making a certain gesture. Then, at a given sign, all participants should repeat thefacilitators name and gesture at the same time. The next participant continues by saying theirname and making a new gesture, and the others then repeat the name said and the gesture made.The participants are motivated to make new gestures never made before. The game continues untilall participants take their turn. Main activity 1: All participants are distributed a copy of the handout: Self-portrait and should draw their self-portrait (a drawing of themselves) in as much detail as possible within 10 minutes.After they finish, the participants are split into groups of four and sit around the tables. Then,everyone flips over the self-portrait and cuts it along the lines into six equal parts and the cutoutsare put in the middle of the table in one single pile. The facilitators mix the self-portrait parts anddeal them out one by one to all the members of the group (each group member gets six pieces).Then the following instructions are given:Now each member has six parts of the self-portraits of the members of their group. They will onlyhave some of the parts of their own self-portrait, while the rest of the pieces will be from the self-portraits of the others.Each group member should put their self-portrait together. The self-portraits can be put togetheronly by collaborating with the others. The task will be considered completed when all the membersof a group have their self-portraits assembled in front of them. 7
  • However, the self-portraits will be put together according to a set of rules:·no one can take pieces which are placed in front of the other participants (on the board, it iswritten: “No taking”)·everyone can give pieces placed in front of them (on the board, it is written: “With giving”).After finishing this part of the activity, each participant is given a piece of paper with a frame(continuation of the Self-portrait handout) to which they stick parts of their self-portrait with glue.Then, the participants from the whole group stick their pictures on a poster, after which it is putsomewhere in the room where it can be easily seen. INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS Discussion: 1.Could someone put their self-portrait together without the help of the other members of the group?2.Was it difficult to respect the rules?3.Was it good or bad that you had to cooperate?4.Was it fun to watch how the parts of the faces of different participants were combined? Main activity 1: All participants sit in a circle, and the facilitators announce that they will make a try to find a name which will represent the whole group. That can be a new and unusualname which no one has heard before or could be a known name. The participants are asked to givesuggestions for the name, and the facilitators write them on a flipchart without any comments ordiscussion (in all the languages spoken in the group).Then there is a vote, after which the three suggestions that get the most votes are reviewed, andfrom them through discussion and consensus, one common name for the group should be chosen.During this process, attention should be paid that the name is not typical for either boys or girls, orthe members of one or another ethnic community, but to be unifying and to point to the sharedcharacteristics or interests of all participants in the group.For that reason, each of the three suggestions is appraised using the following questions. Discussion: 1.Is this name equally nice to both boys and girls? 2.Is this name equally nice to both… (members of one ethnic community) and to…(members of the other ethnic community)?3.Does this name refer to something which all the participants in this group have in common?After a name has been chosen (it can be a combination of two or three suggestions if theparticipants cannot make up their minds about one suggestion only), the facilitators write it in bigletters on a poster in the languages spoken in the group, they announce the name of the groupclearly and they emphasize the membership of each member in it. In the end, it is said that theposter with the name of the whole group will be taken to every workshop and will be displayed ina visible place in the room. Wrap-up activity: One participant goes out of the room, while all the others sit in a circle and quietly choose a “conductor”. Then the participant who was outside is called to come back to the room.The “conductor” should start making a movement (for example, scratching, setting their hair, crossingtheir legs…), and the others should follow and imitate them – when the “conductor” changes themovement, all the others follow. 8
  • The point of the game is for the volunteer to guess who the “conductor” is, while the group shouldmake the guessing more difficult by quickly and unnoticeably changing the movements the way the“conductor” does (the conductor is motivated to change the movements at shorter time periods).The volunteer has three shots to guess, and then the person who was previously the “conductor”goes out, and the group chooses a new “conductor”. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS 2.What from todays activities did you like the most? 3.What did you learn? 9
  • Handout for participants: Self-portrait INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS 10
  • Handout for participants: Self-portrait (back side of the self-portrait) INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS 11
  • Handout for participants: Self-portrait (frame for sticking the self-portrait) INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS 12
  • III AGE CYCLE (11 AND 12 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP III.1.1: GETTING TO KNOW EACH OTHER Objectives: ·Getting to know the members of the group ·Encouraging collaboration among the group members ·Getting familiar with the way of working of the group INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS Materials: ·handout for participants: Comparison sheet – one for each participant ·handout for participants: Group table – one for each group ·color paper – yellow, green and red – each sheet of paper cut into eight equal parts; as many parts in each color as there are participants ·posters – as many sheets as there are groups ·writing sets – as many as there are participants ·crayons – as many sets as there are groups ·tape ·scissors Introductory activity: Everybody is standing in a circle. One of the facilitators starts, and then each participant, one by one, says their name ordinarily, with a normal pitch of voice.After everyone has said their name, a second turn is played: now everybody, one by one, says theirname first, and then the name of the person standing on their left, and after that, of the personstanding on their right.The third round is started by a participant finishing the following sentence with one word or phrase:I enjoy… (adding one thing the person really enjoys doing). The following person in the circlecontinues, linking to the previous one: And to… (adding something else). In the same way, thefollowing participants continue, paying attention not to repeat something already said. The gamefinishes when all participants in the circle have said what they enjoy doing. Main activity: Each participant receives one handout: Comparison sheet, which is filled out individually. After that is done, all participants are divided into four groups and each participantreceives three pieces of paper in different colors: red, yellow and green. The pieces of paper serveto show (by lifting) which of the offered answers to the questions from the handout previouslyfilled out each one has chosen:·the red piece of paper signifies having chosen the first offered answer·the yellow piece of paper signifies having chosen the second offered answer·the green piece of paper signifies having chosen the third offered answer.The showing of the chosen answers is done within each group individually, and in the handout:Group table each group records how many participants have chosen which answer for eachquestion, i.e. how many times each of the three colors has appeared for each question individually.Then each group presents to which question they had the largest number of the same answers,and to which question most of them chose different answers. 13
  • In the end, everybody sits in a circle. The facilitators choose and read several questions with allthe offered answers (one by one), and those participants who have chosen the particular answershould stand up quickly, go to the middle of the circle, hold hands and raise them high up (as ifthey were shouting “hurray”), after which they sit back in the circle. If only one participant haschosen some of the offered answers to a question, while he or she is in the middle of the circlewith their hands up in the air, all the others sitting around them should shout Hurray. Wrap-up activity: INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS The participants are divided into three or four groups (with equal number of participants), and one poster is put up in three or four different places in the room.Each participant in the group gets one crayon in a color different from the crayons of the others inthe group. Each group stands in front of one of the posters, and its members make a line onebehind another. At a given sign, the first participant from each group starts drawing something onthe group poster until they hear Stop. During that time, one of the facilitators counts to five andthen says Stop. When the first participant hears Stop, they stop drawing and go to the end of theine of their group, and the next one continues to draw until the next Stop, which is uttered by thefacilitator after having counted to five. The activity lasts until all participants in each group have atleast three times participated in the drawing of the collective drawing.While the activity is going on, there must not be any planning about what and how to draw amongthe members of the group. What is important is that every one gives their personal contribution tothe collective drawing, according to their own idea and that there is no pressure that it should be“a true work of art”, but the goal is more to have fun in the process.In the end, each group thinks of a title of their collective drawing and presents it in front of theother participants. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.How did you feel? 3.What did you learn? 4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? 14
  • Handout for participants: Comparison sheet 1. If you could choose, you would 2. You had rather: choose: INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS ? a walk in the woods ? read a book ? a walk on the beach ? listen to music ? a bicycle ride ? watch TV 3. You had rather be with 4. You had rather be: company: ? rich ? at a birthday party ? famous ? in a sweets shop ? happy ? shopping ? 5. It is most important that your 6. From the following things, it is friend: the most difficult for you: ? makes you happy ? to admit having lied ? is honorable ? to apologize if you have made a ? knows how to keep a secret mistake ? not to tell anybody for the damage caused by your friend 7. From the following subjects, the 8. You become the most annoyed easiest one for you is: when someone: ? language ? is late ? math ? is showing off ? physical education ? does not share things with others 9. What kind of food do you like 10.If you could choose, you would the most? travel around the world by: ? sweet ? car ? savory ? bus ? sour ? train 15
  • IV AGE CYCLE (13 AND 14 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP IV.1.1: GETTING TO KNOW EACH OTHER Objectives: ·Getting to know the members of the group ·Getting familiar with the way of working of the group INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS Materials: ·handout for participants: If you were… – one for each participant ·three smaller objects to be passed around – a soft ball and two soft toys that can be easily tossed and caught ·badges – one for each participant ·markers ·writing sets – as many as there are participants Introductory activity: All participants write their names (or nicknames) in big letters using markers on badges which they pin on themselves somewhere visible.The participants stand in a circle. One of the facilitators takes a ball, utters the name of theparticipant standing opposite in the circle and passes the ball. The participant catches the ball andpasses it to the participant opposite them, but to the right of the facilitator who started the circle,previously uttering the name of the one to whom the ball is being passed. The second participantcontinues in the same way, uttering the name and passing the ball to the next participant in thecircle (the one opposite and to the right of the previous participant). The activity goes on until allparticipants in the circle take a turn.If the ball drops, the person it was passed to should pick it up; during that time, all the otherspeacefully wait for their turn to come. If it happens that some of the participants do not say aname before passing the ball, the activity must be stopped and restarted.During this activity, attention should be paid so that the passing of the ball does not turn into targetingand hitting and not hearing anything except for the names of the people who are passed the ball. Main activity: The participants are divided into two equal groups using the principle in-out, in order to line up in two circles: inner and outer ones. Each participant from the first circleshould have a partner from the second circle: the partners (one from the outer and one from theinner circle) should be facing each other (the inner circle is facing outwards, while the outer circleis facing inwards).Each participant receives one copy of the handout: If I were a/an…, with the task to fill it out byinterviewing the participants from the other circle. It is started by interviewing the partners fromthe two circles facing each other first (they answer the questions to each other, and the answers ofthe other are written in their handout). At first, everybody writes the name of the partner in thefirst picture (next to “animal”), and then first asks the question If you were an animal, which animalwould you like to be?, and then wants to hear the explanation Because of which trait?. The receivedanswers are written next to the appropriate picture in the handout (beneath “animal”).Before moving to the next picture, the participants are asked to change their partner in the waythat one of the circles moves two spots to the right so that everyone faces a different participant.The circles move in turns before asking the questions for each subsequent picture: if the outercircle has moved to the right first, then the inner circle will move to the right next etc. 16
  • For each following picture, one first writes down the name of the participant being interviewed, andthen the answers to the questions If you were a/an…, what… would you like to be? and Because ofwhich trait?.After everyone has changed five partners and filled out the whole handout, the participants sit in a circle.The facilitators continue the activity by asking questions addressing all participants:Which animals were mentioned most often? Which ones most rarely?Then they call on participants of the most numerous group to come to the center of the circle andthey ask them Why did you wish to be that animal precisely?. The same is repeated with the ones INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPSwho belong to the least numerous group (or are unique) – they should come to the center andexplain why they wished precisely that.The same procedure is repeated for the other questions on the handout – at first, it is asked whichanswers were the most numerous, and which were the least numerous, and then, after themost/least numerous come to the center of the circle, they are asked to explain their answer. Discussion: 1.Were there more similarities or more differences among you? Why? 2.Did the similarities and differences depend on your ethnic background or somethingelse? What did they depend on?3.(for the multilingual groups) Did the language get in the way of filling out the handout? How didyou solve the language issues when they occurred? Wrap-up activity: The participants stand in a circle and play a continuation of the introductory activity. One of the facilitators starts passing the ball after uttering the name of the personthey are passing the ball to, the same way as in the introductory activity. However, this time, afterthe ball has been passed to four or five participants, the facilitator who has initiated the passing ofthe ball introduces a second toy (utters the name, then passes the toy). The same is repeatedwith a third toy. This cycle of the activity is considered as successfully finished when all three toysare passed to all participants.During this activity, attention should be again paid so that the passing of the toys does not turninto targeting and hitting and not hearing anything except for the names of the people who arepassed the toys. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.How did you feel? 3.What did you learn? 4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? 17
  • Handout for participants: If I were a/an... INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS because it is… because it is… NAME NAME If I were because it is… a/an... NAME because s/he is… because it is… NAME NAME 18
  • V AGE CYCLE (15 AND 16 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP V.1.2: WE ARE A GROUP Objectives: ·Getting to know the members of the group ·Encouraging collaboration among the group members INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS Materials: ·tangerines/apples/oranges/grapes¹ – one for each group ·paper plates – one for each participant ·poster – cut into stripes – one stripe per participant ·poster – small piece rolled up and fastened with tape in the shape of a relay baton approximately 30cm long ·tape ·scissors Main activity 1: The facilitators ask the question Are the tangerines the same, similar or different? and listen to the answers, whereas the discussion about this question is to follow aftercompleting this activity.The participants are divided into groups of three and each group sits around a desk separately.A tangerine is placed on each desk. Each group look closely at the tangerine and try to find certaintraits after which they could recognize it later.Afterwards, all the tangerines from the groups are placed in a pile and the facilitators put them onone desk at a 30cm distance from one another, as in an exhibition. The participants should get upand carefully look at the exhibited tangerines, and each group should recognize “their” tangerine.The participants should circle in the same direction around the desk and they should be asked notto grab the tangerines so they would not damage them and so that all groups could look at them. Discussion: s Conclusion: 1.Have you found your tangerine? Tangerines, just like people, by some traits are How did you recognize that it was the same, by some are similar, and by some arethe right one? different. It is precisely the differences that2.Are the tangerines the same, similar or helped everyone to find their tangerine, whichdifferent? means that they, and not only the similarities,3.What are people like – are they the same, can be of help too. Unless we try to knowsimilar or different? someone better and discover their specifics,4.Are all members of the same group the they would look the same as all othersame? For example, are all teachers the same, representatives of their group, which does notor all students, or all neighbors? Why? necessarily need to be true. ¹Depending on the availability of fruit and the funds available to the facilitators of the activity, any of the listed fruits can be supplied and used. Inthe further text, the word “Tangerine” is used, but it can be replaced by any fruit to be used in the workshop. 19
  • Main activity 2: The participants, in the same groups from the previous activity, sit in a circle and should peel their tangerine, split it into pieces and place the pieces on the paper platesthat are put in front (or on the lap) of each participant, but they must not eat them. Afterwards, thefacilitators bandage the participants right arm (or left arm in left handed participants) in the elbowarea with a strip of poster (the elbow, as well as a small part below and above it are wrapped) andfasten it with tape so that the arm cannot bend.The facilitators address the participants: INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPSToday, we will all need something to eat and especially in a way that will show us how important isto cooperate. At first, place your arm which is not “blocked” by a poster strip behind your back,as it will not be allowed to use it in this activity. The other arm which is fastened with a poster stripcan be used, but it must not be bent in the elbow area. Now you will need to eat a few tangerinepieces without bending your elbows. Try to do that.They are left for three or four minutes to try to feed themselves, and if they do not succeed, thefacilitators show them how to feed each other. If in the meantime someone tries to throw foodtowards their mouth, it will be emphasized that it can be dangerous and it is not allowed. Conclusion: No one could feed oneself if they respected the Discussion: instructions. The participants could only get food if 1.Could everyone feed oneself they thought of giving food to one another, i.e. if alone? they cooperated. It is not cooperation when we help2.How did you get food? the other person and that makes us feel bad,3.How did it feel to cooperate? uncomfortable and under pressure, but it is real cooperation when people work together with patience and love. Wrap-up activity: All participants stand in a circle and the “relay baton” (piece of poster rolled up and fastened in the shape of a relay baton) is passed from one to another holding it withtheir knees.In the following step, it can be passed by the participants holding it between their neck andshoulder, and in the last step, it can be alternately passed holding it between ones neck andshoulder and then between ones knees.If the “relay baton” falls down, it is started from the beginning. The time needed to pass the relaybaton can be measured and the group can be cheered to get the “relay baton” across as fast aspossible. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.How did you feel? 3.What did you learn? 4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? 20
  • VI AGE CYCLE (17 AND 18 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP VI.1.3: RULES OF THE GROUP Objectives: ·Forming a group – developing the feeling of belonging to the group, independently of the belonging to a concrete ethnic community ·Encouraging the participants to reach group decisions about issues INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS of mutual interest ·Laying down group rules Materials: ·poster ·markers ·chalk and board Main activity 1: All participants are divided into groups of three and stand in an empty, wide space. At first, the two basic elements of the activity are explained:.........................................* · “house”: two participants from the groups of three stand up holding hands high above their heads · “resident”: one member from the group of three stands between the two other members who make up the “house”. Afterwards, all groups of three build their “house” with a “resident” in it. Then, one of the facilitators, who at the beginning did not belong to any of the groups of three, stands in the middle and gives the following instructions one by one clearly, and the groups of three follow them** .................................................................................................................................................................................................... · house: the two members from each group of three who constitute the “house” still holding hands, leave their “resident” and try to quickly find a new “resident”; during that time, all “residents” stand still............................................................................................................... · resident: all “residents” leave their “houses” and try to quickly find a new “house”; the “houses” stand still when this instruction is given..................................................................................... · earthquake: all existent groups of three split up and completely new groups of three are formed, in which two members are a “house”, and one is the “resident” in that “house”. After having practiced the instructions and the movements, the facilitator starts to play actively – after giving the first instruction, they try to enter some group of three (as a “resident” or as a part of a “house”, depending on the instruction given). The participant who does not enter any group of three is the following to give instruction. Conclusion: Discussion: Rules enable an activity to flow smoothly and 1.What were the rules of this game? activity participants to feel good. Unless there 2.What are rules for? are rules, there is chaos, which makes the3.What would have happened if the game was objective of the activity not to be achieved, andplayed without rules? the participants start to feel uncomfortable. In4.Would we have known how to play the game order to know how to realize some activity, theif we did not hear the instructions? instructions must be given clearly, but they must5.Should our group have rules in the course of also be heard and understood well.these workshops?* In the multilingual groups, the facilitators write down the words house, resident and earthquake in the languages spoken in the group in big letters on the boards, and in the explanation they use the words in all the languages spoken in the group.** In the multilingual groups, each participant uses the words for house, resident and earthquake in any language they desire. 21
  • Main activity 2: The facilitators ask the participants to think of rules for conducting the workshops of this program. The participants will suggest, and the facilitators will write theirsuggestions on the board.After all ideas have been exhausted, the facilitators say the two basic principles according to whicheach of the given ideas will now need to be reviewed: how much that will help the group to workwell and the participants to feel good. INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPSWhile evaluating the rules, the following questions can be used:1.Why would we like to have that precise rule?2.What would happen if we did not have that rule?3.Does the group agree to have that rule written?Examples for rules:·careful listening when someone is speaking – without cutting in and interrupting (agreeing on a signfor speaking next)·respecting the other person speaking – no insulting and no mocking·mutual cooperation (changing of groups, joint work, helping each other, sharing materials…)·signaling the end of an activity and attracting attention (“stop” sign and “zipping” ones mouth sign)·coming on time·....The facilitators should constantly have in mind that the rules should be made by the participants,and not to be imposed by the facilitators. The rules should be phrased in the form of concretebehaviors/procedures (for example, no mocking, no cutting in, no interrupting, listening attentively,raising ones hand, etc.), and not as general categories (for example, to be tolerant, to respect, topay attention, to be active etc.).The rules which are accepted by the group are written legibly and clearly on a poster, which is thenhung at a visible place in the room.It should always be emphasized that the rules are not fixed and that at any time some of them canchange or a new one can be added if the group agrees on that. Conclusion: Discussion: Every time a rule is broken, the facilitators should remind 1.What will happen if the group that it is not working as they previously agreed someone or some people and ask it to identify the rule/rules which were broken.break the rules??????..........??????? Meanwhile, it is extremely important to refrain from naming2.What kind of warning should be or pointing at the participant or participants who haveissued if rules are broken? Is it better broken the rule in order to secure the required atmosphere.to warn generally, or to say which The answers, which indicate that the whole group isrule has been broken??????????????? responsible for respecting the rules, and the facilitators are3.Who should make sure that rules only responsible for their implementation, are explicitlyare respected? Who should inform emphasized by the facilitators and are inferred as awhich rule has been broken? conclusion from the discussion. Wrap-up activity: Everybody stands in a circle and holds hands. The activity is started by one facilitators squeezing the hand of the participant on their right, and they, immediately after feelingthe “pulse”, should transfer it, i.e. squeeze the hand of the participant on the their right. That way,the “pulse” is transferred across the participants to the one who started the game. 22
  • The other facilitator can track the time in which the pulse was transferred from the beginning tothe end, and then the game can be played once or twice more in order to try to beat the resultfrom the first cycle. The participants can try to play the game with their eyes shut. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.How did you feel? 3.What did you learn? INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS 4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? 23
  • MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS Goals: •Developing respect for “the others” by familiarizing with their culture •Establishing interpersonal communication with members of “the other” ethnic communitiesMANUAL FOR MULTICULTURAL ACTIVITIES 24
  • I AGE CYCLE (6, 7 AND 8 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP I.2.1: HOW DO YOU SAY RED IN ANOTHER LANGUAGE? Objectives: ·Learning words in the language of “the others” ·Encouraging collaboration with “the others” Materials: ·paper – each participant gets one sheet, previously divided into two halves with line ·crayons – as many sets as there are groups Introductory activity: All participants sit in a circle. It is explained that the participants will great each other in both Macedonian and in Albanian/Romani/Turkish, depending on which languagesare spoken in the group. So, for example, it is said that in Albanian Good afternoon (Добар ден) MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPSis Mirëdita, and in Romani – Šukar dive, or in Turkish – Günaydın. Then, each participant in thecircle takes a turn to say Good afternoon in a language/languages that are not Macedonian. In thefollowing cycle, everyone says Good afternoon in Macedonian, and in the third cycle – everyonesays Good afternoon in a non-mother tongue. Main activity: The participants are divided into groups of four or five. Each participant in the frames of their group gets one crayon in a different color and a sheet of paper to draw on,which has previously been divided into two halves with a line. The participants are instructed todraw flowers, sun and grass on one of the halves using the crayon they have. After some time,they are instructed to make one more drawing, on the other half of the sheet, but this time theycan also use the crayons of the other members of the group, but only if they ask them to borrowthem – one cannot take someone elses crayon without asking them. The question is asked in themother tongue in the following way: …(name of participant), could you give me… (name of color)?. Discussion: Conclusion: 1.Which drawing do you like better, the When we draw or do something first or the second one? Why? else, it is better when we canHow are the drawings different? use more items instead of one.2.What would it be like if we always used only one crayon? When we are limited in our3.And are all people the same? Do they look the same? choice to only one thing, it canDo they talk the same? Are they all important? be boring and not so wonderful.4.Do we all use the same names for colors? People, just like crayons, differ5.Do you remember how to say some of the colors in from one another by skin color,another language? Which one? How? language they speak and many other things. However, when everybody is together and feels the togetherness, most beautiful things can be achieved. 25
  • Wrap-up activity: Everybody sits in a circle. The facilitators explain that they will hand many crayons to the participants to pass down the circle (everyone receives the crayons from their leftand passes them on their right). On every passing of a crayon, the name of its color is uttered inthe way the facilitator had uttered it at the beginning. The facilitators first pass a crayon and utterthe name of its color in Macedonian, and then pass the next crayon, which is of the same color asthe first one, and utter the color in the other language spoken in the group. The following crayonof a different color is first named in a language different from Macedonian which is spoken in thegroup, and then the following crayon, which is of the same color as the previous one, is named inMacedonian, and in this way many circles are made with crayons in several different colors. Afterthe facilitators give each crayon, they make a short break before giving the following crayon. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.What from todays activities did you like the most? 3.What did you learn? MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS 26
  • II AGE CYCLE (9 AND 10 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP II.2.1: BAKLAVA¹ AND SARMA² Objectives: ·Developing awareness for the existence of similarities and differences in the traits of ones own and “other” cultures ·Learning words/phrases in the language of “the others” Materials: ·colored paper in different colors ·paper towels ·scissors – as many as there are groups (three pairs per group) ·scalpel ·cardboard box – as many as there are groups ·chalk and board Introductory activity: MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS The participants stand in a circle. It is explained that in this game, shapes of baklava and sarma will be made. The shape of baklava is made when each participant finds apartner and holds hands with them facing each other, and lifting ones arms to the side so that ashape of diamond or baklava is made. The shape of sarma is made when two participants holdhands (just like in baklava) representing the shell/leaf of the sarma, and between them (inside theleaf of the sarma) there is one participant, who represents the stuffing of the sarma.The activity goes on by giving two different “commands”:·baklava – pairs hold hands, making the shape of baklava·sarma – in groups of three: two participants hold hands and one participant stands between them.The “commands” are given at random and at each new “command” the existing shapes are takenapart and new ones are formedThe game is played with an even number of participants, and the total of the even number ofparticipants needs to be divisible by 3 (for example, 18, 24, 30, etc.) There should always be oneextra participant who is not part of the shapes made, and who needs to give the “command”according to which they should also try to become part of some of the newly made shapes. Theparticipant who stays alone (who is not part of any shape) is the next to give a “command”. Theinclusion of facilitators in the game depends on the number of participants – if one participant islacking, one facilitator is included in the game, and if two participants are lacking, both facilitators.enter the game.If even after the inclusion of the facilitators, an ideal number of participants, as describedabove, cannot be secured, and instead of one person, there are two or three people left standingin the middle, then all of them together give one “command” and try to find a place in the newlyformed shapes at the same time. Main activity: The participants are divided into four groups. Two groups get a task to work on making “baklava”, and the other two on making “sarma”.¹Baklava is a rich, buttery, sweet pastry made of layers of phyllo dough filled with chopped nuts or rice and sweetened with syrup.²Sarma is a dish of grape or sour cabbage leaves rolled around a filling usually based on minced meat or rice. 27
  • All groups receive the same materials: colored paper (for making the stuffing for the sarma/baklava),paper towels (for making the leaves/dough sheets), scissors and cardboard boxes (as a pan/pot).If some group needs to cut the baklava, the facilitators help out with a scalpel.In the end, the groups present their products, explaining how they made them (what they put in them). Discussion: Conclusion: 1.Are these dishes prepared at home? Does that happen often? Some dishes are prepared more often, while ........... 2.On which occasions is baklava some more rarely. Some are prepared on prepared, and on which sarma? special occasions such as holidays. So,for example, baklava is prepared almost always for Bayram, and sarma – for Christmas. Wrap-up activity: Everybody is seated as for the game “day-night”. At first it is said (and written on the board) how to say Day in the languages spoken in the group, and then how to say Night.Afterwards, it is explained how to play the game: the “commands” are given by only one of thefacilitators, who can only say Day or Night, and the participants then react by lifting their head highor Day, and lowering their head down for Night. At first, the “commands” are given in one language, MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPSthen in another, so that in the end they can be mixed.>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>It is very important that there are no punishments for the mistakes made, i.e. when someparticipant makes a mistake they are not sent out of the game, but continue to play as previously. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.What from todays activities did you like the most? 3.What did you learn? 28
  • III AGE CYCLE (9 AND 10 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP III.2.1: VISITING... Objectives: ·Developing awareness for the existence of similarities and differences in the traits of ones own and “other” cultures ·Learning words in the language of “the others” Materials: ·colored paper in different colors ·replacement for a tray for glasses – as many as there are groups ·paper plates and glasses – as many as there are participants ·scissors – as many as there are groups (two pairs per group) ·chalk and board Introductory activity: At first the facilitators say (and write on the board) how Hello is said in the languages MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS spoken in the group. Then, at a given sign, everyone at once repeats the greeting fivetimes in each of the languages spoken in the group.............................................................Then everybody lines up into two lines (two equal lines, at an 80-100cm distance from one anotherand facing one another). Two participants (one from each line, standing on one end) enter betweenthe two lines and start to move slowly towards the other end, while shaking the hand of everyparticipant standing on their side of the line, at the same time uttering Hello in a non-mothertongue. When these two reach the end, they become part of the lines once again, and other twofrom the other end enter between the lines and repeat the same procedure. The activity goes onuntil all participants pass between the lines, greeting the other participants in the lines. Main activity: The participants are divided into four ethnically “clean” groups. Each group gets a task to think and agree on how to present a situation when someone is visiting them at theirhouse. They should pay attention that the presentations refer to the typical/traditional customswhich are practiced when visiting someone in a specific culture, and refer to greeting, puttingon/taking off ones shoes, serving drinks and food and seeing the guests out. The groups receivethe materials necessary for preparing the items that will be used when receiving guests bymembers of different cultures..........................................................................................After they have prepared themselves for presentation, each group acts out by miming (withouttalking) the prepared situation. In this process, one group member will be the guest, and two willact as hosts (a husband and a wife). If necessary, the prepared materials for receiving guests willbe described (what they represent, how they were made, etc.). Discussion: 1.What is characteristic for visiting… (one by one, each culture present in the group is mentioned) 2.What is similar, and what is different between/among them? 29
  • Wrap-up activity: At first, the facilitators say (and write on the board) how one says Good bye, i.e. the greeting that is usually used when parting, in the languages spoken in the group.Then, at a given sign, everyone at once repeats the greeting five times in each of the languagesspoken in the group......... ...............................................................Afterwards, all participants line up in pairs in one part of the room, one behind another. One by one,the pairs move to the middle of the room, greeting the others by shaking their hand and utteringthe farewell greeting in a non-mother tongue. Then, the members of each pair part in a way thatone of them goes to the left corner, and the other one to the right corner of the room. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.How did you feel? 3.What did you learn? 4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS 30
  • IV AGE CYCLE (13 AND 14 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP IV.2.1: MUSIC, INSTRUMENTS AND FOLK DANCES Objectives: ·Developing awareness for the existence of similarities and differences in the traits of ones own and “other” cultures Materials: ·handout for participants: Traditional music, instruments and folk dances – one for each group ·writing set – as many as there are groups Introductory activity: Everybody stands in a circle. Everybody imagines a musical instrument and at a given sign everybody starts imitating playing it, while also producing the typical sounds. Aftera while, one of the facilitators starts clapping and whoever notices them stops playing and joins in MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPSthe clapping. Main activity: The participants are divided into four groups (two from each ethnic group). Each group receives one copy of the handout: Traditional music, instruments and folk dances,which needs to be filled out. The information filled out should not refer to the cultural traits of onesown ethnic group, but to the cultural traits of the “other” ethnic group, so for example, theMacedonians will write about the Albanians, and the Albanians will write about the Macedonians.Here is an example of what the instructions for filling out the handout should sound like:In the handout, on the line next to Ethnic group, the Macedonians will write Albanians (orRoma/Turkish, depending on the distribution), and the Albanians (or Roma/Turkish) will writeMacedonians. That means that the Macedonians will need to write what they know about thetraditional cultural traits regarding the music, instruments and folk dances of Albanians (orRoma/Turkish), and the Albanians (or Roma/Turkish) – what they know about the same traditionalcultural traits of the Macedonians.The space left open in the questionnaires is for the questions that you would like to ask themembers of the “other” ethnic group regarding a concrete cultural trait, in order to provideclarification and/or explanation.After having filled out the handouts, everybody sits in a circle and talks about the traditionalcultural traits regarding music, instruments and folk dances of one of the ethnic groups first, byhaving representatives of the two groups belonging to the “other” ethnic group say what they knowabout it, and then asking clarifying questions which are answered by members of the first ethnicgroup. Then the roles are switched. 31
  • Wrap-up activity:The participants stand in a circle. Folk dances typical for the place where the participantscome from and for each ethnic group are danced separately for a short while.Reflection:1.What did we do today?2.How did you feel?3.What did you learn?4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS 32
  • Handout for participants: Traditional music, instruments and folk dances CULTURAL TRAITS Ethnic group: Traditional music: MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS Traditional instruments: Traditional folk dance: ????: 33
  • V AGE CYCLE (15 AND 16 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP V.2.2: TEPHONS AND RIPHONS OR RIPHONS AND TEPHONS Objectives: ·Developing awareness for the importance of cultural identity ·Developing awareness for the harmful consequences of the attempts of one culture to impose on another culture ·Learning of words in the language of the “others” Materials: ·handout for participants: Tephons and Riphons or Riphons and Tephons – one part for each participant (one part to one half of the participants, the other part to the other half) ·A3 format paper – two sheets for each group ·crayons – as many sets as there are groups ·tape ·scissors Introductory activity: MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS All participants stand in a circle. The facilitators explain that a game will be played by finishing the following sentence It is nice to be… (member of any people in the world)because… One of the facilitators starts by finishing the sentence saying one people and a reasonwhy it would be nice to be a member of that people. Then, everybody in the circle finishes thesentence saying their preferences and the reasons for them. Main activity: The participants receive a text from the handout: Tephons and Riphons or Riphons and Tephons. Attention is paid so that half of the participants sitting next to one anotherunnoticeably get the part “Tephons and Riphons”, and the other half the part “Riphons andTephons”. After each one has read the text, the participants are divided into four groups, two groupsof the ones with the “Tephons and Riphons” text and two groups of the ones with the “Riphonsand Tephons” text. Each group receives two sheets of A3 paper and crayons with a task to drawone Tephon and one Riphon. At the end, the drawings are put up on the board, with the Tephonson one part, and the Riphons on another part of it. Conclusion: Discussion: People tend to experience and describe themselves or 1.Are all Tephons from the the members of their group in a positive light, most drawings the same? Are all often creating an ideal picture, whereas theRiphons the same? representatives of some other group are experienced2.Why do Tephons, or Riphons, differ and described in a negative light. That contributes tofrom one another in their groups? the strengthening of stereotypes and prejudices of the3.Who would be the author of the text ones towards the others and vice versa.“Tephons and Riphons”, and who of The messages that we receive from the youngest age“Riphons and Tephons”? both at home and at school (teachers, peers) and from4.Why do Tephons and Riphons represent the media contribute to the creating of a negativethemselves and the others in that way? picture for the others The general tendency is to always blame “the others”5.Are Tephons and Riphons present in and they to be responsible for everything, without eveneveryday life? Can that be illustrated by identifying part of the responsibility in oneself (ones group).an example? 34
  • Wrap-up activity:Everybody sits in a half circle. Every participant, one by one, comes and sits in a betterchair in the open part of the circle and says one thing that they like about members of theother community, or something which is related to the other community.Reflection:1.What did we do today?2.How did you feel?3.What did you learn?4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS 35
  • Handout for participants: Tephons and Riphons or Riphons and Tephons -"------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TEPHONS AND RIPHONS You, Tephons, are students in the “Hope” high school. You find it nice and interesting at school. You help one another, especially those in trouble, and when there is some kind of injustice – you always react. You are very industrious and dedicated and you always try to make the school a better place for living, you respect the teachers, you behave well, you are always cheerful and pacifist. You are most interested in learning. Everything would have been wonderful at your school if Riphons didn’t attend it, too. As if they were made for troubles – they are true troublemakers. They create some problem at school every day. They are true provokers and they always tease you, Tephons. When they appear on the playground, you Tephons need to step aside. The MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS Riphons always frown, as if the whole world did them wrong. They play truant, they are lazy, and they don’t even respect the teachers. When something gets damaged at school, it goes without saying that they did it, but even then, everybody suffers, including you. In their backpacks, one can find items to be used in fighting and making problems, but one cannot find books. -"------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ RIPHONS AND TEPHONS You, Riphons, are students in the “Hope” high school. You find it nice and interesting at school. You help one another, especially those in trouble, and when there is some kind of injustice – you always react. You are very industrious and dedicated and you always try to make the school a better place for living, you respect the teachers, you behave well, you are always cheerful and pacifist. You are most interested in learning. Everything would have been wonderful at your school if Tephons didn’t attend it, too. As if they were made for troubles – they are true troublemakers. They create some problem at school every day. They are true provokers and they always tease you, Riphons. When they appear on the playground, you Riphons need to step aside. The Tephons always frown, as if the whole world did them wrong. They play truant, they are lazy, and they don’t even respect the teachers. When something gets damaged at school, it goes without saying that they did it, but even then, everybody suffers, including you. In their backpacks, one can find items to be used in fighting and making problems, but one cannot find books. -"------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 36
  • VI AGE CYCLE (17 AND 18 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP VI.2.2: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Objectives: •Developing awareness for the existence of separation along ethnic lines and how that influences the interaction between the different ethnic communities •Learning of words/phrases in the language of “the others” Materials: ·handout for facilitators: Identifying the problem ·handout for participants: Persons – previously cut into pieces, one piece for each member of each group ·tape ·scissors ·chalk and board Introductory activity: MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS The participants sit in a circle. The facilitators say (and write on the board) the questions for Am I male? and Am I female? and how one responds: Yes and No in thelanguages spoken in the group. .......................................................Then, each of the participants in the circle needs to pose one of the questions in a non-mothertongue to the person sitting next to them and get an appropriate answer in the same language. Itis started with the question: “Am I female?,” and then it is continued with the other question (“Am Imale?”), regardless of the sex of the person asking the question and this continues alternately. Thequestion is always asked in a non-mother tongue, and the answer is given in the language in whichthe question was asked. .The facilitators say (and write on the board) the questions for Am I young? and Am I old?. Then,each of the participants in the circle chooses which question (regarding young or old) they will askaloud, but always in a non-mother tongue and in accordance with the persons gender. An answeris not expected.....................................................................................Then, the participants are divided into four groups. In each group one volunteer needs to guess afamous person, whose name is stuck to their forehead (handout for participants: Persons). Theguessing is done by asking yes-no questions for the others to answer. Main activity: The participants sit in a circle. One of the facilitators chooses four volunteers (two girls and two boys), who need to help the solving of a problem and they are proclaimed asexperts. The facilitator briefly leaves the room with them to give them instructions, just like they arewritten in the handout for facilitators: Identifying the problem.The “experts” agree on a strategy for asking questions before the facilitator gives them a sign toenter the room.While the “experts” are planning outside, the other facilitator gives instructions to the group in theroom (in accordance with the handout for facilitators: Identifying the problem).Then the “experts” are called in to identify the problem.After five minutes the most, one of the facilitators asks them to step out of the room and offersolutions to the problem. 37
  • After five minutes the most, they come back to the room to present their “findings” as a group.After presenting the “findings” of the “experts”, one of the facilitators explains the rules which werevalid for the “experts” and the rules which were valid for the others. They particularly apologize tothe “experts” for having put them under a delusion on purpose. Discussion: 1.(for the “experts”): Did you have an impression that you were being listened Conclusion:to when asking questions? Why? How did you feel When there is ignoring in communication,when you were asking questions? Why? Did you that influences the relations so the partiesstart selecting who you will be asking questions? are distanced from each other or further2.(for the others): How did you feel when you were communication is stopped............................supposed to ignore the ones who were asking you When communication happens betweenquestions? ?????????????????????????????????????? members of different communities, the3.Are there similar situations in the everyday ignoring has a discouraging effect andlife – some people speak, and others ignore them? facilitates the process of creating aWhat are the consequences to communication when n e g a t i v e p i c t u r e o f t h e “ o t h e r s ”.there is ignoring? What if the communication takes In everyday life, communication/socialization MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPSplace between Macedonians and Albanians with ethnically different people is more a(or Turkish/Roma)? ?????????????????????????? rare, rather than a normal occurrence.4.Who do we communicate more in our everyday Each community has typical places for goinglife with, Macedonians or Albanians (Turkish/Roma)? out and there is not much mingling inDo we communicate with the “others” at all? this respect................ ..........5.To what places (cafés, restaurants, discos…) do Avoiding contact with others feeds thewe go more – to typically Macedonian or typically process of parallel coexisting, as anAlbanian (Turkish/Romani) places? Why?????????????? alternative to relations of interdependence.6.Does that illustrate the nature of the everyday life Quality socializing with the “others” basedin the city? Do we have dual/parallel stores, on mutual respect leads to more harmonioussupermarkets, pharmacies, green market, relations, but also to increasing the chancesplaygrounds, residential buildings, business for advancement in the area of interest.organizations, municipality council… a dual/parallel city?7.What are the consequences of non-communication,non-socialization and non-cooperation with the othercommunities on the municipal level? Wrap-up activity: All participants are gathered in a group, standing in one place in the center of the room. The group becomes dense. Then, with the arms lifted high up, everybody needs to holdhands with two other participants – with one participant using one hand and with another one usingthe other hand. That way, a “knot” is formed, which needs to be untied in a way of moving withoutletting each others hands. The game finishes when all participants form one or more circles(independent or intertwined), holding hands, regardless of whether they are facing the inner orouter side of the circle. Reflection: 1.What did we do today? 2.How did you feel? 3.What did you learn? 4.How can we apply what we have learned to our everyday life? 38
  • Handout for facilitators: Identifying the problem Instructions for the “experts”: ·You have been invited to come as experts in order to identify the problem of the group (the other participants) and to offer solutions......................... ·You may only ask yes-no questions....................................................... ·It is advisable to approach the members of the group individually and to ask many of them questions, and not to stick to only two or three of them. ·You will have five minutes to ask questions in order to identify the problem and five more minutes to discuss separately about the possible solutions. MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS Instructions for the group: ·You can only respond to the questions that will be asked of you with Yes or No. ·The Macedonians can only respond if they are asked by Macedonians, and the Albanians only if they are asked by Albanians (Roma by Roma/Turkish by Turkish); if a Macedonian asks an Albanian (Roma/Turkish), the Albanian (Roma/Turkish) should ignore them, and if an Albanian (Roma/Turkish) asks a Macedonian, the Macedonian should ignore them (the ignoring is achieved by averting your eyes, touching your shoes, talking to the participant next to you…).................... ·If the questions refer to the relations between Macedonians and Albanians (Roma/Turkish) in the group (for example, regarding mutual communication, socializing etc.), you will respond with Yes. To every other question, you will answer No. 39
  • Handout for participants: Persons Note: On the pieces of paper given below, there are names of a few persons who are now famous or popular. The facilitators can offer other persons as an addition or as a replacement, if they reckon that some of the offered persons is not popular at the moment or there is no person who is a member of some of the ethnicities to which the participants in the group belong. IGOR DZAMBAZOV MULTICULTURAL WORKSHOPS -"---------------------------------------------- ADRIAN GAXHA -"--------------------------------------------- ESMA REDZEPOVA -"---------------------------------------------- ANGELINA JOLIE 40
  • PROJECT WORKSHOPSGoals:· Encouraging collaboration with “the others” through accomplishing of PROJECT WORKSHOPS common goals· Understanding the need for interaction with “the others” on an equal basis· Establishing interpersonal communication with members of “the other” ethnic communitiesObjectives:· Creation of “products” of common interest· Developing awareness for equal treatment of the different ethnic communities· Encouraging collaboration among the members of the group· Encouraging the participants to reach group decisions about issues of common interest MANUAL FOR MULTICULTURAL ACTIVITIES 41 5
  • V AGE CYCLE (15 AND 16 YEARS OLD)WORKSHOP V.3.1: SCANNING THE SCHOOL Materials: ·handout for participants: Checklist for visual material – several copies for each group ·handout for participants: Checklist for textual material – several copies for each group ·handout for participants: Checklist for labels – several copies for each group ·handout for participants: Checklist for gender – several copies for each group ·handout for participants: Planning of the activities – one for each group ·writing set Introductory activity: The participants are grouped into groups of four or five. Each group receives a task to use their bodies to make a monument of a famous person from the present time. Onerepresentative from each group or the whole group together presents their monument, withoutsaying who the person is, while the other groups guess what the person represented by thesculpture is famous for. After several attempts to guess (successful or not), the group says andpresents the person represented with the sculpture. Main activity: A discussion with the participants is started about where all visual material can be seen in the school – pictures and drawings, hung on walls or displayed in a different way inthe school. ........................................................................................................The same is done for the textual material. The group also discusses about what all is presented inthe material (national heroes, scientists, writers, poems about them etc.).In addition, it is explained to the participants that they are expected to check the visual and textual materialin their school by registering their answers in special checklists.The participants are divided into four groups, paying attention that in each group there is abalanced number of participants who study in different languages, i.e. a balanced number of PROJECT WORKSHOPSmembers of different ethnic groups, as well as a balanced number of participants by gender.Groups may be formed by counting, after the participants have lined up according to the languageof instruction/ethnic background, and then within these groups by gender as well.Each group receives several copies of the same handout (same checklist) with explanation that theywill have to fill it out while visiting each of the places listed in the checklist. The way of fillingin is explained according to the following instructions: ·Checklist for visual material. In order to fill it out, photographs, drawings, paintings, wall posters, different symbols (such as flags, coats of arms, logos) and other visual materials displayed in the places listed in the handout (principals office, teachers lounge etc.) should be observed. The content of each displayed visual material is registered in the checklist separately (ex. yearbook poster of students graduated in the school year 2009/2010, picture of Goce Delcev, drawing of Mother Theresa, the flag of the country, advertisement for a karate club...) for each of the listed places in the school, and if possible, it should be listed to which ethnic community it refers or which ethnic community finds that visual material closer or more significant. It is done by using abbreviations (MAC, ALB, ROM etc.). If the visual material is relevant to all, a special word (ALL) is used. At the bottom of the table (in Total) the sums for each ethnic community are calculated separately, as well as those that refer to all ethnic communities. 42
  • Handout for participants: Checklist for visual material Ethnic Place Content community Principals office Teachers lounge Office of the school pedagogue/psychologist Corridor outside the administrative offices Corridor outside the classrooms PROJECT WORKSHOPS School entrance and hall at the entrance Four classrooms with different languages of instruction Library Total 44
  • ·Checklist for textual material. In order to fill out this checklist, the songs, essays, quotations, thoughts, advertising and other written messages displayed in the places listed in the handout (principals office, teachers lounge etc.) should be read. First, the language the text was written in is registered in the checklist (using abbreviations: ALB, MAC, TUR etc.), and after that the content of the displayed written material is registered (ex. a thought about learning, an advertisement for a karate club…) for each of the listed places in the school. If possible, the ethnic community it refers to or finds that written material closer or more significant is listed (again by using abbreviations), and if the written material is relevant to all, a special word (ALL) is used. At the bottom of the table (in Total) the sums for each language and for each ethnic community are calculated separately (as well as those that refer to all ethnic communities)........................................................................................... ·Checklist for labels. It is filled out by registering how each room in the school has been labeled – in which language/s the labels are written: if they are written in one (which one) or more (which) languages. If they are written in two or more languages it is registered which language is written first, which second etc. At the bottom of the table (in Total) it is listed how many times in total the one, the other or possibly the third language appeared as first in all reviewed labels in the school. ·Checklist for gender. In order to fill out this checklist, the photographs, drawings, paintings and wall posters that illustrate well-known or neutral people should be observed so as to see where male, and where female characters, have been displayed. The content of the displayed visual material is first registered in the checklist (ex. picture of Goce Delcev, drawing of Mother Theresa, wall poster with three male karate masters...) for each of the listed places in the school, and after that it is registered how many female and male characters have been represented in that content. At the bottom of the table (in Total) the sums of male and female characters presented in the visual material in the school are calculated.After the task is explained, all groups receive one copy of the handout for participants: Planning ofthe activities. In order to fill it out, first the participants in every group need to agree how many ofthem will go to the listed places, but there is one condition: the group has to be always ethnicallymixed/balanced. After that they need to agree who will visit which place and their names are written PROJECT WORKSHOPSin the section titled responsible for the realization of the task (it should be noted that oneparticipant in one group can be a member of more such small subgroups). The listed responsiblepersons agree on the time when they will implement the task and register that in the table underperiod for implementation of the task. In the end, each subgroup needs to take one copy of thechecklist that they need to fill out. Wrap-up activity: The participants are divided into small groups. Each small group should think of a way to pose in front of the other groups so as the other participants could guess what kindof sports team they are representing. After they reach an agreement, one group poses and theothers guess. 43
  • Handout for participants: Checklist for textual material Ethnic Language Content Place community Principals office Teachers lounge Office of the school pedagogue/psychologist Corridor outside the administrative offices Corridor outside the classrooms PROJECT WORKSHOPS School entrance and hall at the entrance Four classrooms with different languages of instruction Library Total 45
  • Handout for participants: Checklist for labels PLACE Language/ languages Order of the languages Principals office Teachers lounge Office of the school pedagogue/psychologist Other administrative offices Classrooms School entrance PROJECT WORKSHOPS Busts, monuments, memorials Library Written first in __________ language in total Written first in __________ language in total Written first in __________ language in total 46
  • Handout for participants: Checklist for gender Place Content Female Male Principals office Teachers lounge Office of the school pedagogue/psychologist Corridor outside the administrative offices Corridor outside the classrooms PROJECT WORKSHOPS School entrance and hall at the entrance Four classrooms with different languages of instruction Library Total 47
  • Handout for participants: Planning of the activities Team from the school _______________________________ from ______________ Team members: __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ TASK: Checking the place RESPONSIBLE for the realization PERIOD for implementation of the of the task: task: 1.Principals office 2.Teachers lounge 3.Office of the school pedagogue/psychologist PROJECT WORKSHOPS 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 48
  • WORKSHOP V.3.2: PRESENTATION OF THE RESULTS FROM THE RESEARCH Materials: ·handouts from the previous workshop (filled out by each group) ·flipchart paper ·paper ·markers ·tape ·camera (or mobile phone with a camera) ·printer Main activity: The facilitators give the groups that were formed in the previous workshop for scanning the school previously prepared flipchart paper on which the checklist from each groupis copied separately. The participants register the answers they have reached for each category inthese checklists. After that each group presents the results prepared in this way. Discussion: Conclusion: 1.What is the textual and visual material in the school like? Are all It is desirable for the visual and textualcommunities represented in it?.......... .......... material in the school to be balanced, to refer2.Is there an equal representation of male and to all communities that attend that school, andfemale characters?............ ............... to both boys and girls. If the instruction in the3.Is some of the languages more frequently school is delivered in at least two languages, itpresent or is more frequently written first? is important for the labels to be bilingual and toWhat does that imply?............... ...................? make sure that no language is given a priority4.Are you satisfied with the way and how much because ONLY in that way the message that all are equal and respected is sent. PROJECT WORKSHOPSthe different communities are represented?5.Are you satisfied with the way and how much Note: if a misbalance in the visual or textualmale and female characters are represented? material is observed, it is very important NOT to look for the people accountable or responsible for that situation. It is important to Wrap-up activity: recognize the existent situation as a A photograph is taken of each precondition for undertaking actions for its group separately. In the end a improvement.photograph is taken of all groups together.If possible, the photographs are printed and exhibited in a visible place and/or are uploaded to theschool web page. 49
  • WORKSHOP V.3.3: IDEAS FOR CHANGE Materials: ·paper ·flipchart paper ·writing set ·markers ·chalk and board ·camera (or a mobile phone with a camera) Introductory activity: Everyone stands in a circle and two volunteers are first asked to have a look at the participants well, and then to go out of the room while other two participants areexchanging parts of their clothes (jacket, vest, sweater, or something else that is easily taken offand would not make them feel uncomfortable), shoes, or jewelry that could be more easily noticed.The goal is, when the volunteers come back in the room, to jointly guess, from three tries, whichparticipants have made an exchange. When they guess right, or have tried three times already, theparticipants who made the exchange go outside to prepare for guessing, while other twoparticipants in the room make the new exchange of clothes/shoes/jewelry. The activity can berepeated once or twice more. Main activity: Groups of four or five participants are formed and each group has to offer ideas how to design the visual and textual material in the school so that it would show that thereis a multicultural atmosphere in the school, which ensures equal treatment of all ethniccommunities present in the school, and of both boys and girls....................................................After the group work is finished, the ideas are presented in front of the whole group. The facilitators PROJECT WORKSHOPSwrite them on the board and at the end they help assess how much each of the ideas can beimplemented. Those ideas that are assessed as possible are separated and a delegation from thewhole group (ethnically and gender balanced) is assigned to present them as suggestions forchange in front of the school management and administration. Wrap-up activity: A relaxed atmosphere is created and the participants are called to come up to the board spontaneously, whenever they feel like it, to write on the board, in several wordsor sentences, something from the socialization or the work on this project activity that they liked.In the end, pictures can be taken of the participants and/or the messages on the board, or if thefacilitators want to keep the messages, the same activity can be done on several sheets of flipchartpaper put on several desks throughout the classroom. It is recommended at the end to read themaloud (and simultaneously translate them, if necessary) and to give a big round of applause. 50
  • BIBLIOGRAPHYIn this manual are used adapted materials previously designed by the experts team of theCenter for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution for the needs of different educational programs:Petroska-Beshka, V. (2002). Abra – mir – dabra, Peace education, 1 and 2. (manual for internal use).UNICEF in collaboration with the Center for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution.Petroska-Beshka, V., Najcevska, M. and Popovski, M. (1999). Appreciating Differences.(manual forimplementers).Ethnic Conflict Resolution Project – Faculty of Philosophy, Skopje.Petroska-Beshka, V., Popovski, M. and Abdulai, J. (1997). Understanding the Conflicts.(manual forimplementers. Ethnic Conflict Resolution Project – Faculty of Philosophy, Skopje. 51