Key trends on children in the CEECIS
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Key trends on children in the CEECIS

on

  • 1,902 views

An information system monitoring the situation of women and children in CEECIS. ...

An information system monitoring the situation of women and children in CEECIS.

TransMONEE provides trends against common and comparible benchmarks across the following 28 countries since 1989. Annual updates can be seen at this dedicated web-based database www.transmonee.org and its user-friendly version www.moneeinfo.org.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,902
Views on SlideShare
1,177
Embed Views
725

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

4 Embeds 725

http://unjobs.org 442
http://www.unicef.org 254
http://webcms.unicef.org 28
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Key trends on children in the CEECIS Key trends on children in the CEECIS Presentation Transcript

  • TRANSMONEE-2012 DATABASE Key trends on children in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia in graphs Prepared by the UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS
  • SHRINKING CHILD POPULATION: Opportunity for improved services for children? Child Dependency RatioRatio of population aged 0-14 to population aged 15-59, per cent 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 Source: TransMonEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.
  • SOME COUNTRIES ARE STILL LAGGING BEHIND THE ‘NORM’ FOR PRE-PRIMARY EDUCATION IN RELATION TO GDP Pre-primary enrolment rate in relation to GDP, 2010/11 100 Bel R² = 0.483 90 Hun Slo Lat Est 80 Mol Rom Rus Cze Ukr BulPre-primary enrolment rate Lit 70 Pol Svk Cro 60 Ser Alb Kaz 50 Geo Mon 40 Need to pay increased attention to pre- Arm primary coverage with a focus on 30 TFYROM disparities. Uzb Tuk Aze 20 Kyr BiH 10 Taj 0 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 GDP per capita, PPPSource: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.a. For Tajikistan, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kazakhstan, Albania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Russian Federation enrolment data are for 3-5 years oldb. For Albania and Slovakia the enrolment data are for 2009/10, while for Georgia, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan the data are for 2006/07.
  • THE NUMBER OF CHILDREN LEFT WITHOUT PARENTAL CARE HAS CONTINUED TO DECREASE IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UKRAINE AND TAJIKISTAN Children left without parental care during the year 500 40,000 fewer children were left without 450 parental care in the rate per 100,000 children aged 0-17 Russian Federation in 400 2010 when compared to five years ago. 350 However, still 150,000 children were left 300 without parental care in 2010 in CEECIS countries ( 250 based on data for 17 countries). 200 150 Moreover, in some 100 countries such as Tajikistan, this decrease 50 was accompanied by an increase in the number of 0 children in infant homes suggesting that younger 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 children have become Belarus Russian Federation Ukraine particularly vulnerable. Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan TajikistanSource: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.
  • CHILDREN ARE LEFT WITHOUT PARENTAL CARE FOR DIFFERENT REASONS THAT GO BEYOND ORPHANHOOD Children left without parental care by causes, 2010100%90%80%70%60%50%40%30%20%10% 0% BiH Kazakhstan Moldova Hungary FYROM Belarus Serbia Other causes Parents temporary unable to care for the child reasons why children are left without Abandonment or Relinquishment by the parents Deprivation of parental rights parental care can vary greatly from Orphan children one country to another...Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.
  • THE TOTAL NUMBER OF CHILDREN PLACED IN ALL FORMS OF CARE HAS STABILISED Children in residential care and in the care of foster parents or guardians in 19 countries of CEECIS 2500rate per 100,000 children aged 0-17 2000 but the gap between use of family type care and residential care has remained stable as well 1500 1000 Residential care Foster or guardian care Total in formal care 500 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS. a. Children in residential care include children in infant homes, in orphanages, in boarding homes and schools for children without parental care or poor children, disabled children in boarding schools and homes, family-type homes, SOS villages, etc. Children in punitive institutions are normally excluded. Definitions may differ among countries. b. Foster parents are obliged to take care of the child personally. Guardian has the same rights as foster parents, but he is obliged to take care of the child personally and to replace fully the care of parents.
  • MORE CHILDREN IN FAMILY BASED CARE THAN BEFORE, BUT INSTITUTIONALISATION CONTINUES TO BE WIDESPREAD Rate of children aged 0-17 living in residential public care institutions or in foster/guardian care in selected countries, 1989, 2000, 2005 and 2010 3000 Foster/guardian careper 100,000 population aged 0-17 2500 Residential care 2000 1500 1000 500 0 2005 2010 2000 2005 1989 2000 2005 2010 1990 2000 1992 2000 2005 2010 1989 2000 2005 2010 1989 2000 2005 2010 1989 2000 2005 2010 1989 2010 1990 2000 2005 Czech Republic Lithuania Romania Belarus Russia Ukraine Azerbaijan KyrgyzstanSource: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.Notes on residential carea. Czech Republic: data on residential care include establishments of institutional and protective education, where are placed children aged 0-14, after hearing a lawsuit.b. Lithuania: data on residential care include boarding special schools and 18 years and older residing in child care institutions.c. Romania: data on child care institutions include children 18 years and older residing in institutions.d. Data on residential care include children living in boarding schools in Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Kyrgyzstan and Azerbaijan.Notes on foster/guardian caree. Romania: data on foster care refer to children cared by maternal assistants. Due to changes in the system, data since 2000 are not comparable with those reffering to the earlier period.f. Data for year 1989 for Belarus, Russia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan refer to guardian care only.g. Kyrgyzstan: data refer to guardian care only (guardians usually are grandparents or close relatives (about 80%).
  • CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES ARE USUALLY THE LAST GROUP OF CHILDREN TO BE CONSIDERED FOR ALTERNATIVE CARE Children with and without disabilities in residential care, 2010 90,000 80,000 In some countries, children with disabilities represent a large proportion of all children in residential care. Only 70,000 in the Russian Federation, about 140,000 children with disabilities (almost every second child) live in 60,000 residential care.Number of children 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Number of other children Number of children with disabilities Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS. Data for Albania is for 2009
  • WHERE APPROPRIATE POLICIES ARE UNDERTAKEN, CHILDREN UNDER THREE CAN BE PREVENTED FROM GETTING INTO INFANT HOMES Children in infant homes and child population 0-3 in 16 countries, 2001-2010 41000 15500000 400 Number of children in infant homes 39000 15000000 350 2001 2010Number of children in infant homes 300 Number of child population 0-3 14500000 37000 250 14000000 35000 200 13500000 150 33000 13000000 100 31000 50 12500000 29000 0 12000000 BiH FYROM Tajikistan 27000 11500000 25000 11000000 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Fewer children in infant homes in the region than five years ago (based on the data for 16 countries). Children in infant homes However, in BiH, FYROM and Tajikistan, the number Population number at the age 0-3 years of children in infant homes has still been on the rise. Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS. Data for BiH refer to children at age 0-10 residing in public and non-public institutions.
  • YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT IS TWICE AS HIGH AS TOTAL UNEMPLOYMENTannual average per cent of labour force from the relevant age group Annual unemployment rate in CEECIS countries in 2010 (based on LFS) 60 Total Among 15-24 year olds 50 40 30 20 10 0 Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS. a. Data for Tajikistan refer to 2009 and for Albania to 2008.
  • IN MOST COUNTRIES MORE YOUNG PEOPLE ARE UNEMPLOYED SINCE THE START OF THE CRISISannual average per cent of labour force from the relevant age group Annual unemployment rate among 15-24 years old in CEECIS countries in 2007- 70 2010 (based on LFS) 2007 2008 2009 2010 60 In 5 countries, youth unemployment 50 rate went above 30 percent over the last 2 years. 40 30 20 10 0 Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.
  • HIGH SUICIDE RATES AMONG 15-19 YEAR OLD ADOLOSCENTS Suicide rate by sex among 15-19 year old, 2010 30 Male Female death per 100,000 relevant population 25 20 15 10 5 0Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.Data for Poland and Montenegro are for 2009.
  • MORTALITY FROM EXTERNAL CAUSES REMAINS HIGH IN SOME COUNTRIES Mortality rate due to external causes among 15-19 year olds by gender, average for 2008-2010 120 Males 100 External causes of mortality include Females accidents, suicides, medical misadventures or abnormal 80 reactions, homicide etc. 60 40 20 0Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.a. Data for Poland, Albania and Montenegro refer to average for 2007-2009.b. Data for 2007-2009 are not available for Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan.
  • FOR CHILDREN IN CONFLICT WITH LAW, THE DURATION OF IMPRISONMENT REMAINS LONG IN SOME COUNTRIES Duration of juvenile imprisonment sentences in selected CEE/CIS countries, average for 2008-2010 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% More than 5 years From 3 to 5 years From 1 to 3 years Up to 1 yearSource: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.
  • NON-MARITAL BIRTHS ARE INCREASING AND... Proportion of non-marital births in selected CEE/CIS countries, 1989-2010 70 Czech Republic Hungary Poland 60 Slovakia Slovenia 50 Estonia Latviaper cent of total live births Lithuania 40 Bulgaria Romania Croatia 30 Montenegro Serbia TFYR Macedonia 20 Belarus Moldova Russian Federation 10 Ukraine Armenia Kazakhstan 0 Kyrgyzstan 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.
  • IT IS PARTICULARLY DRAMATIC FOR ADOLESCENT MOTHERS Non-marital births to mothers under age 20 100per cent of live births to mothers under age 20 1990 2010 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS. a. Data for 1990 for Romania refer to 1993.
  • Russian Federation Ukraine 57,214 ALARMING HIV TRENDS Annual New HIV cases, 2004-2010 28,371 20,521 5,000 12,175 Especially, in the Russian Federation and Ukraine. 2004 2010 4,000Annual New HIV cases 3,000 Uzbekistan 2,000 Kazakhstan Belarus 1,000 Kyrgyzstan Moldova 0 Tajikistan 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source: TransMONEE 2012 Database, UNICEF Regional Office for CEECIS.
  • TRANSMONEE CONTINUES TO MONITOR THE SITUATION INCENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE AND COMMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES.