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Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013
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Commission follow up - Johannesburg Meeting, February 2013

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  • The key question for all of us is “What can we do to change the course of the global HIV epidemic”?Are we going to pursue business as usual, allowing new infections to plateau and slowly increase again, beyond 7,400 a day?Are we going to pursue rapid scale-up of all the public health interventions at our disposal? Or are we also going to pursue structural change – changes to the overall environment that can make prevention and care more effective? Structural change – including to law and law enforcement – is not a panacea or a magic bullet. Nevertheless, it is undoubtedly one of the most effective and under-utilized tools at our disposal. - something about cost efficeinecyCurrent Trends:Coverage of key interventions continues to expand to 2015 as it has in the past few years. As a result some countries achieve universal access for some services but not others and some countries do not achieve universal access by 2015. Across all interventions coverage reaches about two-thirds of universal access targets by 2015 and then remains at those levels after 2015.
  • The Commission’s work reveals that evidence-based laws and practices firmly grounded in human rights do exist, and are powerful instruments for challenging stigma, promoting public health, and protecting human rights. The benefits are felt beyond HIV responses to encompass health and development outcomes more broadly.
  • Citing Commission recommendations, examples of such work include preparation of FAQs for Country Offices critiquing attempts to criminalise clients of sex workers in Kyrgyzstan; a similar exercise for attempts to criminalise same sex marriage in NigeriaA note was prepared suggesting a modified version of the dialogue driven, consultative and constructive Commission RD process to ensure involvement of KPs in devising the Concept Note and other country proposal processes for piloting the NFMThis is to take place in March (Brazil). As faculty at a training of civil society activists organised by Sexuality Policy Watch – to present and examine the Commission’s processes and how different dimensions did (or did not) foster legal and policy change for sexuality rightsOngoing. This exercise will sharpen knowledge on legal and policy responses that are required and best suited to address violence & discrimination against KP
  • GBV and HIV: UNDP collaborates with civil society, government and UN partners to strengthen attention to gender-based violence and integrate men and boys as partners for gender equality in in national HIV plans and other critical policies.Commission findings stressed the need to remove legal barriers that impede women’s access to sexual and reproductive health services, as well as broader initiatives around laws that discriminate (de facto or de jure) against women and girls living with and affected by HIV. This includes work with international and regional bodies, such as the CEDAW Committee, SAARC and the AU.Legal empowerment and rights: UNDP promotes the rights of women and girls, including key affected women and girls (such as sex workers, female drug users, etc.) to and supports advocacy for legal reform, including reform in the context of parallel or plural legal systems, engaging formal and informal justice mechanisms
  • Example the case of the criminalisation of sex work in Kyrgyzstan.From the process of the Global Commission on HIV and the Law, UNDP has built strong relationships with various resource persons on the topic of HIV, law and human rights. UNDP has compiled a list of these high-level persons, experts, and activists in a roster available depending on the specific need.
  • UNDP HQ is developing global policy and normative tools and guidance to support the implementation of the Commission’s findings and recommendations. UNDP is working on various guidance documents on normative aspects related to Commission follow up. These include:
  • Teamworks space of the Global Commission on HIV and the Law, launched on 24 September 2012. The space is a platform where colleagues can access and share knowledge, tools and experiences related to Commission follow up. A wide array of  technical/policy resources  have been generated through the Commission’s work, including FAQs, technical papers, selected bibliographies, national dialogue guidance, action plans, agendas, presentations, ToRs, proposals etc. The ‘Commission Follow Up Materials’ section has been created to help colleagues in accessing these materials. Of special note is the ‘Resource Library’ section where all issue briefs, regional dialogue reports, media articles etc. are available.
  • Mention the US launch
  • Transcript

    • 1. Source: Cost and Finance Working Group, aids2031 (across 139 countries) • • – – – • • •
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