May, 2011 Zadar GENDER EQUALITY IN  ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF NHRIs Louise Sperl
OUTLINE OF PRESENTATION   <ul><li>Why gender equality matters to the work of NHRIs? </li></ul><ul><li>Why gender matters i...
WHY GENDER MATTERS TO THE WORK OF  NHRIs <ul><li>NHRIs’ mandated to promote & protect human rights </li></ul><ul><li>Conve...
WHY GENDER MATTERS IN STRATEGIC PLANNING & COMMUNICATIONS <ul><li>Policies/procedures/strategies may impact differently on...
MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>A.) Participatory & Inclusive Planning Processes </li></ul><ul><li>Ma...
MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>B.) Mainstreaming Gender into a Situation Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>...
MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>B.) Mainstreaming Gender into a Situation Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>...
MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>C.) Assessing the potential impact from a gender perspective </li></u...
MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>D.) Defining gender-sensitive indicators & targets </li></ul><ul><li>...
EN-GENDERING COMMUNICATION <ul><ul><ul><li>Considering a “Gendered Public” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Using a gen...
<ul><li>Thank you for your attention! </li></ul><ul><li>Contact:  [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>http://europeandcis.un...
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Gender Equality in Organizational Development of National Human Rights Institutions

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UNDP presentation, Louise Sperl, Zadar Croatia, May 2011

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Gender Equality in Organizational Development of National Human Rights Institutions

  1. 1. May, 2011 Zadar GENDER EQUALITY IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF NHRIs Louise Sperl
  2. 2. OUTLINE OF PRESENTATION <ul><li>Why gender equality matters to the work of NHRIs? </li></ul><ul><li>Why gender matters in strategic planning and communications? </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstreaming gender into strategic planning </li></ul><ul><li>En-gendering Communications </li></ul>
  3. 3. WHY GENDER MATTERS TO THE WORK OF NHRIs <ul><li>NHRIs’ mandated to promote & protect human rights </li></ul><ul><li>Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW): promotes and protects women’s human rights </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstreaming gender into strategic plans and communication plans of NHRIs: </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances NHRIs’ credibility as institutions tasked to promote & protect human rights </li></ul>
  4. 4. WHY GENDER MATTERS IN STRATEGIC PLANNING & COMMUNICATIONS <ul><li>Policies/procedures/strategies may impact differently on men and women </li></ul><ul><li>Gender mainstreaming as important tool to make sure strategic planning and communications respond to existing gender inequalities, </li></ul><ul><li>taking into account different needs and situations of men and women (as potential clients of NHRIs, providers/audiences and subjects of communications) </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances credibility as a human rights institution </li></ul>
  5. 5. MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>A.) Participatory & Inclusive Planning Processes </li></ul><ul><li>Makes sure that those who have a stake are being heard </li></ul><ul><li>Some guiding questions: </li></ul><ul><li>Who are the key stakeholders and decision-makers? </li></ul><ul><li>To which extent are women involved? </li></ul><ul><li>What specific knowledge and skills can different </li></ul><ul><li>stakeholders contribute, including gender expertise? </li></ul><ul><li>To which extent are women/relevant institutions and </li></ul><ul><li>CSOs consulted for planning purposes? </li></ul><ul><li>Where is gender expertise available? </li></ul>
  6. 6. MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>B.) Mainstreaming Gender into a Situation Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Can assist in identifying power relations that define how men and women are able to exercise their rights </li></ul><ul><li>Provides insights into causal factors underlying human rights violations </li></ul><ul><li>Can point to existing inequalities </li></ul>
  7. 7. MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>B.) Mainstreaming Gender into a Situation Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Situation analysis – potential guiding questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What are the issues at stake and how do they impact on women and men? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the needs of women and men? </li></ul><ul><li>What information do we have and what information is missing that would provide a gender perspective (e.g. policy reviews/legal reviews/mapping from a gender perspective? </li></ul>
  8. 8. MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>C.) Assessing the potential impact from a gender perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Potential guiding questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What is the goal of the strategic plan? Does the goal address the needs and concerns of both women and men? </li></ul><ul><li>What benefits will it bring to both women and men? </li></ul><ul><li>How do both male and female stakeholders perceive the option in terms of costs, benefits, acceptability and practicality? </li></ul><ul><li>What may be the wider consequences of failing to adopt a gender-sensitive approach? (e.g, not reaching out to potential clients etc) </li></ul>
  9. 9. MAINSTREAMING GENDER INTO STRATEGIC PLANNING <ul><li>D.) Defining gender-sensitive indicators & targets </li></ul><ul><li>Important element to make sure plans and programmes are </li></ul><ul><li>indeed gender-responsive </li></ul><ul><li>(“What is being measured is more likely to be done”) </li></ul><ul><li>All indicators should be disaggregated by sex wherever </li></ul><ul><li>possible </li></ul><ul><li>Ideally, gender-sensitive indicators include both qualitative </li></ul><ul><li>and quantitative indicators </li></ul>
  10. 10. EN-GENDERING COMMUNICATION <ul><ul><ul><li>Considering a “Gendered Public” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Using a gender perspective when designing communication </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>strategies </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Should highlight the different ways in which men and women </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>respond to different messages </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Potential guiding questions: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do men and women read different publications? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do men and women watch or listen to different electronic </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>media? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Are media consumption patterns (frequency, time) different </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>for men and women? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do men and women have different credibility criteria </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li> (regarding “authorities”, arguments used, etc) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do men and women have different values that cause them </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>to respond to certain messages in different ways? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Thank you for your attention! </li></ul><ul><li>Contact: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>http://europeandcis.undp.org/gender </li></ul>

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