©CatHolloway/WWF-Canon
• Sustainable Consumption & Production
• Voluntary Certification of Commodities
• WWF‟s Experience in Australia
Outline
-28%
Global Living Planet Index (LPI)
WWF/ZSL, 2012
Ecological footprint by component (1961-2008)
Global Footprint Network, 2011
2/07/2013 - 5
Major drivers of biodiversity loss
Source: Rethinking Global Biodiversity Strategies: Exploring structural changes in prod...
2/07/2013 - 7
Deforestation
85% Agriculture & Ranching
10% Logging, Pulp & Paper
2/07/2013 - 8
2/07/2013 - 9
Largest source
of pollution
2/07/2013 - 10
2/07/2013 - 11
2/07/2013 - 12
87% of fisheries fully exploited
or overfished
100% sustainable sourcing of paper products
100% sustainable sourcing of all agricultural raw
materials by 2020
Committed ...
Mature Developing Emerging
How to prove that raw materials are sourced
sustainably? The role of voluntary standards
0
20,000,000
40,000,000
60,000,000
80,000,000
100,000,000
120,000,000
140,000,000
160,000,000
180,000,000
200,000,000
FSC ...
MSC labelled seafood products currently available to consumers
Source: MSC
What are the results? (2)
Ecological Footprint by country
Global Footprint Network, 2011
Market transformation in Australia:
Corporate partnerships
Wild Caught Seafood Aquaculture Beef Sugar Forest Products Palm...
• Soil erosion & degradation
• Loss of natural habitats &
agro-biodiversity
• Over use of fresh water
• Excessive use of a...
Issues of concern:
• Labourrights of cane cutters and mill employees
• Mechanization of harvesting leading to redundancy o...
Includes:
• Production standard (2011)
• Chain of custody standard (mass balance)
Basic principles:
1. Obey the law
2. Res...
2/07/2013 - 22
Annual production of 30-35 million tonnes on
over 400,000 ha, worth around AU$2 billion.
95% of sugar produ...
Sugar farming
poses major
risks to Great
Barrier Reef
Source: Great Barrier Outlook Report
2009, Chapter 8, “Risks to the ...
WWF Goal: 20% adoption of best management practice by
producers in the Great Barrier Reef catchments, by 2016.
WWF approac...
• Who bears the cost of sustainable production?
• How to reduce the costs of certification / chain of custody?
• What are ...
WWF is in over
100 countries, on
5 continents
+100
WWF was founded
in 1961
1961
WWF has over
5,000 staff
worldwide
+5,000
...
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Joshua Bishop, WWF Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13

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Joshua Bishop from WWF Australia presented at the UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar held on 27 June 2013 hosted by Russell Kennedy, Melbourne.

Held in support of the United Nations 10 Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns, the seminar brought together experts and practitioners from across business, government and civil society to provide a platform for shared learning on integrating sustainable consumption and production measures throughout business operations, relationships and value chains.

Guest Speakers and Panelists:
- Tim Grant, Director, Life Cycle Strategies
- Joshua Bishop, National Manager – Markets, Sustainability and Business Partnerships, WWF Australia
- Craig Chester, Operations Manager Australia, Fairtrade Australia and New Zealand
- Liam Smith, Director, BehaviourWorks Australia, Monash Sustainability Institute
- Clinton Squires, Australian Managing Director, Interface

More information available at: http://www.unaavictoria.org.au/education-advocacy/masterclasses/sustainable-consumption-and-production-seminar/

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  • The global LPI continues to show a decline of about 30 per cent (-28%) between 1970 and 2008. This is based on trends in 9,014 populations of 2,688 mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian and fish species – many more than in any previous edition of the Living Planet Report.
  • The Ecological Footprint, in partnership with GFN, tells us why:Footprint has doubled since 1966. In 2008, the most recent year for which data are available, the footprint exceeded the Earth’s biocapacity – the area of land and productive oceans actually available to produce renewable resources and absorb CO2 emissions – by more than 50 per cent.Our current overshoot is largely due to carbon emissions: and has grown 11-fold since 1961. The largest component of the Ecological Footprint is the carbon footprint (55%). At a national level the carbon footprint represents more than half the Ecological Footprint for one-quarter of the countries tracked. It is the largest component for approximately half the countries tracked
  • An individual’s Ecological Footprint varies significantly depending on a number of factors, including their country of residence, the quantity of goods and services they consume, the resources used and the wastes generated to provide these goods and services. This comparison includes all countries with populations greater than 1 million for which complete data are available.
  • Joshua Bishop, WWF Australia - Presentation UNAA Sustainable Consumption and Production Seminar 27.6.13

    1. 1. ©CatHolloway/WWF-Canon
    2. 2. • Sustainable Consumption & Production • Voluntary Certification of Commodities • WWF‟s Experience in Australia Outline
    3. 3. -28% Global Living Planet Index (LPI) WWF/ZSL, 2012
    4. 4. Ecological footprint by component (1961-2008) Global Footprint Network, 2011
    5. 5. 2/07/2013 - 5
    6. 6. Major drivers of biodiversity loss Source: Rethinking Global Biodiversity Strategies: Exploring structural changes in production and consumption to reduce biodiversity loss. © Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), The Hague/Bilthoven, 2010 MSA - Mean Species Abundance
    7. 7. 2/07/2013 - 7 Deforestation 85% Agriculture & Ranching 10% Logging, Pulp & Paper
    8. 8. 2/07/2013 - 8
    9. 9. 2/07/2013 - 9 Largest source of pollution
    10. 10. 2/07/2013 - 10
    11. 11. 2/07/2013 - 11
    12. 12. 2/07/2013 - 12 87% of fisheries fully exploited or overfished
    13. 13. 100% sustainable sourcing of paper products 100% sustainable sourcing of all agricultural raw materials by 2020 Committed to trading 100% sustainable palm oil by 2015, in US/EU, and globally by 2020 100% of top 20 wild-caught seafood products are sourced from sustainable fisheries, or from fisheries on a pathway to sustainability, by 2015 Corporate commitment to sustainable sourcing (a few examples)
    14. 14. Mature Developing Emerging How to prove that raw materials are sourced sustainably? The role of voluntary standards
    15. 15. 0 20,000,000 40,000,000 60,000,000 80,000,000 100,000,000 120,000,000 140,000,000 160,000,000 180,000,000 200,000,000 FSC certified area by forest zone (hectares) Sub-/Tropical Temperate Boreal What are the results?
    16. 16. MSC labelled seafood products currently available to consumers Source: MSC What are the results? (2)
    17. 17. Ecological Footprint by country Global Footprint Network, 2011
    18. 18. Market transformation in Australia: Corporate partnerships Wild Caught Seafood Aquaculture Beef Sugar Forest Products Palm Oil
    19. 19. • Soil erosion & degradation • Loss of natural habitats & agro-biodiversity • Over use of fresh water • Excessive use of agro- chemicals (fertilizers & pesticides) • Discharge and runoff of polluted effluent and air pollution Environmental impacts of sugar production
    20. 20. Issues of concern: • Labourrights of cane cutters and mill employees • Mechanization of harvesting leading to redundancy of cane cutters • Low productivity and income of small-scale farmers • Land and water conflicts - especially in expansion areas Countries mainly affected: Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Honduras, India, Malawi, Pakistan, P araguay, South Africa Social issues in sugar
    21. 21. Includes: • Production standard (2011) • Chain of custody standard (mass balance) Basic principles: 1. Obey the law 2. Respect human rights and labourstandards 3. Manage input, production and processing efficiencies to enhance sustainability 4. Actively manage biodiversity and ecosystem services 5. Continuously improve key areas of the business Bonsucro standards
    22. 22. 2/07/2013 - 22 Annual production of 30-35 million tonnes on over 400,000 ha, worth around AU$2 billion. 95% of sugar produced in Australia is grown in Queensland and about 5% in northern New South Wales, along 2,100 km of coastline. 80% of production is exported, mainly to South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia and Japan. Around 4,000 farming enterprises, most owned by sole proprietors or family partnerships, although corporate ownership of farms is increasing. Sugarcane in Australia
    23. 23. Sugar farming poses major risks to Great Barrier Reef Source: Great Barrier Outlook Report 2009, Chapter 8, “Risks to the Reef” (http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/__data/as sets/pdf_file/0017/3905/GBRMPA_O RCH8.pdf)
    24. 24. WWF Goal: 20% adoption of best management practice by producers in the Great Barrier Reef catchments, by 2016. WWF approach: Towards sustainable sugar in Australia • Validate improved practices at farm level (Project Catalyst) • Support industry-led Best Management Practices (BMPs) • Government funding to develop and promote improved practices (e.g. Reef Rescue) • Market recognition for growers and millers who move towards Bonsucro accreditation • Research and development
    25. 25. • Who bears the cost of sustainable production? • How to reduce the costs of certification / chain of custody? • What are the social & environmental impacts of certification? • How to strengthen the business case for sustainable production? Especially in developing countries? • What role can/should governments play? • How to go beyond the „conscious‟ consumer? • What potential beyond consumer goods markets? • How to broaden the scope of certification to embrace ecosystem services (carbon, water, biodiversity)? Questions and challenges...
    26. 26. WWF is in over 100 countries, on 5 continents +100 WWF was founded in 1961 1961 WWF has over 5,000 staff worldwide +5,000 WWF has over 5 million supporters +5m Photo: © Michel Roggo / WWF-Canon wwf.org.au Thank you

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