Global Food Security and
Sustainable Agriculture
Setting the Scene

Jim Woodhill – Principal Sector Specialist Food Securi...
Overview

• The context
• Opportunities and challenges
• Framing the transition
• Implications for Australia
Healthy Food – our most basic need
We need to eat the right food
for good health
Too much of the wrong food is
a major hea...
Context: Key Trends

• 2 billion more people by 2050
• At least 70% more food needed
• Urbanisation
• Globalisation of sup...
Context: A Perfect Storm – or Not?

Rising food prices
Infectious diseases
Natural disasters
Climate change

Land Grapping...
Context - Population Dynamics

1960
2050

?
2010

Adapted Gapminder / Hans Gosling
Context - Key Development Facts

• 1 billion people suffer from hunger (58% in Asia)
• 2.7 billion people live on less tha...
Opportunities

• Market growth
• Development of resource smart
technologies
• Healthy food
• Eliminating hunger and malnut...
Challenges

• Transforming small scale-agriculture
• Incentives that drive responsible resource
use
• Mobilising investmen...
Framing - Dimensions of Food Security
Food Security
Why

What

Availability

Global Food
Sector
Productivity

Access

Tran...
Framing - A Rubik's Cube of Agri-Food Innovation

Consumption and
wellbeing
Markets and
distribution
Production and
resour...
Critical Enablers

• Evidence based foresighting and scenario analysis
• Dialogue and partnerships between business,
gover...
Implications For Australia

• Economic and political stability
• Agricultural export opportunities
• Regional business opp...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

UNAA Global Food Security & Sustainable Agriculture Seminar - Jim Woodhill, AusAID

168

Published on

Jim Woodhill, Principal Sector Specialist, Food Security and Rural Development, AusAID, presented at the UNAA Victoria Global Food Security & Sustainable Agriculture Seminar held on Tuesday 29 October in Melbourne.

Held in support of the United Nations Zero Hunger Challenge, in partnership with NAB and the University of Melbourne, this seminar was part of the UNAA Sustainability Leadership Series and sought to build momentum for collective action on food security and sustainable agriculture post Rio +20.

Bringing together experts and practitioners from government, business, civil society, farmers' organisations, research and academia, the seminar sought to provide a platform for shared learning and discussion on Australia's role in addressing the global food security challenge and advancing sustainable agricultural practices.

It highlighted the challenges and opportunities that Australian government, businesses, and NGOs face as they contribute to developing and promoting sustainable food supply chains that increase food production, preserve natural resources and fight hunger at the local, national and global level.

For more information about this seminar and the UNAA Sustainability Leadeship Series please visit www.unaavictoria.org.au/education-advocacy/masterclasses/

Published in: News & Politics, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
168
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

UNAA Global Food Security & Sustainable Agriculture Seminar - Jim Woodhill, AusAID

  1. 1. Global Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture Setting the Scene Jim Woodhill – Principal Sector Specialist Food Security and Rural Development
  2. 2. Overview • The context • Opportunities and challenges • Framing the transition • Implications for Australia
  3. 3. Healthy Food – our most basic need We need to eat the right food for good health Too much of the wrong food is a major health risk Our most basic need Food Producing food can destroy the environment and peoples livelihoods Our food systems are at risk from climate change Agri-food sector growth is a significant economic opportunity
  4. 4. Context: Key Trends • 2 billion more people by 2050 • At least 70% more food needed • Urbanisation • Globalisation of supply • Plateauing yields • Resource degradation and water scarcity • Climate variability and extremes
  5. 5. Context: A Perfect Storm – or Not? Rising food prices Infectious diseases Natural disasters Climate change Land Grapping Food and Nutrition Security Increasing food demand Water scarcity Population growth Urbanisation Obesity Land degradation Ecosystem collapse
  6. 6. Context - Population Dynamics 1960 2050 ? 2010 Adapted Gapminder / Hans Gosling
  7. 7. Context - Key Development Facts • 1 billion people suffer from hunger (58% in Asia) • 2.7 billion people live on less than $2 per day and the same number largely depend on agriculture for their livelihoods • 90% of the worlds 525 million farmers are small scale, they feed 50% of the worlds population • 80 per cent of farmers in Africa are women • 36% of children in Indonesia are malnourished • The annual global spend of development assistance to agriculture is a about 10 billion USD (8%) of ODA or equivalent to 4% of just Australia’s food industry
  8. 8. Opportunities • Market growth • Development of resource smart technologies • Healthy food • Eliminating hunger and malnutrition
  9. 9. Challenges • Transforming small scale-agriculture • Incentives that drive responsible resource use • Mobilising investment • Research and development
  10. 10. Framing - Dimensions of Food Security Food Security Why What Availability Global Food Sector Productivity Access Transforming Rural Economies and small-scale agriculture Utilization Productive Social Protection Measures Healthy, sustainable affordable food (nutrition) Policy and Investment Areas (Public and Private) Business enabling policy environment How Agricultural Inputs Infrastructure Domestic Policy Human Capability Market Access Facilitation Private Sector Investment Efficient Trade Research and Innovation Financial Services Trade and Market Access Advisory Services and Extension Private Sector Investment and engagement Sustainable use of natural resources Equitable access to natural resources Global Public Goods
  11. 11. Framing - A Rubik's Cube of Agri-Food Innovation Consumption and wellbeing Markets and distribution Production and resource use Perspectives Prospects Pathways Political Innovation Institutional Innovation Technological Innovation
  12. 12. Critical Enablers • Evidence based foresighting and scenario analysis • Dialogue and partnerships between business, government, NGOs and research • Innovation brokering • Sustained leadership • Tenure and property rights • Women’s economic empowerment • Efficient markets within a context of good governance that manages externalities
  13. 13. Implications For Australia • Economic and political stability • Agricultural export opportunities • Regional business opportunities • Service and expertise opportunities

×