Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Graham Tupper - TIA - Presentation - UNAA Climate Finance Seminar 29102012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Graham Tupper - TIA - Presentation - UNAA Climate Finance Seminar 29102012

451
views

Published on

Graham Tupper (Director, Transparency International Australia) - Presentation at the United Nations Association of Australia (Victorian Division) Climate Finance: Sustainability with Integrity …

Graham Tupper (Director, Transparency International Australia) - Presentation at the United Nations Association of Australia (Victorian Division) Climate Finance: Sustainability with Integrity Seminar. The seminar, part of the UNAA (Vic) Sustainability Leadership Series, was held in Melbourne on 29 October 2012, in partnership with National Australia Bank.

Building momentum for collective action post-Rio+20, the seminar brought together key players from government, business and civil society to discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with climate finance. In particular, the seminar addressed issues of governance, transparency and accountability for climate finance, key requirements to ensure that climate finance becomes an effective driver of sustainable development.

Expert panel discussion focussed on:

- The Australian Government perspective on climate finance: current priorities, role, contributions, and commitments;
- The global Green Climate Fund (GCF) and Australia's fast-start finance contribution
Issues of transparency and accountability for climate finance governance.
- Investor perspective on climate finance: challenges and opportunities and the role of the investment community.
- Community development perspective on climate finance: achieving sustainable development objectives
- Experiences and opportunities for cross-sector collaboration

Facilitator:

- Rosemary Sainty (Former Head, Secretariat, UN Global Compact Network Australia and Adviser, Corporate Engagement, Transparency International Australia)

Guest Speakers:

- Gregory Andrews (Assistant Secretary, Finance, Forests and Development Branch, International Division, Australian Government Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency)
- Graham Tupper (Director, Transparency International Australia)
- Nathan Fabian (Chief Executive, Investor Group on Climate Change)
- Dr Simon Bradshaw (Climate Change Advocacy Coordinator, Oxfam Australia)

For more information on this or other events in the Sustainability Leadership Series please contact:
United Nations Association of Australia (Vic)
T: (+613) 9670 7878
E: sustainability@unaavictoria.org.au
www.unaavictoria.org.au

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
451
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.       “mani  belong  skai”   Addressing  the  risks  to  climate  finance  integrity Graham TupperTransparency International AustraliaOctober 2012
  • 2. Overview o  High  Stakes  and  Aspects  of  Integrity o  TI  Climate  Governance  Integrity  Program o  Specific  Measures:  Coherence,  Capacity   and  Enforcement o  Examples  of  Tools  and  Resources o  Lessons  from  forests  and  carbon
  • 3. High  Stakes  –  Climate  Governance Scale  of  investment   required  is  huge. Cost  of  public   confidence  being   undermined? The  governance   integrity  challenge   of  the  century!
  • 4. One  aspect  of  the  challenge “Unlike  traditional  commodities,  which   sometime  during  the  course  of  their  market   exchange  must  be  delivered  to  someone  in   physical  form,     the  carbon  market  is  based  on  the  lack  of  delivery,  of  an  invisible  substance,  to  no-­‐‑one”       Mark  Shapiro  “Inside  the  Carbon  Trading  Shell  Game”,  Harpers  Magazine  2010.      
  • 5. TI  Climate  Governance  Integrity  GOAL:     Prevent  corruption  from                                           undermining  climate  goals.   o  Citizen  engagement  so  that  climate   finance  achieves  best  social  and   environmental  benefits. o  Public  and  private  sector  climate  finance   decision  makers  adopt  and  enforce  legally   binding  and  transparent  anti-­‐‑corruption   standards.
  • 6. Aspects  of  Integrity  –  Mutual  Effect o  Government:    Treat  anti-­‐‑corruption  safeguards  as   integral  elements  in  the  design  of  mitigation  and   adaptation  action.   o  Business:  While  going  green,  adhere  to  strong   compliance,  and  anti-­‐‑corruption  regime  –  including  to   commit  adequate  resources  to  accurate  and  publicly   accessible  reporting. o  Civil  Society:    Undertake  independent  oversight  and   monitoring  of  corruption  risks  in  climate  finance  and   build  broad  coalitions  for  integrity  in  climate  finance.   Global  Corruption  Report  on  Climate  Change  2011
  • 7. The  start  of  a  complex  journey
  • 8. Finance  Integrity  Streams Stream  1 o  Public  finance  provided  primarily  by   donor  countries  to  support  climate   change  adaption  and  mitigation  action.   Stream  2 o  Public  finance  to  support  or  leverage   private  sector  investments  in  both   developing  and  developed  countries.
  • 9. TI  Climate  Governance  Integrity   o  Stage  1  (2011-­‐‑13):    Research,  capacity   building,  assessment  of  governance   weaknesses. o  Stage  2  (2012-­‐‑2015):    Implement  strategy   to  address  key  weaknesses  -­‐‑  applying   tools  and  examples  of  leading  practice.
  • 10. Which  tracks  to  take?
  • 11. Coherence  and  finance  tracking o  Donor  governments  harmonise  their  country   assistance  strategies  under  the  leadership  of  the   recipient  country  to  ensure  coherent  support  to     relevant  institutions. o  Recipient  governments  are  required  to  report   on    integration  of  climate  finance  into  national   policy,  planning  and  budgetary  systems. Coherence:    “clearly  connected” “consistent”
  • 12. Capacity  and  finance  management o  Governments  undertake  regular  capacity   assessment  to  ensure  national  entities   established  for  managing  funds  are  equipped   with  the  resources  and  skills  needed  to  fulfil   their  fund  allocation  and  monitoring  roles. o  Capacity  building  programs  which  integrate   proven  anti-­‐‑corruption  measures  to  strengthen     integrity  of  institutions  and  legal  and   regulatory  frameworks. Capacity:    “abilities” “managing    resource  limits”
  • 13. Capacity  indicators  and  tests o  Full  budget  transparency  by  revenue  source   and  sector  at  all  levels  –  national  to  local. o  Climate  finance  plans  and  documents  have  easy   and  timely  access  to  facilitate  meaningful   citizen  engagement. o  Reporting  transparently  on  results  and   outcomes  against  clear  goals  –  verified  with   citizen  engagement.
  • 14. Enforcing  accountability o  Transparent  legal  and  administrative  policies  in   place  which  make  clear  who  decides. o  Citizen  hotlines  to  provide  information  and  to   refer  allegations  of  suspected  unethical   behaviour,  fraud  or  corruption. o  Clear  guidelines  and  independent  mechanism   to  process  complaints  and  investigate   allegations  of  corruption  and  fraud. o  Adequate  protection  for  whistle-­‐‑blowers.  
  • 15. Where  are  we  heading?
  • 16. Citizen  tests  in  plain  language o  Are  budgets  and  plans  publicly  available  and   easy  to  understand? o  Are  local  communities  involved  on  decisions   about  how  money  should  be  spent? o  Are  the  processes  for  monitoring  accountability     of  decision  makers  clear  to  citizens? o  Is  an  independent  body  monitoring  the  work   and  reporting  to  communities? o  Is  there  a  clear  and  trusted  process  to   investigate  allegations  of  fraud  and  corruption?
  • 17. Tools  to  produce  the  product
  • 18. TI  Tools  and  Resources o  Integrity  Pacts o  Development  Pacts o  Anti-­‐‑corruption  Legal  Advice   Centres o  Forest  governance  and  integrity   corruption  risk  assessment  tool
  • 19. Project  Anti-­‐‑Corruption  System  PACS Jointly  developed  tool  by  TI-­‐‑UK  and  Global   Infrastructure  Anti-­‐‑corruption  Centre  (GIACC): Anti-­‐‑corruption  standards  and  templates  for: Independent  assessment,    Transparency,     Procurement,  Pre-­‐‑contract  disclosure,   Project  anti-­‐‑corruption  commitments,     Funder  anti-­‐‑corruption  commitments,   Government  anti-­‐‑corruption  commitments, Compliance,  Audit,  Reporting,  Enforcement.  hEp://www.giaccentre.org/project_anti_corruption_system_home.php
  • 20. Is  it  legal?  Is  it  sustainable?
  • 21. Lessons?      Forests  and  Carbon o  Opportunity:  sustainable   forestry  as  cost-­‐‑effective   carbon  abatement  -­‐‑  income   and  jobs  for  communities. o  Risk  –  “mani  belong  skai”   scams  and  corrosion  of  forest   governance  integrity.
  • 22. More  information www.transparency.org Climate  Governance Integrity  Program TI  Australia www.transparency.org.au

×