Quality of life & opportunities to position parks & recreation

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Quality of life & opportunities to position parks & recreation

  1. 1. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Quality of life & opportunities to position parks & recreation INGRID E. SCHNEIDER, PHD BRIGID TUCK, MS XINYI QIAN, PHD MRPA LEADERSHIP SUMMIT, MAY 2014
  2. 2. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Forest & Natural Resource Mgmt Major Park and Protected Area Management track
  3. 3. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. TOURISM CENTER Vision: – Be the source for tourism education & research Mission/end: – Lead, prepare & support tourism for success & sustainability Outputs: – Educational programs – Educational & research publications – Educational products – Engagement – Research projects with reports/presentations Outcomes: –Informed decisions, educated workforce & engaged communities
  4. 4. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. OUR TRAIL TODAY  Quality of life….  Economic impact…  Festival & events…  Sustainability
  5. 5. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. QUALITY OF LIFE (QOL)
  6. 6. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. 3 STUDY METHODS (SCHNEIDER, GUO, SCHROEDER) Literature review Focus groups Questionnaire
  7. 7. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. METHOD 2, FOCUS GROUPS (N=29)
  8. 8. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. FOCUS GROUP RESULTS: 11 QOL AREAS
  9. 9. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. METHOD 3: QUESTIONNAIRE  Representative sample, 45% response  Quantify QOL & transportation’s role  Importance & satisfaction with performance Northwest Northeast South Central Metro (7 county)
  10. 10. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. MINNESOTANS’ SATISFIED WITH QUALITY OF LIFE
  11. 11. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. QUESTIONNAIRE RESULTS PREVIEW
  12. 12. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE OF QOL AREAS 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Rec and entertainment Local services and amenities Transportation Spirituality faith and serenity Education Environment Employment and finances Housing Family, friends and neighors Safety and security Health Very unimportant Somewhat unimportant Slightly unimportant Neither Slight important Somewhat important Very important
  13. 13. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RELATIONSHIP AMONG 11 QOL AREAS Factor 1 Factor 2 Factor 3 Health Education Local services/ amenities Spirituality, faith & serenity Family/friends Environment Recreation Safety/security Employment Housing Transportation
  14. 14. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTHY PARKS & HEALTHY LIVES  2002 Presidential E.O. 13266: improve citizen health. PA 1 of 4 pillars; led to MOU with DHHS, USDA, USDOI, USACE  National Recreation & Parks Association ‘healthy parks/healthy lives’  “Outdoor alliance for Kids (OAK)” national coalition to get kids outdoors & active – ‘Moving outdoors in nature act’  First Lady’s initiatives – Let’s move (LM Outside; DOI administers) – Get outdoors
  15. 15. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OPPORTUNITIES Lei TransHome Occ
  16. 16. US stats on obesity
  17. 17. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. UFF DA! http://www.health.state.mn.us/cdrr/obesity/index.html
  18. 18. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. LEISURE TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (LTPA) & PARKS  Public parks & trails: important places to facilitate LTPA & improve public health  Park use linked to several physical health outcomes  Motivations  Physical activity common benefit sought by people using parks & trails (Bichis-Lupas & Moisey, 2001; Payne et al., 1999)  Approximately 9 of 10 U.S. citizens participate in outdoor recreation (RoperASW, 2004)  24% of U.S. adults report no leisure time physical activity (CDC, 2008)
  19. 19. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. DISPARITY IN OBESITY & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY  63.0% U.S. adults overweight or obese (CDC, 2007)  72.5% Black  66.8% Hispanic  Inactivity contributing factor – 14% U.S. population is inactive  21.5% Black  22.1% Hispanic – 48% meet the recommended amount of physical activity (CDC, 2008)  40.2% Black  41.1% Hispanic
  20. 20. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESULTS- CONSTRAINTS TO LTPA DIFFERENCES BY RACE/ETHNICITY (SCHNEIDER, WILHELM STANIS, SHINEW, CHAVEZ) Summary:  Hispanic/Latino & Black: most constrained & visitors have BMI > healthy  PROBLEM! Visitors who most need LTPA are most constrained ! 
  21. 21. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RELATIONSHIP AMONG 11 QOL AREAS Factor 1 Factor 2 Factor 3 Health Education Local services/ amenities Spirituality, faith & serenity Family/friends Environment Recreation Safety/security Employment Housing Transportation
  22. 22. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE OF PARKS/REC TO MN IMAGE  Water/lakes/rivers  Fishing…  Hunting..  Scenery…  Parks/trails…  Outdoor activities…  Charming small towns… http://www.exploreminnesota.com/industry-minnesota/research-reports/researchdetails/?nid=168
  23. 23. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. QUALITY OF LIFE (QOL)
  24. 24. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  25. 25. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. A CLOSER LOOK AT PARK/RECREATION ASSETS IN RELATION TO QUALITY OF LIFE & $  Byways  Golf  Festivals/Events
  26. 26. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  27. 27. 150 Scenic Byways in 46 states
  28. 28. Driving as leisure travel  49% drive for pleasure (Cordell et al. in press)  40% travelers use scenic byway (USDOT 2005)
  29. 29. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. BYWAY RELEVANCE: ECONOMIC FLOW
  30. 30. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. BYWAY RELEVANCE: ECONOMIC ROI PRIMARY RESEARCH NEED (WILLIAMS ET AL. 2012)
  31. 31. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. BEYOND $, BYWAY RELEVANCE: LIVABILITY/QUALITY OF LIFE (QOL)
  32. 32. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. PROJECT PURPOSE (SCHNEIDER, LIECHTY, & TUCK) Assess Byway impact on quality of life elements & Economic impact of byway visitors
  33. 33. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. MINNESOTA BYWAYS 6 National 22 designated scenic drives 39 million travelers driving =13% of travel activities (EMT 2007)
  34. 34. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. METHODS –2 STUDY SITES  Paul Bunyan: 54 miles  Nat’l & state  Visitation: ??;  Lake Country: 88 miles  Est. visitation: 250,000
  35. 35. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESIDENTS…RESULTS OVERVIEW  Byway contributes to 8 of 14 important quality of life attributes  4 of 5 most important & contributing similar across Byways  Residents > aware of Byways than visitors
  36. 36. Resident QOL: 4 top contributing attributes similar
  37. 37. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESIDENT QOL: 2 DIFFER IN TOP 5 Lake Country: Paul Bunyan: Events Community amenities
  38. 38. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESIDENT: 6 AREAS BYWAYS NOT PERCEIVED AS CONTRIBUTING TO QOL  Feeling safe  Good jobs for residents  Property value  Diverse economy  Proper zoning  Good public transportation
  39. 39. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESIDENT QOL FINDINGS: SO WHAT?  Max what matters!  Educate about Byway impact
  40. 40. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. PROJECT PURPOSE Assess Impact on quality of life & Economic impact of byway visitors
  41. 41. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ECONOMIC IMPACTS RESULT PREVIEW  < 10% visit because of Byway  10-15% alter route because of Byway  % spending on trip similar to other research
  42. 42. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ECONOMIC: BYWAY AWARENESS (%)
  43. 43. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ECONOMIC: BYWAY & IMPACT ON VISITATION (%)
  44. 44. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESULTS: TOURIST PARTY SPENDING PROFILES (US$)
  45. 45. Results: Total Economic Impact $12-38 million US$
  46. 46. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. VISITOR FINDINGS: SO WHAT?  Economic impact of Byway  Residents don’t recognize them  Opportunity to increase awareness & increase visitation
  47. 47. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SUMMARY FINDINGS  Byways contribute to - important QOL & $  Residents don’t recognize breadth of Byway contributions & Visitors not aware  Opportunity! 
  48. 48. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  49. 49. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. A CLOSER LOOK AT PARK/RECREATION ASSETS  Byways  Golf  Festivals/Events
  50. 50. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. IMPACT OF 3M CHAMPIONSHIP
  51. 51. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS
  52. 52. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS
  53. 53. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF 3M GOLF $0.0 $2.0 $4.0 $6.0 $8.0 $10.0 $12.0 $14.0 $16.0 $18.0 $20.0 Direct Indirect Induced Total Millions Labor Income Output
  54. 54. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. VISITOR SPENDING General Public Sponsored Guests Players & Guests $4.9 million
  55. 55. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SPENDING PER PERSON $- $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200 $1,400 $1,600 $1,800 $2,000 General Publiic Sponsored - Non- Golfer Players Sponsored - Golfer
  56. 56. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. TOP INDUSTRIES IMPACTED
  57. 57. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SUMMARY FINDINGS  Returns to residents: $7 million  Returns for businesses: $11.7 million – Restaurants and bars – Hotels and motels – Advertising
  58. 58. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  59. 59. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. A CLOSER LOOK AT PARK/RECREATION ASSETS  Byways  Golf  Festivals/Events
  60. 60. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. FESTIVAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO QOL (QIAN & SIMMONS)
  61. 61. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. MN FESTIVALS & EVENTS 2013  Methods: – Online questionnaire – Respondents (876 usable contacts):  Response rate=21% (n=194)  Completion rate=18% (n=156)
  62. 62. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. PURPOSES OF FESTIVALS & EVENTS 66 64 46 36 33 28 27 25 19 13 7 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Percentage of respondents Lore/Legend Ethnic Diversity Promote Natural Resources Charity Sports/Outdoor Activities Support Heritage of Community Promote Local Retail Sales Promote Arts and Crafts Provide Local Entertainment Develop a Sense of Community Attract Visitors Develop a sense of community Attract visitors Provide local entertainment
  63. 63. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ACTIVITIES OFFERED AT FESTIVALS & EVENTS 71 67 55 37 33 28 23 20 17 15 12 11 11 10 8 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Percentage of respondents Flea Markets Tractor Pulling Contests Midway Rides Games of Chance Fireworks Bingo Classic Auto or Machinery Shows Beauty Contests and Talent Shows Beer/Wine Brewing/Tasting Athletic Contests Parades Dance Business Display Booths Arts and Crafts Fairs and Shows Food Vendors Live Entertainment Live entertainment Food vendors Arts & Crafts Fairs & Shows
  64. 64. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. COMMUNITY QUALITY OF LIFE WITH VOLUNTEERS 3 20 13 29 12 14 10 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 None 1-10 11-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 More than 250 Percentageofrespondents Number of volunteers at festival/event
  65. 65. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES 13 27 24 10 22 0 20 40 $999 or less $1,000-$9,999 $10,000-$24,999 $25,000-$49,999 $50,000 or more Percentage of respondents Budget 16 14 12 10 17 10 22 0 10 20 30 No Income $1,999 or less $2,000-$4,999 $5,000-$9,999 $10,000-$24,999 $25,000-$49,999 $50,000 or more Percentage of respondents Income
  66. 66. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ENGAGEMENT & ECONOMICS OF SPONSORSHIPS 1.3 16 17.3 24.4 32.1 38.5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Other Service Clubs Chamber of Commerce City or County Government Non-profit Organizations Private Businesses Percentage of Respondents
  67. 67. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. MORE ALIKE THAN DIFFERENT? (PESCH)
  68. 68. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.  In summary… – Contribute to both resident & visitors QOL – Engage residents as volunteers & sponsors – Generate income for community – Build interest & income for sponsors FESTIVALS & EVENTS
  69. 69. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  70. 70. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.  Quality of life….  Economic impact…  Festival & events…  Sustainability OUR TRAIL TODAY
  71. 71. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SUSTAINABILITY
  72. 72. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS PRACTICES IN TOURISM INDUSTRY  Methods: – Online questionnaire – Benefits/challenges & What they are doing – Analyze by year & region – Respondents: Usable sample size Response rate (%) Completion rate (%) 2007 451 26 19 2010 581 22 17 2013 426 16 12
  73. 73. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. WHY IMPLEMENT SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Economic savings Improved consumer prospects Remaining competitive Meeting customer expectations Improved organizational image Improved customer perceptions Increased environment protection Attracting new clientele Percentage of respondents Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree
  74. 74. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. CROSS-YEAR COMPARISON IN PERCEIVED BENEFITS TO IMPLEMENT SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES 1 2 3 4 5 Averagescore 2007 2010 2013
  75. 75. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. WHY NOT IMPLEMENT SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Staff opposition Customer opposition Lack of interest within the organization Lack of interest within the consumer base Lack of professional network Lack of control over customer behavior Lack of information External restrictions on operations Time and energy Initial financial costs Percentage of respondents Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree
  76. 76. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. CROSS-YEAR COMPARISON IN PERCEIVED DIFFICULTIES TO IMPLEMENT SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES 1 2 3 4 5 Initial financial costs Time and energy Lack of information External restrictions on operations Lack of interest within the consumer… Lack of interest within the organization Staff opposition Customer opposition Average score 2013 2010 2007
  77. 77. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. ENERGY EFFICIENCY PRACTICES IN 2013 0 20 40 60 80 Use renewable energy sources Operation schedules include an energy audit/assessment of the facility by a qualified professional Replace electric package terminal air conditioner (PTAC) units with more efficient heat pump technologies Install window film to lower heating and cooling loads and reduce glare Use occupancy sensors or timers to control lighting and vending machines in intermittent-use areas Replace exit signs with light emitting diode (LED) Exit signs Provide customers with ideas about energy conservation practices Use light emitting diode (LED) bulbs Use an energy management system (EMS) to prevent circulating air, heating, cooling, and lighting while not necessary Equipment is installed with or replaced by the Energy Star qualified equipment Include periodic HVAC tune-up in our preventative maintenance schedule Use compact fluorescent light bulbs Use daylight to the greatest possible extent Percentage of respondents Completed/Ongoing Just beginning Under consideration No attempt
  78. 78. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. CROSS-YEAR DIFFERENCE IN IMPLEMENTING TWO ENERGY EFFICIENCY PRACTICES  Equipment is Energy Star qualified  Use compact fluorescent light bulbs 0 10 20 30 40 50 2007 2010 2013 No attempt Under consideration Just beginning Completed/Ongoing 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 2007 2010 2013 No attempt Under consideration Just beginning Completed/Ongoing
  79. 79. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. WATER CONSERVATION PRACTICES IN 2013 0 20 40 60 80 100 Have a reclaimed water system install automatic run-off water taps Collect rainwater/stormwater to use whenever possible Provide customers with ideas for water conservation practices Install new or replace equipment with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's WaterSense- labeled products Our water plan monitors, records, and posts rates of water use, and makes repairs or replaces equipment when rate changes indicate problems Install water-saving fixtures/devices Seep or vacumm instead of wash down large areas such as sidewalks and driveways Include regular testing for and repairing of leaks in preventive maintenance program Properly dispose of hazadous chemicals and avoid disposing them into the sink and toilet Percentage of respondents Completed/ Ongoing Just beginning Under consideration No attempt
  80. 80. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. CROSS-YEAR DIFFERENCE IN IMPLEMENTING WATER CONSERVATION PRACTICES  The large areas are swept or vacuumed instead of washed down 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 2007 2010 2013 No attempt Under consideration Just beginning Completed/Ongoing
  81. 81. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. LANDSCAPING/ WILDLIFE PRACTICES IN 2013 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Use residual pesticides or herbicides in landscaping Use interpretative signs on nature to instruct customers Switch to drought resistent native plants, and/or replace mowed landscaping with native ground cover in garden areas Provide publications to offer information on native plants and wildlife Use an integrated pest management system to reduce or eliminate the need for toxic insecticides and pesticides Promote the Leave No Trace princples to customers and employees Compost landscaping wastes Ensure that usual noise levels from all activities at the site are not significantly more than the background noise in nearby… Retain or include the native vegetation in landscaping Facility design & construction reflects the natural surroundings and culture of the area Irrigation watering takes place in early morning or at night Wildlife observation done from a remote distance and avoided during sensitive times of the year Percentage of respondents Completed/ Ongoing Just beginning Under consideration No attempt
  82. 82. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES + QOL  Opportunities to reduce difficulties to implement sustainable practices  To increase implementation  Opportunities to further implement some sustainable practices
  83. 83. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. 3 IDEAS FOR RESEARCH IN THE NEXT 3 TO 5 YEARS?! BURNING QUESTIONS…
  84. 84. Thanks to Carlson Chair for Travel, Tourism & Hospitality, UMN Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership! ingridss@umn.edu tuckb@umn.edu qianx@umn.edu
  85. 85. © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SELECT UMN RESOURCES OF INTEREST  Tourism Center – www.tourism.umn.edu; 612 624 4947  Sustainability – MnTechnical Assistance Program – Clean Energy Resource Team – Center for sustainable Building Design  Economic impact – http://www.extension.umn.edu/community/eco nomic-impact-analysis/ 507-337-2814

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