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Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters
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Creating a Vibrant Future for Michigan\'s Cities: Why Urban Revitalization Matters

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June Thomas, UM …

June Thomas, UM
Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning, Wolverine Caucus power point presentation. 2/12/10

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  • 1. Urban Revitalization: Rationale and Status Wolverine Caucus February 12, 2010 June Manning Thomas, Ph.D., FAICP Centennial Professor Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning The University of Michigan
  • 2. Overview • The importance of cities • Implications of city underdevelopment • The status of cities and metropolitan areas in  Michigan • Michigan’s policy response
  • 3. Why are Cities Important? • Traditional wisdom (cities are no longer  needed) turned out to be wrong • Recent thinking – Saskia Sassen – Michael Porter – Richard Florida – Terry Clark – Thomas Hutton Vancouver, B. C.
  • 4. The Importance of Cities  • Cities are essential for economic  functions in the global “new  economy,” because of • The nature of advanced services, • Both social and economic  agglomeration, and • Resulting attraction of key  populations and economic activities. Vancouver, B.C. • They are also an effective way to  safeguard public investment in  infrastructure, and help ensure • Both social equity and  environmental sustainability.
  • 5. Implications of City  Underdevelopment • Inability to attract recent immigrants, a key  factor in economic development.
  • 6. City of Chicago Population Change 1980‐2006; Positive Effects of Hispanics 3500000 3 million 3000000 2500000 2000000 Total White Hispanic Black 1500000 1000000 500000 0 1980                         1990                         2000                        2006 2006 1980 1990 2000 Source:  U. S. Census. White and black population  numbers have declined steadily.
  • 7. Implications of City  Underdevelopment • Inability to attract recent immigrants, a key  factor in economic development. • Constantly increasing development of urban  land and cost of infrastructure improvement  on the fringes.
  • 8. Population Static but Land Use  Increases, S.E. Michigan 1990 2000 % Change Undeveloped  2,018,784 1,855,150 ‐8.1 Land Developed  926,486 1,090,120 17.7 Land % Developed 31.5 37.0 17.7 Population 4,590,468 4,833,493 5.2 Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG), “Land Use in Southeast  MI:  Regional Summary,” April 2004
  • 9. Metro Detroit, 1965‐2020 SEMCOG, 1995 Source:  Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, “Land Use and Land  Development in Southeast Michigan,” March 1999
  • 10. Metro Detroit, 1990‐2030 SEMCOG 2000 Source:  SEMCOG, at http://www.semcog.org/data.aspx?id=4614&terms=Developed+Land+1990+2030.  Accessed  Feb ‘10 
  • 11. Selected City Population Decline, MI Cities vs. Their Counties 2000‐2005 Ann Arbor Detroit Kalamazoo Muskegon Source:  Michigan Higher Education Land Policy Consortium (MIHELP), “State of Michigan  Cities:  An Index of Urban Prosperity,” February 2007.
  • 12. Implications of City  Underdevelopment • Inability to attract recent immigrants, a key  factor in economic development. • Constantly increasing development of urban  land and cost of infrastructure improvement  on the fringes. • Fiscal crisis.  Example:  Roads.
  • 13. Inability to Match Federal Aid MDOT Highway and Maintenance Program State Revenue Shortfall and Federal Aid Lost * Resulting program amount with declining state revenues and inability to match federal  aid. MDOT 2009
  • 14. 2010 Is the Last Year We Will Be Able to Fully Match  Federal Funding for Highway and Maintenance  Program. MDOT 2009
  • 15. Implications of City  Underdevelopment • Inability to attract recent immigrants, a key  factor in economic development. • Constantly increasing development of urban  land and cost of infrastructure improvement  on the fringes. • Fiscal crisis.  Example:  Roads.  Another ex.:   fiscal crisis for diverse municipalities.
  • 16. Detroit metro tax base vs. change in  tax base Myron Orfield and Thomas Luce, “Michigan Metropatterns:  A Regional Agenda,” 2003.  http://www.ameregis.com/maps/region_maps/michigan_1c.pdf
  • 17. Implications of City  Underdevelopment • Inability to attract recent immigrants, a key factor  in economic development. • Constantly increasing development of urban land  and cost of infrastructure improvement on the  fringes. • Fiscal crisis.  Example:  Roads.  Another ex.:  fiscal  crisis for diverse municipalities. • Hindrances in ability to attract “new economy,”  increase employment. • Debilitating inequities, abandonment, decay.
  • 18. Michigan’s Policy Responses • 1977:  “Cities in Transition:  Report of the  Urban Action group to Michigan Gov. William  G. Milliken” • 1990 catalog of “Working with our Cities” • 2003 Michigan Land Use Leadership Council  (MLULC) and related initiatives
  • 19. Some Key Theories about the Best  State Actions • The Orfield Approach • The Vey and Brookings Institute Approach • The Creative Cities Approach • The Land Use Approach
  • 20. Key Theories about Best State Actions:   Strengths, Shortcomings • The Orfield/ Vey Approach—tax reform,  regional land use planning, metropolitan  partnerships, and (Vey, Brookings) major  central‐city and human investment initiatives • The Creative‐class Cities Approach—attract  creative class, young people, creative activities • The Land Use Approach—improve land use, in  particular via urban containment or “smart  growth”
  • 21. 2003 Michigan Land Use Leadership  Council Looked at four major areas; specific  recommendations for change: – Urban revitalization – Land resource‐based industries – Planning and development legislation – Infrastructure and community services
  • 22. Summary of 2003 MLULC Recommendations for  Urban Revitalization “Fully addressed” ORIGINAL MLULC RECOMMENDATIONS Implementation •Site additional public offices in already‐ Yes urbanized areas •Establish a technical assistance capacity in  Yes, CAT state government for urban revitalization  (community assistance) •Reuse of brownfields P.A. 252, 253, ‘03 •Land Bank Fast Track Authority P.A. 258‐263,  ’03 •Promote reuse of historic buildings P.A.s 2008 •Urban blight legislation P.A. 316‐21, ’03
  • 23. Summary of 2003 MLULC Recommendations for  Urban Revitalization “Fully addressed” ORIGINAL MLULC RECOMMENDATIONS Implementation •Site additional public offices in already‐urbanized areas Yes •Establish a technical assistance capacity in state govt for urban  Yes, CAT revitalization (community assistance) •Reuse of brownfields P.A. 252, 253, ‘03 •Land Bank Fast Track Authority P.A. 258‐263,  ‘03 •Promote reuse of historic buildings P.A.s 2008 •Urban blight legislation P.A. 316‐21, ’03 •Housing and Community Development Trust Fund . •Michigan IDA for home ownership . •Safe Routes to School . •Cool Cities and related actions •Neighborhood Enterprise Zone amended Source:  Kellogg “People and Land” tally, MLULC web page,  Updated March 3, 2009; accessed Feb. 2010  http://www.peopleandland.org/MLULC_Recommendations/index.cfm
  • 24. MLULC Land Use Recommendations  Overall (Four Categories) RECOMMENDATIONS  NUMBER ADDRESSED BY MARCH 2009 FULLY 22 PARTIALLY 39 IN PROGRESS 3 NOT ADDRESSED 149 Source:  Kellogg Foundation “People and Land” tally, MLULC web page, updated March  2009, accessed February 2010.  http://www.peopleandland.org/MLULC_Recommendations/index.cfm
  • 25. Key Theories about Best State Actions:   Michigan’s Record Reviewed • The Orfield/ Vey Approach—tax reform, regional land use  planning, metropolitan partnerships, and major central‐city  and human investment initiatives • The Creative‐class Cities Approach—attract creative class,  young people, creative activities • The Land Use Approach—improve land use, in particular via  urban containment or “smart growth” More detail:  June M. Thomas, “Michigan’s Urban Policies in  an Era of Land Use Reform and Creative‐class Cities,” in  Richard Jelier and Gary Sands, editors, Sustaining Michigan:   Metropolitan Policies and Strategies (East Lansing:   Michigan State University Press, 2009), pp. 261‐80.
  • 26. Conclusions • Cities are important in  the new global  economy • Many of Michigan’s  cities are suffering • Actions thus far are not  addressing the problem  sufficiently

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