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Flipping with Classroom: Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom's Taxonomy
 

Flipping with Classroom: Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom's Taxonomy

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  • HOM MANY OF YOU HAVE HEARD OF THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM? <br /> HOW MANY OF YOU HAVE ACTUALLY TRIED FLIPPING A LESSON? <br /> This presentation is going to prepare you to flip a single lesson. It will use Bloom’s taxonomy to identify what to do before class and what to do during class. <br />
  • This presentation is based on the material in Robert Talbert’s blog on the Chronicle of Higher Education web site. The URL http://snurl.com/flipped will take you to the complete blog post. I will put that in the chat window in case you want to save that link. <br />
  • Let me try to very briefly describe how a flipped classroom is different from a classic classroom. In a classic classroom, the students receive information. They listen, watch, and take notes during class. The faculty member demonstrates and explains. <br />
  • After class the student processes the information by studying the notes taken during class and working on homework activities. This is where and when the real learning takes place. The student is usually alone when processing the material. <br />
  • In a flipped classroom the student receives the information before class, by watching screencasts, mini-lectures, and doing other activities. <br />
  • When the student come back together as a class, they process the material. They often work in groups, and the faculty member is available to clarify and guide the students. <br />
  • What should you expect the student to learn before class, and what should you help the student learn during class? How do you keep from assigning a recording of the entire lecture as pre-class activity and then having nothing to do in class? That is where Bloom’s taxonomy comes in. <br />
  • We are going to use Bloom’s Taxonomy to decide what the students should do before class and what will happen during class. HOW MANY OF YOU ARE FAMILIAR WITH BLOOM’S TAXONOMY? (Green check, red check) HOW MANY OF YOU HAVE A COPY OF BLOOM’S TAXONOMY ON YOUR WALL BY YOUR DESK? Bloom’s taxonomy tries to classify and rank types of learning, from trivia (remembering) to generation of new material (creating). <br />
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy consists of categories, with specific action verbs for each of the categories. For example… See http://snurl.com/bloomsverbs for a page listing many more action verbs than are provided on this page. I WILL PUT THAT LINK IN THE CHAT, SO THAT YOU CAN COPY IT IF YOU WOULD LIKE. <br />
  • Let’s go through the six steps that you can use to easily flip a lesson. <br />
  • The process starts by identifying the learning object for the lesson. List the things you want the students to be able to do once the class is over. Always start a learning objective with a verb. User verbs that can be evaluated. Never use “understand” or “know” for example. A good list of verbs for learning objectives can be found on the <br />
  • Then you take your learning objectives and assign them to the categories in Bloom’s taxonomy. This should be fairly easy, if you used the action verbs from the snipurl.com/bloomsverbs page. <br />
  • The “Cognitive Cutoff” divides what will be done before class (below the line) from what will be done during class time. You can decide where that cutoff lies. <br />
  • Now that you have a guide as to what you want the students to learn before class, plan the activities that will help them learn. That may include short video lectures, screencasts, guided practice activities, and so on. <br />
  • Then plan the activities that will be done during class in order for the students to get experience using Bloom’s higher level learning activities. These might be projects, reports, mind maps, and more. <br />
  • Finally, have the students go through the process. Evaluate the results, based both upon how well the students mastered the learning objectives and how they reacted to the process. Make adjustments as you see fit so that the next time you teach this lesson, or the next lesson you flip, can be better. <br />
  • This model can be used for everything from a single lesson to an entire course. MUSIC… BUSINESS… CONTINUING AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION… A&S/GENERAL STUDIES… <br />
  • Some faculty have concerns about the flipped classroom. These are real concerns and need to be talked about. <br />
  • An Educause guide has a wonderful concluding sentence. <br />
  • If you are interested in knowing more about this, here are some additional resources. <br />
  • After going though this short presentation, HOW MANY OF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN TRYING THIS OUT FOR ONE LESSON IN ONE OF YOUR CLASSES? (Green and Red checkmarks.) <br /> ARE THERE ANY QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS? <br />

Flipping with Classroom: Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom's Taxonomy Flipping with Classroom: Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom's Taxonomy Presentation Transcript

  • FLIPPING THE CLASSROOM Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy 2/19/2014, Bill Vilberg, Univ. of Miami, Virtual Office Hours
  • Source: CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION A divide-and-conquer approach to planning a flipped class session June 10, 2013, 3:28 pm By Robert Talbert http://snurl.com/flipped
  • WHAT IS FLIPPING? Classic Receive in Classroom
  • WHAT IS FLIPPING? Classic Receive in Classroom Process at Home
  • WHAT IS FLIPPING? Classic Receive in Classroom Flipped Receive at Home Process at Home
  • WHAT IS FLIPPING? Classic Receive in Classroom Process at Home Flipped Receive at Home Process in Classroom
  • THE QUESTION What should be provided as home learning activities and what should be saved for processing in class?
  • BLOOM’S TAXONOMY
  • Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy http://snurl.com/bloomsverbs
  • FLIPPING A LESSON USING BLOOM’S TAXONOMY Six Steps
  • Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy 1. Write your learning objectives What do you want the students to be able to do once the class is over? • • • • • Identify… State… Apply… Solve… Contrast… See http://snurl.com/bloomsverbs
  • Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy 2. Organize by Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy 3. Determine “Cognitive Cutoff”
  • Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy 4. Plan the pre-class activities
  • Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy 5. Plan the in-class activities
  • Flipping a Lesson Using Bloom’s Taxonomy 6. Close the loop • Give the lesson • Evaluate the results • Adjust the lesson • Repeat the process
  • USES •Single lesson •Entire Unit •Entire Course
  • CONCERNS •Replacing Faculty •Students won’t do the work •Too much work •No technical skills
  • IMPLICATIONS •“What the flip does particularly well is to bring about a distinctive shift in priorities—from merely covering material to working toward mastery of it.”
  • ADDITIONAL RESOURCES •Educause 7 Things document: http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ eli7081.pdf •Flipped Classroom Infographic: http://www.knewton.com/flippedclassroom/ •Article on original Flipped Classroom: http://www.thedailyriff.com/articles/ho w-the-flipped-classroom-is-radicallytransforming-learning-536.php
  • Bill Vilberg bill.vilberg@miami.edu 305-284-3949 (desk) 786-218-3052 (cell)