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Chemical Structure: Structure of Matter: Seminar
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Chemical Structure: Structure of Matter: Seminar

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Lecture materials for the Introductory Chemistry course for Forensic Scientists, University of Lincoln, UK. See http://forensicchemistry.lincoln.ac.uk/ for more details.

Lecture materials for the Introductory Chemistry course for Forensic Scientists, University of Lincoln, UK. See http://forensicchemistry.lincoln.ac.uk/ for more details.

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  • 1. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License Structure of matter seminar: moles and molarity University of Lincoln presentation
  • 2. The mole
    • Definition:
    • 1 mole of any substance contains
    • 6.022x10 23 atoms and/or molecules
    • Amadeo Carlo Avogadro (1776-1856)
    • 6.022 x 10 23
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 3. For Elements:
    • The relative atomic mass,
    • A r = mass of 1 mole of atoms in grams (g)
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 4. For Molecules:
    • The relative molecular mass,
    • M r = sum of all A r in the molecule
    • = mass of 1 mole of molecules (g)
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 5. Molar Concentrations, M
    • A molar solution (1M) is a solution containing 1 mole of substance (solute) in every litre of solvent
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 6. Molarity
    • The molarity of a solution is the concentration of the solution expressed as:
      • the number of moles per litre –
        • M or mol L -1 or mol dm -3
    • (all of these are the same)
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 7. Molarity
    • How to calculate the molarity:
    • Calculate how many moles there are in solution
    • Work out how many moles there are per ml
    • X 1000 to give the number of moles per litre
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 8. Example 1
    • 22 g of CaCO 3 was dissolved in water and made up to give a total volume of 200 cm 3 . C
    • Calculate the concentration of the solution in mol dm -3 .
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 9. Example 1
    • 1. No mols of CaCO 3 in solution =
    • 22g/100 = 0.22 mols
    • 2. No mols/ml = 0.22/200 = 0.0011
    • (= 1.1 x 10 -3 )
    • 3. 1.1 x 10 -3 x 1000 = 1.1M
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 10. Example 2
    • If we take 15ml of our 1.1M CaCO 3 solution and make it up to 250ml with H 2 O, what is the concentration of the new dilution?
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 11. Example 2
    • N o . mols in 15 ml of 1.1M solution =
          • = 1.1 x 15 = 0.0165 mols
          • 1000
    • This is put into 250 ml. N o . mols per ml = 0.0165/250 = 6.6 x 10 -5
    • 6.6 x 10 -5 x 1000 = 0.066M
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License
  • 12. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License Alternatively You can use the following formula: V 1 C 1 = V 2 C 2 15 ml x 1.1 M = 250 ml x C 2 C2 = 15 ml x 1.1 M = 0.066 M 250 ml
  • 13. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License Acknowledgements
    • JISC
    • HEA
    • Centre for Educational Research and Development
    • School of natural and applied sciences
    • School of Journalism
    • SirenFM
    • http://tango.freedesktop.org