Lecture08222
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Lecture08222

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Lecture08222 Lecture08222 Presentation Transcript

  • Gas State: Basics, Pressure and Its Measurement Lecture 8
  • Aristotle’s Elements
  • Gases everywhere.
  • Some important gases
    • Oxygen O 2
    • Nitrogen N 2
    • Argon Ar
    • Carbon dioxide CO 2
    • Methane CH 4
    • Ammonia NH 3
    • Chlorine Cl 2
    • Ethylene C 2 H 4
    • Hydrogen H 2
    • Helium
    • Hydrogen sulfide H 2 S
  • Carbon cycle
  •  
  • Gases are important.
  • All gases has remarkably similar physical behavior.
  • The molecules are much farther apart in the gas than in either the liquid or the solid.
  • What distinguishes gases from liquids and solids:
    • Gas volume changes greatly with pressure.
    • Gas volume changes greatly with temperature.
    • Gases have relatively low viscosity.
    • Most gases have relatively low densities under normal conditions.
    • Gases are miscible.
  • Pressure (P) is defined as the force exerted per unit of surface area: Pressure=Force/Area Pa=N/m 2
  •  
  • Gases exert pressure on all surfaces with which they make contact.
    • Evangelista Torricelli (1608-1647), Italian scientist
  • Torricelli’s experiment
  • Manometers are devices used to measure the pressure of a gas in an experiment.
  • Some widely used manometers
  • A sample problem on converting units of pressure.
  • THE END