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Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
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Eliminating Sexism in Police Force

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  • 1. Eliminating Sexism in Police Force
  • 2. Situation <ul><li>Nina Hobkins went undercover as a reporter in the police force to show the bullying and sexism that occurs regularly in this public institution </li></ul><ul><li>Sexism is still high – women in police force accept the way they are spoken to and men believe good officers need testosterone </li></ul><ul><li>She said women are objectified in the police force and claimed men think women should not have to deal with violence </li></ul><ul><li>Hobkins wonders how to change the system if men think like this </li></ul><ul><li>Public is outraged by Hobkins’ findings </li></ul>
  • 3. Objectives <ul><li>Show public that sexism occurs everywhere and not just in the vicinity of a police station </li></ul><ul><li>Instead of denying Hobkins’ findings, work towards changing the system </li></ul>
  • 4. Audience <ul><li>Focus is on male and female police officers </li></ul><ul><li>Others will be affected, particularly women ages 18-55, who are in the workforce and affected by sexism in their everyday society </li></ul>
  • 5. Strategy <ul><li>1) Define sexism and point out specific examples </li></ul><ul><li>2) Focus on its repercussions and how it affects women </li></ul><ul><li>3) Provide outside help for police forces so they can work on changing </li></ul>
  • 6. Tactics <ul><li>Hold a press conference where chief officers from Hobkins’ police force discuss sexism – what it is, how to spot it, ways to prevent it, and why it is unnecessary and inappropriate </li></ul><ul><li>Create an advertising campaign with print ads - posters placed in everyday places around the city: subway, buses, telephone booths, etc. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each poster has a picture of a woman who was objectified partaking in everyday activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The headline has the woman’s first name written on top of the poster and the copy at the bottom briefly tells how she was negatively affected </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: a man made an inappropriate comment about her body </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Provide police forces with experts on sexism and psychologists to host workshops for officers to learn how to change their behavior and system </li></ul>
  • 7. Timetable <ul><li>The press conference will be held immediately to address the outrage of the public </li></ul><ul><li>The advertising campaign will last for at least 3 years with new posters being created every 3 weeks </li></ul><ul><li>Workshops in police forces will begin within the month and occur every 2 months to work towards improvement </li></ul>
  • 8. Method of Evaluation <ul><li>Online surveys will be issued, blogs read, and polls observed to determine general opinion of police forces and public understanding of sexism </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising effectiveness will be determined by the response of women volunteering to share their stories in the form of print ads </li></ul><ul><li>Experts will evaluate police forces on their progress in workshops </li></ul>
  • 9. Source Credibility <ul><li>Though it will be difficult to separate myself from the police department, I will be showing the public that the police department is getting help from professionals and doing everything they can to change their behavior and overall system. </li></ul><ul><li>The public will understand this and restore their faith in the police force, therefore, allowing them to trust me. </li></ul>
  • 10. Cognitive Dissonance <ul><li>Those people’s opinions will not change in the beginning of the campaign, but my aim with this intense campaign is to effectively change their minds by the end via different methods. </li></ul><ul><li>Chief officers will be apologizing and trying to change their system, which will hopefully win over the community. </li></ul>
  • 11. The Flow of Opinion <ul><li>The advertising campaign will appeal to this immigrant community </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The emotional appeal of the ads will be strong showing a large picture of a victimized woman and her name </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>These ads will be all over the city and impossible not to see during its 3 year run </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. Suggestions For Action <ul><li>Since most people in the community ignore pr campaigns, my campaign will effectively reach the entire community via different methods – it taps into creative advertising and online public participation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They will not be able to ignore the blaring posters covering the city </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They can participate in online polls and write about the situation in blogs </li></ul></ul>

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