Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative and NREL: Implementing Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative and NREL: Implementing Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

on

  • 4,213 views

Paul Norton of NREL spoke about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, and the challenges of renewable energy and conservation in Hawaii. Slides from the REIS ...

Paul Norton of NREL spoke about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, and the challenges of renewable energy and conservation in Hawaii. Slides from the REIS seminar given at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on 2009-09-03.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,213
Views on SlideShare
4,108
Embed Views
105

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
245
Comments
0

5 Embeds 105

http://insight-energy-solutions.com 48
http://reis.manoa.hawaii.edu 26
http://www.slideshare.net 15
http://moodle.ncvps.org 15
http://hidoe.blackboard.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Michael Crowley, a senior scientist with the Chemical and Biosciences Center, created an animated model of Cel7A, nature's primary enzyme for decaying plants. By visualizing the enzyme's process, Crowley and his co-workers hope to bioengineer a version that will accelerate the process of making simple sugars from woody plants and farm wastes that are easily converted into cellulosic ethanol. Cel7A is a vegetarian molecule that is nature's primary agent for decaying plants. Crowley, an NREL senior scientist, and his associates are modeling Cel7A in hopes of bioengineering a version that will accelerate the process of making cellulosic ethanol from woody plants and farm wastes. A breakthrough like this would enable biofuels to be produced more easily from abundant biomass wastes and could reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil.
  • McKinsey, like virtually all efficiency and carbon reduction studies, has assessed potential contributions of individual technologies, but has not attempted to assess the much more powerful aspects of whole building integration approaches to net-zero homes and commercial buildings. Advanced design, construction, control and operations are wholly missing from this analysis – as well as from NEMS, MARKAL, and MINICAM modeling efforts. Also, it should be noted that for virtually all of the IPCC and DOE CCTP scenarios to “work” in stabilizing atmospheric carbon concentrations massive amounts of new efficiency is assumed to occur without explanation of the source of that new efficiency in terms of R&D, investment, and support infrastructure.
  • Upper Right : NREL designed and built a Net Zero Energy Habitat for Humanity House about 5 miles from the NREL campus. Over the two years that NREL monitored the building it actually produced 3000 kWh more than it used (accounting for gas use). Key energy features of the building are: a) Highly Insulated R-30 Walls and R-60 roof, b) passive solar window design, c) energy recovery ventilation system, e) 4kW PV array, f) Solar domestic hot water system backed up by an instantaneous gas water heater. Upper Middle : NREL has collaborated with industry to develop a number of Building Integrated PV (BIPV) systems that can work with shingle style roofs, standing seam metal roofs, and flat “built-up” roofs. NREL has also partnered with industry to develop a combined PV-Thermal system (shown on the house) that simultaneously cools the PV array, and preheats the solar thermal array providing electricity and hot water while reducing the roof area needed for the panels. Upper Right: NREL has collaborated with industry to produce a variety of evaporative and desiccant based coolers that are more efficient than vapor compression technology. NREL has also developed a revolutionary concept “DEVap” that combines desiccant and evaporative cooling in a single element making it possible to do highly efficient evaporative cooling anywhere in the country. Analysis for a DEVap unit in Phoenix showed 80% energy savings compared to a typical vapor compression air conditioner (even accounting for the 1 to 2 month humid monsoon period in the summer). Bottom Left: NREL has collaborated with industry to develop electrochromic windows that can be controlled to darken when the sun is not wanted, and lighten when the sun is beneficial. Bottom Middle : NREL has collaborated with industry partners to develop two low-cost polymer based solar hot water systems. The system in a box can be purchased at Home Depot and installed as a do-it-yourself project for about $1000. Bottom Right: NREL has developed building energy simulation and optimization tools that enable the most cost effective package of efficiency and renewable technologies to be determined for any given savings level, in any building type, in any climate. Other NREL developed tools assist developers to design energy efficient community layouts accounting for trees and other buildings.
  • Worldwide installed capacity = 56,813 MW as of Jan 2006 Worldwide industry = $12-$14B
  • Fly Ranch Geyser at fly Ranch Hot Springs, located in Hualapai Flat about 24 km north of Gerlach, Nevada (3 spouting mountains) Caption Geysers are the rarest fountains found in geothermal aresa. What makes them rare and distinguishes them from hot springs is that somewhere, usually near the surface in the plumbing system of a geyser, there are one or more constrictions. Expanding steam bubbles generated from the rising hot water build up behind these constrictions, ultimately squeezing through the narrow passageways and forcing the water above to overflow from the geyser. Credit:
  • NREL Research Thrusts The Biorefinery Solutions to under-utilized waste residues - Agriculture - Forestry - Urban Advanced agriculture (energy crops) enabled by plant genomics and bioscience
  • Found there is the potential to tap up to 100 GW of energy in the first 10 km of rock underneath the U.S. by 2050 (one-tenth of current U.S. generating capacity) It is estimated the resource potential of ocean energy is on par with hydropower (which currently makes up 7% of electricity generation) Current Energy – more advanced, production potential is largely unmapped Wave Energy – less advanced, multiple technological approaches, production potential is estimated to be between 250,000-260,000 GWh per year (or 5% of total current generation; EPRI, 2004) Federal Geothermal Program since the 1970’s NREL Geothermal R&D since the late 1980’s Low temperature energy conversion cycles Better performing, lower cost components Innovative materials Analysis to define technology path to Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Program de-emphasized last several years Ongoing renaissance of DOE program and NREL efforts

Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative and NREL: Implementing Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative and NREL: Implementing Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Presentation Transcript

  • The Hawai’i Clean Energy Initiative: Implementing Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Renewable Energy and Island Sustainability Seminar Series University of Hawai’i September 3, 2009 Paul Norton NREL
  • Seminar Objectives
    • Introduce NREL
    • Give you a broad view of renewable energy and energy efficiency in Hawai’i
    • Raise some of the technical issues that need to be addressed in this field
    • Have a open, creative, lively and fun discussion
    Hawi Wind Farm, Big Island Photo: HELCO
  • Overview
    • NREL introduction
    • HCEI introduction
    • Energy Efficiency and Zero Energy Buildings
    • Renewable Energy – projects, challenges, and opportunities
    Parker Ranch, Big Island Photo: SunPower
  • Who is NREL?
    • U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory located in Golden, CO
    • Dedicated to energy efficiency and renewable energy
    • Lead National Laboratory for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative
    • Staff of about 1600, 2009 budget of about $460 million
    • Research centers for ...
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
            • Residential and Commercial Buildings
            • Wind Energy
            • Solar Energy - Photovoltaics
            • Advanced Vehicles and Fuels
            • Biomass
            • Geothermal
            • Energy Analysis…
  • Long-Term Impact: Requires Breakthrough/Translational Science Managing the science-to-technology interface Translational Research Facility
  • Mid-Term Impact: Accelerate Next-Generation Technology to Market
    • NREL Focus on Technology and Systems Development
    • Unique Partnering Facilities
    • Testing and Validation Capabilities
    Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Energy Systems Integration Facility
  • Near-Term Impact: Harvest Past R&D Energy Investments
    • NREL Provides Data, Tools and Technical Assistance to:
    • Educate and inform
    • Develop codes and standards
    • Inform policy options, program design, and investment choices
      • Resource Assessment
      • Technology Analysis
      • Policy Analysis
    • Remove Barriers to Broad Deployment
    • Fuels Economic Recovery
    • Creates Jobs
    U.S. Renewable Electricity Installed Nameplate Capacity Source: EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release
  • NREL areas of focus
    • Renewable Research Potential
    • Energy Efficiency
    • Renewable Electricity Supply
    • Biofuels
    • Sustainable Transportation
    • Hydrogen and Fuel Cells
    • New Directions
  • Renewable Resource Potential
  • U.S. Photovoltaic Solar Resource
  • U.S. Concentrating Solar Resource
  • U.S. Wind Resource (50m)
  • U.S. Biomass Resource
  • Energy Efficiency
  • Energy Efficiency Offers Low or No-Cost Carbon Reduction Options Building Efficiency (in red) represent largest No-Cost option Source: McKinsey Global Institute, 2007
  • Buildings
    • Status U.S. Buildings:
    • 39% of primary energy
    • 71% of electricity
    • 38% of carbon emissions
    • DOE Goal:
    • Cost effective, marketable zero energy buildings by 2025
    • Value of energy savings exceeds cost of energy features on a cash flow basis
    • NREL Research Thrusts
    • Whole building systems integration of efficiency and renewable features
    • Computerized building energy optimization tools
    • Building integrated PV
    April 10, 2008
  • Energy Used in Buildings Buildings use 72% of the nation’s electricity and 55% of its natural gas. 100.7 Quads of Total Use, 2005 Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2007
  • Technology for Cost Effective Zero Energy Buildings NREL Zero Energy Habitat House BIPV Products & PV-T Array Compressorless Cooling Electrochromic Windows Polymer Solar Water Heaters Computerized optimization & simulation Tools
  • Net-Zero Energy Homes That Are Cashflow Neutral Average 1990’s home Homeowner cost for low energy home* is the same as minimum code home * low energy home requires 65% less energy • NREL Analysis using BEOpt software for Boulder,CO climate Example taken from the “GEOS” Neighborhood. Courtesy of Wonderland Hills Development, Boulder Colorado
  • Renewable Electricity Supply
  • Wind
    • Today’s Status in U.S.
    • 25,300 MW installed capacity
    • Cost 6-9¢/kWh at good wind sites*
    • DOE Cost Goals
    • 3.6¢/kWh, onshore at low wind sites by 2012
    • 7¢/kWh, offshore in shallow water by 2014
    • Long Term Potential
    • 20% of the nation’s electricity supply
    * With no Production Tax Credit Updated May 8, 2009 Source: U.S. Department of Energy, American Wind Energy Association
    • The 20% Wind Energy by 2030 Scenario
    • How it began:
      • 2006 State of the Union and Advanced Energy Initiative
      • Collaborative effort of government and industry (DOE, NREL, and AWEA) to explore a modeled energy scenario in which wind provides 20% of U.S. electricity by 2030
    • Primary Assumptions:
      • U.S. electricity consumption grows 39% from 2005 to 2030—to 5.8 billion MWh (Source: EIA)
      • Wind turbine energy production (capacity factor) increases about 15% by 2030
      • Wind turbine costs decrease about 10% by 2030
      • No major breakthroughs in wind technology
    • Primary Findings:
      • 20% wind electricity would require about 300 GW (300,000 MW) of wind generation
      • Affordable, accessible wind resources available across the nation
      • Cost to integrate wind modest
      • Emissions reductions and water savings
      • Transmission a challenge
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future The “20% Wind Report” Informs Our RD&D www.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro
  • Wind Energy Technology Advanced Blades Offshore Wind US Wind Resource Exceeds Total Electrical Demand Innovative Tall Towers Giant Multi-megawatt Turbines Wind Forecasting Courtesy:WindLogics, Inc. St. Paul, MN
  • Wind Photo credit: Megavind
    • NREL Research Thrusts
    • Improved performance and reliability
    • Advanced rotor development
    • Utility grid integration
  • Applications of Solar Heat and Electricity Photovoltaics (PV) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Centralized Generation, large users or utilities Distributed Generation, on-site or near point of use Solar Thermal Transportation Residential & Commercial Buildings Industrial Passive solar Hot water
  • Solar – Photovoltaics and CSP
    • Status in U.S.
    • PV
    • 1,000 MW installed capacity
    • Cost 18-23¢/kWh
    • CSP
    • 419 MW installed capacity
    • Cost 12¢/kWh
    • Potential:
    • PV
    • 11-18¢/kWh by 2010
    • 5-10 ¢/kWh by 2015
    • CSP
    • 8.5 ¢/kWh by 2010
    • 6 ¢/kWh by 2015
    Source: U.S. Department of Energy, IEA Updated January 1, 2009
  • Solar Research Thrusts
    • Photovoltaics
    • Higher performance cells/modules
    • New nanomaterials applications
    • Advanced manufacturing techniques
    • Concentrating Solar Power
    • Low cost high performance storage for baseload markets
    • Advanced absorbers, reflectors, and heat transfer fluids
    • Next generation solar concentrators
    8.22-megawatt Alamosa, Colo., PV solar plant
  • National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future PV Conversion Technologies— Decades of NREL Leadership
  • Geothermal
    • Today’s Status in U.S.
    • 2,800 MWe installed, 500 MWe new contracts, 3000 MWe under development
    • Cost 5-8¢/kWh with no PTC
    • Capacity factor typically > 90%, base load power
    • DOE Cost Goals:
    • <5¢/kWh, for typical hydrothermal sites
    • 5¢/kWh, for enhanced geothermal systems with mature technology
    • Long Term Potential:
    • Recent MIT Analysis shows
    • potential for 100,000 MW installed
    • Enhanced Geothermal Power systems
    • by 2050, cost-competitive with coal-
    • powered generation
    • NREL Research Thrusts:
    • Analysis to define pathways to commercialization of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)
    • Systems engineering/integration to enable fast track development of EGS and other program goals
    • Geothermal energy conversion RD&D Low temperature geothermal, direct use, and ground source heat pump RD&D
    June 18, 2009
  • Biomass Power
    • Biopower status in U.S.
    • 2007 capacity – 10.5 GWe
      • 5 GW Pulp and Paper
      • 2 GW Dedicated Biomass
      • 3 GW MSW and Landfill Gas
      • 0.5 GW Cofiring
    • 2004 Generation – 68.5 TWh
    • Cost – 8-10¢/kWh
    • Potential
    • Cost – 4-6¢/kWh (integrated gasification combined cycle)
    • 2030 – 160 TWh (net electricity exported to grid from integrated 60 billion gal/yr biorefinery industry)
    July 16, 2009
  • Biofuels
  • Biofuels
    • Current Biofuels Status in U.S.
    • Biodiesel – 171 companies; 2.2 billion gallons/yr capacity1
    • Corn ethanol
        • 174 commercial plants2
        • 10.8 billion gal/yr. capacity2
        • Additional 2.4 billion gal/yr planned or under construction
    • Cellulosic ethanol (current technology)
        • Projected commercial cost ~$3.50/gge
    • Key DOE Goals
    • 2012 goal: cellulosic ethanol $1.33/ETOH gallon or ~$1.99/gge
    • 2022 goal: 36B gal Renewable Fuel; 21B gal “Advanced Renewable Fuel”– 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act
    • 2030 goal: 60 billion gal ethanol (30% of 2004 gasoline)
    • NREL Research Thrusts
    • The biorefinery and cellulosic ethanol
    • Solutions to under-utilized waste residues
    • Energy crops
    • New biofuels
    Updated February 2009 Sources: 1- National Biodiesel Board 2 - Renewable Fuels Association, all other information based on DOE and USDA sources
  • Why Follow-On Generations?
    • 3 rd & 4 th Generations – “beyond ethanol”
      • Higher energy density/suitability
      • Better temp and cold start ability
      • Energy and tailored feedstocks
      • Infrastructure compatibility
    Algae
  • Wide Range of Biofuel Technologies National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Feedstocks Lignocellulosic Biomass Perennial - Herbaceous - Woody Annual Crops Sugar/Starch (corn, sugarcane, wheat, sugarbeet, etc.) Other Residues - Forestry, forest products - Municipal and urban: green waste, food, paper, etc. - Animal residues, etc. - Waste fats and oils Plant Oils/A lgae Transportation Fuels Ethanol & Mixed Alcohols or Methane or Hydrogen Diesel * Methanol Gasoline * Diesel * Gasoline * & Diesel * Diesel * Gasoline * Hydrogen Ethanol, Butanol, Hydrocarbons Bio-Methane Biodiesel Green diesel Catalytic synthesis FT synthesis MeOH synthesis HydroCracking/Treating Aqueous Phase Processing Catalytic pyrolysis Aqueous Phase Reforming Fermentation Catalytic upgrading MTG Ag residues, (stover, straws, bagasse) Intermediates Bio SynGas Bio-Oils Lignin Sugars Biogas Lipids/ Oils Gasification Pyrolysis & Liquefaction Hydrolysis Pretreatment & Hydrolysis * Blending Products Anaerobic Digestion Upgrading Transesterification Hydrodeoxygenation Extraction Fermentation
  • Sustainable Transportation
  • Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV)
    • Status:
    • PHEV-only conversion vehicles available
    • OEMS building prototypes
    • NREL PHEV Test Bed
    • Key Challenges
    • Energy storage – life and cost
    • Utility impacts
    • Vehicle cost
    • Recharging locations
    • Tailpipe emissions/cold starts
    • Cabin heating/cooling
    • ~33% put cars in garage
    • NREL Research Thrusts
    • Energy storage
    • Advanced power electronics
    • Vehicle ancillary loads reduction
    • Vehicle thermal management
    • Utility interconnection
    • Vehicle-to-grid
  • Advanced Vehicle Technologies Batteries UltraCaps GM Volt Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics Before After
  • Fuels Performance
    • Coordinating Research Council
    • FACE
    • Biodiesel Stability
    • E10/E20/E85
    • ASTM
    • Specs & Test
    • Method Development
    • Biodiesel
    • E85
    Fuels Chemistry Lab
    • IQT Projects
    • Fundamental Ignition Studies
    • Pollutant formation
    • FACE Fuels Testing
    • NBB CRADA - Biodiesel
    • Quality/Stability
    • Compatibility with Emission Controls
    • Real-World Evaluation
    • Fuel Surveys
    • Biodiesel
    • E85
    • Test Methods
    • Impurities
    • Chemical analysis
  • Hydrogen and Fuel Cells
  • Hydrogen and Fuel Cells
    • U.S. Status
      • 400+ fuel cell vehicles on the road
      • 58 hydrogen fueling stations
    • Goals
    • Hydrogen Production
      • $2-3/Kg for all pathways
      • Renewables in $5-10/Kg range
    • Fuel Cells
      • $30/kW by 2015
      • 5,000 hour stack life
    • NREL Research Thrusts
      • Renewable H2 production
      • Safety/codes/standards
      • Early market introduction
  • New Directions
  • Evaluating Potential New Directions Enhanced Geothermal Systems Ocean Kinetic Energy Pelamis—Ocean Power Delivery Verdant—Power RITE Turbine Tidal Wave
  • Smart Grid – Renewable Energy Integration in Systems at All Scales
  • An Integrated Approach is Required
  • Making Transformational Change We must seize the moment. The opportunity for making renewable energy transformational change is now before us as a solution to a global crisis.
  • What is HCEI? National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future What is HCEI?
  • www.hawaiicleanenergyinitiative.org
  • The 70% clean energy by 2030 goal Source: HECO IRP4, Sept. 2008
  • Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Goals Total Electricity Consumption Year 2008 2030 Projected consumption – business as usual
  • Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Goals Total Electricity Consumption Year 2008 2030 Projected consumption – business as usual Actual consumption with efficiency improvements Efficiency savings = 30% of 2030 projected use
  • Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Goals Total Electricity Consumption Year 2008 2030 Projected consumption – business as usual Actual consumption with efficiency improvements Renewables = 40% of 2030 projected use Renewable Electricity Efficiency savings = 30% of 2030 projected use
  • Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Goals Total Electricity Consumption Year 2008 2030 Projected consumption – business as usual Actual consumption with efficiency improvements Renewables = 40% of 2030 projected use Oil = 30% of 2030 projected use Efficiency savings = 30% of 2030 projected use Generation from oil Renewable Electricity
  • 70% Clean Energy = 30% Efficiency + 40% Renewables Source: Booz Allen Hamilton, 2008
  • Each island has unique renewable energy opportunities
  • Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard
    • Passed by the legislature and signed into law (Act 155) in July
      • “ The energy-efficiency portfolio standard shall be designed to achieve
      • four thousand three hundred gigawatt hours of electricity use reductions
      • statewide by 2030”
    • Where will 4300 GWh of efficiency come from?
    Booz-Alan-Hamilton High-level analysis Completed in 2007
  • Building Code Changes on the Path to Zero Energy Buildings (ZEB)
    • Energy efficiency for new buildings
    • Residential and commercial building code changes:
      • Step 1: “Hawaiianized” IECC 2006
        • In place for state buildings
        • Counties are in various stages of adoption
      • Step 2: “Hawaiianized” IECC 2009
        • May include the efficiency package required for ZEB
      • Step 3: ZEB codes (2015)
    • Zero Energy Demonstration Projects
        • Kaupuni Village (DHHL)
        • Military Housing (Forest City and Actus)
        • Kona airport
    • Zero Energy Buildings
    • produce
    • as much energy as they
    • consume
    • on an annual basis.
    What is a Zero Energy Building? National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
    • Zero Energy Buildings
    • produce
    • as much energy as they
    • consume
    • on an annual basis.
    What is a Zero Energy Building? National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future NET Zero Energy Building Consumption Production
  • National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future An example of NET Zero Energy in a home kW kW NET energy consumption Hourly energy consumption Hourly PV production kW
  • A key to success is including operating cost in our design decisions
    • Commercial Buildings
    • Construction costs only
    • Construction costs plus
    • lifetime building energy costs
    Residential Buildings Initial sales price Monthly mortgage plus utility bill cost
  • To AC or not to AC… that is the question
    • Traditional approach
        • Architectural shading
        • Orientation and window design for natural ventilation
        • No air conditioning
    • Why are we moving away from this?
        • Times of the year that are hot (…and getting hotter?)
        • Some area are hotter than other and have less trade wind
        • Security concerns with open windows
        • Noise issues with open windows
        • Lower tolerance for indoor temperature variations
    • The hybrid approach
        • Architectural shading
        • Orientation and window design for natural ventilation
        • Insulated ceilings and walls, low-e windows, modest air tightness
        • High-efficiency air conditioning
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  • Residential example: Affordable air conditioned home on Oahu Percent energy savings Combined monthly cost: energy cost + increased mortgage cost due to efficiency measures ($/month) National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  • Residential example: Affordable air conditioned home on Oahu Percent energy savings Combined monthly cost: energy cost + increased mortgage cost due to efficiency measures ($/month) National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Net metering $0.20/kWh 7% 30 year mortgage Minimum cost design Neutral cost design Zero energy Efficiency/PV balance point
  • Energy Costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  • Percent energy savings Combined monthly cost: energy cost + increased mortgage cost due to efficiency measures ($/month) National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future $0.20/kWh $0.30/kWh $0.40/kWh $0.50/kWh Residential example: Affordable air conditioned home on Oahu
  • Sizing the PV system National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Typical new home Zero energy home Annual PV Production efficiency
  • Sizing the PV system National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Typical new home Zero energy home efficiency education Annual PV Production House Design Occupant Education
  • Will it really be ZERO?? It could be!
    • In any given year, it depends on….
    • Plug loads
      • (TVs, DVDs, Microwave, computers, stereo, toaster, electric blanket, hair dryer, …. the list goes on!)
    • AC use and cooling setpoint
    • Hot water use
    • Specific weather conditions
    The HOUSE AND the PEOPLE living in the house meet or miss the zero energy target TOGETHER National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  • Energy use depends on us! Las Vegas Homes with identical energy efficiency features Annual Energy Use per Home 3300 kWh/mo 620 kWh/mo National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future More than 5x difference
    • Compact florescent lighting?
    • Consider energy use in purchases:
      • Efficient air conditioner
      • TVs – How many? How big? Plasma or LCD? TEVO boxes?, game boxes?
      • Refrigerator – Newer ones can use much less energy
    • Use of high-energy equipment?
      • Freezer
      • Hot tub
      • Pool
      • Aquarium
    • The list goes on.......
    The choices we make….. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  • For example, our refrigerators… Source: NRDC National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  • … .our TVs… National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
    • Taking advantage of natural ventilation?
    • Using blinds for shading?
    • Air conditioning setpoint?
    • AC off when home is unoccupied?
    • Turning off lights when not in use?
    • TVs off when not in use?
    • Computer and peripherals:
      • Screen shut off?
      • Power strip shutdown?
    … . our behavior….. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
    • There is energy, CO 2 and other pollution associated with:
    • Materials
    • Manufacturing
    • Transportation
    • Disposal
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future … .the STUFF we buy….
  • Example Analysis: Big –Box Pet Store in Colorado
  • Starting Point Minimum Cost Point Cost Neutral Point Maximum Energy Savings ZEB Not Possible Example Analysis: Big –Box Pet Store in Colorado
  • Balancing Efficiency and Renewable Energy
    • Invest in efficiency first!
      • Many efficiency options are less expensive than renewable energy
      • Building energy needs can often be cut by 40% to 50% through efficiency while lowering combined capital and operating energy cost
    • Very deep (60% to 80%) energy savings are often available at neutral combined capital plus operating energy cost
    • Achieving zero energy may not be possible with the roof area available
    • These savings can only be achieved if they are designed into the building
      • Retrofitting shell efficiency options is more expensive or impossible
      • Roofs must be designed to accommodate the appropriate amount of solar at an appropriate orientation and tilt.
  • A key to success is a measureable energy goal
    • Set a measureable energy goal for the building early!
    • Examples (f rom weak to strong)….
      • Design a green building
      • Design a LEED [pick a rating level] building
      • Design a building to use 30% less energy than code
      • Design a building to use less than 25,000 BTU/sf per yr.
      • Design a net zero energy building
  • Examples of Low-Energy and Zero Energy Commercial Buildings
      • Oberlin College Lewis Center
        • Oberlin, Ohio
        • goal: zero net site energy use (117%)
      • Zion Visitor Center
        • Springdale, UT
        • goal: 70% energy cost savings (65%)
      • Cambria Office Building
        • Ebensburg, PA
        • goal: 66% energy cost savings (43%)
      • Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF)
        • Annapolis, MD
        • goal: LEED 1.0 Platinum Rating (25%)
      • Thermal Test Facility (TTF)
        • Golden, CO
        • goal: 70% energy savings (51%)
      • BigHorn Home Improvement
        • Silverthorne, CO
        • goal: 60% energy cost savings (53%)
      • Science House, Science Museum of Minnesota
        • St. Paul, Minnesota
        • goal: zero net site energy use (139%)
  • Examples of Low-Energy and Zero Energy Residential Buildings DHHL Kaupuni Zero Energy Village, Oahu Frisco, Texas Hickory, North Carolina Patterson, New Jersey Washington State Tucson, Arizona Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    • Paul Norton
    • HCEI Senior Project Leader
    • National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    • 808-220-1555
    • [email_address]
    • Websites:
    • hawaiicleanenergyinitiative.org
    • www.nrel.gov
    • www.highperformancebuildings.gov
    • www.builidingamerica.gov
    Mahalo!