O4O – Older people for older people. Can the people do it themselves?  Artur Steinerowski O4O team member Centre for Rural...
Challenges relating to service provision in remote and rural areas What is O4O? The O4O  project - Older People for Older ...
<ul><li>Social Enterprises as Service Providers </li></ul><ul><li>Policy interest in social enterprise (not for profit soc...
Perception of older people
Changing perception of older people - To promote older people as a positive force Aims of O4O - To involve older people  i...
O4O theory Engagement of  older people  in O4O Older people  remain active  for longer Trust and  social networks develop ...
Community Action <ul><li>Meet community </li></ul><ul><li>Publicity </li></ul><ul><li>Generate confidence/ enthusiasm </li...
T4T: Transport for Tongue Provides Transport services including: - Informal connecting of people to share lifts - Formal v...
Ardersier - Oral history DVD - Development of community buildings O4O examples
Taste of the reality?  Why should we support O4Os? (community perspective) - The State should provide services  - Capacity...
Evaluating O4O impact  Establishing cost of the service delivery <ul><li>In 2009 nearly 2,500 questionnaires were sent to ...
Key inputs to governmental policy  <ul><li>The assumption that all communities might be ready to do things for themselves ...
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[3 of 4] O4O – Older people for older people. Can the people do it themselves? [Artur Steinerowski]

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The future for rural health services is the topic for the first in the new series of free public lectures at UHI, the prospective University of the Highlands and Islands.

Professor Jane Farmer, UHI co-director of the Inverness-based Centre for Rural Health, is joined at the lectern next week by two of her researchers, Amy Nimegeer and Artur Steinerowski. The centre has carried out two years of concentrated research with rural communities in the region about their health services.

Amy has been working on a project looking at ways to involve communities in planning services, while Artur is looking at the role of social enterprises in community sustainability and working on the centre’s O4O (Older for Older) scheme. In collaboration with local people, the O4O team is devising initiatives to enable elderly people to live happily and healthily in remote and rural areas.

Professor Farmer said: "Our research has shown what rural communities want from health services and how that might be provided. We also speak about the changes required from managers, professions and community members themselves - and how everyone may have to think and act in much more radical ways to have services provided in the future."

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  • So, T4T helps local communities to provide transport services. There are different aspects of the project but all of them address transport issues. People are able to travel from one place to another e.g. they can go to a shop, to a church, they can go and visit their friends and relatives more easily than in the past. Also, transport can be provided to those who need to see their health providers. Thus, in one way the transport scheme helps people to stay independent for longer as with a minimum support they are able to look after themselves. On the other hand, it improves physical and mental health as people are more active and are not isolated in their rural communities. Consequently, there is a health aspect attached to T4T. For service providers T4T helps to provide transport services, but there is also less tangible outcome of improved health of those who participate in T4T.
  • Ardersier is a very interesting place. There was a huge amount of hesitation to participate in the project and the community did not seem to be integrated. The community started O4O with an oral history project – a group of older people bought a video camera and video editing equipment (with support from the local Councillors Ward Discretionary Budget) and got advice about filming and interviewing. They interview older people in the village about their early memories and what life was like in the village years ago. They have recorded over 20 interviews so far. Each person who has been interviewed will get a DVD of their interview. It is hoped to edit all the footage to produce themed DVDs that can be used for school projects. And a summary of the project is available on You Tube – you can see it on the O4O website. The project helped with building capacity of this particular community. People involved in o4o learnt new skills but what is more important – they became more confident and the sense of place was developed . This confidence building although not tangible has important impact on the community which decided to start a new project and people in the community continue working together. O4O is linking with other initiatives in the community around developing community capacity; for example, with an initiative around the development of the village hall. So, again, apart for a tangible outcome of the project (DVD) there is something more that can’t be easily measure. These relate to increased confidence and enhanced capacity of the community that is likely to remain active for longer integrating local people (and this, obviously has health impacts).
  • [3 of 4] O4O – Older people for older people. Can the people do it themselves? [Artur Steinerowski]

    1. 1. O4O – Older people for older people. Can the people do it themselves? Artur Steinerowski O4O team member Centre for Rural Health
    2. 2. Challenges relating to service provision in remote and rural areas What is O4O? The O4O project - Older People for Older People Demographic changes and apocalyptic scenarios Government policies about service provision e.g. social enterprise Testing these policies through O4O
    3. 3. <ul><li>Social Enterprises as Service Providers </li></ul><ul><li>Policy interest in social enterprise (not for profit social organisations); economic, social and environmental development </li></ul><ul><li>Additional benefits e.g. participation, well-being, social capital; empowering communities; tackling social exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Social enterprises have a role in delivering health and social care </li></ul><ul><li>Current policy represents social enterprises as a panacea. Is it really? </li></ul><ul><li>Limits to current evidence base, e.g. measurement of benefits </li></ul>Policy view on social enterprise
    4. 4. Perception of older people
    5. 5. Changing perception of older people - To promote older people as a positive force Aims of O4O - To involve older people in producing O4O organisations and services - To help maintain people living in their own communities for as long as possible
    6. 6. O4O theory Engagement of older people in O4O Older people remain active for longer Trust and social networks develop Increased community capacity Positive impact on physical and mental health O4O organisations deliver services for other older people Reduced dependence on the State as a provider
    7. 7. Community Action <ul><li>Meet community </li></ul><ul><li>Publicity </li></ul><ul><li>Generate confidence/ enthusiasm </li></ul>Community engage in O4O concept <ul><li>Discussion with community </li></ul><ul><li>Building trust </li></ul>Community identify needs Initiatives selected to take forward <ul><li>Support from O4O: </li></ul><ul><li>Building capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Building confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Avoiding duplication </li></ul><ul><li>Accessing finance </li></ul><ul><li>Accessing information </li></ul><ul><li>Skills needed </li></ul><ul><li>Community capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Models of social organisation </li></ul>Community action/ entrepreneurship Social organisation model established - Community takes on roles <ul><li>Business planning </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul>O4O delivers services Process of O4Os creation
    8. 8. T4T: Transport for Tongue Provides Transport services including: - Informal connecting of people to share lifts - Formal volunteering for the car scheme - Demand responsive service / minibus hire (planned) O4O examples
    9. 9. Ardersier - Oral history DVD - Development of community buildings O4O examples
    10. 10. Taste of the reality? Why should we support O4Os? (community perspective) - The State should provide services - Capacity issue - Equality issues (rural vs. urban) Why should we support O4Os? (service providers perspective) - How much money can we save? - What are the tangible outcomes? - Social enterprise is a good idea BUT …
    11. 11. Evaluating O4O impact Establishing cost of the service delivery <ul><li>In 2009 nearly 2,500 questionnaires were sent to people aged 55 and over in six O4O Highland communities (58% response rate) </li></ul><ul><li>Informal helping e.g. 87.7% of respondents said they had done a favour for a neighbour in the past 6 months </li></ul><ul><li>Formal helping e.g. 32.9 % have taken part in the community projects in the past 3 years </li></ul><ul><li>There is connection between participation and self assessed health, age, level of education and access to a vehicle. </li></ul>… is very challenging and in majority of cases impossible. Many service providers do not possess exact data relating to the cost of service provision.
    12. 12. Key inputs to governmental policy <ul><li>The assumption that all communities might be ready to do things for themselves is unrealistic. </li></ul><ul><li>Many communities need structural support to develop social enterprises. </li></ul><ul><li>Communities need external support to overcome bureaucracy and a model of a successful social enterprise that could be copied. </li></ul><ul><li>Remote and rural communities need special approach due to specific characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>Government wants social enterprise to grow. Yet, there is lack of understanding that creation of social enterprises is a process that requires time, persistence and tailored support. </li></ul>Artur Steinerowski, Research Assistant, Centre for Rural Health [email_address]

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