Aerospace STEM+M Workforce Connection - GLOBAL CHANGE
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Aerospace STEM+M Workforce Connection - GLOBAL CHANGE

Aerospace STEM+M Workforce Connection - GLOBAL CHANGE
Education Committee; Dr. Stephanie Wright, Chair; Dr. Barry Butler, Member; Dr. Bobby McMasters, Member

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  • Credit: Original artwork from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide Marketing Department.
  • Credit: Title, logo and text modified from Mr. Charles H. Huettner’s original work, Global Competitiveness, “THE FUTURE ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE.” Presented at the 2nd Annual Center for Aviation and Aerospace Leadership Conference, Orlando, Florida, February, 2011.
  • Credit: Roosevelt, F.D. (1945). President Roosevelt’s letter. In V. Bush, Science-the endless frontier. A report to the President on a program for postwar scientific research (p 4). Washington, DC: U.S.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Bush, V. (1945). Science-the endless frontier. A report to the President on a program for postwar scientific research (p 23). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Bloomberg Businessweek, 19-25 July 2010, pp 58-63.
  • Credit: General Robert Mansfield (USAF Ret.), 16 September 2011, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
  • Credit: General Robert Mansfield (USAF Ret.), 16 September 2011, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
  • Credit: Building and Retaining the Aerospace Workforce (2009), Inside Aerospace, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 12-13 May 2009, Doubletree Hotel Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia. Retrieved from: http://www.aiaa.org/pdf/public/Inside_Aerospace0 9_Report -_and_Recommendations.pdf. Photo provided by the University of Iowa.Photos provided by the University of Iowa.
  • Credit: General Robert Mansfield (USAF Ret.), 16 September 2011, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
  • Credit: General Robert Mansfield (USAF Ret.), 16 September 2011, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Photo provided by the University of Iowa.
  • Unlike the overall Industrial product Index, the Aerospace Production Index did not show a precipitous decline during the recession. Rather it was more of a flattening out. Credit: Chadwick, W. A., Ellis, B. W. C., Mansfield, R.E., Materna, R. & Fischer, G. J. (2011). Aerospace industry report 2011: facts, figures & outlook for the aviation and aerospace manufacturing industry, Washington, D.C: Aerospace Industries Association and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.2 factors that will impact the above indices are: a reduction in domestic defence spending, and increasing demand for large civil aircraft (LCA) driven by a global economic recovery and continued growth in emerging-market economies.
  • The above graph illustrates both the number of production workers and total employment in U.S. Aerospace Product and Parts Manufacturing for the period 2000-2009.Credit: Chadwick, W. A., Ellis, B. W. C., Mansfield, R.E., Materna, R. & Fischer, G. J. (2011). Aerospace industry report 2011: facts, figures & outlook for the aviation and aerospace manufacturing industry, Washington, D.C: Aerospace Industries Association and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.Over this period, total employment decreased 4.6 percent, while the number of production workers increased 18.1 percent.
  • The U.S. aerospace industry is uniquely resilient and has thus far performed admirably through the economic downturn. However, in the coming years, downward pressure on the defense budget is likely to be reflected in military aerospace procurement levels.Credit: Chadwick, W. A., Ellis, B. W. C., Mansfield, R.E., Materna, R. & Fischer, G. J. (2011). Aerospace industry report 2011: facts, figures & outlook for the aviation and aerospace manufacturing industry, Washington, D.C: Aerospace Industries Association and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
  • Credit: Chadwick, W. A., Ellis, B. W. C., Mansfield, R.E., Materna, R. & Fischer, G. J. (2011). Aerospace industry report 2011: facts, figures & outlook for the aviation and aerospace manufacturing industry, Washington, D.C: Aerospace Industries Association and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx. Photos provided by the University of Delaware.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx. Photos provided by the University of Delaware
  • Credit: Dr. Ralph Coppola.
  • Credit: Dr. Ralph Coppola.
  • Credit: Dr. Ralph Coppola.
  • Credit: Dr. Ralph Coppola.
  • Credit: Building and Retaining the Aerospace Workforce (2009), Inside Aerospace, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 12-13 May 2009, Doubletree Hotel Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia. Retrieved from: http://www.aiaa.org/pdf/public/Inside_Aerospace0 9_Report -_and_Recommendations.pdfPhotos provided by the University of Delaware
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
  • Credit: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.

Aerospace STEM+M Workforce Connection - GLOBAL CHANGE Aerospace STEM+M Workforce Connection - GLOBAL CHANGE Presentation Transcript

  • Aerospace STEM+MAchieve Workforce ConnectionYour Dreams GLOBAL CHANGE Education Committee Dr. Stephanie Wright, Chair Dr. Barry Butler, Member Dr. Bobby McMasters, Member www.aerostates.org
  • Aerospace and the Future Workforce• Importance of a K – College STEM Education pipeline in each State.• Focus on STEM plus the added component of Manufacturing in preparing students for the workforce.• Provide perspective on the impact of Aerospace and Aviation business on the National economy.
  • What is ASA?• The Aerospace States Association (ASA) is a bi- partisan organization of Lieutenant Governors and other top-ranking State leaders.• ASA represents States’ interests in Federal Aerospace and Aviation policy development.• ASA advocates on behalf of States for: – workforce training. – economic development in Aerospace and Aviation. – excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education in every State. – Keeping States competitive in a global marketplace. – R&D funding.
  • AGENDA1. The original STEM Education challenge.2. Condition of STEM Education in the U.S. school systems, K – College.3. The original STEM Education solution.4. Why add Manufacturing (+M)?5. Status of the U.S. Aviation & Aerospace industries.6. Outlook & Strategies for 2012 and beyond.
  • The Original Problem• On 17 November 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote a letter to Vannevar Bush, the head of the U.S. Office for Scientific Research and Development. In that letter, President Roosevelt posed the question: “Can an effective program be proposed for discovering and developing scientific talent in American youth to show that the continuing future of scientific research in the country may be assured on a level comparable to what has been done during the war?”
  • The State of STEM Education in the U.S. % agree among students and parents STEM College Students Parents of K–12 StudentsBase: All Qualified Respondents (College Students: n=500, Parents of Child in Grades K-12: n=854)Q940/Q1060: How strongly do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements?Q1050: How willing would you be to spend extra money to help your child(ren) be successful in their math and science classes?
  • The First SolutionIn Science-The Endless Frontier (1945)Vannevar Bush offered his answer. Bushcalled for the renewal of our scientific talentthrough the U.S. education system. Hewrote:“The responsibility for the creation of new scientificknowledge rests on that small body of men andwomen who understand the fundamental laws ofnature and are skilled in the techniques of scientificresearch. While there will always be the rareindividual who will rise to the top without benefit offormal education and training, he is the exceptionand even he might make a more notablecontribution if he had the benefit of the besteducation we have to offer.”
  • What is STEM+M?• Today, STEM education alone may not be sufficient. To be effective, ultimately physical goods need to be made and the most significant require Manufacturing -- the +M.
  • Education & Industry STEM+M Connection• Linking mental skills and capabilities that STEM Education provides, with the technologies and processes for manu- facturing products of value, realizes the promise of strengthened STEM+M Education in the United States.
  • The Need for STEM+M• Adding STEM+M = Adding Jobs.
  • Aviation & Aerospace Industry?• Our ability to design, engineer, and build world class Aerospace products and provide Aviation services, while continually innovating, will be an important determinate of the United States future Economic and National security.
  • Aviation & Aerospace Industry?• The Aviation & Aerospace industry is one of the last in which the United States has a current advantage and is also growing globally.
  • Investment in Human Capital U.S. versus Top Performers Percentage of Adults with a Tertiary Degree, by Age60%50% 25 to 3440% 35 to 4430% 45 to 5420% 55 to 6410%0% United States Canada Korea Japan Source: OECD, Education at a Glance 2010.
  • Small to Medium Manufacturing is Key• National STEM+M Workforce Development opportunities exist in the Aviation & Aerospace industry.
  • U.S. Aerospace Industrial Production Index 2000-2009 15 26%• Defense spending 31% allowed production to increase.• Increasing demand for civil aircraft is keeping production going – driven by emerging markets. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census and ITA; U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics; Federal Reserve Board.
  • U.S. Aerospace Manufacturing Employment 2000-2009 16 •Overall employment has dropped. -5% •Production workers have increased since 18% the turn of Century. •Aerospace Jobs are growing.Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census and ITA; U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics; Federal Reserve Board.
  • U.S. Aerospace Sales 2000-2010 17•Reduction in civil sales Aerospace Industry Sales by Product Group and growth in defense Military Aircraft Civil Aircraft Space sales after 9/11. 225 200•Overall sales continue 175 to grow. 150 Billions of Dollars 125 100 75 50 25 0 Source: Aerospace Industries Association
  • Aerospace STEM+M Workforce Connection Outlook & Strategies for 2012 & Beyond
  • Industry Outlook for 2012 & Beyond• Global economic recovery is uneven – some countries recovering faster than others.• Aerospace industry is growing at a rate faster than GDP (2%); Asia Pacific region is fastest.• Aerospace products will see significant growth over the next 30 years.• Aerospace forecasts $3.2 trillion commercial aircraft production; not including $40 Billion in U.S. Defense spending.
  • Outlook for 2012 & Beyond - Parents• While most parents of K–12 students (93%) believe that STEM education should be a priority in the U.S., only half (49%) agree that it actually is a top priority for this country.
  • Outlook for 2012 & Beyond - Students• Importance of K–12 Education: – For many, the decision to study STEM starts before college.
  • Outlook for 2012 & Beyond – Students• STEM+M, A Manufacturing Application: – ASA, with Dr. Ralph Coppola’s leadership, sponsors the Real World Design Challenge (http://www.realworlddesignchallenge.org/). It aligns secondary education with 21st-century workforce needs, and strengthens professional development for teachers by providing software, training, and support by mentors from national laboratories to teams of High School students competing to become State Champions.
  • Outlook for 2012 & Beyond – Students– The Real World Design Challenge (RWDC) is an annual competition that provides High School students, grades 9-12, the opportunity to work on real world engineering challenges in a team environment. Each year, student teams are asked to address a challenge that confronts our nations leading industries.
  • Real World Design Challenge is one of the Largest and Fastest Growing STEMPrograms in the Country & the World’s Largest Aviation Education Program The Real World Design Challenge FREE annual competition that provides students with the opportunity to apply the lessons of the classroom to the technical problems currently faced in the engineering field. • Real Problems • Real Tools • Real Roles • Real Contributions FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 States 10 26 29 38 Teams trained & 275 367 454 702 signed up Students on teams 1,925 2,569 3,178 4,914 signed up INDUSTRY & GOVERNEMENT PROFESSIONAL SPONSORSHIPS
  • Outlook for 2012 & Beyond – Students – RWDC students utilize professional engineering software to develop their solutions and will also generate presentations that convincingly demonstrate the value of their solutions. The RWDC provides students with opportunities to apply the lessons of the classroom to the technical problems that are being faced in the workplace.• The Goal is for all States to participate.
  • Outcomes• To “cast a wide net” with STEM+M curriculum designed to recruit and retain women and traditionally under-represented minorities.• Support the National need of growing student capacity enabling significant advances in recruitment and retention of future employees in the Aviation & Aerospace STEM+M disciplines.
  • Recommendations• The ASA Education Committee recommends that individual States: – Explore and encourage STEM + M curriculum designed to recruit, prepare and retain all youth including women and traditionally under- represented minorities to enter the workforce.
  • Recommendations (Cont.)– Focus on encouraging, when appropriate, the use of STEM + M curriculum as a means of increasing a student’s critical thinking skills and applications in an effort to recruit and retain future employees in the Aviation & Aerospace STEM+M disciplines.
  • Presentation Credits• Slide #1: Original artwork from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide Marketing Department.• Slide #3: Title, logo and text modified from Mr. Charles H. Huettner’s original work, Global Competitiveness, “THE FUTURE ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE.” Presented at the 2nd Annual Center for Aviation and Aerospace Leadership Conference, Orlando, Florida, February, 2011.• Slide #5: Roosevelt, F.D. (1945). President Roosevelt’s letter. In V. Bush, Science-the endless frontier. A report to the President on a program for postwar scientific research (p 4). Washington, DC: U.S.• Slide #6: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.• Slide #7: Bush, V. (1945). Science-the endless frontier. A report to the President on a program for postwar scientific research (p 23). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Bloomberg Businessweek, 19-25 July 2010, pp 58-63.• Slides #8, #9 and #11: Brigadier General Robert E. Mansfield (USAF Retired), 16 September 2011, Embry- Riddle Aeronautical University.• Slide #10: Building and Retaining the Aerospace Workforce (2009), Inside Aerospace, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 12-13 May 2009, Doubletree Hotel Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia. Retrieved from: http://www.aiaa.org/pdf/public/Inside_Aerospace0 9_Report - _and_Recommendations.pdf. Photo provided by the University of Iowa.
  • Presentation Credits (Continued)• Slide #12: Brigadier General Robert E. Mansfield (USAF Ret.), 16 September 2011, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Photo provided by the University of Iowa.• Slide #13: Dr. Terry W. Hartle (Senior Vice President, Government Relations and Public Affairs [American Council on Education], February, 2011 presentation to the Council of College and Military Educators, used with permission.• Slides #15, #16, #17, #18 and #19: Chadwick, W. A., Ellis, B. W. C., Mansfield, R.E., Materna, R. & Fischer, G. J. (2011). Aerospace industry report 2011: facts, figures & outlook for the aviation and aerospace manufacturing industry, Washington, D.C: Aerospace Industries Association and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.• Slides #20 and #21: Written permission received from Rachel MacGillivray, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide, on 19 September 2011, to use selected PowerPoint slides from Microsoft Corporation “STEM Perceptions Report” - http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/presskits/citizenship/docs/STEM_Perception_Report.pptx.
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  • ExtrasAdditional PowerPoint slides for use as needed.
  • Parent and Child Career Hopes Parents who give their Reported by parents; top responses shown child’s school an “A” on its ability to prepare students for careers in STEM are more likely to say their child wants to pursue a STEM career (52% vs. 38% give school a “B” or lower).Base: All Parents of Child in Grades K–12 (n=854)Q1020: Which of the following careers, if any, would you like your child to pursue? Which of the following, if any, do you think your child will want to pursue?
  • STEM Students: How Important Is Each Factor to Your Success? % Absolutely Essential/Extremely Important Female students are more likely to cite “studying hard” as an important success factor (81% vs. 60% males). Female students are more likely than males to say “supportive parents” is an important success factor (50% vs. 37% males).Base: All College Students (n=500)Q920: How important are each of the following to your success as a student studying in your area or major?
  • Parents: Why Should Preparing Students for STEM Careers Be a Top Priority for Schools in the U.S.? Up to 3 responses selected Dads are more likely than moms to list this is a reason (62% vs. 47% moms). Moms are more likely than dads to list this as a reason (36% vs. 22% dads).Base: Parents who agree that STEM preparation should be a top priority for schools (n=774)Q1065: Why do you think preparing students for careers in STEM should be a top priority for schools in the United States. Please select up to three responses.
  • Parents: What Is Your Child’s Favorite Subject in School? Average Age INTEREST Began 8.2 7.2 7.5 * * * * * 6.3 4.9 5.5 9.4 *Base is too small to report. Note: other subjects tested include Social Studies, English, Foreign Language and Geography. All had 5% or less as favorite subject.Base: All Parents of Child in K–12 (n=854) Q1035: What is your child’s favorite subject in school?Base: Child has a favorite subject listed (variable base by subject) Q1040: At what age did your child become interested in [FAVORITE SUBJECT]?Base: All College Students(n=500) Q830: When did you decide that you wanted to be pre-med/to study your area or major in school?
  • STEM Students: Before College, 37% of STEM college students WHAT Got You Interested in STEM? have a parent in STEM.Base: Parents in STEM Careers (n=132) Q1005: When you were a child, who was the most influential personin your life in helping you decide what career to pursue?Base: All College Students (n=500) Q820: Who had the most influence on your decision to study in this area?; Q840: Before goingto college, which of the following got you interested in science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics?; Q845: Please tellus specifically what got you interested in science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics.
  • Students: Parent Influence and Encouragement How influential were your parents on your decision to study STEM?Base: College Students with mother/father in life (variable base) Q880: How influential were your mother and father on your decision to be pre-med/to study in your area or major?Q890: When you were growing up, to what extent did you mother and father encourage or discourage you from pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering or mathematics?Base: All Parents of Child in Grades K–12 (n=854) Q1015: How influential do you think you will be on your child(ren)’s future, specifically the career path they may decide to pursue?
  • Parents: How Willing Would You Be to Spend Money to Help Your Child Be Successful in Math and Science? 61% Extremely /very willingBase: All Parents of Child in Grades K–12 (n=854)Q1045: How confident are you that you have the skills to help your child with their math and science homework if they asked for your assistance?Q1050: How willing would you be to spend money to help your child(ren) be successful in their math and science classes?Q1030: Assuming all of your child’s basic needs are met, if you had an extra $100 to spend each month on your child, in which of the following wayswould you be most likely to spend that money?
  • The word cloud illustrates keywords used by students to indicate how parents and schools can make STEM more interesting for kids. Larger words represent higher frequencies while smaller words represent lower frequencies.Base: All College Students (n=500)Q950: What can parents and schools do to help kids and teens becomeinterested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics?
  • Outlook for 2011 & Beyond - Parents• Parents who feel that STEM should be a priority feel this way because they want to ensure the U.S. remains competitive in the global marketplace (53%) and to produce the next generation of innovators (51%); fewer say it’s to enable students to have well- paying (36%) or fulfilling careers (30%).
  • Outlook for 2011 & Beyond - Students• Importance of K–12 Education (Cont.): – Students who felt less prepared for STEM college courses said that offering more STEM courses and having better/more challenging courses would have helped to better prepare them — and for students who felt extremely/very well- prepared, it was the challenging, college-prep courses that helped to prepare them.
  • Outlook for 2011 & Beyond - Students• Importance of K–12 Education (Cont.): – Females in STEM are more likely than males to say they were extremely/very well-prepared (64% vs. 49%) by their K–12 education, and they are slightly more likely than their male counterparts to say that preparing students for STEM should be a top priority in K–12 schools (92% vs. 84%).
  • Outlook for 2011 & Beyond - Students• Importance of K–12 Education (Cont.): – Male students are more likely to pursue STEM because they have always enjoyed games/toys, reading books, and/or participating in clubs that are focused on their chosen subject area (51% vs. 35% females). – Female students are more likely to say that they chose STEM to make a difference (49% vs. 34% males).