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Fall 2010 NT4CM

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  • 1. National Training For Counselors and Mentors Fall 2010 A UHEAA Presentation
  • 2. Agenda
  • 3. Scholarships Work-study Grants Student Loans Savings
  • 4.  
  • 5. Extinct Grants
    • ACG
    • SMART
  • 6. Current Grants
    • Pell
    • FSEOG
    • LEAP
    • TEACH
    • UCOPE
  • 7.  
  • 8. UtahFutures & Scholarships
    • Local Scholarship feature
      • Please send us scholarships that aren’t currently in the search so we can add them!
    • Adding ability for regional searches on UtahFutures
  • 9. Eight Tips from the Experts
    • ACT efforts
    • Get to know your recruiter
    • Get involved
    • Search beyond institutions
    • Deadlines!
    • Convince the committee that you’re the perfect fit
    • Show your plan for success
    • Demonstrate your financial backup plan
  • 10. Other Scholarship Resources
    • Institutional Ambassador Programs
    • Resident Advisor
    • AmeriCorps
    • UtahFutures.org
    • College.ed.gov
    • Fastweb.com
  • 11. April 21, 2010
  • 12. New Century Scholarship- Overview
    • Purpose
      • This scholarship encourages students to accelerate their education by earning an Associate’s degree in high school
    • Background
      • Created in 1999
      • Initiated by former Governor Leavitt
      • In the 11 th year award cycle
    2010-2011
  • 13. New Century — Program Changes for 2011
    • Program Changes
      • Class of 2011
        • Must earn Associate’s degree by the date of high school graduation
          • Earn a minimum 3.0 college GPA
        • Must have a minimum high school GPA of a 3.5
        • Home School Student
          • Must earn an ACT Score of 26 or higher, score submitted by June 15
        • No criminal record
        • Citizenship requirement
    April 21, 2010
  • 14. New Century — Application Timeline
    • Application Timeline for 2011 High School Graduates
    April 21, 2010
  • 15. Regents’ Scholarship - Overview
    • Established in 2008
    • Based on nationally-recognized foundational core designed to help prepare students for college beyond high school graduation requirements
    Fact: Students can qualify for 1, 2, or 3 of the awards. For example a student can qualify for the Base award only, Base and UESP, Base and Exemplary, or Base, Exemplary and UESP.
  • 16. Regents’ — Application Timeline
    • A complete application file consists of:
    • The application itself which is submitted online
    • Supporting documents which must provide evidence of what the student reported on the online application is true and accurate--these documents are mailed
    • Note: all deadlines are postmarked deadlines unless otherwise stated.
  • 17. Scholarship Funding
      • Award Levels for College Academic year 2011 and beyond
      • New Century and Regents’ Exemplary Academic Achievement Award will be a flat dollar amount to be paid in 4 installments.
        • MAXIMUM award value of $1,250 a semester
        • Award values may not always be the same for both programs
      • Regents’ Base Award: $1000
      • Specific award amounts for the 2011-2012 college academic year are estimated to be set in April 2011.
    • Please be advised:
    • Award amounts are determined on an annual basis and are subject to legislative funding and number of qualified participants.   Therefore, award amounts may be reduced, may vary from year to year, and are dependent on when the recipient is enrolled in college .
    April 21, 2010
  • 18. Things to Consider…
    • Student should look to ALL financial aid opportunities
    • If possible diversify, rather than relying on one
    • Other Financial Aid Options
      • Saving for College through the Utah Educational Savings Plan program
      • Work while attending school
      • Private Scholarships/grants
      • --visit UtahFutures.org
      • Federal Financial Aid
        • Loans, Grants and Work Study
    April 21, 2010
  • 19.
    • To access the scholarship information
    • Higheredutah.org
    • Click on “Scholarships”
    • Click on the specific program that you want to access
    Where to Find Scholarships Information
  • 20. Scholarship Contact Information
    • New Century
      • [email_address]
      • 801-321-7221
    • Regents’ Scholarship
      • [email_address]
      • 801-321-7294 (students and parents)
      • 801-321-7159 (school personnel)
    April 21, 2010
  • 21.  
  • 22. Student Loans
    • Federal Loan Programs
      • Stafford Loan
      • PLUS Loan
      • Perkins
    • Private/Alternative Loans
  • 23. Switch to Direct Lending
    • William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program
      • Change as of July 1, 2010
      • 100% Direct
    • Impact to Utah’s students
      • Lack of competition among lenders
      • Origination fees
      • Service
      • Loss of benefits
  • 24. Other Federal Aid
    • Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program
    • Corporation for National and Community Service
    • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
    • Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
    • Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Grants
    • Vocational rehabilitation benefits
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
  • 25. Savings
    • Summer jobs
    • Bank savings accounts
      • CD accounts
    • 529 Savings Plans
      • www.uesp.org
  • 26.
    • Free Application for Federal Student Aid
  • 27. FAFSA Recap
    • Free Application for Federal Student Aid
    • Required for all Federal Financial Aid
      • Grants
      • Work-study
      • Federal Loan Programs
    • Fill it out online at: www.fafsa.gov
    • E-sign using a PIN!
      • Get yours at www.pin.ed.gov
    • Available in English and Spanish
  • 28. Ready, Set, FAFSA!
    • IRS Data Retrieval
    • Computer-based logic for questions
  • 29. After the FAFSA
    • Ask about other forms
      • Colleges often require additional forms & documentation for a “complete application”
      • Verification documentation
      • No premarital FAFSA!
  • 30. Unusual Circumstances
    • “ Professional Judgment”
      • Parent lost a job
      • Medical expenses that weren’t covered by insurance
      • Parents divorced
      • Cannot get parents’ info
      • Any other unusual changes
  • 31. Deadlines
    • Deadline for COMPLETE Fin Aid Application
      • Receive financial aid before classes start
      • Meeting this deadline could also get students access to additional types of financial aid
    • Remember…
      • Students need to file a new
      • FAFSA every year.
      • Priority filing deadline
  • 32. How much aid do you need?
    • School—Cost of Attendance (COA)
        • Tuition and Fees
        • Room and Board
        • Transportation
        • Books and Supplies
        • Miscellaneous Living Expenses
        • Exceptions
    • FAFSA—Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
    • COA – EFC = Financial Need
  • 33. How will you know?
    • The school will send an award letter
      • Many times this is online, or through email
    • The award letter will explain what types of aid are available
    • Choose what aid you accept and let your school know
  • 34. Sample Award Packages
    • Student 1 – No Pell Award
    • Student 2 – Pell Eligible
    • Budget: $13,688
    • Pell EFC: $5,381
    • Financial Need: $8,307
    • Subsidized Loan: $3,500
    • PLUS:$7,788
    • Unsubsidized: $2,000
    • State Leap Award: $400
    • Budget: $22,714
    • Pell EFC: $0
    • Financial Need: $22,714
    • Pell Grant: $5,500
    • FSEOG: $600
    • Perkins: $4,000
    • Subsidized: $4,500
    • Unsubsidized: $2,000
    • PLUS: $6,064
  • 35.
    • from Department of Education’s National Training for Counselors & Mentors
  • 36. Definition: Undocumented
    • Individual lacks the documents required for immigration or legal residence
    • Individuals may:
      • Have entered the country legally on a temporary basis and stayed after documents expired
      • Have entered without documents
      • Have been brought into the country by someone else
  • 37. Statistics about Undocumented Immigrants
    • 90% are from Mexico and Latin America
    • 66% live in six states: California, Texas, New York, Florida, Illinois, and New Jersey
    • Other areas have seen significant growth in undocumented residents in past 10-15 years
  • 38. Statistics about Undocumented Students
    • 1.6 million are children under 18
    • Another three million children are U.S. citizens by birth
    • Approximately 65,000 undocumented students graduate from U.S. high schools every year
  • 39. Undocumented Parents
    • Parents’ undocumented status usually does not affect student’s eligibility to apply for certain types of aid
    • Eligibility depends on student’s status
  • 40. Federal Aid
    • To be eligible for federal aid, students must be:
    • U.S. citizens or nationals
    • U.S. permanent residents
    • Citizens of the Freely Associated States (Micronesia, Palau, and the Marshall Islands)
    • Other eligible noncitizens
  • 41. Categories of Eligible Noncitizens
    • Refugees
    • Victims of human trafficking
    • Persons granted asylum
    • Conditional entrants
    • Persons paroled into U.S. for at least one year
    • Cuban-Haitian entrants
  • 42. Eligible Noncitizens
    • Can often document their status with an I-94, or Arrival-Departure Record
    • Can usually apply for permanent residency after specified time period, such as one year
  • 43. Ineligible Immigration Statuses
    • Family unity status
    • Temporary residents
    • Non-immigrant visas for work, students, tourists, and foreign government officials
  • 44. Student Options for Federal Aid
    • May need to refer undocumented students to an attorney familiar with immigration law and regulations about the feasibility of student obtaining permanent status in the U.S.
  • 45. State Legislation
    • States allowing undocumented students to pay in-state tuition:
    • California
    • Illinois
    • Kansas
    • Nebraska
    • New Mexico
    • New York
    • Oklahoma
    • Texas
    • Utah
    • Washington
  • 46. Eligibility Criteria for In-State Tuition
    • Attend a Utah high school for three or more years
    • Complete a high school diploma or GED in Utah
    • Enroll in a public postsecondary institution
    • File affidavit with USHE institution stating intent to legalize status and become permanent resident
    • SB 81: http://www.le.state.ut.us/~2008/bills/sbillint/SB0081.htm
    • SBR Policy R513-13: http://www.utahsbr.edu/policy/R513.pdf
  • 47. Aid from Colleges and Universities
    • Institutional scholarships, grants, loans, or work-study programs
    • Availability of institutional aid varies widely
    • Scholarship funds come with a merit component
  • 48. Aid from Private Sources
    • Fast Web
    • Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund
    • Salvadoran American Leadership and Educational Fund
  • 49. Be Proactive with Private Aid
    • Locating private aid sources is labor intensive and time consuming
    • Be proactive and identify local sources of aid
    • Make information easily available
    • Good project for student assistants or local organization
  • 50. Counseling Undocumented Students
    • Safe environment
    • Non-threatening
    • Not required to report status
    • Be supportive
  • 51.  
  • 52. Parental Planning
    • Students look to their parents as a key source of information
    • One survey found that 45% of parents had taken none of the suggested steps to plan for college
    • Many parents wait until their student is in high school before beginning the college planning process
  • 53. Financial Planning
    • People tend to overestimate the cost of a postsecondary education
    • Survey by the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP) found that a majority of parents believe that they are at least partially responsible for paying for at least part of their children’s postsecondary education
  • 54. Financial Planning
    • Many parents prepare financially for college expenses by:
      • Saving money
      • Reducing spending
    • Two thirds of parents with middle school students have not started saving money for college expenses
      • Other priorities
      • Believe that they have enough time to save
  • 55. Financial Planning
    • Many parents hope that financial aid will pay for their child’s education
    • Unaware of available resources
    • Don’t start researching financing options early enough
    • Students and their parents are not aware of the full range of available financial aid programs
  • 56. Tools and Resources to Promote Financial Planning
    • FAFSA4caster
    • USHE Junior High School Guide Book
    • USHE Take a Look at Your Future
    • ED’s My Future, My Way: How to Go, How to Pay
    • NASFAA’s Cash for College
    • College savings resources
  • 57. FAFSA4Caster
    • Early estimate of EFC
    • Auto-populates FAFSA
    • Good early planning tool
  • 58. My Future, My Way
    • Workbook for middle/junior high students
    • How to go to college and how to pay for college
    • Charts, checklists, and more
    • Download PDF at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov/pubs
  • 59.  
  • 60. Major Updates
    • Website redesign (launched in August)
    • Learning Express Library (available in December)
      • Petersen’s information available for full year as well
    • UtahFutures Connections
  • 61. Find more information at www.HigherEdUtah.org www.facebook.com/uheaa www.youtube.com/uheaa www.twitter.com/uheaa
  • 62.  
  • 63. Evaluation
    • This training funded by College Access Challenge Grant
    • Help us bring you more training in the future!
    • http://www.surveymonkey.com/
    • s/DQCYXSG
  • 64. UHEAA Outreach
    • Michelle Riddle
    • [email_address]
    • (801) 321-7145
    • Sumiko Martinez
    • [email_address]
    • (801) 366-8477
    • Brian Hosie
    • [email_address]
    • (801) 321-7245
    • Steve Rogers
    • [email_address]
    • (801) 366-8460
  • 65. Brought to you by