Say What

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Talking to instructors/faculty, presenting and writing... OH MY!

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  • UNT’s own ratemyprofessor.comSearch by professor or by class.
  • Write from your college or university e-mail account. Include the course number in your subject line. Think about what you're saying. - Choose an appropriate greeting. - Ask politely. - Proofread what you've written. - Sign with your full name, course number, and meeting time.Don't send unexpected attachments. When you get a reply, say thanks.
  • ASK: Who becomes anxious when faced with public speaking?Written - Must be well thought out, organized, explain ideas fully; answer all questionsOral – Listener can ask for clarification
  • Essay exams are an abbreviated version of writing a paper in class.Summarize – To restate in your own words the main point of another. (WHAT?)Define – Describe, explore, characterize a key idea. (WHAT?)Classify – To group items by shared characteristics, separate from other groups. (WHAT?)Compare/contrast – Explore significant likenesses and differences between 2+ subjects.(WHAT?)Analyze – Break an idea into parts and explain how those ideas work together. (WHY? HOW?)Argue – State a claim and support with reasons and evidence. (WHY? HOW?)Synthesize – Pull together varied ideas from 2+ sources. (WHY? HOW?)ASK: What kind(s) of writing have you practiced most recently? What types for which courses?
  • ASK: Why do instructors subject you to the hideous task of working with others?Roles – Sections? Strengths and interests?Group presentationsMeet - Analyze audience & goalsCan do work individuallyMeet again – Review content and plan visualsPRACTICEHave one person in charge of running visuals during presentation
  • C – This one’s easy. It’s a little-known fact that the past participle verb form (ending with “-ed” or “-en”) of the verb “to hang” (as in “from a noose,” different from the verb “to hang,” as in “putting your clothes on a hanger”) is “hanged,” in order to distinguish it from the verb of the same spelling.
  • B
  • C – Anytime we add a proper noun that can fit anywhere in a direct address, we should surround it with commas. Ex. James, run over to the refrigerator, James, and snag a cold brewsky for me, James. “James” can fit in several different places in the sentence. Thus, we need to surround it with commas. Also, proper nouns that act as appositives, which usually rename a noun, may be nonrestrictive (set off by commas) or restrictive (not set off by commas). A nonrestrictive appositive provides additional but not essential details about the noun or pronoun. Ex. The hybrid of aloe vera, xxeyzx, has not been approved yet by the FDA.
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