Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Effective business communication of message formats
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Effective business communication of message formats

2,694
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,694
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
75
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Presented by Sugiharto, SH. MM © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 2. Today’s professional employee is inundated with communications sent via different forms of media. Whether the message is in electronic or hard copy form Making a Good First Impression Remains Essential © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 3. Use Subject matter Help to tailor Corporate Culture the design of Local Business the messages Customs The aesthetic design of the message will speak to the reader and invite him or her to investigate and discern the content of the message. © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 4. will want those documents to create a lasting, positive impression on the receivers Internal receivers Will write messages External receivers The selected format for each message will contribute to that impression © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 5. first decision will be whether to convey the message in In writing Orally spoken Each method has advantages and disadvantages When faced with a situation that requires communication © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 6. The advantages of written messages are … Provide a permanent record that can be filed and referred to in the future Can be reread and studied, which is important if a message is long, is complex, or has been written in anger Can be revised and edited to ensure they adhere to the principles of business communication Can have legal value © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 7. The disadvantages of written messages are … Are generally transmitted slowly; e-mail and fax are notable exceptions Are viewed as being more formal, in part because they are permanent Do not lend themselves to quick or thorough feedback because there are few nonverbal cues and because the sender and receiver are in different locations Require storage, which can be timeconsuming and expensive © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 8. The process for developing written business messages consists of the following three steps: PLANNING DRAFTING FINALIZING © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 9. ANALYZE THE COMMUNICATION SITUATION PLANNING ESTABLISH PRIMARY AND SECONDARY PURPOSES ANALYZE THE RECEIVER SELECT THE TYPE OF MESSAGE © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 10. Is the receiver internal or external to the organization? PLANNING is to decide what is involved in the specific communication situation ANALYZE THE COMMUNICATION SITUATION Will he or she be the final receiver or an intermediate reader? What are the physical and political constraints under which I am operating? What action do I want my receiver to take? Who will receive the message Will my receiver view my message as positive? negative? persuasive? mixed? What is the relationship between me and my receiver? between our organizations? © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 11. PLANNING After analyzing the communication situation, you will establish the primary and secondary purposes of your message. This will be done within the framework of the four (4) business communication goals: ESTABLISH PRIMARY AND SECONDARY PURPOSES The main idea is the primary purpose, and the supporting ideas are the secondary purposes Receiver understanding Necessary receiver response Favorable relationship Organizational goodwill review the example next page … © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 12. PLANNING The main idea is the primary purpose, and the supporting ideas are the secondary purposes ESTABLISH PRIMARY AND SECONDARY PURPOSES The supporting ideas the primary purpose Approve purchase of 4 new computers unit The secondary ideas Describe purchasing procedure Identify hardware/software requirements Specify budget limitations © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 13. PLANNING Analyzing The Receiver in 4 areas Knowledge ANALYZE THE RECEIVER Interests Attitudes Emotional reaction To achieve its goals and purposes, your message must be understandable to the receiver with … the least amount of subject knowledge the lowest vocabulary level the most emotional opposition without insulting or being condescending to other receivers The analysis will determine the ideas, words, and approaches that communicate the message best in the situation to face. © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 14. PLANNING SELECT THE TYPE OF MESSAGE Written messages can be formatted as … E-mail Letters Memos Written reports Other document types Format and style will vary with the situation. Memos are used exclusively for internal communication; letters, e-mail, and reports may have either an internal or an external audience. © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 15. DRAFTING Using your mental or recorded notes from the outlining process, draft the message : Apply the principles of business communication use the you–viewpoint focus ON CONTENT. At this stage, getting something in writing is more important than generating perfect copy. Even with good planning, experienced writers sometimes encounter writer’s block—difficulty in putting thoughts into words © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 16. Proofreading the document to determine where it needs to be revised and edited. FINALIZE THE MESSAGE Revising and editing are similar processes with different objectives Revising focuses on content; editing focuses on mechanics © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School
  • 17. THANK YOU FOR LISTENING 3nd Meeting Business Communication Presented by Sugiharto, SH. MM STIE GICI Business School October 2013 Background image provide by slide Factory.blogspot.com Twitter @Hotslides c Presentation created by Ace 013/ugik Slides factory © MCX 2013 © SUGIHARTO, SH.MM GICI Business School