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Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
Electoral Process
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Electoral Process

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  • 1. Primary electionDemocrats Republicans General Election
  • 2. Self AnnouncePetition Caucus Direct Convention Primary
  • 3.  A person announces they want to run for office. Who uses this?  Someone who failed to win their party’s nomination.
  • 4.  A group of like-minded people who meet to select the candidates they will support in an upcoming election. Originally the caucus was a private meeting consisting of a few influential figures in the community.
  • 5.  Political Parties:  Political parties began to broaden the membership of the caucus. Democracy:  People criticized the caucus for their closed, unrepresenta tive character.
  • 6.  The process begins in local caucus and works its way up to through the country, state and then the national level. The convention system began to come under attack in the early 1900s and was to be replaced by another method.
  • 7.  Anti-Mason Party in 1831 (1st national convention) Party Bosses began to manipulate the process.
  • 8.  A direct primary is an intra-party election to pick that party’s candidate for the general election. State laws require that the major parties use the primaries to choose their candidates for the Senate, House, governor ship, etc.
  • 9.  Party nominating election in which ONLY declared party members can vote. Party membership is established by registration.
  • 10.  Party nominating election in which ANY qualified voter can take part.
  • 11.  All voters receive same ballot and can vote for any party for any office they like. California’s version was ruled Unconstitutional.
  • 12.  Winner needs an absolute majority (more than 50%) Top 2 vote getters in the 1st primary “Run-Off” or face one another in a 2nd election.
  • 13.  These are elections in which candidates are not identified by party labels. Typically, a contender who wins a clear majority runs unopposed in the general election.
  • 14.  Nominating by means of petitions signed by a certain number of required qualified voters in the election district. When is this method used?  Mostly at the local level.
  • 15.  Why did Congress pass the bill?  Election of 2000 Some of the major provisions of the bill:  Replace lever-operated and punch-card voting devices by 2006  Upgrade administration of elections
  • 16.  A voter’s eligibility has been challenged…but can vote and the voter’s qualification can be checked or verified later.
  • 17.  Congress set the date for national elections (Tuesday after the 1st Monday in November). Explanation of:  Never on a Sunday (Church and state)  1st day of month is often payday (pressure from employer)
  • 18.  Some states have allowed for early voting in an effort to increase voter turnout and make voting more convenient.
  • 19.  Voting by those unable to get to their regular polling places on election day. Designed for: 1. Sick/Ill 2. Disabled 3. Away from home
  • 20.  This occurs when a strong candidate running for an office at the top of the ballot helps attract voters to other candidates on the party’s ticket. Reverse Coattail:  Candidate at top of ticket can HURT other party members.
  • 21.  Define Ballot:  A device used to record a voter’s choices. Over the history of the United States voting has taken many shapes (voice, paper ballots) and corruption led to a demand for ballot reforms.
  • 22. 1. Printed at public expense2. Lists names of all candidates3. Given out only at polls4. Marked in secret
  • 23.  Candidates are grouped on this ballot by office they are running for. Sometimes called the Massachusetts ballot because of its early use (1888) there.
  • 24.  Lists each party’s candidates in a column under the party’s name. Good: parties like because it promotes straight-ticket voting Bad: does not take much thought in the voting process.
  • 25.  Can help voters prepare for an election. They are mailed in some states and appear in newspapers in others.
  • 26.  Origin of :  Jacksonian Democracy in the 1830s  More offices meant more democratic the government was

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