Super
Carnivals
Nigeria’s biggest
street parties
PRESIDENT
GOODLUCK
JONATHANGCFR
Launches Nigeria’s Centenary Celebrations...
The National AnthemThe Flag
The National PledgeThe Coat of Arms
“Arise, O Compatriots”
(1978–present)
Arise, O compatriots...
1www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
His Excellency, President
Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr
The visionary behind
Fascinatin...
3www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
A personal word of
welcome from
Nigeria’s First Lady
I
should like to add my voice in ...
National Orientation Agency (NOA)
NOA was established with the mandate of enlightening
Nigerians on government policies, programmes and
activities, as well ...
Great Reasons
to Visit Abuja
ZUMA ROCK
Zuma Rock towers over Abuja
from the surrounding plains.
At 750 metres high it is k...
Centre
of Unity
Admire	our innovative
architecture: the
Presidential Villa, the
National Assembly
Complex, Abuja
Stadium, ...
At home in Our Environment
Chrome Group is more than oil and gas. Whether it is destination inspection,
power, logistics, ...
10 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
A
warm welcome to all citizens and friends of
Nigeria. It is a great pleasure to tur...
11www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Introduction by
Chief Edem Duke,
Honourable Minister
of Tourism, Culture 
National Or...
Contents
President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan GCFR – The Visionary Behind Fascinating Nigeria...............1
Dame Patience J...
Kola Aluko – Motor Racing Aficionado.........................................................................................
14 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Editor’s
Letter
W
elcome to the first issue of
Fascinating Nigeria, the magazine
tha...
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF – Funmi Oladeinde-Ogbue
DEPUTY EDITOR – Obebe Ojeifo
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR – Sarah Cartledge
ASSOCIATE EDITOR...
16
17www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
P
resident Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr believes
wholeheartedly i...
18 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Dubai. We have had numerous festivals and events
here in Nigeria...
19www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
well as tourism, with participation by Nigerians at
home and in t...
20 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
The budget allocation for tourism is currently
one of the lowest...
21www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
happens in Maiduguri, tourists are not able to
determine the dist...
22 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Vision
The Vision of the Ministry is to reposition Nigeria as
th...
23www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
CHIEF DUKE’S TOP TOURIST ATTRACTIONS
n Obudu Mountain Resort
n Id...
Former President General Olusegun Obasanjo (rtd)
and Dame Patience Jonathan enjoying the event. 
Behind them are President...
25www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
President Goodluck Ebele
Jonathan gcfr with former
President Shehu Shagari
President ...
26 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
our blessings as a nation, celebrate our resilience as a people
and launch into our ...
27www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
The Centenary Projects initiative
n This private sector initiativ...
28 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
I
am very proud of our beautiful country.As a
people we are fortunate enough to enjo...
29www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
fascinating nigeria
29www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
women to produce their own r...
30 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
fascinating nigeria
Does the investment give any special advantage in the City?
No i...
31www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
fascinating nigeria
Who is the visionary behind this whole concept?
The visionary is ...
32 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
fascinating nigeria
CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
FEBRUARY – MARCH 2013
n Ground-breaking c...
Centenary City
NIGERIA’S
“SMART CITY”
Out of Nigeria’s glorious Centenary celebrations, a major legacy
will be created – t...
35www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
fascinating nigeria
C
entenary City will promote world-class
multinational and domest...
36 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
fascinating nigeria
include a mini stadium and signature golf course). A
modern spor...
Centuryin pictures
A
Front view Government House, Lagos.
Marina Street waterfront shops Lagos, 1925.
38 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Nigerians in trenches, at the battle of
Mahiya (1919). Source – ...
39www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
King's College, Lagos (circa 1910), a boys-only secondary school
...
40 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
 Classes for children
in the street, Ibadan, 1970.
 Enda Park. A...
41www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Lagos, 1960.
Aerial view of Lagos, 1960s.
42 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Sugar cane seller, 1930s.
Oba Afunbiowo Adesida I
meeting the Queen, 1956.
 Lagos du...
43
Fascinating nigeria
Tinubu square at night, Lagos, 1967.
His Majesty the Oba of
Benin, Akenzua II, at his
desk in the p...
44 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Installation of the Sultan of
Sokoto Attahiru II, 1903.
Burial c...
45www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Catholic mission, Asaba, Southern Nigeria, 1900s.
The Sariki of G...
46 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Abirimagia Masquerade, Buguma, Nigeria, 1944. King Duke IX of Ol...
47www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Sir Ahmadu Bello (right) with the
Emir of Kano Sir Muhammadu
Sanu...
48 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
Aerial view of the University of Lagos Staff Quarters, 1972.
The...
49www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating nigeria
 The Emir of Kano Alhaji (Dr)
Ado Bayero when he was a
policeman ...
fascinating
NIGERIA
52 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating Nigeria
Ever wondered what makes Nigeria such a fascinating
nation? We c...
53www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating Nigeria
our other “black stuff” – Guinness. Since
1962, we have brewed Gu...
54 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
We respect our elders
Another source of Nigerian pride is our
societal values, and I...
55www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating Nigeria
a writer for the New York Times in 2002
– is second largest in th...
56 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
A Marvellous
Country – Nigeria
M
y next door neighbours back home in
Benin have a da...
57www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Fascinating Nigeria
worship, thanks to our recent win in the African Cup
of Nations T...
NIGERIAeverything
under the sun
Lagos Architecture, by Kelechi Amadi-Obi
58
T
ucked away in the inner curve of West
Africa, surrounded by French-speaking
republics, Nigeria remains something of a
my...
www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Nigeria’s history is an ongoing journey of
discovery, from the south’s famous Benin Bro...
61www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
Venture off the beaten track in Nigeria and
you’ll discover many hidden gems. Explore...
www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
stocked with everything from antelope and
monkeys to birds of almost every variety.
If ...
www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
In the country’s capital, Abuja, the Hilton has
evolved from an international hotel com...
www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
anthropologists. It’s a place given to creation and
improvisation, where jazz clubs, po...
Ontario – Powering Africa Today and Tomorrow
Ontario Oil and Gas Limited is a world-class integrated trading company and
i...
Ontario Oil  Gas Limited
Tel: + 234 9 670 7957, + 234 9 413 6398 | Fax: +234 1 271 8186 | www.ontariooilng.com
10 Ologun A...
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1

12,113

Published on

Welcome to the first issue of Fascinating Nigeria, the magazine that celebrates the best of Nigerian art, culture, sports, and entertainment, showcasing the country in all its beauty and versatility.

Published in: Education, Business, Travel
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
12,113
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
86
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Fascinating Nigeria Issue 1

  1. 1. Super Carnivals Nigeria’s biggest street parties PRESIDENT GOODLUCK JONATHANGCFR Launches Nigeria’s Centenary Celebrations Discover Nigeria’s Hidden Gems VOL 1 ISSUE 1 2013 CULTURE I TOURISM I ENTERTAINMENT the flag Nigeria’s colours are green and white, as symbolised by the Nigerian flag. This unique design represents the essence of Nigeria – the green for its natural abundance and white for the desire for peace and unity within the country. As each state hosts the Nigerian flag during the Centenary Celebrations, the people of Nigeria can identify with the inherent Nigerianness within all of them. 1 the coat of arms The Coat of Arms is the official stamp of Nigeria as a country. It symbolically represents the country and is found on all official documents, particularly passports that identify the bearer as being Nigerian. As with most national emblems, it originates in the natural world: the white “Y” represents the country’s two main rivers, Niger and Benue, and the black shield its fertile soil. The red eagle symbolises strength and the two white chargers dignity and pride. 2 the national anthem “Arise, O Compatriots” dates from 1978, when it replaced the original anthem instituted in 1960. It is sung to pledge allegiance to the nation as a whole and calls on all Nigerians to love and serve the country and to remember those who fought for its independence and unity. 3 the national pledge The National Pledge is recited immediately after the Anthem and reaffirms a good citizen’s loyalty and faithfulness to Nigeria. It reinforces Nigeria’s unity as a country and as one people, requiring all Nigerians to defend the nation and to honour Nigeria. 4 Nigeria’s national emblems are symbols of the country’s unity.They represent the many facets of Nigeria that have combined to create this giant of African nations. They symbolise the union of many different peoples, faiths and traditions and the belief that Nigerians have in the unity of Nigeria. Their history represents the transition from the old to the new, taking Nigeria forward with hope and confidence into the next 100 years. Nigeria’s National Emblems
  2. 2. The National AnthemThe Flag The National PledgeThe Coat of Arms “Arise, O Compatriots” (1978–present) Arise, O compatriots, Nigeria’s call obey To serve our Fatherland With love and strength and faith. The labour of our heroes past Shall never be in vain, To serve with heart and might One nation bound in freedom, peace and unity. O God of creation Direct our noble cause Guide our leaders right Help our youth the truth to know In love and honesty to grow And living just and true Great lofty heights attain To build a nation where peace And justice reign. The National Pledge of Nigeria is recited immediately after the Anthem: I pledge to Nigeria my country, To be faithful, loyal and honest, To serve Nigeria with all my strength, To defend her unity, And uphold her honour and glory, So help me God. Nigeria’s coat of arms consists of a shield, two wavy bands, two horses, an eagle and plants at the foot of the shield. The black shield represents the rich and fertile earth the country is endowed with, while the wavy bands represent the river Niger and the river Benue, which flow through Nigeria. The two white horses represent dignity and pride, and a common wild Nigerian flower (Costus spectabilis) covers the ground on which the symbols stand, representing the beauty of Nigeria. The wreath is in the national colours (green and white) and the eagle represents strength. The motto of Nigeria “Unity and Faith, Peace and Progress” is also cited on the coat of arms. Nigeria’s national anthem is a rousing, patriotic song that evokes the past history and future aspirations of all Nigerians. It glorifies our country and reminds us all that we are one nation, despite our many different cultural backgrounds. The first national song was adopted in October 1960, when Nigeria obtained its independence from the United Kingdom. It was written by Lillian Jean Williams, a British expatriate, and the music was composed by Frances Berda. However, a few years later it was decided that a new song should be composed. And in 1978 a competition for a new anthem was organised. The five winners, John A. Ilechukwu, Eme Etim Akpan, B. A. Ogunnaike, Sota Omoigui and P. O. Aderibigbe, were chosen from 1,499 entries. Their lyrics were incorporated into the new anthem and set to music by Benedict Odiase, the Director of Music of the Nigeria Police Band. Created by a Nigerian student Michael Taiwo Akinkumni, this well-loved design was chosen from almost 3000 entries in a competition held to create a new national flag to represent an independent Nigeria. The green stripes represent Nigeria’s agriculture industry and its lush vegetation. The white stripe represents the desire for peace and unity within the country. The Nigerian flag was adopted the same day Nigeria gained independence from Britain on 1 October 1960 and was hoisted for the first time as the Union Flag was lowered.
  3. 3. 1www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com His Excellency, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr The visionary behind Fascinating Nigeria I am delighted to introduce Fascinating Nigeria, a new brand that I have just approved to promote the development of tourism. I believe wholeheartedly in the potential of tourism development in our beautiful country and its vital role in the transformation of Nigeria. Fascinating Nigeria has been developed to capture the essence of our uniqueness. Nigeria is indeed fascinating, and the brand will communicate the riches that lie within our borders, so that not only Nigerians but people from all around the globe will seek out its glories. In the pages of Fascinating Nigeria magazine you will discover all that is amazing about our country. We are a cohesive nation, rich in human resources and uncommon biodiversity. We have a wide variety of cultural offerings and economic opportunities that few countries can boast. We are a united, powerful and prosperous nation and our Centenary offers us the chance to explore and affirm the Nigerian identity. We shall count our blessings as a nation, celebrate our dexterity and resilience as a people and resolve to launch into our next century with renewed determination, hope and expectations. We are one nation – one Fascinating Nigeria. Let us proudly celebrate and share in our nation’s story of freedom, achievements and aspirations and show the world we are – Fascinating.
  4. 4. 3www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com A personal word of welcome from Nigeria’s First Lady I should like to add my voice in welcoming you to Fascinating Nigeria. Like everyone in Nigeria I know how spectacular and diverse our country is, but this is not a secret we should keep to ourselves. As Tourism Ambassador for Nigeria I endeavour to promote Nigeria in all its glory to the rest of the world. As you may know, I have been particularly keen to promote the interests of women, especially through the Women for Change and Development Initiative (WCDI). Tourism is one of the ways in which women and young people can earn a living and I have been very focused on making sure these opportunities are recognised. WCDI is training women for the hospitality industry because there will be many new positions as we grow this sector. Women will find they are much in demand and, as we create new leisure destinations, more openings will proliferate. Women are also learning new skills and receiving adult education through my foundation, the A. Aruera Reachout Foundation. It aims to alleviate the suffering of the poor and less privileged in society by empowering the beneficiaries in skills acquisition, as well as offering health services and by subsidising household income. Since these initiatives were launched we have seen many women rise to the top in previously male-dominated circles, most visibly in government. This success can filter down so that every Nigerian woman can have the confidence to succeed in life, providing successfully for her children and achieving career goals – which she can do within the growing tourism environment. As our tourism industry grows, so our national unity will strengthen ever more deeply. Nigerians will demonstrate pride in our nation as international visitors arrive in greater numbers. Here in Nigeria we are fortunate to have fascinating assets, whether cultural, environmental or historical, that can attract many tourists. I look forward to welcoming you to Nigeria to see for yourselves! Her Excellency, Dame (Dr) Patience Goodluck Jonathan, First Lady of the Federal Republic of Nigeria www.aaruerareachoutfoundation.org
  5. 5. National Orientation Agency (NOA)
  6. 6. NOA was established with the mandate of enlightening Nigerians on government policies, programmes and activities, as well as mobilising public support for them. It is also responsible for re-orientating the attitudes of Nigerians and providing feedback to government on the people’s feelings and reactions towards its policies and activities, thus expanding the space for public input into the government decision-making process. National Orientation Agency (NOA) Block B, Old Federal Secretariat, Area 1, Garki, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory Tel: +234 9 873 3900 www.noa.gov.ng
  7. 7. Great Reasons to Visit Abuja ZUMA ROCK Zuma Rock towers over Abuja from the surrounding plains. At 750 metres high it is known as the Gateway to Abuja, as it stands on the edge of the Federal Capital Territory, marking the outer edge of the city limits. It is depicted on the N100 bill and is one of the official wonders of Nigeria.
  8. 8. Centre of Unity Admire our innovative architecture: the Presidential Villa, the National Assembly Complex, Abuja Stadium, the National Mosque, the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC), NNPC Towers, the Abuja Conference Centre and the ECOWAS Secretariat. Explore Aso Rock, Eagle Square, Abuja Zoological Park, Abuja Wonderland and Park, Zuma Rock, Millenium Park, Jabi Lake. Shop in Abuja's Arts Crafts Village and the Grand Towers Mall. Relax at the Transcorp Hilton, IBB Golf Course and the Silver Bird Cinema. Oloye Olajumoke Akinjide Honourable Minister of State for the Federal Capital Territory Senator Bala Mohammed Honourable Minister of the Federal Capital Territory
  9. 9. At home in Our Environment Chrome Group is more than oil and gas. Whether it is destination inspection, power, logistics, broadcasting, telecommunications, insurance or oil and gas, we are at home in our terrain. We care about the environment, seeking to make a “green difference”, helping to create a better planet for all: doing well and doing good.GettoknowmoreaboutChromeGroup.Visit:www.thechromegroup.net ChromeG R O U P A Nigerian company with a global perspective BALGL SCANSYTEMSTECHNOLOGYLIMITED Starcrest Nigeria BALGL Scanystems Limited C o m m u n i c a t i o n s L t d . www.thechromegroup.net
  10. 10. 10 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com A warm welcome to all citizens and friends of Nigeria. It is a great pleasure to turn the pages of this fascinating magazine and see such diverse places and people, all Nigerian! We are each proud of our own state, glorying in its beauty, traditions and culture. This pride is at the heart of our sense of identity, but we know we are part of a bigger entity too. Nigeria is a magnificent country and we should all take the opportunity to visit as many places as possible, whether in our own state or further afield. While we hope that tourists will come here in great numbers to see our natural wonders and experience our widely varied culture, as Nigerians we are fortunate to have this beauty and culture all around us – let us go out and enjoy it. I should like to add my own welcome to all readers of Fascinating Nigeria. As Senator Ahmed Hassan Barata has so eloquently described, Nigeria is indeed a diverse and dynamic country and it deserves to have a worldwide audience. Fascinating Nigeria magazine skilfully shows us how we can use culture to unite Nigeria and benefit from our diversity. From my own perspective, the sector aims to harness the various and diverse cultural endowments to re-orientate the consciousness of Nigerians and to make us realise that we need each other. Through these pages we can understand the different cultural norms, values, rich traditions and customs of the many ethnic groups in our country. We are indeed fortunate to be Nigerians and to live in such a beautiful country. I look forward to future issues of this fascinating magazine as it reveals more of Nigeria in all its glory. Senator Ahmed Hassan Barata Chairman, Senate Committee on Culture andTourism Hon. Ben Nnebedumchukwu Nwankwo Chairman, House of Representatives Committee on Culture andTourism National Assembly Committees onTourism, Culture and National Orientation: Providing Legislative Support 10 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
  11. 11. 11www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Introduction by Chief Edem Duke, Honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture National Orientation F ascinating Nigeria magazine illustrates, communicates and showcases some of the extraordinary attributes of Nigeria, her people and her natural assets. When we think about Nigeria many images, feelings and thoughts go through our minds. Nigeria is like thirty-seven countries in one. We’re perhaps the most culturally diverse nation in the world, and there are so many attributes that make us fascinating. Our country exudes energy and spirit, and has an unbelievable amount of potential, so there can be no better name to describe our “brand” than Fascinating Nigeria. But for all of our glorious attributes, we haven’t yet told our story – and that is why this magazine is so important. Our nation’s youth will see the creative achievements of role models. The world will learn things about our country that they never, ever expected. And everyone will see that Nigeria is ready to take her place on the world stage. By 2050 we will be one of the most populous countries on the planet, and we need to harness our creativity and individuality to make our country the great place it is poised to be. We need to develop the opportunities that lie within our history and our How fascinating is Nigeria! We are blessed with the most beautiful country and vibrant people, and as we approach our Centenary next January I am proud to announce a new initiative to celebrate our uniqueness – Fascinating Nigeria. culture. And this includes showcasing our beautiful landscape – so that we can build world-class resorts for both Nigerians and visitors to enjoy our natural assets. With tourism comes investment opportunities, and I am pleased to note that Nigeria is currently the focus of both big hotel chains and individual boutique hotels. The time has come now to work with local governments to develop the infrastructure for visitors and tourists, and to identify the places they will want to see. We need to let the world know that Nigeria is just as safe as other countries, with a more developed tourist market. The more visitors we attract, the more Nigerians will see the personal benefits that tourism can bring. Sport is a viable tool to encourage tourism and we are looking at ways to make Nigeria an important part of the world sporting itinerary – and create valuable business opportunities from it. Exciting times lie ahead for our country, with new opportunities for all Nigerians. So please feel free to pass this magazine on to your friends and contacts. Show them how fascinating Nigeria is, and encourage them to invest in our future! This will define Nigeria.
  12. 12. Contents President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan GCFR – The Visionary Behind Fascinating Nigeria...............1 Dame Patience Jonathan – A Warm Welcome from Nigeria’s First Lady..............................................................3 Senator Ahmed Hassan Barata and Hon. Ben Nnebedumchukwu Nwankwo – Welcome the Readers of Fascinating Nigeria...................................................................................................................................10 Introduction by the Honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture National Orientation.........................................................................................................................................................................11 Editor’s Welcome......................................................................................................................................................................................................................14 Fascinating Nigeria Interview with Chief Edem Duke, Honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture National Orientation.........................................................................................................................................................................16 President Jonathan gets Centenary Preparations Moving............................................................................................24 Centenary Celebrations – Secretary to the Government of the Federation Discusses the Arrangements......................................................................................................................................................................................28 Centenary Celebrations – At a Glance.........................................................................................................................................................32 Centenary City – The Smart City.........................................................................................................................................................................34 A Century in Pictures .......................................................................................................................................................................................................37 Fascinating Nigeria – Why Nigeria Is So Fascinating................................................................................................................51 Nigeria – Everything Under the Sun..................................................................................................................................................................58 Fascinating Facts – All You Need To Know............................................................................................................................................68 Fascinating Destinations Yankari National Park – Nigeria’s Best-Known Tourist Destination......................................................................70 Taraba’s Natural Treasures – Mambilla Plateau, Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve and Gashaka Gumti National Park.................................................................................................................................................................................76 Grape Expectations – A Nigerian Wine Industry?........................................................................................................................82 Idanre Hills – A Backpacker’s Dream..............................................................................................................................................................84 Boki Rainforest – A Stunning Display of Biodiversity...............................................................................................................88 Calabar – Nigeria’s First Capital City................................................................................................................................................................94 Carnivals – Traditional Celebrations in Abuja and Lagos................................................................................................ 101 Hotels in Nigeria – Definitely On the Up............................................................................................................................................ 108 Nigerian Food – The Best of Nigerian Cooking............................................................................................................................ 112 Fascinating People Iyanya – Music Maestro............................................................................................................................................................................................... 117 Serena and Venus Williams – Tennis Icons Visit Lagos................................................................................................... 119 Igho Sanomi – Sponsoring Nigeria’s Culture.................................................................................................................................... 122 58 150 222 171 51 94
  13. 13. Kola Aluko – Motor Racing Aficionado................................................................................................................................................. 124 Angela Morenike Adebayo – Young and Fascinating......................................................................................................... 126 Chinua Achebe – A Tribute................................................................................................................................................................................... 128 Yinka Shonibare MBE – Artist and Sculptor ..................................................................................................................................... 132 Ruke Amata – Nollywood Director............................................................................................................................................................. 140 Ituen Basi – Fashion Designer............................................................................................................................................................................ 142 Chika Ike – Dressing Nigeria................................................................................................................................................................................ 146 Michelle Ogundehin – Elle Decoration’s Top-Flight Editor......................................................................................... 150 Fascinating Culture The African Artists’ Foundation – Showcasing Nigeria’s Talent.......................................................................... 156 Gidan Makama Museum – Revealing Kano’s Illustrious Past................................................................................... 162 Kalakuta Museum – Remembering Fela Kuti................................................................................................................................ 164 Africa Heritage Group – Saving Nigeria’s Historic Buildings.................................................................................... 166 Return of the Artefacts – Nigeria’s Heritage Pieces Come Home......................................................................... 168 Naija Beats – Nigerian Music Goes Global......................................................................................................................................... 171 Nightlife in Lagos – Hit the Clubs................................................................................................................................................................ 174 Motor Racing – Nigeria’s Racing Eagles Hit the World Circuit................................................................................. 180 Football – Super Eagles – Say No More................................................................................................................................................... 183 Spa Trek – Heaven on Earth in Nigeria.................................................................................................................................................... 188 Ebo Landing – How Africa and America are Helping Slave Descendants Find Their Roots ...... 194 UNESCO – Keeping the History of Slavery Alive....................................................................................................................... 198 Fascinating Events NAFEST – The National Festival for Arts and Culture......................................................................................................... 200 AFAC – The African Arts and Crafts Expo.......................................................................................................................................... 202 Africa Magic Viewers’ Choice Awards – The Star-Studded Awards Ceremony.............................. 208 UNWTO – The World Tourism Organisation’s Africa Regional Conference in Calabar........... 214 Emancipation Week – President Jonathan’s Visit to the Caribbean.................................................................... 218 Nigerian Culture Week in Beijing – Bringing Nigeria to China.......................................................................... 222 Fascinating Final Pidgin – Learn to Speak the Lingo................................................................................................................................................................. 226 Travel Supplement Nigerian Do’s and Don’ts ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 234 Healthy Nigeria – Medical Advice Before You Travel........................................................................................................... 238 Airports in Nigeria.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 240 Airlines in Nigeria............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 242 Car Hire........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 243 Where to Stay – Hotels, Guest Houses and Resorts................................................................................................................. 245 Emergency Services........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 251 208 132 68 188 84 146
  14. 14. 14 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Editor’s Letter W elcome to the first issue of Fascinating Nigeria, the magazine that celebrates the best of our wonderful country. There is so much to see and do across Nigeria that it has been hard to know quite where to start in this issue! Next January we celebrate Nigeria’s centenary. Even though our country is only 100 years old, it has established a firm identity – we have celebrated our differences and respected all our traditions to pull together to make Nigeria cohesive, vibrant and strong. The first issue of Fascinating Nigeria takes a look at our country’s proud history through photos. From the early years of transport through to the modern cities that we now take for granted, we examine how Nigeria has evolved, and is poised to become an African powerhouse. We also speak with Nigerians, some of the most industrious, versatile, inspiring and talented people in the world. We examine our music and film scene, our arts and crafts heritage, our sports, museums and social life, and our fashion industry which is currently taking the world by storm. In short, we take a good look at who we are. Our society and culture has been shaped by our stunning landscape, and in this issue we celebrate our most beautiful hidden gems. We bring you pictures and reports from the Boki rainforest, one of the world’s 25 biodiversity hotspots, the Yankari Game Reserve, historic Calabar, the Mambilla Plateau and the Idanre Hills. I’m delighted to reveal that Fascinating Nigeria is the brainchild of Chief Edem Duke, the Honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation. Chief Edem Duke is doing so much to open up Nigeria’s diversity to visitors at home and abroad. After pioneering tourism in his native Cross River State, he is perfectly placed to present Nigeria to the world. In this issue he speaks about his vision for tourism, and how it will contribute greatly to the economy and the development of Nigeria. He discusses his plans to bring this to life and reveals his favourite destinations around the country. This issue explores the Nigerian cultural weeks in Trinidad and Tobago, China and Brazil, and we review the success of the UNWTO meeting in Calabar last year. We also examine the rising hotel industry in Nigeria, in both the business and leisure sectors, and take a trip through our nightlife, restaurants and cultural events. But most importantly of all we look at the planned Centenary celebrations, giving us an exciting preview of how Nigeria will party in January 2014. If you have a favourite place or old photo of Nigeria, we’d love to include them in upcoming issues, so please get in touch. We look forward to taking this journey from the past and into our future together. Enjoy! Funmi Oladeinde-Ogbue Editor-in-Chief
  15. 15. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF – Funmi Oladeinde-Ogbue DEPUTY EDITOR – Obebe Ojeifo EDITORIAL DIRECTOR – Sarah Cartledge ASSOCIATE EDITOR – Dr Taiwo Oladokun ASSOCIATE EDITOR – Chika Balogun ASSISTANT EDITOR – Terfa Tilley-Gyado SUB-EDITOR- Hannah Martin CONCEPT AND DESIGN – Steve Bell and Lesley Mitchell CONTRIBUTORS ALKASIM ABDULKADIR DAMI AJAYI PETER AZIZA KIRIEM BELLO VICTOR EHIKHAMENOR LYNN HOUGHTON Lucy Mason CHETA NWANZE YEMISI OGBE MICHELLE OGUNDEHIN DR UGO OKOLI TAMARA THIESSEN SESU TILLEY-GYADO LIZZIE WILLIAMS SARAH WOODS VOL 1 ISSUE 1 2013 Fascinating Nigeria is a publication of the Federal Ministry of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation. Published by Ancorapoint Limited 2nd Floor Berkeley Square House, Mayfair, London, W1J 6BD | 2 Island Way Dolphin Estate, Ikoyi, Lagos | 13b Dar es Salaam Street, Wuse 2, Abuja info@ancorapoint.com | www.ancorapoint.com Official Magazine of the Federal Ministry of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation NIGERIA FASCINATING CULTURE I TOURISM I ENTERTAINMENT Disclaimer PHOTOGRAPHS: Every effort has been made to trace the copyright holder for photographs used in this publication. They have been reproduced in good faith. If you believe you hold the copyright please contact us at info@ancorapoint.com If you would like to contribute your own pictures for inclusion in the magazine, please either email us at info@ancorapoint.com or visit our Facebook page www.facebook.com/FascinatingNigeriaMagazine 15www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. 17www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria P resident Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr believes wholeheartedly in the tourism potential of Nigeria, and with good reason. Nigeria offers a beautiful variety of riches that can be developed to create attractive tourist destinations and provide a much-desired second stream of income for the country. It is vital that Nigeria’s economy diversifies away from its current reliance on oil and gas. President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr believes in the potential of our country and is working tirelessly through his Transformation Agenda to grow non-oil sectors. Tourism and culture have been identified as a prime target for this end. The Honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation, Chief Edem Duke, has already set in motion many different initiatives within the Tourism Transformation Agenda remit. Here he speaks about the bigger picture and his plans to grow the tourism sector substantially. Fascinating Nigeria is an ambitious concept. Please tell us what you think is most fascinating about our country. Fortunately you can list a hundred and one things that are fascinating and attractive about Nigeria. One, the sheer size of Interview with the Honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation, Chief Edem Duke The head of Nigeria’s tourism ministry discusses the many varied ways Nigeria can promote herself as a tourist destination our country. Two, the dynamism of our youth. Three, the creativity of the people. The achievements of Nigerians in every sphere of human endeavour; the huge size of our market, which makes it a most profitable investment destination in all of Africa; the landscape. Nigeria is thirty six states and a federal capital territory. It’s like thirty seven countries in one. Nigeria is, perhaps, the most culturally diverse country in the world. There are so very many attributes of this country that make us fascinating. Despite its beauty, West Africa traditionally has not been a big tourist destination for international visitors. How do you plan to promote Nigeria as an attractive destination? The Ministry of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation has a clear mandate to promote tourism and culture from the President within his Transformation Agenda. In line with that we are undertaking programmes and activities geared towards promoting our rich tourism and cultural potential. We are identifying and developing many different opportunities, both at home and abroad. We have had cultural exchanges and visits with China, Brazil and Trinidad and Tobago, and we have participated in tourism fairs in London, Spain, Berlin and
  18. 18. 18 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Dubai. We have had numerous festivals and events here in Nigeria including the UNWTO (World Tourism Organization) in Calabar last year, and of course the wonderful carnivals which proudly promote our culture. Do you have a long-term plan in place to achieve a certain number of tourists? Yes, but this involves aligning with other ministries to achieve vital elements such as good infrastructure – roads and hotels for a start – and from there we can grow substantially. Tourism is a labour-intensive sector and there are huge opportunities for employment, but we need to work with the hotel and service industries to train local people to a certain standard. What are the most popular tourist destinations in Nigeria? These would easily be the pristine Obudu Mountain Resort in Cross River state, the Idanre Hills, Yankari Reserve, the Afi Mountain Resort and the slave routes around Badagry and Calabar. In the south east there are some unbelievable caves that you could explore for days on end. And then you can go up to Lokoja, the Confluence City. The Niger and Benue rivers flow through and meet here, making it a prime location for tourist investment. In the south west, we have the Ikogosi Warm Springs – it is a phenomenal thing. In fact, there is hardly any state where you won’t find a unique product; the greatest aspect of our tourism is our culture, which is quite individual and fascinating in each state. Do you plan a big campaign to promote national tourism to Nigerians? Fascinating Nigeria Magazine is part of this big campaign. We have designed it to showcase the best of Nigeria and to encourage all Nigerians to travel around our wonderful country and absorb its special identity. In the last two years, the culture and tourism environment in Nigeria has become increasingly active. It is benefitting from a new enthusiasm by the various state governors who have identified this sector as a major focal point to rally their people and as a platform for unity, as well as a major employment area. Once we raise its profile, there will be growth in our cultural industries as With Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, in Lagos
  19. 19. 19www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria well as tourism, with participation by Nigerians at home and in the Diaspora. Other African countries promote their wildlife parks and animals to attract international visitors. Currently Nigeria only has around 25 lions, but plenty of primates and other animals. Would you consider working with international wildlife organisations to promote this aspect, which could generate large revenues? The wildlife parks are under the remit of the Minister of Environment, but obviously there is a crossover as the parks in particular will attract tourists. Additionally, opportunities are available for us to tap into platforms in the private sector, development partners and donor agencies, in order to enhance some of the basic framework in the sector. How will the creative sector (the arts, fashion etc.) generate tourism appeal in Nigeria on the scale of, say, Kenya or South Africa? The creative sector in Nigeria is easily the most dynamic on the continent. The challenge is that we are not capturing the sector’s GDP achievements and contributions as much as we should. In terms of our fashion, Nigerian designers are already in Selfridges and other retail chains around the world. In fact, I have sat with international designers like Roberto Cavalli who have identified the fashion business in Nigeria as being the new frontier globally. Our recording artistes are making music that is resonating even in North America. All over Africa, Nigerian music has become the most popular. Nollywood has grown in leaps and bounds and has redefined the perception of Nigeria and brought a better understanding of our environment. So, when you look at our sector and compare it to Kenya’s or South Africa’s, we’re recording more music, selling more fashion, making more films, but we are not deliberately marketing these or communicating the merits that they are bringing. Nor are we identifying opportunities for them. On the runways of Paris, London, New York and Johannesburg, Nigerian designers are earning recognition. In terms of music, on some of the most important platforms on the continent, Nigerian recording artists are cleaning up the prizes. We need to develop a better strategy to promote, market and disseminate information. During a courtesy visit by the Lebanese Ambassador
  20. 20. 20 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria The budget allocation for tourism is currently one of the lowest. Can anything be done to attract more funds? We’re trying to devise unique opportunities for enhancing resources available to us. Yes, it is low, but we’re working very closely with the Ministry of Finance, the FCT, and so on. We’re developing initiatives which will be recording considerable, positive results soon with the Tony Elumelu Foundation. We’re also exploring some of our bilateral agreements with different countries of the world and these will bring enormous value to the sector. What investment opportunities are available in the sector? There are enormous investment opportunities in tourism and culture. First and foremost, hospitality in Nigeria is a very profitable investment area. We do not have enough 5-star hotels. We do not have enough conferencing facilities or convention centres. On average, a decent bed will cost about US$1,000. There’s nowhere else in the world that this happens. When you invest in Nigeria, you’re sure that you’re going to be generating considerable profit. All over the country there are amazing opportunities, not just for 5-star hotels, but even for 3-star hotels. A lot of our natural assets like waterfalls, lakes and beaches are yet to be developed. These are areas where investment is desirable because people would like to visit these places to enjoy their spare time. We have to find ways to work with the local governments to be able to give some incentives to members of the private sector to develop them. Could you specify some objectives for public- private co-operation for boosting tourism? We need to get the buy-in of various stakeholders by promoting our products in both the domestic and international marketplace. We also will begin to look at the possibility of mainstreaming culture and tourism in the educational curricula of our schools and tertiary institutions. Which are the areas of infrastructure that are most critical to achieve high volumes of visitors? Tourism is a valuable economic activity that must fuse with transportation, particularly aviation, and with power, agriculture and, of course, security. Have recent instances of insecurity affected Nigeria as a destination choice for visitors? How can the country be recast in a positive light? Insecurity is an impediment to the enjoyment of tourism in any part of the world. The unfortunate thing is that we have not properly managed the information about insecurity in Nigeria. If something
  21. 21. 21www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria happens in Maiduguri, tourists are not able to determine the distance between Maiduguri and say, Lagos, or Abuja, or any other tourism destination. Generally, there’s the impression that bombs are going off everywhere. But from what I have heard, there have hardly been any foreigners who have gone back with a negative perception of Nigeria. This is just a beautiful country. People are warm and hospitable and this has recommended the area to a lot of tourists. The government is working to make sure that incidents of insecurity are dealt with, but when you compare this with the crime rate in places like the United States, the United Kingdom and some parts of Africa, there’s actually nothing to compare. But they have managed the media in such a way that information about those crimes does not blur the values that the nation promotes or offers. We need to do some work in that direction. It is my belief that with the government’s strategy of engaging with security agencies and state governments, it will be addressed in the very near future. Can sport be a viable tool for Nigerian tourism? Of course. We need to host more sporting activities, beyond annual sports events. There is a need for us to host continental and international events in order to accelerate the opportunities for using sport to promote tourism. I’m sure that the Minister of Sports has a strategic plan in that direction. Could you highlight how business can bolster tourism? What steps have been taken towards this end? Business cannot exist in isolation from tourism. Business requires movement from place to place. That decision, made in pursuance of business, that takes you from your primary location, triggers participation in the tourism sector. You would have to seek transportation and accommodation, patronise catering and so on. Nigeria is now seen as a business tourism destination because of the profitability in investing in the Nigerian economy in every sector of endeavour. Tourism provides the ancillary support network for doing business in Nigeria. What benefits will tourism bring to each Nigerian? Nigerians have a fervent love of our country and we want to share that with everyone. The hospitality industry is labour intensive and the sector will provide substantial employment. This will transform the people in the way they perceive themselves and will bolster their self-esteem. It will also stimulate the economy and promote social growth. So every Nigerian, whether he or she works in the industry or is a tourist, will benefit from the promotion of our beautiful country. ■ opposite page, clockwise from left With the Nigerian ambassador to Brazil, Vincent Okoedion; with entertainment impresario Ben Murray Bruce at one of the evening performances of the Abuja Carnival; with the Greek ambassador. below Visiting the Dajo Pottery in Benue State.
  22. 22. 22 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Vision The Vision of the Ministry is to reposition Nigeria as the preferred tourism destination and cultural capital in Sub-Saharan Africa, offering diverse world-class tourism products geared to contribute at least 10% of the Gross Domestic Product through a transformation- driven policy, legislative and regulatory environment that emphasises global competitiveness. Parastatals • National Orientation Agency • National Gallery of Art • National Theatre/National Troupe of Nigeria • Nigerian Tourism Development Corporation • Centre for Black African Arts and Civilization • National Institute for Hospitality and Tourism • National Institute for Cultural Orientation • National Commission for Museums and Monuments • National Council for Arts and Culture Core Mandate TO RE-ORIENTATE NIGERIANS TOWARDS NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN LINE WITH THE TRANSFORMATION AGENDA TO PROMOTE TOURISM AND CULTURE AS A CATALYST FOR FOREIGN INCOME EARNINGS, EMPLOYMENT, DEVELOPMENT AND PEACE TO UNDERTAKE PROGRAMMES AND ACTIVITIES GEARED TOWARDS PROMOTING NIGERIA’S RICH TOURISM POTENTIAL AND CULTURAL HERITAGE TO IDENTIFY, DEVELOP AND MARKET NIGERIA’S DIVERSE CULTURAL AND TOURISM OPPORTUNITIES TO IMPLEMENT POLICIES AIMED AT DIVERSIFYING AND GROWING THE ECONOMY Federal Ministry of Tourism, Culture and National Orientation Mission To engage with stakeholders to reinvent and reposition Nigerian tourism for the emergence of an integrated, vibrant, globally competitive, skilled, professional private sector-driven industry through strategic international cooperation, investment promotion and a strong, regulatory and cooperative inter-governmental environment that generates employment; to alleviate poverty for sustainable national economic advantage. 1 2 3 4 5
  23. 23. 23www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria CHIEF DUKE’S TOP TOURIST ATTRACTIONS n Obudu Mountain Resort n Idanre Hills n Yankari Game Reserve n Afi Mountain Resort n Slave route around Badagry and Calabar n Caves in the south-east n Lokoja – the Confluence City n Ikogosi Warm Springs n Boki Rainforest CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Boki Rainforest; Yankari Game Reserve; caves in the south-east; Idanre Hills.
  24. 24. Former President General Olusegun Obasanjo (rtd) and Dame Patience Jonathan enjoying the event.  Behind them are President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr with former Heads of State General Muhammadu Buhari (rtd) and General Abdulsalami Abubakar President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr and Dame Patience Jonathan with former Heads of State General Olusegun Obasanjo (rtd), General Abdulsalami Abubakar, General Muhammadu Buhari (rtd), Shehu Shagari and General Yakubu Gowon, standing with Vice-President Namadi Sambo and Hajiya Amina Sambo President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr with (L-R) former Heads of State General Muhammadu Buhari, (rtd), General Olusegun Obasanjo (rtd), General Abdulsalami Abubakar, Shehu Shagari and General Yakubu Gowon. President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr with former Head of State General Muhammadu Buhari (rtd) listening to the memories of a gentleman born in 1914, the year of the amalgamation
  25. 25. 25www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr with former President Shehu Shagari President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr lights the ceremonial flame with former Head of State General Muhammadu Buhari (rtd) President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr launches Nigeria’s Centenary Celebrations On 1 January 1914 the Northern and Southern Protectorates of Nigeria were formally amalgamated into one country, and the nation we now know as Nigeria was established. As Nigeria’s centenary approaches, the country is celebrating with a calendar of memorable events to re-inspire the unity of our unique nation. W hile the world grapples with the challenges of globalisation, technology and the economy, our centenary offers the perfect opportunity to focus attention on Nigeria, our history, people, achievements and aspirations for the next 100 years. Nigeria has come a long way over the past century. Our story is one of admirable and remarkable progress – attaining independence, fighting and surviving a civil war and committing to building a stable nation with a strong economy. We are a melting pot of cultures; multiple ethnic nationalities and different religions united as one nation. We are blessed with a vibrant population, a rich geographical landscape and a maturing democracy. Our centenary celebration is an opportunity for us to count
  26. 26. 26 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com our blessings as a nation, celebrate our resilience as a people and launch into our second century with determination, hope and increasing expectations. The Centenary Project is a private sector exercise and is largely self-funding. The government is partnering with companies that have the commitment and capacity to organise and manage the project. Through sponsorship and engagement strategies, private sector companies can fly the centenary logo on their products for the duration of the centenary. The celebrations are providing as many as 5,000 jobs directly, and more than 10,000 indirectly. They will also give an economic boost to the hospitality sector and petty traders. The focus of the celebrations The Centenary celebrations signify the beginning of a new chapter for Nigeria. They emphasise our history, identity and unity – one indissoluble Nigeria based on our shared colonial experience, common humanity and national destiny. They will restore hope and celebrate the diversity that marks our distinctiveness. They express our determination to rise above our present challenges to build a strong and united nation that is eager to lead in world affairs. The celebrations will highlight our achievements, successes and progress, and institute legacy projects as a lasting reference for the centenary. They will create job opportunities, boost tourism, ensure enterprise development and endorse the preservation of our history and heritage. They will also encourage environmental awareness and enhance our national image and prestige. The centenary project The Nigerian Centenary Project highlights the central thrust of the celebrations – our resilience and determination to remain together as one nation. Through active participation and the involvement of Nigerians at home and in the diaspora, the Centenary Project is anchored on three pillars: the Enduring Legacy Project, Commemorative Events and the History and Heritage Programme. Dancers welcome the guests to the celebrations Traditional musician Music played a big part in the event
  27. 27. 27www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria The Centenary Projects initiative n This private sector initiative focuses on a number of specially selected, needs-driven, socially impacting projects and events in local communities in each state, such as sports, arts, education, health, environment and social assets. n Projects include school laboratories, medical diagnostics centres, crime laboratories, community recreational parks, road shelters, ICT centres and other initiatives. The commemorative events n The official flag-off ceremony provided a grand opening to the year’s celebrations with music, fireworks and special legislative sessions. n Other events include thanksgiving services, exhibitions, symposia, youth and children’s programmes, women- related and physically-challenged programmes, as well as arts events, such as music, fashion, beauty pageants and the Centenary Ball. n Diaspora programmes enable those outside Nigeria to share in the essence of our centenary. n Trade and investment shows showcase Nigeria’s vast trade and economic potential. The history and heritage programme Nigeria is a beautiful mosaic of cultures with a national identity defined by its history and contemporary culture. The arts are fundamental to our existence, drawing our nation’s soul for the world to see. To tell our story, the programme includes art expos, literary festivals, student essay competitions, photo exhibitions from personal archives, festivals and carnivals, a film festival and plays. State events All states in Nigeria have the opportunity to create their own centenary programmes throughout a specified six-month period. Each state is to build a Unity Square in its capital which will be unveiled during the proposed nationwide unity rally. The celebrations will culminate in a flag-off ceremony at the Centenary Expo in Lagos, and a Centenary National Parade at the new Centenary City, and will be rounded off with celebratory fireworks and huge national rejoicing as we go forward into Nigeria’s next century. ■ A big day for such a young singer President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr and Dame Patience Jonathan Hon Minister of Aviation Princess Stella Oduah oon, Hon Minister of Labour and Productivity Chief Emeka Wogu and Hon Minister of Housing, Lands and Urban Development Lady Amal Iyingiala Pepple cfr
  28. 28. 28 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com I am very proud of our beautiful country.As a people we are fortunate enough to enjoy its glorious wonders and, as we approach our Centenary as a nation, it is only fitting that we should celebrate our heritage. Nigeria is a beautiful mosaic with a national identity defined by its history and contemporary culture. Our resolve to rebuild can only be informed by a new understanding of our history, the visions of our founding fathers and the promise of the nation we can become. President Goodluck Jonathan has created a vision for Nigeria with his Transformation Agenda that will revitalise our country.With his wife Dame Patience, herself the foremost Tourism Ambassador, he is leading us with confidence into the future. The Centenary Celebrations hold the promise of this future greatness.As Nigeria stands poised to become one of the greatest nations on earth, even by the middle of this century, we must stand together to realise our potential.The Centenary projects are designed to show our greatness in all areas and to reinspire the unity of Nigeria. We are one indissoluble Nigeria and we should celebrate our diversity in culture and the distinctiveness of our vibrant population. We are a united and progressive nation, eager to lead in world affairs. In the run-up to January 2014, I urge you to seek out all that is best in our nation and tell the world. I urge you join in the Centenary Celebrations wholeheartedly and rejoice in our nationhood. OUR FASCINATING NIGERIA Interview with Anyim Pius Anyim As Nigeria looks forward to a packed year of exciting activities to celebrate the country’s glorious centenary, we speak to the Secretary to the Government of the Federation to find out what the government has planned – and how it will benefit the country. What role are you and this office playing in the Centenary Celebrations and the Centenary Project? National celebrations are usually co-ordinated by this office, and the Centenary Celebration is no exception. Fifty years ago the nation celebrated our half century, and those celebrations too were organised from here. The difference last time though, was that the celebrations were sponsored by the government, while this time they are being sponsored by the private sector. The companies involved will need to see value for money, so the arrangements and the organisation have to take a different shape this time, too. We have already met with investors in the Centenary City and started the process of government disengagement. Our role has been to identify the programme, set out the policy direction and agree on the length and breadth of the programme – then we hand over to the event managers to co-ordinate. How will the Centenary Celebrations differ from 50 years ago? It may not be as colourful, but every activity in the Centenary Celebrations has a point – no activities are planned to simply attract attention. Most have a target to achieve or have a certain policy direction such as the programme for Labour Day. Take, for example, the programme commemorating 100 years of the Nigerian woman. It’s not just for Nigerian women to come and celebrate; we have two major targets to achieve. The first is for Nigerian The Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Anyim Pius Anyim, outlines the events leading up to the Centenary Celebrations. fascinating nigeria
  29. 29. 29www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com fascinating nigeria 29www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com women to produce their own report – the Nigeria Country Report on Women should be a standard document that can fit anywhere in the world as the basic country report on women in Nigeria in the last 100 years. The second aim is to increase the involvement of women in politics. Many people aren’t yet aware that the President has exceeded the aim of 35% representation of women in his government. Now he is setting a new target of 50/50 by 2020; only the President can do that. This celebration is planned to span an entire year, unlike the previous celebration. The idea is not that people leave their jobs and take to the streets in celebration. Instead every event has a target, a purpose, and we are careful about hitting that target. So the key difference may be in the arrangement. This time there will not be as much colour but there will be a touch of class, and by the time we’ve finished, the government will gain from it, rather than carrying liabilities. “Nigeria is a beautiful mosaic with a national identity defined by its history and contemporary culture.Our resolve to rebuild can only be informed by a new understanding of our history, the visions of our founding fathers and the promise of the nation we can become.” How will the celebrations be funded and what has been the process for funding the Centenary City so far? We have two arms of the celebration – the legacy projects and the events. We fund the events from the marketing that generates money. The legacy projects are sponsored, but the Centenary City will be funded from investments. To ensure value for money, if you sponsor a project you may have an advert on it for about 10 years. The government is not going to invest in Centenary City, it will be solely private sector. As such, the private sector should organise themselves to drive it, although we have facilitated the titles to the land. We have already appointed legal and consulting firms. The process was started at the investment meeting with lawyers, international accounting firms and businesses. This marked the beginning of government withdrawal, because the lawyers and consulting firms would gradually take over from us. We made a capital call and set a benchmark. The lowest investment was $250,000 and the maximum was $5 million. The total sum we were able to raise was about $130 million. Many people never believed we could do this.
  30. 30. 30 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com fascinating nigeria Does the investment give any special advantage in the City? No it doesn’t, but then the idea is that in the next one or two years the City’s stock will be listed on the London Stock Exchange. That alone is an investment that you can take anywhere, and that is why we are adopting the transferring process; more than 50% of the investing companies are foreign. How will other areas of the private sector benefit from funding projects? The idea is that each programme should be self-accounted. We don’t want anybody to simply donate money, instead we want them to invest their money into something that will generate a return. As an example, Dangote sponsored the documentary that was screened during the flag-off, and two weeks ago about 10,000 viewers had watched that documentary on YouTube and saw the Dangote logo. We are not going to ask anybody to donate a single kobo to our programme. If you are putting in money, we will agree on what you are going to get in return for that investment. This ensures that we won’t need to give any special currency to anybody and, unlike last time, we will not be left with liabilities to clear. Will there be a Centenary Lottery? Yes, we intend to run a centenary lottery. We have an understanding with the Lottery Commission, but we will not run any programme that does not raise the funding outside government. That is why we plan ahead; the whole idea is to have enough time to raise the money. We have already appointed a marketing company, so soon we will see the adverts and billboards coming out. Will the marketing reach out to the masses so they get a feel for the importance of the occasion? Yes, it will. I received a proposal recently from a Nollywood group that are proposing a centenary movie, with the theme of peace and harmony. They plan to shoot in communities so we are considering it, and if it is approved we can raise the funding from a sponsor. What will the people gain from it? We are working on a very elaborate programme for youths that will capture the idea of job creation. Initially, as part of the preparation for 50/50 2020, we are setting up a fund for educating orphaned Nigerian girls, who won’t be allowed to leave school until they are 18. Legislation will also make it a criminal offence for any parent to allow a girl under the age of 18 to not attend school. For the following youth programme, we will develop a programme that will address their specific needs. Are there any specific plans to involve the Nigerian Diaspora who have contributed considerably to the development of their communities outside the country? We have a number of Diaspora programmes, and even in the city we have a space for a Diaspora centre. We have activities that will be organised outside the country, but we don’t yet have any fully developed Diaspora programmes. In addition to the Diaspora programme we have international events that already have been funded, and we have international concepts that we will hold in cities around the world.
  31. 31. 31www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com fascinating nigeria Who is the visionary behind this whole concept? The visionary is President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan gcfr – he called me one day and asked me to start preparing early for the Centenary Celebrations, so I assembled the committee that created the first concept, which we took to Council. Everybody contributed their input and the Council approved it. The President feels incredibly passionately about this project and has had considerable input in it. He’s the major driver behind the project and talks about it wherever he travels around the world. We are just doing what we should do to get it going. Is there any concerted effort to involve Nigeria’s local media? Yes, there is, although it’s a little different from what they’re used to. Before we flagged off we briefed every stakeholder, from the Federal Executive Council to the International Economic Council where the governors meet. Then we went to the Nigerian Labour Congress and the National Assembly and we took time to brief the Senate and the House of Representatives. Then we approached the organised private sector with a huge programme in legacy, and also got the buy-in from Nollywood before briefing the media in two segments in Lagos. Finally, prior to the flag-off, we invited the Broadcasting Organisation of Nigeria to a dinner and asked them to partner with us. Every television and radio station covered the event live without any cost to us. Now we are setting up our office for the Centenary, and we hope that we will have an arm of it for the media. A lot of thought goes into everything we do. We are not limited to our offices and can look outside for sponsors and to get the service we want. Since May we have started a number of activities to get the celebrations under way. Our marketers are still working out their strategy. Earlier in the year the President invited all CEOs and chief executives of privately-owned companies in Nigeria to a dinner to emphasise that they need to be involved in the Centenary Celebrations. With all the work that is being undertaken this year, I am confident that the Centenary Celebrations and the Centenary Project will be a resounding success. ■
  32. 32. 32 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com fascinating nigeria CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS FEBRUARY – MARCH 2013 n Ground-breaking ceremony of the Centenary City/Abuja Unity Square n States unveil their individual programmes for the Centenary Celebration programmes n International Women’s Day APRIL – MAY 2013 n Democracy Day Celebration – Centenary Special n Symposium (Nigeria in History: Milestones Challenges) n Recognition of Heritage Sites (sites that have played a key role in the history of Nigeria) n Novelty Match n Labour Day Celebration – Centenary Special n World Press Freedom Day JUNE 2013 n The President launches Dress Nigeria Day n Nigerian Fashion Show n Flag-off National Essay Competition n World Environment Day JULY 2013 n 100 Years of Nigerian Music n International Centenary Concerts n Celebration of Broadcasting in Nigeria n International Justice Day (100 Years of the Nigerian Judiciary) AUGUST 2013 n Youth Day Celebration – Centenary Special (NYSC in Focus) n Beauty Pageant – Centenary Edition n Diaspora Events SEPTEMBER – DECEMBER 2013 n Unity Rallies in all the States of the Federation (to be concluded with the Grande Finale in Abuja in December 2013) n 100 Years of Nigerian Theatre and Films n World Tourism Day: National Centenary Tourism Summit n 100 Years of Nigeria Literature/Arts Crafts Exhibitions OCTOBER 2013 n INDEPENDENCE DAY – CENTENARY YEAR SPECIAL n National Honours Awards – Centenary Special n State Dinner n International Day for the Eradication of Poverty n World Food Day NOVEMBER 2013 n Exhibitions by MDAs n World Television Day DECEMBER 2013 n Special Centenary Legislative Session n People Living with Physical Challenges – Support Programmes n National Carnivals – Centenary Special (established carnivals to be adopted) n Programme with Traditional/Religious Leaders n Dinner with Former Presidents and Heads of State JANUARY 2014 – GRAND CELEBRATION n Presidential Centenary Broadcast n Special Parades (callisthenics displays, etc.) n Special Centenary Prayers (Christian/Muslim) n Special Centenary Concert in Abuja to close the Centenary Celebrations n Centenary Dinner n Book presentation: Milestones in Nigerian History n Centenary Awards/Recognitions at a glance
  33. 33. Centenary City NIGERIA’S “SMART CITY” Out of Nigeria’s glorious Centenary celebrations, a major legacy will be created – the development of Centenary City. Built from scratch along Airport Road in Abuja, Centenary City will be the second-largest private city development in history, and signals a new national economic awakening. 34 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
  34. 34. 35www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com fascinating nigeria C entenary City will promote world-class multinational and domestic businesses in a planned environment that will encourage business and trade in the 21st century. Around 100,000 people will live in the new city, with a further 500,000 expected to pass through it daily. In a concerted effort to boost trade and investment in Nigeria, and following the success of Dubai, Monaco, Shenzhen, Singapore and Songdo, Centenary City will incorporate a free trade zone, duty free regime, tax holidays and non-regulated banking services. According to Nigeria’s Minister of Information Labaran Maku, at least 16 private sector companies will invest around $4 billion in the development of 10 districts in the city. The Federal Government will provide the land in the FCT and agree the design, but will have no further input. The concept of Centenary City is exciting and far-reaching. The aim is to synchronise the demands of today’s society with the expectations of tomorrow, and allow the city to develop in a sustainable, ecologically and socially responsible manner. As well as signposting the Nigeria of the future, Centenary City is designed to be a centre for the preservation of Nigeria’s political history, and the documentation of the country’s contributions to the political, cultural and economic development of Africa. Centenary City will be beautiful, merging the natural landscape with great architecture, and creating an environment that is alive and productive. It will be a green city with a natural buffer that envelops the entire conurbation, and will include a central park to provide a green spirit to give clarity and iconic power to the city centre. While flexible topographies will create a flowing and vibrant city, Centenary City will be formed around an urban grid that is modular and organic, with an efficient traffic system where people and transport can co-exist successfully. Public areas will feature a prominent cultural core, with symbols of Nigeria’s unity and strength, and the commercial centre will boast the latest in office architecture, exotic hotels, shopping malls, convention centres, theatres and cinemas. Elegant high-rise apartment blocks will mix with family houses, served by schools and a university campus, health centres and theme parks. Sport will also be given great prominence (there is already an offer of sponsorship for an Institute of Sport that will
  35. 35. 36 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com fascinating nigeria include a mini stadium and signature golf course). A modern sports hospital will provide cutting-edge sports medicine and diagnostic tools, and plans are being made for it to perform double bundle arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (knee surgery), with a view to attracting medical tourism to the city. The city will benefit from a constant power supply, with a gas-fired 500 MW power plant connected directly to a gas terminal. Water management will ensure that 60% of water will be recycled, and waste will be reduced as close to zero as possible. Domestic waste will be used to create nutrient-rich soil fertiliser, or incinerated as an additional power source. As a preferred destination for multinational and domestic businesses, it is expected that the top corporate bodies in Nigeria will have a major presence in the city. Federal and Presidential presence Centenary City isn’t the only major construction planned to celebrate Nigeria’s centenary. Visitors to Abuja will be welcomed by a new Abuja City Gate (expected to become a major tourist attraction in its own right), a new ceremonial arcade will be built in Eagle Square for government ceremonies and activities, and a presidential retreat is planned as an alternative operational base for the president. The Presidential Archives will house the history of Nigeria’s political development and the contributions of the country’s presidents, while the Institute of Federalism in the University Campus will become a world-class institution for the preservation of Nigeria’s political history. With its outstanding infrastructure and secured business environment it is expected that Centenary City will become a popular business and tourist destination by the end of its planned five-year development cycle. The city will demonstrate the harmony between nature and the work of man, and set an ideal example for the future of urban development in Nigeria – reinforcing the nation’s collective destiny for the next 100 years. ■ PREVIOUS PAGE A view of Dubai at night ABOVE Singapore’s Central Business District www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com
  36. 36. Centuryin pictures A Front view Government House, Lagos. Marina Street waterfront shops Lagos, 1925.
  37. 37. 38 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Nigerians in trenches, at the battle of Mahiya (1919). Source – Nigerians in German East Africa. Tin worker carriers crossing a swamp (1914). City of Kano. Aerial photo taken in 1930 by Swiss pilot photographer Walter Mittelholzer. Murtala Muhammed international airport, Lagos, 1970s. Burial custom in Igbariam, Eastern Nigeria, 1913.
  38. 38. 39www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria King's College, Lagos (circa 1910), a boys-only secondary school Construction of the Port Harcourt-Kaduna railway in the 1930s. Yam market at Iddo, Lagos, 1910. A very young Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke of Edinburgh, the late Justice (Sir) Adetokunbo Ademola and Chief Obafemi Awolowo on Her Majesty's trip to Nigeria in 1956
  39. 39. 40 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Classes for children in the street, Ibadan, 1970. Enda Park. An Itsekiri woman, born and raised in Lagos (pictured) was the first Miss Nigeria at the Miss Universe contest, in the 1964 pageant held in Miami, Florida. Tinubu Square, LagosKano Airport, 1950s.
  40. 40. 41www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Lagos, 1960. Aerial view of Lagos, 1960s.
  41. 41. 42 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Sugar cane seller, 1930s. Oba Afunbiowo Adesida I meeting the Queen, 1956. Lagos during Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Nigeria, 1956. View of Paterson and Zochonis’ Factory House on the Marina, Lagos. This photo was taken on Coronation Day, 1912. Opening of Nigeria Constitutional Conference, 1958.
  42. 42. 43 Fascinating nigeria Tinubu square at night, Lagos, 1967. His Majesty the Oba of Benin, Akenzua II, at his desk in the palace of Benin. Groundnuts transport by rail, Northern Nigeria, 1930s. Feb 1956 Queen Elizabeth II meets His Majesty the Oba of Benin at the Benin Aerodrome.
  43. 43. 44 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Installation of the Sultan of Sokoto Attahiru II, 1903. Burial ceremony of late Chief Coco Ota Bassey, Calabar, 1910s.
  44. 44. 45www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Catholic mission, Asaba, Southern Nigeria, 1900s. The Sariki of Geidam, Northern Nigeria, returning from Zaria with followers, 1910. The Emir of Katsina Muhammad Dikko dan Gidado and Guards, Katsina, 1909. Queen Elizabeth II inspects the Guard of Honour, Enugu, Eastern Nigeria, 1956. A British expeditionary officer interviewing a chief, 1901.
  45. 45. 46 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Abirimagia Masquerade, Buguma, Nigeria, 1944. King Duke IX of Old Calabar, 1895. A day school at Jen, Taraba, 1950s.
  46. 46. 47www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Sir Ahmadu Bello (right) with the Emir of Kano Sir Muhammadu Sanusi, late 1950s. 15th anniversary of T.A. Oni Sons Ltd 1961. The contemporary Yoruba Kings: Oba Adeniji Adele of Lagos (middle) with the later Olubadan of Ibadan Oba Yesufu Oloyede Asanike (extreme left – perhaps a regional Chief at that time) and Alake of Abeokuta Oba Adetokunbo Ademola (extreme right). Circa 1950.
  47. 47. 48 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria Aerial view of the University of Lagos Staff Quarters, 1972. The Club, Lagos, 1910s. Sailors' house, old treasury and Empire day celebrations, Lagos, 1910s.
  48. 48. 49www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating nigeria The Emir of Kano Alhaji (Dr) Ado Bayero when he was a policeman in the late 50s. Marina, Lagos, 1910s. Government Secondary School, Afikpo, 1966. 1930 photo of Sultan Shehu Sanda Kyarimi’s Borno guards. Peatwal Junior Primary School, Kano, 1960. Fishermen casting off a boat into the Atlantic Ocean, c1920
  49. 49. fascinating NIGERIA
  50. 50. 52 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating Nigeria Ever wondered what makes Nigeria such a fascinating nation? We celebrate the great, bizarre, weird and wonderful in this multi-creed country – from its key role in global peacekeeping, world-class soccer team and commendable history of press freedom, to its love of rhetoric, aversion to punctuality and fanatical passion for comedic self-criticism that borders on a national sport. W ith a political history that unfolds like an espionage thriller, Nigeria is a bewildering paradox with more compelling twists and turns than a Bisi Daniels plot. Nigeria has the potential to be Africa’s powerhouse, yet remains so bound by red tape that the simplest transaction becomes a constipated bureaucratic bottleneck. It is the 6th- largest producer of crude oil on the planet, so why does Nigeria still import petrol and kerosene to power its cars and cooking stoves? Some of the finest award-winning athletic specimens on the planet are Nigerian – so why does the nation encourage obesity, and all the serious health risks it brings, as a sign of good living and wealth? Writer Chinua Achebe famously summed up his own internal conflict by declaring his love for Nigeria, saying, “Being a Nigerian is abysmally frustrating and unbelievably exciting…in my next reincarnation, I want to come back as a Nigerian again.” Many will identify with this complex mishmash of emotions when debating their homeland. We adore it, it maddens us, it inspires us, it disappoints us: we are critical, we are informed, we are proud citizens and its harshest judges – so let’s talk. We are well oiled As the largest oil producer in Africa, Nigeria’s pipelines spew out over 2.4 million barrels per day – a mind-boggling quantity. We are also pretty proud of
  51. 51. 53www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating Nigeria our other “black stuff” – Guinness. Since 1962, we have brewed Guinness using sorghum as opposed to barley to give it the bitter thirst-quenching taste we crave. Apparently, we sup more of the famous froth-topped stout than in the Emerald Isle itself – extraordinary when you consider 50% of our population is non-drinking Muslim. We give peace a chance Since joining the United Nations in 1960 our work in international peacekeeping has been rightly deserving of Nigerian pride. We have consistently committed ourselves to the cause of peacekeeping and peacemaking, sending troops in to Congo to participate in the UN peace mission just hours after gaining independence. Today, Nigeria leads the world in global peacekeeping, contributing 6,500 troops to over 20 international operations in places such as Bosnia Herzegovina, Iraq, Kuwait, Western Sahara, Liberia, Angola and Rwanda – more than any other nation worldwide. We talk the talk Nigeria should also be praised for its ability to juggle a zillion languages. While English is the main tongue, an additional 520 lingos are spoken together with well over 4,000 dialects – not to mention a bewildering use of regional slang that can border on a secret code. We load our conversation with rhetorical questions as a statement to assert a point. However, unlike other nations, we also enjoy answering rhetorical questions. So, don’t say to us, “I mean, can you imagine?” because we will most probably reply with, “What? Imagine what?” A hilarious, if exasperating exchange. We are musical maestros Our music dominates the African continent – everyone in Nigeria is a musician, or wants to be one. The industry is a goldmine, with an estimated 1,200 concerts and shows each year accounting for a combined annual turnover of US$105.5 million. Record sales have more than tripled in the past five years, averaging 10 million in 2005 and rising to an estimated 30 million in 2008 – imagine what it could achieve without an accepted culture of piracy?
  52. 52. 54 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com We respect our elders Another source of Nigerian pride is our societal values, and I am often reminded that the respect we afford to our elders is the envy of many countries worldwide. A surviving practice of respect remains a central tenet of life throughout the country. Age is valued for the wisdom it represents and all older people are greeted and spoken to with great reverence. We are fertile and populous Nigeria has undergone a population explosion over the last 50 years, quadrupling the number of Nigerians. In fact, we are so populous it is almost impossible for the Nigerian government to estimate, despite the 2006 census that put the population at 140m, and guesstimates of 160m could well be tens of millions out. UN figures suggest the population of Nigeria will reach 390 million by 2050 – and a staggering 730 million by 2100. Seeing double? It’s hardly surprising, as Nigeria has the highest rate of twin births in the world. Igbo Ora, a sleepy town in south-west Nigeria, lies at the heart of the twin zone. More twins are born here than anywhere else on earth – a result of a yam-rich diet, according to at least one study. Lonely? Not us You’ll never be lonely in Nigeria. Our social life and depth of interaction is much richer in Nigeria than many Western societies. Indeed, loneliness is a word that most Nigerians would struggle to comprehend in communities where doors are always open, drivers stop to offer lifts and families always set extra places for dinner. We chat at bus stops, share a joke at the market and enquire after the health of our colleagues. Nigerians are also quick to help out people in need – and of that we should be proud. We are resourceful and inventive Ingenuity? Nigerians have this in truck loads. We can get anything working with a bit of tinkering, and can customise all sorts of stuff with ease. We keep old wire coat-hangers, fruit boxes, newspapers, string, cycle wheels, nails, screws and a hammer handy – just in case. In a newspaper recently, I read about a guy in Maiduguri who built a working helicopter from scrap. I also hear that someone in Lagos built a replica Peugeot from garden canes – little wonder that membership of the Nigerian Association of Inventors is on an upward trajectory. We excel at sports Our sporting prowess is legendary and Nigeria has won a huge tally of trophies as an international force across a number of disciplines, including athletics, soccer, boxing, tennis and golf. We’ve won dozens of medals at numerous Olympics, CAF, African Cup and Commonwealth Games – to name just a few. In February this year, tens of thousands of us soccer- mad Nigerians lined the streets of Abuja to welcome the Super Eagles back home clasping the African Nations Cup – for third time. We have a vibrant media With a huge variety of national and local newspapers and magazines, we have one of the world’s largest newspaper sectors. Our constitution supports freedom of speech – and our government generally respects this. Our journalists are often great champions of deserving causes who shout loud at injustice and challenge political shenanigans. Compared to many of our African neighbours, our media sector is more mature, much more established and more respected. We make world-class flicks The Nigerian film industry – rumoured to have been first labelled ‘Nollywood’ by GeorgeOsodi
  53. 53. 55www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating Nigeria a writer for the New York Times in 2002 – is second largest in the world based on production. With the average spend on each movie around US$ 25,000, our film industry is the fourth-largest economic sector in Nigeria, equating to 5% of GDP, generating a colossal $500 million. We are well connected According to a report published by the World Bank and African Development Bank (AfDB), of the 650 million mobile subscribers in 2012 in Africa, Nigeria leads the way with a staggering 100 million subscribers. By 2020, this figure will have soared to a whopping 169 million with cell phones accounting for over half of all web traffic in Nigeria (57.9%). We are funny We are well known around the world for our unfailing ability to always see the funny side of life, even in the most calamitous of situations. We giggle, chortle and chuckle more than any of our African neighbours, according to studies. Seeing the humour in things is a great resource as it helps us to cope with difficulties. It is also a great aid in managing stress. We are skilled in joking about politicians and the frustrating, irritating and maddening things people in power do. We tease our friends, rib our colleagues and quip with strangers. We are also adept at laughing at ourselves. Generous reserves of stoicism can give Nigerians the edge when optimism is called for. Jokes, like those about power cuts and fuel queues, offer laughter when there is little to be sunny about. Example: A man dies and goes to hell. Once there, he finds that there is a different hell for each country, so he tries to seek out the least painful one. At the door to German Hell, he is told: “First they put you in an electric chair for an hour. Then they lay you on a bed of nails for another hour. Then the German devil comes in and whips you for the rest of the day.” He does not like the sound of that, so he checks out American Hell, Russian Hell and many more. They are all similarly gruesome. However, at Nigerian Hell a long line of people is waiting to get in. Amazed, he asks, “What do they do here?” He is told: “First they put you in an electric chair for an hour. Then they lay you on a bed of nails for another hour. Then the Nigerian devil comes in and whips you for the rest of the day.” “But that’s the same as the others,” says the man. “Why are so many people waiting to get in?” “Because of the power cuts, the electric chair does not work. The nails were paid for but never supplied, so the bed is comfortable. And the Nigerian devil used to be a civil servant, so he comes in, signs his time sheet and goes back home for private business.” We know how to party Even though we are sure to arrive late, parties in Nigeria are well attended. And with our loud, booming voices, raucous music and plentiful supply of stories, food and drink – a good time is guaranteed. We celebrate everything and anything. Always. Be it the birth of a baby, a death of an elder or something random like a 37th birthday. We dress up to the nines, often changing our clothes several times throughout the party. We have a cake. We dance until breakfast time. Just one thing to bear in mind, though – when you invite a Nigerian to a party, expect him to bring an army of friends and his food – one very good reason why we always cater for 300 people. Time to do better When it comes to being punctual, we know we could do better. Keeping to time is not a part of Nigerian culture. Yes, we accept that punctuality increases productivity but we just can’t watch the clock. People wonder how the business world survives in a continent that rarely keeps appointment times. In truth, many of us wish that wheels would turn faster – for “African time” impacts education, homebuilding, contract decisions, parcel delivery and all crucial deadlines. Punctuality is the soul of business. Time, as they say, really is money. Well done those Nigerian businesses that reward good time- keeping. In Nigeria, we do business in a leisurely manner. ■
  54. 54. 56 www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com A Marvellous Country – Nigeria M y next door neighbours back home in Benin have a daughter called Marvellous. It seemed strange to me when I first heard the name, for my neighbours aren’t rich people. Their family is squeezed into a cramped, one-room apartment and they rise at 4am every day to start work. And yet, however hard their life now, they chose to give their daughter a name filled with hope and joy – and the optimism of a wonderful life. And that to me represents Nigeria. As hard as life may be for some people, as a nation we are filled with hope and joy – and the optimistic belief that, despite everything, life really is marvellous. You only need to look around at our amazing country to see that they have a point. Our stunning natural beauty and rich cultural heritage is attracting tourists in their droves, as well as the attention of large international and small boutique hotel chains. We even have our very own sporting heroes to by Victor Ehikhamenor
  55. 55. 57www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Fascinating Nigeria worship, thanks to our recent win in the African Cup of Nations Tournament in South Africa. Like many supporters, I enthusiastically cheered our team on from day one – my heart in my mouth in the times when I thought they couldn’t go further. I prayed to God, I prayed in church, I even prayed on Twitter that we’d go the distance! It wasn’t until the final whistle blew that I realised I really have no other country but Nigeria, and the earlier we all start loving it, the better. And it seems we have already started to. The recent AFCON win changed the mood of our nation overnight, making us all worshippers of “Nigerianness” again. The really great thing about football is that it transcends social class. Your bus conductor is just as likely to support the Super Eagles as the CEO of a multinational company. Even the President of Nigeria himself is a fan! And I’m proud of belonging to a country where differences can be set aside, with the right game mind. As our AFCON win proves, Nigeria is a country built on dreams. And slowly we are seeing them come true. Already Nigerians have risen from abject poverty to extreme wealth, proving true the inscriptions you see on lorries around the country “No condition is permanent”. One day a Nigerian can struggle to feed his family. The next moment a chance meeting of the right “man” can suddenly change everything for the best. “Come to Nigeria and be saved” should be our message to the world. As a country we love God, and religion flows through our veins. While, like every country, we have a few bad eggs, as a whole we’re a nation that cares. Our churches have filled the gap in our social-welfare needs, taking care of the needy among us. So it’s no surprise that Nigerians proudly declare themselves the most church-going people in the world (we certainly have more churches than most, if not all, countries). And most importantly, in Nigeria you are able to worship freely. Growing up in Nigeria makes you tough when you need to be, and able to compete anywhere in the world. As they say on the streets here, “Nigeria nor dey carry last” If you study abroad, don’t be surprised if your fellow classmates can’t match your intelligence – in Nigeria you have been trained to use the most meagre resources to survive. Nigerians are a resilient people who don’t take no for an answer. We’re competitive and don’t like to be beaten in anything we do. In my field of visual art and literature, there is no world prize worth its onions that we have not won, from Nobel Prize to Orange Prize and Turner Prize. In fact, you name a field and you can bet that somewhere or other there’s a prize- winning Nigerian resting on their laurels. When you think of just how many of us there are, it’s almost no surprise that there are so many noteworthy Nigerians. One in four of all black people is Nigerian, and it’s estimated that by 2050 we’ll be the 4th-most populous country in the world. This strength in numbers can only work in our favour – helping us achieve our aim of transforming our fortunes and being among the top 20 economies in the world. Already some of the wealthiest people in Africa are Nigerian, and our economy is the second-largest in Africa, after South Africa. When it comes to wealth, Nigeria’s greatest riches are the gifts bestowed on us by Mother Nature. I recently had the privilege of working with Dayo Adedayo, a photographer who has travelled the length and breadth of Nigeria. Adedayo observed during his travels that every state in Nigeria has at least one stunning natural tourist attraction. We also have an amazingly rich and diverse culture for our lucky tourists to explore. Indeed, there’s no reason for any visitor to our country to get bored. We have hundreds of sites and tourist attractions to discover, some of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Our modern day culture and traditions are just as thrilling as our historic relics. Nigeria has produced a mind-boggling number of respected musicians, creating a new soundscape with the ever-growing music industry in Africa. To be Nigerian is to enjoy the dynamic mix of talented musicians who are taking over the world stage – from the Afrobeat legend Fela, to newer legends like TuFace Idibia. Our movie industry, globally known as Nollywood, is the second-largest in the world based on production, too. It’s official, we make more films than Hollywood! So while the rest of the world dreams of making it big in the movies, Nigerians are out there doing it. And what a perfectly fitting way to end my story. For you see, to me Nollywood, just like my neighbours’ daughter, epitomises everything that is great about Nigeria. It doesn’t matter to us how hard our life is now, or what we don’t have. Our bodies may be waking at 4am to start a long working day, but our hearts are flying high with hope, ambition and optimism. We dream big and we work to make those dreams come true. And that, I believe, is truly marvellous. ■
  56. 56. NIGERIAeverything under the sun Lagos Architecture, by Kelechi Amadi-Obi 58
  57. 57. T ucked away in the inner curve of West Africa, surrounded by French-speaking republics, Nigeria remains something of a mystery for tourists. Spread across its 350,000 square miles lie deserts, beaches, cities, kingdoms, and exotic discoveries – both ancient and modern, developed and wild. The country’s warm and friendly people speak a mind-boggling 4,000 dialects, and follow a dizzying array of traditional rituals. The traditional tale of Nigeria is of a land split into three: the Muslim north, the Christian south and the animist or Igbo east. The cities of Lagos in the south, Enugu in the east and Kano and Kaduna each have their own, unique character – all expressed in food and formal rituals. The diverse regional cultures serve to ensure than Nigeria feels less like one single country and more like a rich tapestry of traditions, both new and old. 59
  58. 58. www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Nigeria’s history is an ongoing journey of discovery, from the south’s famous Benin Bronzes from the old Kingdom, to the Nok’s more recently discovered, finely-worked terracotta sculptures that date back thousands of years. A lesson on the country’s history would sweep from the lost cultures of the sub-Sahara and trade with the Malian empire, to pre-colonial contact and the transatlantic slave routes – as found in the National and Heritage museums. Kano Abuja River frog Suya 60
  59. 59. 61www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com Venture off the beaten track in Nigeria and you’ll discover many hidden gems. Explore the wildlife on the Yankari Game Reserve and the Gashaka-Gumti National Park, near the border with Cameroon. These splendid reserves are a reminder that, although Kenya and Tanzania are better known for big game and wildlife, Nigeria also has its share of lions, elephants and other exotic creatures of the magnificent lower savannah. These self-sustained and virgin ecosystems are well Tea plantation Mambilla Highlands Lagos architecture God of Smallpox Nana Kofi Acquah – Water No Get Enemy Elephant in Yankari National Park Kingfisher Agbokim Waterfall, Cross River State River fishing Abuja City Gate
  60. 60. www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com stocked with everything from antelope and monkeys to birds of almost every variety. If you prefer your adventure to be a little more packaged and “curated”, the Obudu Mountain Resort is a fully structured tourist resort with a water park, horse rides and a petting zoo. You can also get a brief glimpse of the country’s nature at the Cross River Park and Lekki Conservation Centre in Lagos. Nigeria’s “wild life” isn’t restricted to its countryside. The country’s cities offer a rich variety of culture and commerce around the clock. The world’s 7th-most populous country, Nigeria’s cities throb and hum with the rhythm of busy and colourful daily routines, where people of diverse cultures, speaking a range of different languages, live side by side. Carnival parade National Communications Commission Abuja Carnival beauty Efo-riro Head with crown. Wunmonije Compound, Ife. 14th-early 15th century CE. Copper alloy. Fundación Botín/Museum for African Art 62 ©NationalCommissionforMuseumsandMonuments, NigeriaPhoto,KarinL.Willis
  61. 61. www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com In the country’s capital, Abuja, the Hilton has evolved from an international hotel complex into an international village. It welcomes everyone from world leaders to club promoters, northern princes and southern salesmen to eastern entrepreneurs, meeting their every need – be it clubs, champagne, fine dining or fast cars. This is where and frequently how business is done. The Federal Capital Territory, as Abuja is known, was built for business by day, and luxury, high-end enjoyment at night. Whatever Abuja can do, Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital, would claim to be able to do better. It certainly manages more – more music, more food, more people and more magic. Lagos is a dream for writers, photographers and cultural Durbar Cowfoot Soup “Bokoto” Gele headtie Catwalk model Ekemini Cultural Troupe from Akwa Ibom 63
  62. 62. www.fascinatingnigeriamagazine.com anthropologists. It’s a place given to creation and improvisation, where jazz clubs, poetry evenings and makeshift restaurants can spring up and be gone in the space of week. It’s impossible not to get caught up in the spirit of the city, even if you’re only passing through. Its complications of heli-taxis, go-slows, music shows, fabric and food markets, civil servants, intellectuals, heat, haggling and hustlers on the make, make it a compelling and intoxicating experience. So if you’re looking for a sedate holiday destination, somewhere you can enjoy a quiet vacation shuttling between your hotel and perfectly paved, picture-perfect promenades, it’s probably better to give Nigeria a miss. However, if you’re longing to explore a country packed with undiscovered beauty, vibrant cities, welcoming people and a rich culture, Nigeria is increasingly becoming the must-see destination. ■ River – Nana Kofi Acquah Regatta Durbar Riyom Rock, near Jos. 64
  63. 63. Ontario – Powering Africa Today and Tomorrow Ontario Oil and Gas Limited is a world-class integrated trading company and is proud to support Fascinating Nigeria.
  64. 64. Ontario Oil Gas Limited Tel: + 234 9 670 7957, + 234 9 413 6398 | Fax: +234 1 271 8186 | www.ontariooilng.com 10 Ologun Agbaje Street | Victoria Island | Lagos
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×