INSPIRED BY
Mark Zuckerberg
Reid Hoffman
Dan Schawbel
Dave Ramsey
Richard L. Rodriguez
Hello!
My name is Angel
Ramos and I’m a
lifelong learner &
problem solver.
I am an MBA professional
working in higher education and
I’ve also had REWARDING EXPERIENCES
in teaching and nonprofits.
Why is networking so important?
Networking Benefits
 Opportunities
 Lead to new and future
business.
Networking Benefits
 Opportunities
 Lead to new and future
business.
 Exposure
 Gives forum to promote
and draw attent...
Networking Benefits
 Opportunities
 Lead to new and future
business.
 Exposure
 Gives forum to promote
and draw attent...
Networking Benefits
 Opportunities
 Lead to new and future
business.
 Exposure
 Gives forum to promote
and draw attent...
Networking Benefits
 Opportunities
 Lead to new and future
business.
 Exposure
 Gives forum to promote
and draw attent...
CNN HAS ESTIMATED THAT
80% OF JOBS ARE NEVER ADVERTISED AND
INSTEAD FILLED THROUGHNETWORKINGAND
EMPLOYEE REFERRALS!
I’ve heard the most challenging part of networking, for most
people, is striking up a conversation with strangers.
answer?
So what’s the
Know
Before
you go…
Target your connections
Set a goal to identify who you need to
know and who needs to know you
• Who are the decision maker...
Target your connections
Set a goal to identify who you need to
know and who needs to know you
• Who are the decision maker...
Research
• Request a list of attendees from event
host prior to event.
Research
• Request a list of attendees from event
host prior to event.
• Search social media sites to get an idea
of who i...
Research
• Request a list of attendees from event
host prior to event.
• Search social media sites to get an idea
of who i...
Research
• Request a list of attendees from event
host prior to event.
• Search social media sites to get an idea
of who i...
Elevator pitch
• Prepare to give a clear, concise, and
compelling summation of who you are, what
you do, why you are at th...
Elevator pitch
• Prepare to give a clear, concise, and
compelling summation of who you are, what
you do, why you are at th...
Elevator pitch
• Prepare to give a clear, concise, and
compelling summation of who you are, what
you do, why you are at th...
Elevator Pitch Example
“ I work in higher education as a data
manager. Prior to that I managed the
admissions process, rec...
Challenges
1)Difficult to start a conversation.
Challenges
1)Difficult to start a conversation.
2)Difficult to make small talk and
continue conversations.
Challenges
1)Difficult to start a conversation.
2)Difficult to make small talk and
continue conversations.
3)Difficult to ...
Networking is not a natural ability that some people are “just born with.” It takes time
and practice.
Create a game plan:...
Develop a networking style or system that sets you
apart from the ordinary professional.
 The Direct Networker
 Wants to...
Develop a networking style or system that sets you
apart from the ordinary professional.
 The Direct Networker
 Wants to...
Stand by the door. Arrive early and hang around by the
entrance. When people register and begin mingling, you’ll be
among ...
Walk the room by going to all 4 corners of the room. Introduce yourself to others along
the way. As you introduce yourself...
Add one item to your wardrobe or briefcase that will give
others something to immediately comment on.
The Conversation Sta...
Wear a name tag on your
right side. A person’s
eyes will follow the line
of sight from the
handshake.
Adda conversation
starter to your name tag.
Ask me how I can help
you!
The Rule of 3
Approach groups of three people. It’s likely one of them will not be actively involved in
their conversation...
“But what do you say (or talk about) when you first meet
someone?”
Conversation Starters You’ll
Actually Use
• “So ______, what exactly do you do
at______?” [then shut up and
listen!]
• “Hi...
Always shake hands with the right.
Some cultures consider the left unclean.
“What if you see a group of people who seem engaged in quality
conversation?”
Just approach them and say, “Well, you guys are certainly
have more fun than the last group I was talking to.”
To have meaningful conversations with as many potential connections as possible, limit
your time with each interaction to ...
Ask Powerful Networking Questions
 “What are the challenges
you've been facing in your
industry?”
 “What do you do when ...
Body Language
• Observe how people stand, and
how they are physically grouped
together.
– Look for open groups vs. closed
...
Body Language
• Observe how people stand, and
how they are physically grouped
together.
– Look for open groups vs. closed
...
Body Language
• Observe how people stand, and
how they are physically grouped
together.
– Look for open groups vs. closed
...
Be a good listener – 80% listening, 20% talking
Remember, don’t dress for the job you do (or don’t)
have; dress for the job you want.
Flattery will get you far in this world. Lead with a compliment
on his or her attire or a recent accomplishment.
Great Job!
“Address him or her by name several times during conversation,
especially as you part ways.”
It’s probably time to politely excuse yourself… End conversation by offering to help
or support your new contact in some w...
Exit Gracefully
“It’s a pleasure to meet you. I’m very
interested in you and your business.”
Then comes the question, “How...
A Pocket Full
of Business
Cards
3Rules To Smart Business Card Etiquette
Rule #1: Keep your
business card to yourself.
Rule #2: Give your business
card to ...
3Rules To Smart Business Card Etiquette
Rule #1: Keep your
business card to yourself.
Rule #2: Give your business
card to ...
Social Networking Sites for Business
Professionals
1) Biznik
A community of entrepreneurs and small businesses dedicated t...
Social Networking Sites for Business
Professionals
7) StartupNation
A community focused on the exchange of ideas between e...
Network TrackingSystem
• Start a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or an Access
Database to keep track of the following:
– Name ...
Network TrackingSystem
• JibberJobber (Free to $9.95/month)
– This tool allows you to organize and
manage your job search,...
You need to first understand that Relationships
take time to develop.
BE VISIBLE!
Opportunities come to those who are visible.
Try to seek out
networking
communities
• Chamber of Commerce
• Ci...
How to Create Networking Opportunitiesat Work
1. Bring in cookies or
munchkins to work
and place them in the
kitchen. Then...
How to Create Networking Opportunitiesat Work
1. Bring in cookies or
munchkins to work and
place them in the
kitchen. Then...
Just like in school, every student is different
and not everyone learns the same way.
We are all unique individuals, with
unique sets of experiences.
Everyone has a story. Try to find a connection between your
story and someone else’s by engaging in meaningful dialogue.
There is no faster way to build rapport with a new connection
than to ask great questions.
Always Focus On Building A Connection With
People
 Share stories.
 Connect with people
on a personal level.
 Find out.....
they are likely willing to share advice and insight from their experiences.
There is an opportunity to learn something new...
You should never ask
for a favor without
providing the
relationship
groundwork.
People may be “turned off” by direct reque...
Most networkers are all about “me”. You can stand out by genuinely caring about the
other person. Invest in the relationsh...
Share Your Expertise
• Remember that you have
something special to offer.
• Look for opportunities to
speak at trade assoc...
Build Credibility When Connecting
• Always know what you are
talking about.
• Work hard and stay focused.
• Be enthusiasti...
A great resource on building relationships…. Dale Carnegie’s How to Win
Friends and Influence People.
So how do you build and maintain
connections?
One of the best things you can do is share
information.
• How often do you forward articles
or services you found helpful ...
Networking is not about
selling yourself
• Networking isn't, "Hi, what
can you do for me?" but
rather: "Hi. Let's get to
k...
Networking is not about
selling yourself
• Networking isn't, "Hi, what
can you do for me?" but
rather: "Hi. Let's get to
k...
Networking is not about
selling yourself
• Networking isn't, "Hi, what
can you do for me?" but
rather: "Hi. Let's get to
k...
Networking is not about
selling yourself
• Networking isn't, "Hi, what
can you do for me?" but
rather: "Hi. Let's get to
k...
You never know who might turn into a valuable connection or
who he knows.
Don’tbe selective in building your network.
Stay in touch
without
asking for
favors
Be
Likable
Have A
Be
Engaged
Be passionate
about something
AND STICK TO IT
Try
This
Clip out newspaper articles highlighting
accomplishmentsof potential connections
Send her a copy of the article with a note attached remarking
what a great job she’s done, and you thought she would want ...
Be there for your network. Attend invited events, show support
during tragedy, and be on time.
The Importance of Showing Up
A Simple Thank-YouGoes A Long Way
Send handwritten thank-you
notes when you’ve…
• Been to a job interview
• Received a gif...
Utilize Networking Sites Like LinkedIn
Greetings _________!
I came across your profile via one of our
connections, I hope you don't mind. I’m always
interested i...
Greetings _________!
(Intro) I hope your day is going well! I came across your profile via one of our
connections, I hope ...
The Power of the Informational Interview
Benefits of Conducting
InformationalInterviews
• Improve your communication skills.
• Gain confidence speaking with other ...
SampleInformational Interview
Request
Greetings _______!
I hope your day is going well! I came across your information via...
DON’T ASK
Hire Me
Just LISTEN
What is the best time to reach out to your
network?
EMAIL
• Alex Moore, CEO of Baydin, an email
management service, suggested that emails
sent from 6 A.M. to 7 A.M. are about...
Twitter
• Fuseworks Studios made an infographic
entitled “Maximizing Your Tweets” based on
data obtained by Buddy Media.
•...
LinkedIn
•Tues-Thurs
–7AM-9AM
–5PM-6PM
GOALS
Try to make 1-2
connections per
day
Keep in contact
with 60 people
on a monthly
basis
Cap your
network at 50-
100
To Learn More,
Check Out
Click here
Interested in
CONNECTING?
CLICK
Sources & Attributions• Morgan, Hannah., “Step-by-step Guide: Networking Your Way Into a Dream Company”, February 17, 2013...
Sources& Attributions
• Schembari ,Marian., “How To Network Your Way Into a Job Without Looking Desperate”, October 15, 20...
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
The 5 Secrets of Networking
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The 5 Secrets of Networking

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I. PREPARATION
II. WORK THE ROOM
III. NETWORKING TOOLS
IV. BUILD MEANINGFUL RELATIONSHIPS
V. BUILD AND MAINTAIN CONNECTIONS

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Transcript of "The 5 Secrets of Networking"

  1. 1. INSPIRED BY Mark Zuckerberg Reid Hoffman Dan Schawbel Dave Ramsey Richard L. Rodriguez
  2. 2. Hello! My name is Angel Ramos and I’m a lifelong learner & problem solver.
  3. 3. I am an MBA professional working in higher education and I’ve also had REWARDING EXPERIENCES in teaching and nonprofits.
  4. 4. Why is networking so important?
  5. 5. Networking Benefits  Opportunities  Lead to new and future business.
  6. 6. Networking Benefits  Opportunities  Lead to new and future business.  Exposure  Gives forum to promote and draw attention to your business, cause, or personal brand.
  7. 7. Networking Benefits  Opportunities  Lead to new and future business.  Exposure  Gives forum to promote and draw attention to your business, cause, or personal brand.  Contacts and Relationships  Help form and maintain a strong contact base.
  8. 8. Networking Benefits  Opportunities  Lead to new and future business.  Exposure  Gives forum to promote and draw attention to your business, cause, or personal brand.  Contacts and Relationships  Help form and maintain a strong contact base.  Common Ground  Like-minded people can come together to discuss common interests.
  9. 9. Networking Benefits  Opportunities  Lead to new and future business.  Exposure  Gives forum to promote and draw attention to your business, cause, or personal brand.  Contacts and Relationships  Help form and maintain a strong contact base.  Common Ground  Like-minded people can come together to discuss common interests.  Learning  Allows you to learn from experienced professionals.
  10. 10. CNN HAS ESTIMATED THAT 80% OF JOBS ARE NEVER ADVERTISED AND INSTEAD FILLED THROUGHNETWORKINGAND EMPLOYEE REFERRALS!
  11. 11. I’ve heard the most challenging part of networking, for most people, is striking up a conversation with strangers.
  12. 12. answer? So what’s the
  13. 13. Know Before you go…
  14. 14. Target your connections Set a goal to identify who you need to know and who needs to know you • Who are the decision makers and key influencers? Where can I meet them? How do I get into their circles? What is it I want from the event? Prepare questions • Have a few targeted, engaging questions prepared ahead of time (These could be focused on their interests, career path, the things they like/dislike about their job, advice they may have for new professionals.) Stay informed with current events • Read at least four articles from local topics, national news, company newsletters, weather information, sports, best sellers list, and food blogs before the event to have some “back pocket” conversation topics handy. Pick 3-5 items to use as emergency re-starters in case the conversation starts to drag.
  15. 15. Target your connections Set a goal to identify who you need to know and who needs to know you • Who are the decision makers and key influencers? Where can I meet them? How do I get into their circles? What is it I want from the event? Prepare questions • Have a few targeted, engaging questions prepared ahead of time (These could be focused on their interests, career path, the things they like/dislike about their job, advice they may have for new professionals.) Stay informed with current events • Read at least four articles from local topics, national news, company newsletters, weather information, sports, best sellers list, and food blogs before the event to have some “back pocket” conversation topics handy. Pick 3-5 items to use as emergency re-starters in case the conversation starts to drag. Become a social event crasher • Find events calendar, listings for public forums and board meetings, chamber of commerce, and grand openings in your local paper. • Join civic clubs, professional business groups, alumni networks, committee, serve on nonprofit boards, become an ambassador with the local chamber, or volunteer with organizations of interest. • Become an event organizer yourself. • Ask to help with the check-in/registration table. • Attend your kid’s events: Little League, soccer, Boy Scouts, etc. • Plan to attend at least two or three meet- ups a month.
  16. 16. Research • Request a list of attendees from event host prior to event.
  17. 17. Research • Request a list of attendees from event host prior to event. • Search social media sites to get an idea of who is attending.
  18. 18. Research • Request a list of attendees from event host prior to event. • Search social media sites to get an idea of who is attending. • Learn attendees' first and last names.
  19. 19. Research • Request a list of attendees from event host prior to event. • Search social media sites to get an idea of who is attending. • Learn attendees' first and last names. • Find out attendees job titles, what they do, where they’re from--any little tid- bits that will help you break into conversation.
  20. 20. Elevator pitch • Prepare to give a clear, concise, and compelling summation of who you are, what you do, why you are at the networking function, and how you bring value to others.
  21. 21. Elevator pitch • Prepare to give a clear, concise, and compelling summation of who you are, what you do, why you are at the networking function, and how you bring value to others. • Have at least two good openers.
  22. 22. Elevator pitch • Prepare to give a clear, concise, and compelling summation of who you are, what you do, why you are at the networking function, and how you bring value to others. • Have at least two good openers. • I try to keep mine at 30 seconds (12-20 words).
  23. 23. Elevator Pitch Example “ I work in higher education as a data manager. Prior to that I managed the admissions process, recruitment, and helped students navigate the process of getting into nursing school for the past few years and it’s been great. What I enjoy most is the ability to solve problems and help students fulfill their career goals.”
  24. 24. Challenges 1)Difficult to start a conversation.
  25. 25. Challenges 1)Difficult to start a conversation. 2)Difficult to make small talk and continue conversations.
  26. 26. Challenges 1)Difficult to start a conversation. 2)Difficult to make small talk and continue conversations. 3)Difficult to end conversations.
  27. 27. Networking is not a natural ability that some people are “just born with.” It takes time and practice. Create a game plan: Strategy, Preparation, Goals, and Tactics
  28. 28. Develop a networking style or system that sets you apart from the ordinary professional.  The Direct Networker  Wants to get straight down to business  Wants to know exactly what return you can give them  A firm hand shaker and will offer a business card immediately  When talked to, she wants to get straight to the point about how you can help her  Punctual, especially with meetings  The Promoter  Informal  Chatty  Views networking events as social occasions  Seller  Will greet, gauge interest, then move on to the next conversation  All about quantity with him  The Expressive Networker  Values making connections  Lively and outgoing  Ensures that other people attending the networking event is comfortable and isn’t left on their own
  29. 29. Develop a networking style or system that sets you apart from the ordinary professional.  The Direct Networker  Wants to get straight down to business  Wants to know exactly what return you can give them  A firm hand shaker and will offer a business card immediately  When talked to, she wants to get straight to the point about how you can help her  Punctual, especially with meetings  The Promoter  Informal  Chatty  Views networking events as social occasions.  Seller  Will greet, gauge interest, then move on to the next conversation  All about quantity with him  The Expressive Networker  Values making connections  Lively and outgoing  Ensures that other people attending the networking event is comfortable and isn’t left on their own  The Supportive Networker  Values sincerity and steadiness  Giver and helper  Values meaningful relationships  The Analytical Networker  Task-oriented  Thorough and focused on getting the job done  Hates networking events
  30. 30. Stand by the door. Arrive early and hang around by the entrance. When people register and begin mingling, you’ll be among the first people they see. Arrive 15 minutes prior to the start of, and plan to stay for the entire event. Some of the best conversations occur before and after an event.
  31. 31. Walk the room by going to all 4 corners of the room. Introduce yourself to others along the way. As you introduce yourself, remember to pronounce your full name clearly.
  32. 32. Add one item to your wardrobe or briefcase that will give others something to immediately comment on. The Conversation Starter
  33. 33. Wear a name tag on your right side. A person’s eyes will follow the line of sight from the handshake.
  34. 34. Adda conversation starter to your name tag. Ask me how I can help you!
  35. 35. The Rule of 3 Approach groups of three people. It’s likely one of them will not be actively involved in their conversation and will be open to talking to you.
  36. 36. “But what do you say (or talk about) when you first meet someone?”
  37. 37. Conversation Starters You’ll Actually Use • “So ______, what exactly do you do at______?” [then shut up and listen!] • “Hi ____, please tell me about you? • “What got you involved in this organization/event?” • “I really like your________.” • “May as well chat if we’re in line for_______.” • “How did you get involved with this line of work and what have you enjoyed most from your experience?” • “What can you tell me about________?” • “What is the greatest opportunity for _________? Biggest challenge?” • “What do you do when you’re not___________?”
  38. 38. Always shake hands with the right. Some cultures consider the left unclean.
  39. 39. “What if you see a group of people who seem engaged in quality conversation?”
  40. 40. Just approach them and say, “Well, you guys are certainly have more fun than the last group I was talking to.”
  41. 41. To have meaningful conversations with as many potential connections as possible, limit your time with each interaction to five minutes. Observe the 5-Minute Rule
  42. 42. Ask Powerful Networking Questions  “What are the challenges you've been facing in your industry?”  “What do you do when you're not working?”  “Is there anything you need or are specifically looking for, in case I happen to know anyone?”  “How did you get involved in…?”  “What made you decide to go into the ___business?”  ‘What advice would you give me if I wanted to be successful in your line of work?”  “What do you love/enjoy most about what you do?”  “How you can be of service to them.”  “Is there anything you're specifically looking for in that area?“  “What ways have you found to be the most effective for promoting your business/organization/product?”  “What would make a person/company an ideal client/customer for you?”  “What separates your business/company/organization from the competition?”  “What significant changes have you seen take place in your profession/area of expertise through the years?”
  43. 43. Body Language • Observe how people stand, and how they are physically grouped together. – Look for open groups vs. closed groups.
  44. 44. Body Language • Observe how people stand, and how they are physically grouped together. – Look for open groups vs. closed groups. • Don’t create barriers between you and the other person: – “Avoid darting eyes’ – “Don’t fold your arms…” – “Resist the urge to look at the floor”
  45. 45. Body Language • Observe how people stand, and how they are physically grouped together. – Look for open groups vs. closed groups. • Don’t create barriers between you and the other person – “Avoid darting eyes’ – “Don’t fold your arms…” – “Resist the urge to look at the floor” • Try this instead: – “Keep an open stance with all body parts aligned” – “Make good eye contact” – “Smile”
  46. 46. Be a good listener – 80% listening, 20% talking
  47. 47. Remember, don’t dress for the job you do (or don’t) have; dress for the job you want.
  48. 48. Flattery will get you far in this world. Lead with a compliment on his or her attire or a recent accomplishment. Great Job!
  49. 49. “Address him or her by name several times during conversation, especially as you part ways.”
  50. 50. It’s probably time to politely excuse yourself… End conversation by offering to help or support your new contact in some way. If you are in a conversation and it’s been about five minutes you start to notice that the other person has started shifting weight from foot to foot, and his eyes are wondering over your shoulder… Exit Gracefully
  51. 51. Exit Gracefully “It’s a pleasure to meet you. I’m very interested in you and your business.” Then comes the question, “How can I or those in my network help you with your biggest problem or challenge you’re facing today?”
  52. 52. A Pocket Full of Business Cards
  53. 53. 3Rules To Smart Business Card Etiquette Rule #1: Keep your business card to yourself. Rule #2: Give your business card to someone when she asks for it. Rule #3: Don’t waste contact information.
  54. 54. 3Rules To Smart Business Card Etiquette Rule #1: Keep your business card to yourself. Rule #2: Give your business card to someone when she asks for it. Rule #3: Don’t waste contact information. A Few Quick Tips: • Have at least 15-20 for each event. • Keep in carrying case to protect from fold and creases. • Do not carry in your back pocket. No one wants to receive a card that you’ve sat on. • Every professional, even if you are currently unemployed or a student, should have a business card. • Should include name, contact information, (including LinkedIn profile & personal website address), and title. • Ask each person you meet for two cards--one to pass on to someone else and one to keep. • When given a business card from someone, politely say thank you and look at for a few seconds before putting it away. • Take notes on the back of the business card.
  55. 55. Social Networking Sites for Business Professionals 1) Biznik A community of entrepreneurs and small businesses dedicated to helping each other succeed. 2) LinkedIn Events A professional network that allows you to be introduced to and collaborate with other professionals. 3) MyChamberApp Chamber members can find and promote their Chamber businesses, events, and network within their local community. 4) SHWBIZ An entertainment industry-oriented social networking site. The site connects working professionals from across all fields and levels within the entertainment industry. 5) Fast Pitch A business network where professionals can market their business and make connections. 6) Young Entrepreneur A forum-based site for entrepreneurs and small business owners who are passionate about promoting business for themselves and others.
  56. 56. Social Networking Sites for Business Professionals 7) StartupNation A community focused on the exchange of ideas between entrepreneurs and aspiring business owners. 8) Networking for Professionals A business network that combines online business networking and real-life events. 9) Plaxo An enhanced address book tool for networking and staying in contact. 10) Ryze A business networking community that allows users to organize themselves by interests, location, and current and past employers. 11) Twitter Is a social networking and micro-blogging service utilizing instant messaging, SMS or a web interface. Twitter is open-ended and people and companies use it in a variety of ways, including to job search. 12) Meetup Helps groups of people with shared interests plan meetings and form offline clubs in local communities around the world. 13) Eventful Find local events in your town or across the world by listing the most popular concerts, festivals, kids events, sports events, and more.
  57. 57. Network TrackingSystem • Start a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or an Access Database to keep track of the following: – Name of the person – Where you met her – What you spoke about – Where she works – What she is interested in – How you might be able to be of benefit to her in the future – How she may be of help to you – Who she connected you with – When you follow up
  58. 58. Network TrackingSystem • JibberJobber (Free to $9.95/month) – This tool allows you to organize and manage your job search, track relationships, target companies, and track the jobs you apply to. • Gist (Free) – Use this tool to import your contacts from Outlook, Facebook, LinkedIn, Gmail, Lotus Notes, as well as .CSV files and vCards. – After you have established your network, you can view the last time you’ve reached out to all of yourcontacts, how many emails you’ve sent and received from them, and what companies they work for. • Xobni for Microsoft Outlook (Free) – Microsoft Outlook can help you manage your address book, but with the Xobni add- on, you can integrate the social media profiles of your contacts. – This means you’ll receive additional contact information that wouldn’t normally be included in your address book.
  59. 59. You need to first understand that Relationships take time to develop.
  60. 60. BE VISIBLE! Opportunities come to those who are visible. Try to seek out networking communities • Chamber of Commerce • Civic associations such as Rotary and Kiwanis • Alumni Associations • Non-profit organizations • Ministries • Health clubs • Support groups • Community organizations • Advocacy groups • Professional associations • Social networking groups • Family and friends • Book clubs • Workshops • Historical and art societies • Garden clubs • Enrichment classes • Country clubs • Cultural societies
  61. 61. How to Create Networking Opportunitiesat Work 1. Bring in cookies or munchkins to work and place them in the kitchen. Then send an all-staff email letting people know that you brought in a little morning snack.
  62. 62. How to Create Networking Opportunitiesat Work 1. Bring in cookies or munchkins to work and place them in the kitchen. Then send an all-staff email letting people know that you brought in a little morning snack. 2. Buy some candy and keep a full candy dish on your desk.
  63. 63. Just like in school, every student is different and not everyone learns the same way.
  64. 64. We are all unique individuals, with unique sets of experiences.
  65. 65. Everyone has a story. Try to find a connection between your story and someone else’s by engaging in meaningful dialogue.
  66. 66. There is no faster way to build rapport with a new connection than to ask great questions.
  67. 67. Always Focus On Building A Connection With People  Share stories.  Connect with people on a personal level.  Find out.. Common interests Common passions Common circle of friends And  How you can help them?
  68. 68. they are likely willing to share advice and insight from their experiences. There is an opportunity to learn something new from everyperson. If you genuinely show interest in people...
  69. 69. You should never ask for a favor without providing the relationship groundwork. People may be “turned off” by direct requests for help. It is best to establish a friendship before you ask help from connections. Are you hiring or do you know someone?
  70. 70. Most networkers are all about “me”. You can stand out by genuinely caring about the other person. Invest in the relationship with time, energy, and resources. Care About The People
  71. 71. Share Your Expertise • Remember that you have something special to offer. • Look for opportunities to speak at trade association meeting, workshops, industry conferences, conventions, and webinars. • Share relevant articles, trainings, advice, services, job leads from other connections you’ve come across. • Write a blog. • Bring people together.
  72. 72. Build Credibility When Connecting • Always know what you are talking about. • Work hard and stay focused. • Be enthusiastic about what you do and how you do it. • Focus on the needs of others. • Use your power and influence to help others. • Always keep appointments, return phone calls in a timely manner, follow through on promises. • Do not disparage others for your own benefit.
  73. 73. A great resource on building relationships…. Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People.
  74. 74. So how do you build and maintain connections?
  75. 75. One of the best things you can do is share information. • How often do you forward articles or services you found helpful to your network? • How often do you post the link to your Facebook page allowing all your friends to benefit? • Do you post the discussion or forward the article to your LinkedIn groups? • Do you share it with your LinkedIn connections? • Do you Tweet and include the link so all of those following you can benefit? • Do you make announcements at networking meetings about how you benefited from an article or service? • Have you passed along YouTube videos that you found helpful?
  76. 76. Networking is not about selling yourself • Networking isn't, "Hi, what can you do for me?" but rather: "Hi. Let's get to know each other. What can I do for you?"
  77. 77. Networking is not about selling yourself • Networking isn't, "Hi, what can you do for me?" but rather: "Hi. Let's get to know each other. What can I do for you?" • It's about giving to get, paying it forward, and building relationships.
  78. 78. Networking is not about selling yourself • Networking isn't, "Hi, what can you do for me?" but rather: "Hi. Let's get to know each other. What can I do for you?" • It's about giving to get, paying it forward, and building relationships. • Get into the mindset of giving to others without an expectation of payback.
  79. 79. Networking is not about selling yourself • Networking isn't, "Hi, what can you do for me?" but rather: "Hi. Let's get to know each other. What can I do for you?" • It's about giving to get, paying it forward, and building relationships. • Get into the mindset of giving to others without an expectation of payback. • Remain authentic and have the other person’s best interest at heart.
  80. 80. You never know who might turn into a valuable connection or who he knows. Don’tbe selective in building your network.
  81. 81. Stay in touch without asking for favors
  82. 82. Be Likable
  83. 83. Have A
  84. 84. Be Engaged
  85. 85. Be passionate about something AND STICK TO IT
  86. 86. Try This
  87. 87. Clip out newspaper articles highlighting accomplishmentsof potential connections
  88. 88. Send her a copy of the article with a note attached remarking what a great job she’s done, and you thought she would want to have this to put on her fridge. .
  89. 89. Be there for your network. Attend invited events, show support during tragedy, and be on time. The Importance of Showing Up
  90. 90. A Simple Thank-YouGoes A Long Way Send handwritten thank-you notes when you’ve… • Been to a job interview • Received a gift • Stayed as a guest in someone’s home • Benefited from a recommendation Thank-you notes • Are more personal And • Make a bigger impact… It is worth the effort to let people know that you appreciate, value and acknowledge them. Thank You!
  91. 91. Utilize Networking Sites Like LinkedIn
  92. 92. Greetings _________! I came across your profile via one of our connections, I hope you don't mind. I’m always interested in connecting and meeting leaders within ________such as you to better develop my role as an aspiring _______. Care to connect? SampleInvitation To Connect
  93. 93. Greetings _________! (Intro) I hope your day is going well! I came across your profile via one of our connections, I hope you don't mind. I’m always interested in connecting and meeting like- minded professionals and community leaders in the area such as you to better develop my role as a __________professional. (Insert Elevator Pitch) (Request) From your profile I noticed that you’re actively involved with _____ and was wondering if I may send a few questions to you? I’ve always been interested in this type of work. I would love to hear more about what you do and any insights or advice you might have from your experience with __________. (Closing) In return, is there anything you need or are specifically looking for, in case I happen to know anyone? Sample Request Email
  94. 94. The Power of the Informational Interview
  95. 95. Benefits of Conducting InformationalInterviews • Improve your communication skills. • Gain confidence speaking with other professionals. • Get inside information into companies and organizations. • Get insight and advice about a particular career path. • Initiate a professional relationship and expand your network of contacts in a specific career field. • Meet people who may forward job leads to you in the future.
  96. 96. SampleInformational Interview Request Greetings _______! I hope your day is going well! I came across your information via one of our shared connections_________. He/She recommended I contact you to set up an informational interview. I was hoping we might be able to connect over the telephone or meet up for coffee sometime, at your convenience. I’m always interested in meeting leaders within the ________ industry to better develop my role as an aspiring _______. I would love to hear more about what you do and any insights or advice you might have from your experience with __________. Would you be available for a brief meeting on ________? In return, is there anything you need or are specifically looking for, in case I happen to know anyone?
  97. 97. DON’T ASK Hire Me
  98. 98. Just LISTEN
  99. 99. What is the best time to reach out to your network?
  100. 100. EMAIL • Alex Moore, CEO of Baydin, an email management service, suggested that emails sent from 6 A.M. to 7 A.M. are about three times more likely to be opened than emails sent at 4 P.M. • She found that when she sent mail on Sunday afternoon, her open rate was as high as 44 percent, while it bottomed out at 35 percent when she sent it during the workweek.
  101. 101. Twitter • Fuseworks Studios made an infographic entitled “Maximizing Your Tweets” based on data obtained by Buddy Media. • Twitter engagement is higher between 8 A.M. and 7 P.M. (turns out fewer people are “on” Twitter during the middle of the night).
  102. 102. LinkedIn •Tues-Thurs –7AM-9AM –5PM-6PM
  103. 103. GOALS
  104. 104. Try to make 1-2 connections per day
  105. 105. Keep in contact with 60 people on a monthly basis
  106. 106. Cap your network at 50- 100
  107. 107. To Learn More, Check Out Click here
  108. 108. Interested in CONNECTING?
  109. 109. CLICK
  110. 110. Sources & Attributions• Morgan, Hannah., “Step-by-step Guide: Networking Your Way Into a Dream Company”, February 17, 2013, http://www.youtern.com/thesavvyintern/index.php/2013/02/17/step-by-step-guide-networking-your-way-into-a-dream-company/ • Chitakasem, Nisa ., “How to Work the Room – 10 Tips for Getting the Best Results from Networking”, October 4, 2012, http://www.jobsite.co.uk/worklife/10-tips-getting-results-networking-10048/ • Lepore, Meredith., “8 Great Icebreakers for Your Next Networking Event”, March 19, 2013, http://www.levoleague.com/career-advice/great- icebreakers-for-networking • Chapman, Dr. Vera V., “10 Tips for Following Up with Networking Contacts Effectively”, May 9, 2012, http://chasingyourfire.com/10-tips-for- following-up-with-networking-contacts-effectively/ • Hoffman, G.L. , “How To Be More Likeable At Work: 10 Things To Do Today”, http://www.careerealism.com/likeable-10-today/ • Sweeney, Deborah ., “7 Everyday Places To Start Networking Face-To-Face At”, March 5, 2013, http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahsweeney/2013/03/05/7-everyday-places-to-start-networking-face-to-face-at/ • Gregory, Alyssa., “20 Social Networking Sites for Business Professionals”, August 28, 2012, http://www.sitepoint.com/social-networking- sites-for-business/ • Kerpen, Dave., “6 Secrets to Better Networking at Conferences”, May 26, 2013, http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130526234123- 15077789-6-secrets-to-better-networking-at-conferences?trk=tod-posts-art-&_mSplash=1 • G, Abena., “#1 Mistake People Make When Networking”, http://www.wallstreetservices.com/blog/1-mistake-people-make-when-networking • Levinson, Peter., “Develop Your Network before You Need It”, http://www.allbusiness.com/business-planning-structures/starting-a- business/3878230-1.html • Schawbel, Dan.,” HOW TO: Organize Your Contacts for Networking Success”, June 3, 2010, http://mashable.com/2010/06/03/how-to- organize-contacts/ • Graham, Derbhile., “What’s Your Networking Style?”, December 10, 2010, http://tweakyourbiz.com/marketing/2010/12/10/whats-your- networking-style/ • Townsend, Heather ., “7 tips to help you remember names when networking at an event”, April 7, 2013, http://www.big4.com/management-and- business/7-tips-to-help-you-remember-names-when-networking-at-an-event/ • 2U, “Best And Worst Times To Reach Out To Your Network”, http://www.careerealism.com/reach-network-best-worst-times/ • SMITH, COOPER ., “The Best Times Of Day To Post On Each Social Network”, MAY 14, 2011, http://www.businessinsider.com/the-best- times-to-post-on-each-major-social-network-2013-5 • Dinsmore, Scott., “5 Underused Tactics to Make an Immediate, Genuine Connection with Anyone”, October 17, 2012, http://blog.brazencareerist.com/2012/10/17/5-underused-tactics-to-make-an-immediate-genuine-connection-with-anyone/ • Delhanty, Cathy., “Most people find it difficult to meet people, but some do it better than others”, April 1, 2012, http://thenetworkingworkshop.blogspot.com/2012/04/most-people-find-it-difficult-to-meet.html • Trnka, Jane., “Network > Relationship > Job Opportunity”, October 2, 2012, http://rollinsmba-career- development.blogspot.com/2012/10/network-relationship-job-opportunity.html • Young, Susan., “12 Secrets to Networking Success”, http://www.getinfrontcommunications.com/12-secrets-to-networking-success.php • Fertig, Arnie., “The Secret of Successful Networking: The Informational Interview”, October 9, 2012, http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2012/10/09/the-secret-of-successful-networking-the-informational- interview • Brooks, Barrett., “How to Master the Art of Networking and Build Meaningful Relationships”, http://livingformonday.com/business-and- careers/networking-relationships/
  111. 111. Sources& Attributions • Schembari ,Marian., “How To Network Your Way Into a Job Without Looking Desperate”, October 15, 2012, http://blog.brazencareerist.com/2012/10/15/how-to-network-your-way-into-a-job-without-looking-desperate/ • Chitakasem, Nisa., “How To Work A Room Like You Own The Place”, February 29, 2012, http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahljacobs/2012/02/29/how-to-work-a-room-like-you-own-the-place/ • 2U., “How To Leverage Your Alumni Network To Get A Job”, http://www.careerealism.com/how-leverage-alumni-network-get-job/ • MUSCARELLO, JOHN., “How to Create Networking Opportunities at Work”, http://startnetworkingtoday.com/how-to-create- networking-opportunities-at-work/ • MUSCARELLO, JOHN., “The Best Way To Stay In Touch With Your Professional Network”, http://startnetworkingtoday.com/your- professional-network/ • MUSCARELLO, JOHN., “How To Follow Up After Networking Events For Job Seekers” http://startnetworkingtoday.com/job-seekers- follow-up-after-networking-events/ • MUSCARELLO, JOHN., “Find More Job Leads By Networking On LinkedIn With Alumni” http://startnetworkingtoday.com/networking- on-linkedin/ • Goodwin, Tai., 3 Rules To Smart Business Card Etiquette, http://www.careerealism.com/3-rules-to-smart-business-card-etiquette/ • Levinson, Meridith ., “How to Network: 12 Tips for Shy People”, December 11, 2011, http://www.cio.com/article/164300/How_to_Network_12_Tips_for_Shy_People • Ciotti, Gregory., “8 Networking Skills that Every Professional Needs to Have”, http://www.bidsketch.com/blog/marketing/networking- skills/ • Trikha, Ritika., ‘Break Off a Networking Convo Without Being Awkward”, September 04, 2012, http://www.careerbliss.com/advice/break-off-a-networking-convo-without-being-awkward/ • Kobara, E. John and Smith, Melinda ., “How to Find a Job By Building Relationships”, May 2013, http://www.helpguide.org/life/job_networking_how_to_find_job.htm • Collamer, Nancy C., “The Perfect Elevator Pitch to Land a Job”, February 2, 2013, http://www.nextavenue.org/blog/perfect-elevator- pitch-land-job • Zack, Devora., “10 Tips For People Who Hate Networking”, http://www.careerealism.com/hate-networking-tips/ • Wicker, Alden., “Get Networking: Half of Job Openings Aren’t Advertised”, January 10, 2013, http://www.learnvest.com/2013/01/get- networking-half-of-job-openings-arent-advertised-123/ • Salmi, Mika and Port, Michael., “Building Your Network: 3 Things to Do Everyday”, May 24, 2013, http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130524133536-45185363-building-your-network-3-things-to-do-everyday Fonts used: Lobster, Cantarelll, Bebas Neue Slide 33-Photo by PA Resources Council, available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial license. Slide 35-Photo by Victoria fee, available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial license.
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