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This presentation was developed for the recruitment meeting for the U->CAN coalition. The presentation features US and WI data on obesity/overweight, nutrition and physical activity trends as well as ...

This presentation was developed for the recruitment meeting for the U->CAN coalition. The presentation features US and WI data on obesity/overweight, nutrition and physical activity trends as well as information about what other WI communities are doing to combat these trends.

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U Can Presentation U Can Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • U CAN’s Mission: To empower Calumet County residents to build and embrace healthy lifestyles through education and opportunities. C A LUMET CTI N NOW WELCOME! U CAN
  • Definitions
    • Overweight: Body Mass Index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9
    • Obesity: Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher
    • Body Mass Index (BMI): A measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters.
  • BMI Chart
  • Definitions
    • Physical Activity Recommendation : At least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on most days of the week is the recommended minimum.
    • Nutrition Guidelines: Based on government guidelines (MyPyramid.gov)
  • Food Pyramid
  • Nutritional Guidelines
  • CURRENT STATE:
  • CURRENT STATE: Obesity Trends 1985-2008
    • The following slides show how the epidemic of obesity has spread across the United States over the past 24 years.
    • Note the color key indicating the % of obese people in each state:
    No Data <10% 10-14% 15-19% 20-24% 25-29% >30%
  • 1985 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1986 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1987 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1988 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1989 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1990 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1991 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1992 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1993 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1994 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1995 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1996 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1997 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1998 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 1999 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2000 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2001 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2002 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2003 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2004 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2005 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2006 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2007 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • 2008 Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • CURRENT STATE: Wisconsin Obesity Stats Prevalence of Overweight and Obese Adults in Wisconsin by Race
  • Projected Rates of Obesity in WI
  • CURRENT STATE: Adult Physical Activity
    • More than 60 percent of U.S. adults do not engage in the recommended amount of activity.
    • Approximately 40 percent of U.S. adults are not active at all.
    (National Center for Health Statistics. National Health Interview Survey, 1999-2001)
  •  
  • CURRENT STATE: Childhood Physical Activity
    • Nearly 23 percent of children get no free-time physical activity at all.
    • Six out of 10 children ages 9-13 don’t participate in any kind of organized sports/physical activity program outside of school.
    (Physical activity levels among children aged 9-13 years – United States, 2002. MMWR 2003;52[33]:785-8)
  • According to a national study, 92 percent of elementary schools do not provide daily physical education classes for all students throughout the entire school year. (School Health Policies and Programs Study. Journal of School Health 2001;71[7])
  •  
  • Physical Activity in WI Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: BRFSS 2007  77% 81% % of Adults that participated in some activity in the past month 49% 55% % of Adults meeting minimum activity level  30 minutes of moderate activity on 5 or more days/week or 20 minutes of vigorous activity on 3+ days/week US Data WI Data Category 
    • Fewer than 25% of Wisconsinites eat at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. 1
    • In 1980, about 50 percent of high school seniors reported eating green vegetables “nearly every day or more.” By 2003, that figure had dropped to about 30 percent. 2
    CURRENT STATE: Nutrition 1-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: BRFSS 2007 2-From the statistical sourcebook “A Nation at Risk: Obesity in the United States.”
  • Mixed Messages
  • Children’s Beverage Consumption (Cleveland L. U.S. Department of Agriculture; National Food Consumption Survey, 1977-78; What We Eat in America, NHANES 2001-02) Between 1977-78 and 2000-01: Milk:  39 % Fruit juice:  54% Fruit drink:  69% Soda:  137%
  • Studies have shown that, between 1977 and 1996, portion sizes for key food groups grew markedly in the United States, not only at fast-food outlets but also in homes and at conventional restaurants. (Nielsen SJ, Popkin BM. Patterns and trends in food portion sizes, 1977-1998. JAMA 2003;289:450-3) French Fries 188 to 256 Calories  27% Hamburgers 389 to 486 Calories Soft Drinks 144 to 193 Calories  25% Portion Size Explosion (changes in standard size offerings)  27%
  • Children eat nearly twice as many calories (770) at restaurants as they do during a meal at home (420). (Zoumas-Morse C, Rock CL, Sobo EJ, Neuhouser ML. Children’s patterns of macronutrient intake and associations with restaurant and home eating. J Am Diet Assoc 2001;101-923-5)
  • A Fast Food Nation is Born
    • Between 1970 and 1980:
    • The number of fast-food outlets in the US increased from about 30,000 to 140,000
    • Sales increased by about 300 percent
    • In 2001, there were about 222,000 fast-food outlets.
    (Paeratakul S, Ferdinand D, Champagne C, Ryan D, Bray G. Fast-food consumption among US adults and children. J Am Diet Assoc 2003:103:1332-8)
  • “ You, the individual, can do more for your health and well being than any doctor, any hospital, any drug, and any exotic medical care device.” ~Joseph Califano “ Food” for Thought
  • CURRENT STATE: Obesity Related Costs
    • The US is expected to spend $344 billion on health care costs attributable to obesity in 2018 if rates continue to increase at their current levels.
    • Obesity-related direct expenditures are expected to account for more than 21% of the nation’s direct health care spending in 2018.
    • If obesity levels were held at their current rates, the US could save an estimated $820 per adult in healthcare costs – a savings of almost $200 billion dollars!
  • Current and Projected Obesity Attributable Health Care Spending (in millions)
  • Wisconsin Health Care Spending per Adult (in dollars) $381 $591 $1,498
  •  
  • Projected Savings for Wisconsin if Obesity can be Held at 2008 Levels (in millions) $3,935 SAVINGS $704 SAVINGS
  •  
  • CURRENT STATE: Change is Coming…It Has To
  • Photos of Waupaca’s Community Garden
    • Plans for a Community-School Garden Partnership are taking shape in Chilton
  • Chilton & Hilbert Schools Farm to School Lunch Programs Students choose healthy options fresh from the farm A farm that supplies the Farm to School Program with produce
  • Wellness Wednesdays in Outagamie County
    • Feature a Wellness Wednesday menu item as a daily special
    • Promote a side salad as an exchange for fries
    • Put fun health facts on placemats or table tents
    • Promote milk instead of soda, call it “Wisconsin Wellness Wednesday ”
    • Offer the “senior menu” portions to any age
    • Use the Wellness Wednesday logo to highlight all the healthy choices on the menu
    Participating restaurants agree to:
  • Be Part of the Solution…
  • Ready to Jump In?
    • Please consider signing up for one of the U CAN subcommittees before you leave today.
    • Thank you for coming!