Chapter 13 The Role of Social Work in the Criminal Justice System

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In this chapter we look at the four components of the criminal justice system: legislative, law enforcement, judicial, and corrections. Although social workers play some role in all of these, our attention will be directed to the corrections component and social work roles involved in rehabilitation

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Chapter 13 The Role of Social Work in the Criminal Justice System

  1. 1. Chapter 13: Criminal JusticeCopyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  2. 2. Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  3. 3. Social Work: A Competency- Oriented Education Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) - Defines Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAs) - Developed 10 “Core Competencies” and 41 Related “Practice Behaviors” Every student should master the Practice Behaviors and Core Competencies before completing the program Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  4. 4. Resources Aligned to EPAS 2008 The Textbook – - “Helping Hands” icons call attention to content that relates to Practice Behaviors and Competencies - “Competency Notes” at the end of the chapter help put the Practice Behaviors and Competencies in practical context Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  5. 5. Resources Aligned to EPAS 2008 (cont’d) The Practice Behaviors Workbook developed with the text provides assignable exercises that assist in mastering the Practice Behavior and Competencies Additional on-line resources can be found at: www.cengage.com/socialwork Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  6. 6. The criminal justice systemThe criminal justice system in its broadest senserefers to the means used to enforce those standardsof conduct required to protect individuals and property and to maintain a sense of justice in the communityEP 2,1.7a, b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  7. 7. Components of the criminal justice system• Legislative• Law enforcement• Judicial• CorrectionsEP 2,1.7a, b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  8. 8. Legislative component: The legislative component deems certain acts to be criminalLaw enforcement component: The law enforcement component seeks to deter crime and to apprehend and prosecute lawbreakersJudicial component: The judicial component determines if the laws are valid under our Constitution and prescribes penalties for illegal behaviorCorrections component: The corrections component administers penalties and performs rehabilitative functionsEP 2,1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  9. 9. Criminal courts• Lower criminal courts• Trial courts• Appellate courtsEP 2.1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  10. 10. Corrections options• Probation• Intermediate punishment• IncarcerationEP 2.1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  11. 11. Juvenile delinquencyRefers to a youth who has committed a crime; astatus offense such as truancy, underage drinking,curfew violation, or running away; or bothEP 2.1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  12. 12. Juvenile justice agencies• Legislatures• Police• Prosecutors• Defense attorneys• Halfway houses• Social service agenciesEP 2.1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  13. 13. Juvenile courtsHave several and often-competing goals:• helping children in need• treating or punishing juveniles who commit crimes• protecting society from juvenile crimeEP 2.1.3b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  14. 14. Juvenile court process• Intake• Adjudication• DispositionEP 2.1.3b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  15. 15. Juvenile correctionsCan be divided into community corrections, such asprobation, and institutional correctionsEP 2.1.3b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  16. 16. Juvenile correctional institutions • Foster homes • Shelters • Group homes • Halfway houses • Ranches and camps • Detention centers • Training schoolsEP 2.1.3b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  17. 17. Dual system of justice• Every jurisdiction in the United States operates separate systems for responding to juvenile and adult criminal behavior• However, recent “get tough” policies have resulted in upwards of 250,000 youth under the age of 18 being sent to the criminal justice system to be adjudicated as adultsEP 2.1.3b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  18. 18. Differential treatment of minority youth in the justice systemMany have addressed the issue of the differentialtreatment of minority youth in the juvenile justicesystemEP 2.1.3b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  19. 19. “Cumulative disadvantage”Overrepresentation of minority youth in the juvenilejustice system tends to accumulate as youth areprocessed through the systemEP 2.1.3b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  20. 20. Alternatives to get tough policiespolicies and programs that help juvenile offendersacquire empathy for those whom they have affectedby their actions and make changes in their lives sothey are less likely to re-offend.EP 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  21. 21. Alternatives to get tough policies (cont’d)• Prevention in early childhood• School-based prevention• Effective child welfare• Intervening with behaviorally troubled childrenEP 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  22. 22. Rehabilitation programs• Reduce further criminal activity• Improve prison management• Help accomplish the mission of humane punishment• Give prisoners something to doEP 2.1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  23. 23. Types of rehabilitation programs• Vocational training• Work release• Financial assistance• Prison industries• TreatmentEP 2.1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  24. 24. Crime Prevention• In communities• In schools• In families• In labor markets• By criminal justice agencies after arrest• In places• By policeEP 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  25. 25. Views of Criminal Behavior• Psychological• Social• Economic• Interaction of personal characteristics and the environmentEP 2.1.3a, 2.1.7a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  26. 26. Social work and the criminal justice systemSocial workers most frequently work in juvenilecourts, rehabilitation centers, prisons, and paroleprogramsEP 2.1.1a, 2.1.9b .Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
  27. 27. Social work and law enforcement• Crisis intervention• Victim assistance• Child abuse or sex crimes• Youth crime prevention• School dropout prevention• Drug and alcohol educationEP 2.1.1a, 2.1.8a, 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing

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