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Chapter 11 Services to Children, Youth and Families
 

Chapter 11 Services to Children, Youth and Families

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Chapter 11 builds on chapter 10, detailing services and policies that prevent or alleviate problems of children, youth, and families, as well as the roles of social workers in providing these services ...

Chapter 11 builds on chapter 10, detailing services and policies that prevent or alleviate problems of children, youth, and families, as well as the roles of social workers in providing these services and developing and implementing these policies.

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    Chapter 11 Services to Children, Youth and Families Chapter 11 Services to Children, Youth and Families Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 11:Services to Children, Youth, and Families Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Social Work: A Competency- Oriented Education Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) - Defines Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAs) - Developed 10 “Core Competencies” and 41 Related “Practice Behaviors” Every student should master the Practice Behaviors and Core Competencies before completing the program Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Resources Aligned to EPAS 2008 The Textbook – - “Helping Hands” icons call attention to content that relates to Practice Behaviors and Competencies - “Competency Notes” at the end of the chapter help put the Practice Behaviors and Competencies in practical context Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Resources Aligned to EPAS 2008 (cont’d) The Practice Behaviors Workbook developed with the text provides assignable exercises that assist in mastering the Practice Behavior and Competencies Additional on-line resources can be found at: www.cengage.com/socialwork Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Child welfare delivery systemTraditionally, the system that has provided programsand policies that address child and family concernshas been called the child welfare delivery systemEP 2.1.7b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Current philosophical issues• Right to a permanent, nurturing family• Best interests of the child• Considerations before state intervention• Preventing family disruption and dysfunction• Holding parents accountableEP 2.1.7b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Defining services to children, youth, and families• Early definitions• Social Security Act of 1935• Contemporary definitionEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – Colonial times• Children were considered the responsibility of their families• Little attention was given to children whose families were available to provide for them, no matter how well the family actually met their needsEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – 19th Century• Child saving movement• Mary Ellen case• Charity Organization Societies and settlement house movement• Reform movementEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – Early 20th Century• U.S. Children’s Bureau (1912)• Public departments of welfare• American Association for Organizing Family Social Work (1919)• Child Welfare League of America (1920)• Development of healthy parent-child relationshipsEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families - Social Security Act of 1935The Social Security Act of 1935 established mothers’pensions and mandated states to establish, expand,and strengthen statewide child welfare programsEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – mid-1970s and 1980s• Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act• Child Abuse and Prevention Treatment Act (CAPTA)• Education for all Handicapped Children Act• Indian Child Welfare Act• Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare ActEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – mid-1980s and 1990s• Independent Living program• Abandoned Infants Assistance Act• Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act• Multiethnic Placement Act I and II• Adoption and Safe Families Act• Personal Responsibility Act• Foster Care Independence Act EP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – 2000 - 2010• Adoption 2002 report• Reauthorization of Welfare Reform Act of 1996• Reauthorization of Promoting Safe and Stable Families program• Kinship care promoted as a viable foster care placement alternative• National Adoption Internet Photo-listing ServiceEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – 2000 – 2010 (cont’d)• Leave No Child Behind Act• Adoption Equality Act of 2005• Kinship Caregiver Act• Children’s Justice Act• Safe and Timely Interstate Placement of Foster Children Act EP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • History of services to children, youth, and families – 2000 – 2010 (cont’d)• Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act• Leave No Child Behind Act• Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions ActEP 2.1.3a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Preventive services to children in their own homes• Natural support systems• Home-based services• Parent education• Child development and child care programs• Recreational, religious, and social programs• Health and family planning programs• Education about family problems• Appropriate educational opportunitiesEP 2.1.7a, b, 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Services to children and families at risk• Health and hospital outreach programs• Child care• Homemaker services• Crisis intervention programs• Counseling• Support and self-help groups• Volunteer and outreach programsEP 2.1.7a, b, 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • School social workA specialized field of social work that focuses onservices to children, youth, and families is schoolsocial work, or social services offered in a school-based settingEP 2.1.1a, 2.1.7a, b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Child protective services• Investigations of child maltreatment• Determination of intervention approach• Typical services providedEP 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Family preservation servicesFamily preservation programs incorporate a familysystems perspective in working with families, viewingthe family as a dynamic system in disequilibriumbecause of unmet needs of various family members EP 2.1.7a, b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Family preservation programs• Family support programs• Family-centered preventive programs• Intensive family preservation servicesEP 2.1.7a, b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Substitute care• Family foster care• Group home care• Residential treatmentEP 2.1.7a, b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • AdoptionWhen parents choose not to or cannot provide fortheir children, the court can terminate their parentalrights, and the child becomes legally free for adoption EP 2.1.7a, b, 2.1.8a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Adoption issues• Adoption of children with special needs• Ethnicity and child placement• Recruiting more families of color• Post-adoption services• Reclaiming children after they have been placed for adoption• Foreign-born adoptions and open adoptionsEP 2.1.7a, b, 2.1.8a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Child welfare and cultural diversity• Impact of culture on individuals, families, and communities• Diversity within as well as across groups• Diversity as a strength rather than a deviation• Impact of oppression and social and economic injustice on at-risk populationsEP 2.1.4a Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Child welfare and the futureA major debate in the child welfare field relates towhat direction should be taken in providing servicesto children, youth, and families in the futureEP 2.1.8a, 2.1.9b Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Role of social workers in providing services to children, youth, and families• Child care workers in group homes and residential treatment centers• Women’s and children’s counselors at battered women’s shelters• Child care workers in group homes and residential treatment centersEP 2.1.1c Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Role of social workers in providing services to children, youth, and families (cont’d)• Women’s and children’s counselors at battered women’s shelters• Counselors at youth shelters• Crisis counselors in law enforcement agencies• Child protective services and foster care workers in public and private social service agenciesEP 2.1.1c Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Role of social workers in providing services to children, youth, and families (cont’d)• Family preservation programs• Assisting families in getting off public assistance• Children with developmental disabilities and their families• Substance abuse counselors• School social workersEP 2.1.1c Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing
    • Role of social workers in providing services to children, youth, and families (cont’d)• Legislative assistants• Advocacy or policy-related positions• Staff members of state and federal child and family service organizations• Directors of child- and family-serving agencies• Faculty at colleges and universitiesEP 2.1.1c Copyright © 2012 Cengage Learning, Brooks/Cole Publishing