COLOR COLOR
Picasso,  Guernica , 1937
Paul Cézanne,  Still Life with Green Melon , 1902-06  BW
Paul Cézanne,  Still Life with Green Melon , 1902-06  CO
Monochromatic - using only one color
Mark Tansey,  The Bricoleur’s Daughter,  1987
Gunther Gerzso Southern
Michaelangelo Sistene Chapel detail (medallion)
Monochromatic  medallion
Barnett Newman,  Yellow Painting , 1949
Gunther Gerzso Opposite
Mark Rothko, untitled, 1968
 
 
 
 
 
 
Church, Frederic Edwin Rainy Season in the Tropics 1866, Oil on canvas, 56 1/4 x 84 3/16 in.  The Fine Arts Museums of San...
COLOR WHEEL HUE
informal definitions HUE  – a particular gradation of color; a spectral color (a color from the spectrum) Color  – many de...
PRIMARY & secondary RED BLUE YELLOW PURPLE GREEN ORANGE
Robert Delaunay,  Circular Forms,  c. 1912
Gunther Gerzso Personaje
Complementary  Colors <ul><li>opposites on the color wheel </li></ul>- note: NOT COMP LIM ENTARY <ul><li>unsettling, hard ...
Barnett Newman,  Dionysius , 1944, 67x49in. Complementary colors Analagous colors
Matisse, Seated Riffian , 1912-13 Complementary colors Analagous colors
Monet,  Impression: Sunrise , 1872
 
Analogous Colors <ul><li>neighbors on the color wheel </li></ul>
Van Gogh,  Sunflowers , 1888
VALUE TINT – adding white to a hue, or a hue to white SHADE – adding black to a hue or vice versa
Robert Delaunay,  Circular Forms,  c. 1912 a very aware use of contrasts of complementary & analogous colors AND  shades  ...
Franz Marc,  Fighting Forms   SATURATION – brilliance or depth of color
L U M I N E N C E L U M I N E N C E LUMINENCE L U M I N E N C E
Monet,  Impression: Sunrise , 1872
Monet,  Impression: Sunrise , 1872
Ellsworth Kelly Red, Yellow, Blue I , 1963 a/c, 3 joined panels, 90&quot; x 90&quot; overall
Ellsworth Kelly Red, Yellow, Blue I , 1963 a/c, 3 joined panels, 90&quot; x 90&quot; overall
Raphael,  Madonna dell Granduca , c.1505 33x22in
Raphael,  Madonna dell Granduca , c.1505 33x22in
 
 
Triadic Color Schemes NOT JUST ANY 3 COLORS
Raphael,  School of Athens , 1511
Ellsworth Kelly Red, Yellow, Blue I , 1963 a/c, 3 joined panels, 90&quot; x 90&quot; overall
Raphael,  Madonna dell Granduca , c.1505 33x22in
PRIMARY & secondary RED BLUE YELLOW PURPLE GREEN ORANGE
 
Also note  countershading
COLOR CONCLUSION <ul><li>Color can be an important part of an artwork’s impact – notice it! </li></ul><ul><li>Color can be...
“ Colors are barbaric, unstable, suggest life, cannot be completely controlled and should be concealed.” Ad Reinhardt, 1957
Kenneth Noland , quoted in the  New York Times , August 25 1968 The thing in painting is to find a way to get color down, ...
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Colorin Art

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  • Mexican-born Gunther Gerzso (1915-2000) moved to Switzerland at the age of 12 to live with his uncle, Hans Wendland, an art collector, dealer and historian. In 1931 he returned to México and became a set and custom designer in the cinematographic industry. His initial artistic works, during the 1940s, were influenced by surrealism but he later turned to abstractionism. His works have been displayed in México City, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Sweden, France, England, Japan, Venezuela, and Germany among other countries. In 1973 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship and in 1978 the Premio Nacional de Artes y Ciencias, the highest artistic/scientific distinction awarded by the Mexican government. The prestigious Gelman collection contains numerous Gerzsos, and works of art by Gerzso are part of the collections of major museums throughout the world. Maestro Gerzso died on April 21, 2000 in México City.
  • opposite Mexican-born Gunther Gerzso (1915-2000) moved to Switzerland at the age of 12 to live with his uncle, Hans Wendland, an art collector, dealer and historian. In 1931 he returned to México and became a set and custom designer in the cinematographic industry. His initial artistic works, during the 1940s, were influenced by surrealism but he later turned to abstractionism. His works have been displayed in México City, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Sweden, France, England, Japan, Venezuela, and Germany among other countries. In 1973 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship and in 1978 the Premio Nacional de Artes y Ciencias, the highest artistic/scientific distinction awarded by the Mexican government. The prestigious Gelman collection contains numerous Gerzsos, and works of art by Gerzso are part of the collections of major museums throughout the world. Maestro Gerzso died on April 21, 2000 in México City.
  • (1826-1900) Hudson River School Frederic Edwin Church, born in Hartford, Connecticut, Writing of Claude Lorrain, an artist against whom the Hudson River painters measured themselves on their excursions abroad, Roger Fry said, &amp;quot;Claude&apos;s view of landscape is false to nature in that it is entirely anthropocentric. His trees exist for pleasant shade; his peasants to give us the illusion of pastoral life, not to toil for a living. His world is not to be lived in, only to be looked at in a mood of pleasing melancholy or suave revery.&amp;quot; But I wonder if there ever was a form of landscape painting that is not &amp;quot;false&amp;quot; in this sense. The landscapes we represent are in effect texts in which our feelings and beliefs about nature, and hence about ourselves as inside and outside nature, are inscribed. According to Wen Fong, Travelers in a Wintry Forest , a twelfth-century Chinese painting after Li Ch&apos;eng, transmits the proposition that &amp;quot;recluse scholars living in the mountains have rediscovered in nature a moral order lost in the human world.&amp;quot; No such contrast is pointed in the Hudson River paintings, of course, because the natural and the social order for them were one - two modalities of divine presence in American reality. Through the metaphysical window of an oil painting its owner could see the face of God and almost hear the voice of God in the cataracts and echoing precipices of Catskill Mountain scenery. In an odd way, the paintings, in bringing God into the living rooms of the land, have almost the sacred office of religious icons. It says a great deal about the American mind in the early mid-nineteenth century that religious art took the form of landscapes that were Edenic, majestic, gorgeous and bombastic, rather than historical scenes of biblical enactment. It says a great deal as well about the mirror function of landscape painting that the transfigurative vistas of the Hudson River painters gave way, after the Civil War, to something more intimate and less awesome - to farms, for example, where sunsets mean the end of the day&apos;s labor, as the workman trudges homeward through diffuse illumination, rather than extravagant timberlands above which God addresses the nation through spectacular cloud formations flamboyantly lit up with cadmium reds and oranges. These were works of high Romanticism . . . Still, one misses the point if one sees these paintings only or even chiefly as transcriptions after nature. They are, with qualification, incidentally that. It is not altogether wrong to say, as John K. Howat, the curator of the show does in an interview in The New York Times, that &amp;quot;you can practically smell the light.&amp;quot; The illusion of transcriptional exactitude was only a means to an end. The end was to have been a work &amp;quot;imbued,&amp;quot; according to Durand, &amp;quot;with that indefinable quality recognized as sentiment or expression which distinguishes the true landscape from the mere sensual and striking picture.&amp;quot; That is a beautiful formulation of a distinction between a visual text and a mere picture, and it is my sense that the message that this is God&apos;s country must still come through to an audience still responsive to the sentimental assurances of &amp;quot;divine visual language.&amp;quot; It is a message transmitted in the vocabulary of waterfalls and rushing streams, storm clouds and florid dawns, massed foliage and blasted tree trunks. It is this, I think, that must explain the popularity of the show rather than the message Howat believes the paintings communicate to us: &amp;quot;The natural environment is something we have to preserve.&amp;quot; DANTO
  • Mexican-born Gunther Gerzso (1915-2000) moved to Switzerland at the age of 12 to live with his uncle, Hans Wendland, an art collector, dealer and historian. In 1931 he returned to México and became a set and custom designer in the cinematographic industry. His initial artistic works, during the 1940s, were influenced by surrealism but he later turned to abstractionism. His works have been displayed in México City, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Sweden, France, England, Japan, Venezuela, and Germany among other countries. In 1973 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship and in 1978 the Premio Nacional de Artes y Ciencias, the highest artistic/scientific distinction awarded by the Mexican government. The prestigious Gelman collection contains numerous Gerzsos, and works of art by Gerzso are part of the collections of major museums throughout the world. Maestro Gerzso died on April 21, 2000 in México City.
  • Colorin Art

    1. 1. COLOR COLOR
    2. 2. Picasso, Guernica , 1937
    3. 3. Paul Cézanne, Still Life with Green Melon , 1902-06 BW
    4. 4. Paul Cézanne, Still Life with Green Melon , 1902-06 CO
    5. 5. Monochromatic - using only one color
    6. 6. Mark Tansey, The Bricoleur’s Daughter, 1987
    7. 7. Gunther Gerzso Southern
    8. 8. Michaelangelo Sistene Chapel detail (medallion)
    9. 9. Monochromatic medallion
    10. 10. Barnett Newman, Yellow Painting , 1949
    11. 11. Gunther Gerzso Opposite
    12. 12. Mark Rothko, untitled, 1968
    13. 19. Church, Frederic Edwin Rainy Season in the Tropics 1866, Oil on canvas, 56 1/4 x 84 3/16 in. The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
    14. 20. COLOR WHEEL HUE
    15. 21. informal definitions HUE – a particular gradation of color; a spectral color (a color from the spectrum) Color – many definitions! A broader term, including all hues, non-spectral colors and maybe even white & black
    16. 22. PRIMARY & secondary RED BLUE YELLOW PURPLE GREEN ORANGE
    17. 23. Robert Delaunay, Circular Forms, c. 1912
    18. 24. Gunther Gerzso Personaje
    19. 25. Complementary Colors <ul><li>opposites on the color wheel </li></ul>- note: NOT COMP LIM ENTARY <ul><li>unsettling, hard to look at </li></ul>
    20. 26. Barnett Newman, Dionysius , 1944, 67x49in. Complementary colors Analagous colors
    21. 27. Matisse, Seated Riffian , 1912-13 Complementary colors Analagous colors
    22. 28. Monet, Impression: Sunrise , 1872
    23. 30. Analogous Colors <ul><li>neighbors on the color wheel </li></ul>
    24. 31. Van Gogh, Sunflowers , 1888
    25. 32. VALUE TINT – adding white to a hue, or a hue to white SHADE – adding black to a hue or vice versa
    26. 33. Robert Delaunay, Circular Forms, c. 1912 a very aware use of contrasts of complementary & analogous colors AND shades and tints
    27. 34. Franz Marc, Fighting Forms SATURATION – brilliance or depth of color
    28. 35. L U M I N E N C E L U M I N E N C E LUMINENCE L U M I N E N C E
    29. 36. Monet, Impression: Sunrise , 1872
    30. 37. Monet, Impression: Sunrise , 1872
    31. 38. Ellsworth Kelly Red, Yellow, Blue I , 1963 a/c, 3 joined panels, 90&quot; x 90&quot; overall
    32. 39. Ellsworth Kelly Red, Yellow, Blue I , 1963 a/c, 3 joined panels, 90&quot; x 90&quot; overall
    33. 40. Raphael, Madonna dell Granduca , c.1505 33x22in
    34. 41. Raphael, Madonna dell Granduca , c.1505 33x22in
    35. 44. Triadic Color Schemes NOT JUST ANY 3 COLORS
    36. 45. Raphael, School of Athens , 1511
    37. 46. Ellsworth Kelly Red, Yellow, Blue I , 1963 a/c, 3 joined panels, 90&quot; x 90&quot; overall
    38. 47. Raphael, Madonna dell Granduca , c.1505 33x22in
    39. 48. PRIMARY & secondary RED BLUE YELLOW PURPLE GREEN ORANGE
    40. 50. Also note countershading
    41. 51. COLOR CONCLUSION <ul><li>Color can be an important part of an artwork’s impact – notice it! </li></ul><ul><li>Color can be optimized & analyzed for greatest effect </li></ul><ul><li>Timbre in music is considered to be analogous to color in painting; some kinds of harmony and scales are also considered to be analogous to color in painting. They are DIFFERENT – try not to confuse them. </li></ul>
    42. 52. “ Colors are barbaric, unstable, suggest life, cannot be completely controlled and should be concealed.” Ad Reinhardt, 1957
    43. 53. Kenneth Noland , quoted in the New York Times , August 25 1968 The thing in painting is to find a way to get color down, to float it without bogging the picture down in Surrealism, Cubism, or systems of structure . . . In the best color painting, structure is nowhere evident, or nowhere self-revealing.
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